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Interaction 2013 - Conference - Sam Marshall - The Digital Workplace Manifesto
 

Interaction 2013 - Conference - Sam Marshall - The Digital Workplace Manifesto

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The Digital Workplace Manifesto, Sam Marshall, Clearbox Consulting at Interaction Intranet Conference

The Digital Workplace Manifesto, Sam Marshall, Clearbox Consulting at Interaction Intranet Conference

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  • 30 minsinc. QuestionsOften the availability of technology runs ahead of our understanding of how we should use it. I think that applies to the digital workplace too, and I want to explore with you a basic framework for how to keep it on track, expressed as a manifesto.The aim is to try to articulate the VOICE of the EMPLOYEE in the digital workplace. Need to resist getting sucked back into technology-first when it comes to DW.
  • A few years ago I write DWMM for IBF. And it was really hard to talk about what the DW is without going through a list of technologies saying “is this in/out?”In reality we ALREADY HAVE digital workplaces by default, the risk is that we’re not managing the impact that it has.Lots of good academic work on CSCW, but crushingly DULL.MICHAEL CRICHTON So I thought, where else do people look into the impact of tech on our lives and decided that Hollywood might have the answer.
  • WitnessJurrasic Park 1993 – the children are trapped in the Park control room, trying to restore the power to the electric fences. One of the most impressive moments in women’s computing since Ada Lovelace sorted out the difference engine.
  • Forrester – p132 Intranets by Paul Blackmore, Aslib 2001http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/internet/9902269/British-internet-users-double-in-six-years.html
  • A lot of what is discussed about the DW has a sense of what the Org does. I wrote this from the employee perspective to give a counterbalance.
  • 13% increase was teleworkers in China (Stanford Uni)20% increase found by BT But in allowing work to follow us wherever we go, it makes it really hard to leave behind.
  • Sometimes the best place to work is still work.We shouldn’t forget all the things we learned about good ergonomics over the years. Crouched over a laptop in the sand isn’t good for your posture.People in open plan offices take 62% more sick leave http://www.nhs.uk/news/2013/05May/Pages/Could-open-plan-offices-be-bad-for-your-health.aspx
  • Sometimes the best place to work is still work.We shouldn’t forget all the things we learned about good ergonomics over the years. Crouched over a laptop in the sand isn’t good for your posture.People in open plan offices take 62% more sick leave http://www.nhs.uk/news/2013/05May/Pages/Could-open-plan-offices-be-bad-for-your-health.aspx
  • Sometimes the best place to work is still work.We shouldn’t forget all the things we learned about good ergonomics over the years. Crouched over a laptop in the sand isn’t good for your posture.People in open plan offices take 62% more sick leave http://www.nhs.uk/news/2013/05May/Pages/Could-open-plan-offices-be-bad-for-your-health.aspx
  • Sometimes the best place to work is still work.We shouldn’t forget all the things we learned about good ergonomics over the years. Crouched over a laptop in the sand isn’t good for your posture.People in open plan offices take 62% more sick leave http://www.nhs.uk/news/2013/05May/Pages/Could-open-plan-offices-be-bad-for-your-health.aspx
  • >> ROWE at Best Buy - turnover down by as much as 90% BUT NOW now abandoned.Results ONLY Work Environment by Ressler and Thompson>> Relies on leaders clearly communicating STRATEGY and what is needed. >>Face time may yield GROUPTHINK rahter than collaboration
  • Research by the Anywhere working consortium found that 73% of the UK workforce felt remote workers wouldn’t work as hard as office based staff. (Cited in “Business Reimagined” by David Coplin)The study was carried out in March 2013 by Ipsos MORI of a representative GB sample of 1,000 office workers. It was commissioned by Microsoft on behalf of the Anywhere Working Consortium. How long does it take to write a proposal?To come up with a new advertising campaign?TO create an intranet strategy?
  • BYOD cannot be held back!If people like a device, they will train themselves to use it. Bad tech sends out a message about how much your employees matter to you – like bad polyester uniformsThe more we have work-life blend, the more work tech spills over into non-office hours, so it matters. BUT, the key word here is LET MEBYOD is great until it becomes compulsory. “I don’t want to have to go out an buy my own laptop for work”.
  • Like BYOD, but applied to SERVICES.Imagine you organised a sports day where everyone could bring their own kit and their own rules? So you get ice hockey players chasing tennis balls, and the football referee keeps stopping the rugby match for handball offences. …and still the offside rule doesn’t make any sense.This is the flipside of BYOD and why its legitimate to manage it.Silos of Dropbox, Yammer, Basecamp – non integratedStory of a Client with 17 extra intranets built on Google Sites, Facebook groups etc. Employees didn’t do it to be rebellious!!Workplaces are NOT CONSUMER markets. “Freedom of choice” leads to paucity of outcome.“Do you want to see traffic jams reduced? YES! Do you want to give up your car and use the bus? No!”>> Still need to architect the Digital Workplace.
  • The more we work virtually, the more we have to manifest our individuality online tooStory of “Worked with someone for 2 years and blanked them in thecorridor”People are more than their role. “A typical accountant…” Work interactions are better if they have the context of the individual
  • You know the bait-and-switch tactic of recruiting graduates via Facebook then blocking access once they work for the company?Why stop them getting help from their networks?
  • MOOCs Much of what we can learn is external, but its rarely built into the professional development syllabus. DW’s still trapped in the idea of buying masses of eLearnign modules or face to face courses.As Intranet managers you’ll know that there’s much to be learned from BLOGSLINKEDIN Groupsblogs, discussion groups and peer events like this. In extreme cases some people even buy books by Australians!Trick is making people aware of it, recognizing its value, and giving them time and space to explore it.
  • Some people will play and don’t need trainingOther will be cautious and DO want to feel like it has been explained. Actually, some of the tools we expect people to use are quite complex…
  • If I said that these are the skills you might need to use, what kind of software do you think I’d be describing?
  • SOSOME people will need training for evrythingSOME tasks will need training for just about EVERYONE
  • Yammer argue payback tails off – OK for social, not for mandated processes
  • Workplace increasingly outsourcing services. One company had outsourced HR helpdesk, but the outsource company couldn’t update answers on the company intranet. So they built a new extranet for employees to go to that they could maintain. Another logion for employees, another area of content that the search engine didn’t index.Same with the huge growth of dropbox, box etc. for file sharing. Collaboration tools gettign much better internally, but with partners we’re effectively back to email and network drives.
  • Imagine needing a different pass for each set of doors in the office.Single-sign on is one of those things that comes up time and again from employees but is seen as poor ROI. I think it would do a lot to reduce annoying distractions.It’s not that signing on necessarily takes time, but that forgotten passwords and authentication is an inhibitor. For example, if I get an email alert with a question I could answer, but then have to fiddle with a password reset, I won’ bother.
  • Other irritants disrup flow – it can take 15 minutes to get back into a task following interruption (study by Tom de Marco)Therfore, we also need mobility WITHIN the workplace so we can get away from distraction. When we DO need to interact, Irritants like lack of wifi, even fspendign 10 minswating for the guy to bring a trailing socket can bog meetings down.http://blogs-images.forbes.com/frederickallen/files/2012/07/0627_forbes071612-leaderboard-deskless-office_6004.jpg
  • Statistic from NetJMC’sDigitalWorkplace Trends Survey 2009 correlated with the global “Great place to work” rankingsThis is why its so important for leaders to get involved in the conversations – or as Guy Browning put it:
  • Works both ways – sounds like a threat to the employer, but there’s also the retort back to the employee – if you want to see change, why do you stay?
  • * The DW is not something in the future, everybody has one, they’re just if different stages of maturityWhat worries me is that we have DW’s by default that have just happened rather than being thought through.What happens if you run ahead with the technology without thinking through the consequences?-- well, I think we need to turn back to Michael Crichton to answer that one..
  • (1) 13% - Stanford University study http://www.stanford.edu/~nbloom/WFH.pdf, 20% - BT case studywww.anywhereworking.org/case-studies/Office layout at GSK: http://www.forbes.com/sites/frederickallen/2012/06/27/inside-the-new-deskless-office/(2) Amabile & Kramer in “The Progress Principle” (3) Cisco Connected World report 2011"www.cisco.com/en/US/netsol/ns1120/(7) Oracle study “Enterprise 2.0: Driving creativity, productivity and collaboration”(10) Digital workplace survey by NetJMChttp://t.co/M5IsOSfF

Interaction 2013 - Conference - Sam Marshall - The Digital Workplace Manifesto Interaction 2013 - Conference - Sam Marshall - The Digital Workplace Manifesto Presentation Transcript

  • Sam Marshall @sammarshall
  • Digital workplace Traditional Intranet News Web Conferencing RSS feeds Employee self- service Advanced Intranet E-mail Telepresence Twitter feeds Collaboration tools for internal teams Instant messaging Extranet HR Systems Policies Corporate information Phone book Micro- blogging Internal social networks External social networks Document Management CRM Supply chain management Desktop Office Applications Online Office applications © IBF 2010
  • “It’s a Unix system – I know this!”
  • It’s not just the movies According to UK ONS by end of 2012 that figure was.. 21m In 2000, Forrester estimated that by 2003 41m people in the UK would use mobile devices to access the internet.
  • So what does that tell us? We’re pretty bad at predicting how technology will be used in practice Technology increases options for how we work, but doesn’t give us a plan We should define the principles of what matters to people, and keep that as the constant as our digital workplaces evolve
  • 1. Work is no longer a place. Let me be productive where I choose, but respect my home life too. Working from home can lead to a 13-20% increase in productivity
  • “ We need to stop thinking of work as a destination and ask ourselves: what’s the best place for me to work today?” —Dave Coplin, Microsoft
  • 2. Manage the outcome, not the process. Trust that I’m working productively when you can’t see me, but hold me accountable for the results. Best Buy saw a 35% increase in productivity in departments adopting a results-oriented approach
  • The challenge of remote knowledge work • Trust between employees not by managers may be the issue • Management by results gets harder the more creative it is • The onus moves to employees to ‘work out loud’ • Introverts may need a different approach 73% of office workers felt remote workers wouldn’t work as hard
  • 3. The digital workplace should be a pleasure to use. If it’s not as good as my digital home life, let me bring in my own solutions.
  • Does your head office look like this…
  • But your digital workplace look like this?
  • 4. Collaboration only works if we do it the same way. The best tool is the one we all use, otherwise we create digital divides to match physical ones.
  • 5. Let me be myself online. My profile is who I am in the digital workplace, and many of my working relationships may be with people I don’t get to meet.
  • 6. Learning is good for me and the company. Give me the opportunity to acquire knowledge from outside and in, and the chance to use it well.
  • MooC • Coursera.com • Code Adademy
  • 7. Not everyone is an early-adopter. Give support and guidance to those that need it, but also freedom to learn by playing for the self-starters. 40% of social network users say they are easier to use than workplace software. 44% of employees say insufficient training is a barrier to adopting new workplace technologies.
  • Skills you might need… • Understand cloud storage • Apply metadata • Use group calendaring • Manage access control lists • Plan audience targeting • Understand presence • Manage 3rd party add-ons • Understand two-factor authentication
  • “Nobody went on a training course for Facebook…” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wMZaKnYCFpc
  • Diffusion of innovation curve http://blog.yammer.com/blog/2012/01/how-much-adoption.html
  • 8. Work doesn’t stop at the firewall. Our digital workplace should encompass customers, suppliers, partners and contacts.
  • 9. Everything should be geared to helping me do the work that matters. Remove the irritants like multiple logins. You know who I am – once I’m logged in I should get everywhere I need to go.
  • GSK office via Forbes.com
  • 10. Working relationships involve understanding each other. Let me express my views and I’ll listen to yours. 39% of “best places to work” have social intranet spaces vs industry average of 17%.
  • “Internal communication is the process by which the bosses tell everyone what is happening, followed by a feedback stage where everyone can tell the bosses what is really happening.” —Guy Browning
  • 11. If I don’t like it, I can always leave.
  • The Digital Workplace Manifesto 1. Work is no longer a place. 2. Manage the outcome, not the process. 3. The digital workplace should be a pleasure to use. 4. Let me be myself online. 5. Learning is good for me and the company. 6. Not everyone is an early-adopter. 7. Work doesn’t stop at the firewall. 8. Everything should be geared to helping me do the work that matters. 9. Working relationships involve understanding each other. 10. Collaboration only works if we do it the same way. 11. If I don’t like it, I can always leave Download the poster: www.clearboxconsulting.co.uk/di gital-workplace-manifesto
  • sam@clearboxconsulting.co.uk www.clearboxconsulting.co.uk @sammarshall
  • References/Credits Original cartoons commissioned by ClearBox from: www.businessillustrator.com & Duncan Scott (1) 13% - Stanford University study http://www.stanford.edu/~nbloom/WFH.pdf, 20% - BT case study www.anywhereworking.org/case-studies/ Office layout at GSK: www.forbes.com July 16th (2) 73% Stat from Ipsos MORI poll of a representative GB sample of 1,000 office workers. http://anywhereworking.org (3) Cisco Connected World report 2011" www.cisco.com/en/US/netsol/ns1120/ Old office pjoto: http://www.old- picture.com/american-legacy/001/Workers- Office-Women.htm (7) Oracle study “Enterprise 2.0: Driving creativity, productivity and collaboration” (10) Digital workplace survey by NetJMC http://t.co/M5IsOSfF