From Renamer Plugin to Polyglot IDE

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History of the IntelliJ IDEA codebase and development practices used in its development.

History of the IntelliJ IDEA codebase and development practices used in its development.

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  • 1. From Renamer Plugin to Polyglot IDE Dmitry Jemerov CTO, JetBrains Monday, September 9, 13
  • 2. IntelliJ IDEA: 2000-2013 • Started as a plugin for JBuilder • Currently a product line of 8 IDEs, a compiler, a DSL workbench and a server- side code browser • $xxK initial investment, $yyyM total revenue • HEAD is a usable IDE every single day Monday, September 9, 13
  • 3. Agenda • IntelliJ IDEA over the years • IntelliJ IDEA development practices Monday, September 9, 13
  • 4. IntelliJ IDEA: Over the Years Monday, September 9, 13
  • 5. 2000 • February 1st - company birthday • Founded by Sergey Dmitriev, Eugene Belyaev and Valentin Kipiatkov from TogetherSoft • IntelliJ Renamer, IntelliJ CodeSearch Monday, September 9, 13
  • 6. Monday, September 9, 13
  • 7. Vista 1.0, Jan 2001 • PSI, VFS, commands • Saved 2 months by not having plugin API • Mentioned by Martin Fowler on http://refactoring.com/ Monday, September 9, 13
  • 8. Stella 2.0, June 2001 • First external developers • JSP, CVS, Ant, formatter, live templates Monday, September 9, 13
  • 9. Pandora 2.5, Dec 2001 • 13 new refactorings • JUnit integration, one unit test in code • Released 1 month after Eclipse 1.0 Monday, September 9, 13
  • 10. IDEA 2.6 June 2002 • Company renamed to JetBrains • JOLT Award in April 2002 Monday, September 9, 13
  • 11. Ariadna 3.0, Nov 2002 • OpenAPI, • 2 plugins (open-source): Starteam, Tomcat • XML • Real tests • Oldest version available for download Monday, September 9, 13
  • 12. Fabrique Monday, September 9, 13
  • 13. Fabrique • Framework and set of components for developing Web applications Monday, September 9, 13
  • 14. Fabrique • Framework and set of components for developing Web applications • Visual IDE based on top of IntelliJ IDEA Monday, September 9, 13
  • 15. Fabrique • Framework and set of components for developing Web applications • Visual IDE based on top of IntelliJ IDEA • Drove a lot of platform API changes Monday, September 9, 13
  • 16. Fabrique • Framework and set of components for developing Web applications • Visual IDE based on top of IntelliJ IDEA • Drove a lot of platform API changes • Project view, structure view, extensions Monday, September 9, 13
  • 17. Fabrique • Framework and set of components for developing Web applications • Visual IDE based on top of IntelliJ IDEA • Drove a lot of platform API changes • Project view, structure view, extensions • Canceled in 2005 before reaching 1.0 Monday, September 9, 13
  • 18. Monday, September 9, 13
  • 19. ReSharper • Started in mid-2003 • Implemented in C#, different architecture • Initially used some parser/PSI technology from IntelliJ IDEA Monday, September 9, 13
  • 20. Aurora 4.0, Feb 2004 • Multiple-module projects • On-the-fly inspections • UI Designer Monday, September 9, 13
  • 21. Pallada 4.5, July 2004 • J2EE • First two community-developed plugins • Inspection Gadgets • Intention PowerPack Monday, September 9, 13
  • 22. Irida 5.0, Aug 2005 • Custom language API • JavaScript, Python • Perforce + Subversion, open-source plugins • 1M LOC • 10 developers, no QA engineers Monday, September 9, 13
  • 23. Monday, September 9, 13
  • 24. Demetra 6.0, Oct 2006 • Core and Enterprise subteams • TeamCity 1.0 • First plugin contest Monday, September 9, 13
  • 25. Selena 7.0, Oct 2007 • New caching VFS implementation • Facets • Ruby, Groovy Monday, September 9, 13
  • 26. Diana 8.0, Nov 2008 • Java-independent IntelliJ Platform extracted • RubyMine 1.0 in April 2009 • Language-independent indices • Language-independent debugger Monday, September 9, 13
  • 27. Community Edition Oct 2009 • Moved to git • ~ 60% of codebase open-sourced • Expected 30% drop in sales, got small gain • Couple dozen external contributors Monday, September 9, 13
  • 28. Maia 9.0, Dec 2009 • Background indexing • Artifacts • PHP Monday, September 9, 13
  • 29. Idea X, Xena 10.0, Dec 2010; 10.5; Feb 2011 • Autopopup completion • Android in Community Edition • PhpStorm (May 2010), PyCharm (Oct 2010) Monday, September 9, 13
  • 30. Nika 11.0, Dec 2011 • UI redesign • "core" package for Kotlin compiler • AppCode (Oct 2011) Monday, September 9, 13
  • 31. Leda 12.0, Dec 2012 • Darcula • External make • UpSource, headless indexing framework Monday, September 9, 13
  • 32. Android Studio May 2013 Monday, September 9, 13
  • 33. Android Studio May 2013 • Built by Google with support by JetBrains Monday, September 9, 13
  • 34. Android Studio May 2013 • Built by Google with support by JetBrains • Apache 2.0 licensed, no contracts and no money involved Monday, September 9, 13
  • 35. Android Studio May 2013 • Built by Google with support by JetBrains • Apache 2.0 licensed, no contracts and no money involved • 500K downloads in first 3 weeks Monday, September 9, 13
  • 36. Cardea Version 13, in development Monday, September 9, 13
  • 37. Cardea Version 13, in development • ~ 25 developers Monday, September 9, 13
  • 38. Cardea Version 13, in development • ~ 25 developers • ~ 5.6M LOC, ~3M LOC open-source Monday, September 9, 13
  • 39. Cardea Version 13, in development • ~ 25 developers • ~ 5.6M LOC, ~3M LOC open-source • ~ 100K daily active users, 72% Ultimate Monday, September 9, 13
  • 40. Cardea Version 13, in development • ~ 25 developers • ~ 5.6M LOC, ~3M LOC open-source • ~ 100K daily active users, 72% Ultimate • 50% Windows, 30% Mac, 20% Linux Monday, September 9, 13
  • 41. IntelliJ IDEA: Development Practices Monday, September 9, 13
  • 42. Break the Rules • No detailed planning • No unit tests • No QA • No code comments or internal docs • No API compatibility • Many wheels reinvented Monday, September 9, 13
  • 43. Release Planning Monday, September 9, 13
  • 44. Release Planning • Management sets only high-level goals and target date Monday, September 9, 13
  • 45. Release Planning • Management sets only high-level goals and target date • Each developer responsible for detailed planning of their subsystem(s) Monday, September 9, 13
  • 46. Release Planning • Management sets only high-level goals and target date • Each developer responsible for detailed planning of their subsystem(s) • No iteration planning Monday, September 9, 13
  • 47. Release Planning • Management sets only high-level goals and target date • Each developer responsible for detailed planning of their subsystem(s) • No iteration planning • No feature specifications Monday, September 9, 13
  • 48. Standup Meetings • Daily, broken into sub-teams • Over video conference between St.Petersburg, Munich and Prague • Allow management, QA and writers to stay on top of dev activity Monday, September 9, 13
  • 49. Development Flow • Everything done in master • Almost no long-lived feature branches • Branches used only for releases • Refactorings in incremental steps • New features side by side with existing code, turned on by system property Monday, September 9, 13
  • 50. Automated Testing • Mostly data-driven acceptance tests • Code before, action to perform, code after • Few pure unit tests, little usage of mocks • Test framework agnostic (JUnit, TestNG, Cucumber) Monday, September 9, 13
  • 51. Continuous Integration • Used TeamCity since day 0, CruiseControl before that • Remote run not mandatory but recommended Monday, September 9, 13
  • 52. Testing: Upsides • Easy to write • Often just copy code example from bug report • Very little fragility when impl changes • Tests written 8 years ago still valuable Monday, September 9, 13
  • 53. Testing: Downsides • Whole test suite (37K tests) takes 7 hours to run • Multiple commits per test run • Failures difficult to debug • Especially async code (indexing, UI) • Tests stay red for weeks Monday, September 9, 13
  • 54. Testers • Had no testers until 2006 • Focus on manual testing and usability • No "quality assurance" as such, relying more on CI tests and user feedback Monday, September 9, 13
  • 55. update.bat • Every developer starts their day with building IntelliJ IDEA from latest sources • "Do not update" emails if something badly broken • Core Java stuff always works Monday, September 9, 13
  • 56. Early Access Preview • Public free-to-use builds released every 1-2 weeks • Broad community testing for features we don't use internally • A few thousand active EAP users • Licenses for most helpful participants Monday, September 9, 13
  • 57. Public Issue Tracker • Initially ITN, then JIRA, then YouTrack • ~ 50 new issues per day • Low noise but many duplicates • Triaging incoming issues – almost full- time job • Imbalance between developers Monday, September 9, 13
  • 58. Exception Analyzer • Separate from issue tracker • Reports grouped into problems • Semiautomatic merging of duplicates • Exception duty rotated between developers, takes a few hours per day Monday, September 9, 13
  • 59. Code Review • Previously used manual review (mostly face-to-face) for merging into release branches • Now reviewing all platform changes • Using Crucible and hating it • Need tools to see context of change Monday, September 9, 13
  • 60. Support Monday, September 9, 13
  • 61. Support • Until recently one support engineer (Serge Baranov) was covering all IntelliJ Platform-based IDEs Monday, September 9, 13
  • 62. Support • Until recently one support engineer (Serge Baranov) was covering all IntelliJ Platform-based IDEs • Best Technical Support (small to medium-sized business, SD Magazine Reader's Choice 2005) Monday, September 9, 13
  • 63. Support • Until recently one support engineer (Serge Baranov) was covering all IntelliJ Platform-based IDEs • Best Technical Support (small to medium-sized business, SD Magazine Reader's Choice 2005) • Developers actively involved Monday, September 9, 13
  • 64. Internal Docs Monday, September 9, 13
  • 65. Internal Docs • XP's belief: comments are a code smell Monday, September 9, 13
  • 66. Internal Docs • XP's belief: comments are a code smell • Most 3rd party plugins are open-source, good examples Monday, September 9, 13
  • 67. Internal Docs • XP's belief: comments are a code smell • Most 3rd party plugins are open-source, good examples • Improving docs does not increase average plugin quality Monday, September 9, 13
  • 68. Internal Docs • XP's belief: comments are a code smell • Most 3rd party plugins are open-source, good examples • Improving docs does not increase average plugin quality • Investing into docs to promote IntelliJ Platform to companies Monday, September 9, 13
  • 69. Plugin API Monday, September 9, 13
  • 70. Plugin API • No separate facade, plugins access internal IDE classes directly Monday, September 9, 13
  • 71. Plugin API • No separate facade, plugins access internal IDE classes directly • No way to repurpose IDE the way we did without breaking API compatibility Monday, September 9, 13
  • 72. Community Plugins • Large part of feature set • Always by agreement with author • Usually reworked at JetBrains • Usually kept open-source • Rewards through plugin contest • Sometimes hiring authors Monday, September 9, 13
  • 73. Build System • Not using Maven or Gradle • Still storing dependency .jar files in VCS • JPS: tool that builds IntelliJ IDEA project from command line • Same as external make in IDE • Gant scripts to generate distribution Monday, September 9, 13
  • 74. Extensibility • Not using OSGi, Guice or Spring • PicoContainer for dependency injection • Home-grown extension point system • Components and extensions to load specified in .xml files Monday, September 9, 13
  • 75. Non-Java Languages • Some Groovy for tests • Live Edit's Chrome extension written in Kotlin and translated to JavaScript • Scala plugin written in Scala • Clojure plugin uses some Clojure Monday, September 9, 13
  • 76. Summary Monday, September 9, 13
  • 77. Summary • Codebase repurposed far beyond original goals through relentless refactoring Monday, September 9, 13
  • 78. Summary • Codebase repurposed far beyond original goals through relentless refactoring • Full-time dogfooding is essential for maintaining quality and usability Monday, September 9, 13
  • 79. Summary • Codebase repurposed far beyond original goals through relentless refactoring • Full-time dogfooding is essential for maintaining quality and usability • Lightweight process is enough for product development with no external stakeholders Monday, September 9, 13
  • 80. Q&A yole@jetbrains.com @intelliyole Develop with Pleasure! Monday, September 9, 13