London Academy of Diplomacy brochure - Intelligent Partners
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London Academy of Diplomacy brochure - Intelligent Partners

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The London Academy of Diplomacy at UEA London has developed a number of postgraduate qualifications to meet the needs of members of the London Diplomatic Corps, staff of various ministries, staff of ...

The London Academy of Diplomacy at UEA London has developed a number of postgraduate qualifications to meet the needs of members of the London Diplomatic Corps, staff of various ministries, staff of multinational corporations, non-governmental organizations, the media and graduates aspiring for an international career. Have a look at their brochure. Interested candidates can shoot a mail to info@intelligentgulf.com.

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London Academy of Diplomacy brochure - Intelligent Partners London Academy of Diplomacy brochure - Intelligent Partners Document Transcript

  • Welcome Masters and Research degrees in Diplomacy, Security, Business and Communication Prepare for an international career in the heart of London gINTO UEA LONDON 1
  • Why study Diplomacy at the London Academy of Diplomacy?• Masters courses designed to prepare The London Academy of Diplomacy at UEA you for an international career. London has developed a number of courses to• Offering a unique blend of academic meet the needs of decision-makers, members of studies and professional training. the London Diplomatic Corps, staff of multinational corporations, non-governmental• Highly experienced staff who have organisations, the media and graduates aspiring trained diplomats, government for an international career. officials and staff of international and regional organisations for over Masters degrees, Postgraduate Diploma and 30 years. Postgraduate Certificate qualifications are available at the London Academy of Diplomacy• Learn from leading professionals in the following subject areas: and experienced diplomats with a series of guest lectures and International Diplomacy simulation exercises.• Gain membership of the Royal International Business and Diplomacy Institute of International Affairs, International Security and Diplomacy Chatham House. International Communication and Diplomacy• Develop your professional network through exchange programmes and visits to international organisations The University of East Anglia has enjoyed in the UK and Europe. considerable success in recent years in independent institutional audits, teaching quality• Study in London: a global capital assessments and subject reviews made by the for diplomacy, politics, business UK Quality Assurance Agency. The latest audit and media. in March 2009 gave the University the highest possible outcome. The London Academy of Diplomacy courses are validated and awarded by the University and all courses at UEA London operate within the same quality assurance framework as those at the main UEA campus in Norwich.2
  • Welcome I am delighted to endorse the London Academy of Contents Diplomacy in UEA London. Professor Ayad and his team bring a wealth of expertise and experience to Diplomatic Introduction to the Diplomacy programmes 04 Education and I hope you find time to read about their MA International Diplomacy 06 courses, reputation and quality in this brochure. Given MA International Business current events and dramatic shifts in international power, and Diplomacy 10few people can doubt the importance of effective and timely diplomacy. As a MA International Securityhistorian, I commend its study in all its forms. and Diplomacy 14 The study of practical diplomacy is a natural one for the University of East Anglia. MA International CommunicationWe have a track record of high-quality research and education in diplomatic history, and Diplomacy 18politics, international relations, language, linguistics and communication studies.Additionally, the University has a much envied reputation in key areas that are Research degrees (MPhil and PhD) 22recasting the diplomatic nexus, including environmental science, bio-science and University preparation coursesinternational development. for international students 23 The venue for the new courses is UEA London, our state-of-the-art campus on Location and facilities 24Middlesex Street, a few minutes’ walk from Liverpool Street station. It is highly International Symposia 26convenient for attendees from diplomatic missions and corporations. It is also set inan area of fascinating cultural history; illustrating the breadth and depth of London’s Members of the Advisory Board 26role as a destination for international visitors and settlers from all over the world. I Staff and contributors 27encourage you to visit UEA London to find out more about the internationaleducation we provide.Professor Edward ActonVice Chancellor, University of East Anglia Welcome to the London Academy of Diplomacy at UEA London, the University of East Anglia’s London campus. We have developed a number of Masters courses, which feature an integration of theory and practice in the field of diplomatic studies in the UK and beyond. Your career development will profit from a wide range of activities, aswell as connections and relations with many reputable institutions andorganisations through direct contacts, visits and exchange programmes. Our staff have an extensive experience in running Masters degrees inDiplomacy. In the past, we have also delivered customised training programmesfor groups of diplomats and officials. These groups were sponsored either by theForeign and Commonwealth Office, the British Council or by their own governments. Many of our alumni occupy senior positions in their countries as Ministers andAmbassadors. Others are working as members of staff for international andregional organisations such as the UN, NATO, the EU, the League of Arab States,as well as the media, multinational corporations and defence and securityorganisations. A number of our graduates have pursued academic careers aslecturers and researchers at various universities. We invite you to come and visit us so that we can introduce you to our uniqueprogrammes and our state-of-the-art facilities in the heart of London.Professor Nabil AyadDirector, London Academy of Diplomacy 3
  • Introduction to the Diplomacy ProgrammeIntroduction to the Diplomacy programmesDiplomacy in the 21st Century Course structure AssessmentRecent advances in communications technology – The Diplomacy courses have been designed You will be assessed on coursework, oralparticularly the Internet, direct broadcast satellites to address the growing global market needs in presentation and written examination. You willand telecommunications – have mutated the world the areas of diplomacy, international business, also be required to submit a dissertation of aboutin which traditional diplomacy was conceived international security and international bilingual 12,000 words on an approved topic.and developed. While globalisation provides the communication. The development of appropriateethos and the context, it is the tragic events of understanding and acquisition of relevant skills in Teaching staff9/11, the subsequent fighting in Afghanistan and these areas have become essential for the effectiveIraq, the recent changes in the Middle East and management of international interaction at public Students on the diplomacy degree programmesNorth Africa, as well as the proliferation of violent and private levels alike. will benefit from the experience and expertisenon-state actors, which together have prompted The courses are a blend of academic studies of Professor Nabil Ayad, Director of the Londonthe vital need to identify a new form of diplomacy. and professional training, providing you with the Academy of Diplomacy, and a team of academics, opportunity to choose from a range of modules to experts and professionals with a proven trackMasters in Diplomacy broaden your knowledge in the respective fields of record in running courses and training programmes study and enhance your career advancement and for members of the London Diplomatic Corps, staffThe London Academy of Diplomacy at UEA overall employability. They are organised around of overseas Ministries for Foreign Affairs and otherLondon has developed a number of courses to a combination of compulsory modules, which government departments, staff of multinationalmeet the needs of decision-makers, members provide subject-specific and research skills and corporations, as well as graduates aspiring to anof the London Diplomatic Corps, staff of options, reflecting the chosen fields of specialism. international and academic career.multinational corporations, non-governmental The courses distinguish themselves by respondingorganisations, the media and graduates aspiring to the professional learning needs of governments,for an international career. organisations, multinational corporations and The courses will lead to the award of one of the educational research institutions.following Masters Degrees: The courses offer opportunities for you• MA International Diplomacy to enhance and broaden your knowledge,• MA International Business and Diplomacy understanding and transferable skills in your• MA International Security and Diplomacy area of study. They enable you to develop the• MA International Communication and Diplomacy capacity to use critical, analytical and conceptual approaches in dealing with complex issues in aPostgraduate diplomas and certificates and short rapidly changing international environment.courses or executive programmes are also available. “The job description for Britain’s ambassadors is to be rewritten to include tough targets for trade promotion and a requirement for the country’s top diplomats to tour the UK’s regions to showcase commercial opportunities abroad” The Financial Times From left to right: HE Mr Alexander Piletsky, Ambassador of Belize to Austria and Permanent Representative to UNIDO; HE Dr Benita Ferrero-Waldner, President of Euro Américan Foundation and former EU External Relations Commissioner and Foreign Minister of Austria; and Professor Nabil Ayad, Director, London Academy of Diplomacy.4
  • London Academy of Diplomacy A group of ARAMCO sponsored students who attended a diplomacy week at the London Academy of Diplomacy as part of the summer course which was organised by the University of East Anglia. (Centre) H E Dr. Michael Frendo, Speaker of the Maltese Parliament and former Foreign Minister of Malta who gave a lecture on: Governments and Multinationals: The Role of Governments and Diplomatic Missions in Promoting Business and Trade, (to his left) Professor Nabil Ayad, Director, London Academy of Diplomacy, (to his right) Ms Alexandra Cole, summer course Director. July 2011 Students on the course go on a one week educational European field trip, organised in conjunction with Nyenrode Business University in The Netherlands. Students visit international and regional organisations such as NATO, EU, International Court of Justice and International Criminal Court. An interesting part of the course is that we have an opportunity to go to Europe to learn about EU policy and also visit The Hague. These are all good lessons for us to learn about global issues. A lot of experts have also come to speak to us – many who have served for more than 20 years in diplomacy. Rejoice Lukumba PRess secRetaRy, Zambian HigH commission ma inteRnationaL business and diPLomacyStaff and a group of candidates on the Masters Degrees in International Diplomacy and International Business and Diplomacy during an educational tour in Brussels, April 2011. 5
  • MA International DiplomacyMA International Diplomacy Educational European visit. Students and staff at Nyenrode Business University, LAD partner institution in delivery the MA course in International Business and Diplomacy. From left to right: Roger McNally, Module Leader, Media Communication Strategies; Myzejen Myftari, Albania; Tesfaye Anteneh, Counsellor, Ethiopian Embassy; Moses Shale, Consular Clerk, South African High Commission6
  • London Academy of DiplomacyThe MA in International Diplomacy covers a range of pertinent Key course factsissues such as protocol, negotiation, and decision-making, as well Start datesas the impact of the revolution in ICT and its implications for October and January Course datespublic diplomacy. 2011 – 2012 Mon 03 Oct 2011 – Fri 28 Sep 2012 Mon 09 Jan 2012 – Fri 31 Jan 2013Compulsory modules Dissertation (50 credits) The Dissertation is the culmination of your 2012 – 2013You will be required to attend the following experience on the MA and evidence of the benefit Mon 01 Oct 2012 – Mon 30 Sep 2013 from the programme with its various modules and Mon 28 Jan 2013 – Fri 31 Jan 2014compulsory modules: distinctive blend of theory and application. It is a Programme lengthDiplomacy: Theory and Practice (40 credits) detailed and substantive evidence of a relatively 1 year or approximately 12 months (full-time) 2 years or approximately 24 months (part-time)This module covers the essentials of modern long process of study and research aided bydiplomatic needs and practice, the qualities and supervision at various stages. Academic entry requirements Applicants should possess one of the following:skills required for the formation of the International • a degree from a recognised UK or overseas institutionDiplomat and the concept of policy capability. Optional modules • a postgraduate degree or professional qualification in aAreas studied within this module include diplomatic relevant disciplineand consular law and practice, diplomatic You will choose four optional modules (80 credits) • knowledge and skills at a university degree standard,missions and the media, diplomatic practice in the from the following: normally obtained through five years’ relevant work experience.information age, foreign policy analysis, strategicpublic diplomacy, and international relations theory. Management (20 credits) Applicants may be exempt from attending certain Other subjects will include the impact of certain This module deals with the skills of management modules (up to 40 credits) if they qualify under either the of government and corporate institutions. It offers Accreditation of Prior Learning or Accreditation of Priordomestic and global issues, such as the environment, Experiential Learning scheme.defence, nuclear proliferation, trade, aid, terrorism, a new insight into the subject by focusing on thenarcotics, ethnic and territorial disputes and the issue requirements of an increasingly multi-national and English language requirements multi-cultural work force. IELTS 6.5 or equivalentof human rights, on external relations. Furthermore, the module will cover the areas The application of information technology within Tuition feeof decision-making and patterns of influence in diplomatic missions, government departments 2011 – 2012 and businesses with design, selection and • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £7,560 (full-time)international and regional organisations. • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £3,780 per year implementation are part of the syllabus. This (part-time)Research Methodology (10 credits) forward-looking module will encourage debate • International students: £11,200 (full-time)Critical thinking is the central intellectual skill about issues of e-government, e-commerce and 2012 – 2013that LAD seeks to develop in students. You are the security of information. • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £9,000 (full-time)encouraged to demonstrate independent research • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £4,500 per yearinvolving critical analysis and evaluation of data Cultural Awareness (20 credits) (part-time)from a wide range of sources. Understanding Understanding the culture of the host country • International students: £11,700 (full-time)the argument in a text and awareness of bias and acquiring an appreciation of the cultural For further information please contact your educationare additional important skills. You need to sensitivity of other nations are essential elements agent or email the Manager at the London Academy ofdevelop your ideas clearly and logically and for professionals operating in any cosmopolitan Diplomacy at diplomacy@uea.ac.ukacquire the necessary skills to meet the academic environment. The module examines the variousrigour of preparing, structuring and writing your theories of culture and intercultural communication,dissertation. This involves judicious use of sources primarily within the framework of global diplomacyas well as an understanding of the key research and business.methods available. MA International Diplomacy CoMPulSoRy MoDulES oPTIoNAl MoDulES (you WIll STuDy FouR oPTIoNAl MoDulES FRoM THE lIST BEloW) • Diplomacy: Theory anD pracTice (40 creDiTs) • managemenT (20 creDiTs) • inTernaTional proTocol anD eTiqueTTe • research meThoDology (10 creDiTs) • culTural awareness (20 creDiTs) (20 creDiTs) • DisserTaTion (50 creDiTs) • public inTernaTional law (20 creDiTs) • science Technology anD inTernaTional • Foreign policy FormulaTion anD assessmenT (20 creDiTs) policy (20 creDiTs) • meDia communicaTion sTraTegies (20 creDiTs) • european inTernaTional markeT/policy (20 creDiTs) • a choice oF any oTher moDule oFFereD by The acaDemy (20 creDiTs) 7
  • MA International DiplomacyMA International Diplomacy continuedPublic International law (20 credits) Media Communication Strategies (20 credits) Science Technology and InternationalThis module examines major areas of International This module deals with the various facets of media Policy (20 credits)Law and Diplomacy, such as diplomatic privileges communication strategies. It identifies and critiques This module examines the various ways of bridgingand immunities, environmental law, international the major theoretical approaches to the media, the gap between scholars and practitionersconventions and treaties and Institutions of and how they relate to the broader themes of by exploring the place and role of science andInternational Diplomacy. More particularly it looks at diplomacy, security and business. It demonstrates technology (S&T) in international policy andthe following areas: understanding and evaluation of contemporary relations. The learning model is active: participatory,• sovereignty journalistic practices, the way our perceptions peer discursive and analytical. The format is• recognition in general, both de jure and de facto of the world and its affairs are constructed and Socratic, examining critically some of the key recognition; legal effects of recognition; depicted by the news media, and the issue of issues and questions analysts, researchers and recognition of insurgency; and belligerency and media objectivity. diplomats. Premiums are placed on interaction, non-recognition This module also lends itself to a thorough innovation, insight and initiative. The module• the principles of State responsibility: Nature and analysis of the impact of ‘New Media’ on examines a range of issues and some critical kinds of State responsibility; responsibility for diplomacy, security, business, and communication. examples currently in play and evaluate national breach of treaty; contractual obligations; and multilateral responses as well as contributing expropriation of property; responsibility for International Protocol and Etiquette high quality assessments and recommendations international acquisitions and claims (20 credits) for consideration by decision-makers and• the State and the Individual: Nationality; rights Whether arranging a state visit, preparing a opinion-leaders. It demonstrates how to conduct and duties of States with regard to aliens; conference, or hosting an international event, innovative, policy-relevant research and analysis. extradition, rendition and asylum; human rights the impressions left with visitors are vital to nation and fundamental freedoms branding and reputation management. In an European International Market/Policy• war, armed conflicts and other hostile relations increasingly globalised world, international protocol (20 credits)• the procedures for seeking remedies in the and etiquette have become key factors in state This module covers the emergence of trading event of any breach of the principles of public management, diplomatic practice and the conduct and the way international operating firms are international law. of business and international relations. responding to these new developments and The module covers: the evolution of protocol opportunities. This module focuses on how theForeign Policy Formulation and Assessment and etiquette; the application of the rules of developments within the EU impact the business(20 credits) protocol in correspondence, dress codes, community and where relevant translates themThis module will examine the various aspects entertaining and staging international events into corporate strategies. Furthermore, the moduleof the dynamics of foreign policy. It explores its whether in politics, business, or sports; the various will consider international factors that affect thevarious actors and factors in a rapidly changing ceremonials pertaining to flags and to the business environment, including competition andinternational environment, in an attempt to organisation of State, working and private visits anti-trust issues. It elaborates on the basics ofreconcile the pursuit of national interest with by Heads of State and Government, as well as by competition and anti-trust matters and deepensthe requirements of the respect of international senior government officials. your knowledge on all major issues that play avalues and rules of engagement in an increasingly The business community has also developed key-role in this particular field of internationalinterdependent world. a code of interaction which requires specific skills business. During this module the latest information provided by this module. and developments regarding the future of deal making in the EU will be discussed. The module also examines the international role of the European External Action Service (EEAS).8
  • London Academy of Diplomacy That is a wonderful course that gives a lot of new opportunities: both to enlarge your knowledge in international politics and economics and to meet new interesting colleagues from all over the world. Colleagues that share the same aim for self- improvement and further self-development. Great thanks to the London Academy of Diplomacy! dessisLava ivanova-koZLeva FiRst secRetaRy, buLgaRian embassy, London ma in inteRnationaL business and diPLomacyThe UEA London launch, April 2011. From left to right: Dr Richard Harvey, Director of Admissions and Dean of UEA London; Mr Ali Akbarov, HE Mr OtabekAkbarov, Ambassador of the Republic of Uzbekistan; Professor Nabil Ayad, Director, The London Academy of Diplomacy and Mr Andrew Colin, Chairman of INTO. 9
  • MA International Business and DiplomacyMA International Business and Diplomacy At the UEA London launch, April 2011. From left to right: HE Mr George Liswaniso, High Commissioner for Namibia to the Court of St James’s; Professor Nabil Ayad, Director, London Academy of Diplomacy; Professor Edward Acton, Vice Chancellor, University of East Anglia and HE Ms Ana Maria Carrera, Embassy of Angola to the Court of St James’s.10
  • London Academy of DiplomacyThe MA in International Business and Diplomacy which addresses Key course factsthe needs of both the public and private sectors and explores the Start datesbest practices in promoting business, trade and investment. October and January Course dates 2011 – 2012Compulsory modules emerging markets and other markets, e.g. those of Mon 03 Oct 2011 – Fri 28 Sep 2012 mature economic powers such as the United Mon 09 Jan 2012 – Fri 31 Jan 2013You will be required to attend the following States, the European Union and Japan which are witnessing increased competition from emerging 2012 – 2013compulsory modules: Mon 01 Oct 2012 – Mon 30 Sep 2013 markets including the so-called BRIC countries. Mon 28 Jan 2013 – Fri 31 Jan 2014Dynamics of International Business (20 credits) Diplomacy: Theory and Practice (40 credits) Programme lengthThis module aims to introduce you to the 1 year or approximately 12 months (full-time)international perspective of business by providing This module covers the essentials of modern 2 years or approximately 24 months (part-time)you with knowledge, skills and business tools that diplomatic needs and practice, the qualities and skills required for the formation of the international Academic entry requirementsare fine-tuned for operating in an international Applicants should possess one of the following:environment. The Diplomacy module will deal diplomat, diplomatic practice and the concept • a degree from a recognised UK or overseas institutionwith the dynamics and conduct of international of policy capability. Areas studied within this • a postgraduate degree or professional qualification in arelations and the role of diplomatic missions and module include diplomatic and consular law and relevant disciplinegovernments in promoting business and trade. practice, diplomatic missions and the media, • knowledge and skills at a university degree standard, diplomatic practice in the information age, foreign normally obtained through five years’ relevant work This module examines the different aspects of experience.and views on the process of globalisation in general policy analysis, strategic public diplomacy; andand puts emphasis on future developments. It international relations theory. Applicants may be exempt from attending certain Other subjects will include the impact of modules (up to 40 credits) if they qualify under either thewill teach you to look from different angles at the Accreditation of Prior Learning or Accreditation of Priorprocess of globalisation. This module will also focus certain domestic and global issues, such as the Experiential Learning scheme.on the dynamics of the international environment, environment, defence, nuclear proliferation, trade, English language requirementsespecially the emerging markets including the aid, terrorism, narcotics, ethnic and territorial IELTS 6.5 or equivalentBRIC-countries. It also provides you with tools disputes and the issue of human rights, on external relations. Tuition feeto translate developments in the international 2011 – 2012environment into your daily practice as a manager Furthermore, the module will cover the areas • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £7,560 (full-time)or entrepreneur. It also deals with trends and of decision-making and patterns of influence in • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £3,780 per yeardevelopments in trade and direct investments; international and regional organisations. (part-time)the monetary world referring to exchange rates, • International students: £11,200 (full-time)exchange rate systems, the role of the International Research Methodology (10 credits) 2012 – 2013Monetary Fund and the balance of payments; and Critical thinking is the central intellectual skill • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £9,000 (full-time)the financial world referring to developments in that LAD seeks to develop in students. You are • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £4,500 per year encouraged to demonstrate independent research (part-time)the financial markets and to financial instruments. • International students: £11,700 (full-time)Emphasis will be given to the process of integration involving critical analysis and evaluation of datawith regard to international trade and FDI’s. This from a wide range of sources. Understanding For further information please contact your educationpart of the course deals extensively with the issue the argument in a text and awareness of bias are agent or email the Manager at the London Academy ofof globalisation versus regionalism and the present additional important skills. You need to develop Diplomacy at diplomacy@uea.ac.ukinterrelationship between countries and trade. your ideas clearly and logically and acquire the The module also focuses on developments in necessary skills to meet the academic rigour ofthe international environment and discusses from preparing, structuring and writing your dissertation.a managerial perspective which way they could This involves the judicious use of the internet andaffect strategic choices. It will elaborate on the shift other sources as well as an understanding of theof balance of power and competitiveness between key research methods available. MA International Business and Diplomacy CoMPulSoRy MoDulES oPTIoNAl MoDulES (you WIll STuDy THREE oPTIoNAl MoDulES FRoM THE lIST BEloW) • Dynamics oF inTernaTional business (20 creDiTs) • european inTernaTional markeT/policy • economic global governance (20 creDiTs) • Diplomacy: Theory anD pracTice (40 creDiTs) (20 creDiTs) • meDia communicaTion sTraTegies (20 creDiTs) • research meThoDology (10 creDiTs) • managemenT (20 creDiTs) • science Technology anD inTernaTional policy (20 creDiTs) • DisserTaTion (50 creDiTs) • culTural awareness (20 creDiTs) • a choice oF any oTher moDule oFFereD • economic Diplomacy (20 creDiTs) by The acaDemy (20 creDiTs) 11
  • MA International Business and DiplomacyMA International Business and Diplomacy continuedDissertation (50 credits) Management (20 credits) Economic Diplomacy (20 credits)The Dissertation is the culmination of your This module deals with the skills of management of This module addresses the developments inexperience on the MA and evidence of the benefit government and corporate institutions. It will offer economic diplomacy which is increasingly linkedfrom the programme with its various modules and a new insight into the subject by focusing on the to international business. This type of diplomacy,distinctive blend of theory and application. It requirements of an increasingly multi-national and also referred to as economic diplomacy, aims tois a detailed and substantive evidence of a relatively multi-cultural work force. increase total welfare among others by stimulatinglong process of study and research aided by In the specific area of Diplomacy, participants free trade and a favourable investment climatesupervision at various stages. will be given the tools to comprehend, appreciate inside and outside a country’s borders. Towards and carry out such tasks as starting a new the end of the last century, countries’ role inOptional modules embassy: legal, administrative and documentary international relations was challenged by the rise procedures; solving problems of integrating of multinational companies. Furthermore, dueYou are to choose three optional modules into, and establishing and maintaining effective to the emergence of new economic powers,(60 credits) from the following: relationships with the diplomatic community; and governments play an increasingly important role managing relations between home-based staff and in the development of the national economies andEuropean International Market/Policy locally-recruited staff. the world economy. For example, by providing(20 credits) The module highlights the application of governmental support to open markets abroad,This module deals with the emergence of trading information technology within diplomatic missions, leads to an increase in economic diplomacy.and the way international operating firms are government departments and businesses withresponding to these new developments and design, selection and implementation as part of Economic Global Governance (20 credits)opportunities. This module also deals with topics the syllabus. This forward-looking module will The purpose of the module is to assess the extentsuch as the further enlargement of the European encourage debate about issues of e-government, of the validity of the economic factor in internationalUnion (EU) and its impact on the internal market. e-commerce and the security of information. affairs and gain an understanding of theIt will focus on how the developments within the EU development and dynamics of the global economyimpact the business community and where relevant Cultural Awareness (20 credits) and its global governance. Specifically it is directedtranslate them into corporate strategies. Understanding the culture of the host country at what is global governance – how it works and Furthermore, the module will deal with the and acquiring an appreciation of the cultural what are the issues and challenges.fact that the business environment is strongly sensitivity of other nations are essential assets The world’s financial and economic systemaffected by international forces not in the least by for professionals operating in any cosmopolitan is increasingly complex and reflects substantialcompetition and anti-trust issues. It elaborates on environment. The module examines the various and growing interdependence. Public policy andthe basics of competition and anti-trust matters theories of culture and intercultural communication, corporate actions must reflect an understanding ofand deepens your knowledge on all major issues primarily within the framework of global diplomacy this system.that play a key role in this particular field of and business.international business. During this module the latestinformation and developments regarding the futureof deal-making in the EU will be discussed. Themodule will also examine the international role ofthe European External Action Service (EEAS).Professor Edward Acton, Vice-Chancellor of the University of East Anglia addressing guests and members of staff at the UEA London launch reception12
  • London Academy of DiplomacyThe IMF, the BIS and the Basel Accords, theFSB and the G20 must all be understood interms of their respective contributions to globaleconomic governance. Bank rates, SDRs,determinants of exchange rates, liquidity andsolvency, minimum reserves, and leverage areparts of the bigger picture. The interweavingof public and private, international and national,demand of practitioners not only an ability tounderstand, but also influence is addressedMedia Communication Strategies (20 credits)The module deals with the various facets ofMedia Communication Strategies. It identifiesand critiques the major theoretical approachesto the media, and how they relate to the broaderthemes of diplomacy, security and business.It demonstrates understanding and evaluationof contemporary journalistic practices, the wayour perceptions of the world and its affairs areconstructed and depicted by the news media, andthe issue of media objectivity. The module also lends itself to a thoroughanalysis of the impact of ‘New Media’ on diplomacy,security, business, and communication.Science Technology and International Policy(20 credits)This module will examine the various waysof bridging the gap between scholars andpractitioners by exploring the place and role ofscience and technology (S&T) in international policyand relations. Premiums are placed on interaction, innovation,insight and initiative. The module examines a rangeof issues and some critical examples currently inplay and evaluate national and multilateral responsesas well as contributing high quality assessmentsand recommendations for consideration by decision-makers and opinion-leaders. It demonstrates howto conduct innovative, policy-relevant researchand analysis. 13
  • MA International Security and DiplomacyMA International Security and Diplomacy LAD staff conducting a simulation exercise on Nuclear Diplomacy- Prospects and Challenge which was led by Dr Sameh Aboul-Enein, Minister Plenipotentiary, Deputy Chief of Mission, Egyptian Embassy. On his right are: Professor Daryl Copeland, Senior Adviser, Strategic Planning and Policy, Foreign Affairs Canada; Professor Nabil Ayad, Director, London Academy of Diplomacy. On his left are: Brian Hurn, Module Leader, Research Methodology and Dr Riad Nourallah, Director of Research. At the UEA London launch, April 2011. From left to right: Ms J Joria, Press Office, US Embassy in London; Professor Nabil Ayad, Director, London Academy of Diplomacy and Ms Susan Wedlake, Cultural Affairs Office, US Embassy in London14
  • London Academy of DiplomacyThe MA in International Security and Diplomacy which deals with the Key course factsemerging trends in international security and their impact on global peace Start dates Start datesand the dilemmas of reconciling universal values such as humanitarian October and January September and Januaryintervention and the responsibility to protect with national interests. Course dates 2011 – 2012 Mon 03 Oct 2011 – Fri 28 Sep 2012Compulsory modules Finally policy recommendations, policy lessons, Mon 09 Jan 2012 – Fri 31 Jan 2013 and implementation issues that policy makers 2012 – 2013You will be required to attend the following and diplomats in both developed and developing Mon 01 Oct 2012 – Mon 30 Sep 2013compulsory modules: worlds have to consider within the context of a Mon 28 Jan 2013 – Fri 31 Jan 2014 transitional and changing global structure are Programme lengthInternational Security (20 credits) considered and debated. 1 year or approximately 12 months (full-time)National and International Security issues and 2 years or approximately 24 months (part-time)problems are important for one very good reason Diplomacy: Theory and Practice (40 credits) Academic entry requirementsabove all others: their human consequences are This module covers the essentials of modern Applicants should possess one of the following:immense. In addition, national and international diplomatic needs and practice, the qualities and • a degree from a recognised UK or overseas institution skills required for the formation of the international • a postgraduate degree or professional qualification in asecurity issues will be momentous policy and relevant disciplinediplomatic issues for the foreseeable future. diplomat, diplomatic practice and the concept • knowledge and skills at a university degree standard, The module considers the relationship between of policy capability. Areas studied within this normally obtained through five years’ relevant workstrategic and security studies, international political module include diplomatic and consular law and experience.economy, international relations and diplomacy, practice, diplomatic missions and the media, Applicants may be exempt from attending certainand considers the full range of factors and actors diplomatic practice in the information age, foreign modules (up to 40 credits) if they qualify under either thethat can affect the prospects for security. It takes a policy analysis, strategic public diplomacy, and Accreditation of Prior Learning or Accreditation of Priorsystematic and in-depth examination of the concept international relations theory. Experiential Learning scheme.of security, the implications of the security dilemma, Other subjects include the impact of certain English language requirementsand the three differing kinds of security problems in domestic and global issues, such as the IELTS 6.5 or equivalenttemporal terms, distinguishing between the sets of environment, defence, nuclear proliferation, trade, Tuition feeproblems: continuing, changing and emerging. aid, terrorism, narcotics, ethnic and territorial 2011 – 2012 The central issue of the security agenda, disputes and the issue of human rights, on external • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £7,560 (full-time) relations. Furthermore, the module will cover the • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £3,780 per yearthe problem of violent conflict and attempts to (part-time)understand the military and now military factors areas of decision-making and patterns of influence in • International students: £11,200 (full-time)can contribute to the causes of violent conflicts international and regional organisations. 2012 – 2013is examined as are all the issues associated with • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £9,000 (full-time)the conduct of violent conflicts. War termination Research Methodology (10 credits) • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £4,500 per yearand the critical issues and challenges of conflict Critical thinking is the central intellectual skill (part-time)avoidance, and control involving efforts at the that LAD seeks to develop in students. You are • International students: £11,700 (full-time)conflict settlement, management, resolution and encouraged to demonstrate independent research involving critical analysis and evaluation of data For further information please contact your educationpeacemaking are considered, and evaluated. agent or email the Manager at the London Academy of The syllabus distinguishes between military and from a wide range of sources. Understanding the Diplomacy at diplomacy@uea.ac.uknon-military challenges to security problems on the argument in a text and awareness of bias areone hand and interstate, intrastate and transnational additional important skills. You need to developon the other – bearing in mind many security your ideas clearly and logically and acquireproblems overlap the categories that are considered. the necessary skills to meet the academic rigour of preparing, structuring and writing your dissertation. This involves judicious use of sources as well as an understanding of the key research methods available. MA International Security and Diplomacy CoMPulSoRy MoDulES oPTIoNAl MoDulES (you WIll STuDy THREE oPTIoNAl MoDulES FRoM THE lIST BEloW) • inTernaTional securiTy (20 creDiTs) • inTelligence sTuDies (20 creDiTs) • meDia communicaTion sTraTegies (20 creDiTs) • Diplomacy: Theory anD pracTice (40 creDiTs) • culTural awareness (20 creDiTs) • science Technology anD inTernaTional policy (20 creDiTs) • research meThoDology (10 creDiTs) • public inTernaTional law (20 creDiTs) • religion, Diplomacy anD securiTy (20 creDiTs) • DisserTaTion (50 creDiTs) • sTraTegic DeFence Diplomacy (20 creDiTs) • a choice oF any oTher moDule oFFereD by The acaDemy (20 creDiTs) 15
  • MA International Security and DiplomacyMA International Security and Diplomacy continuedDissertation (50 credits) Cultural Awareness (20 credits) Strategic Defence Diplomacy (20 credits)The Dissertation is the culmination of your Understanding the culture of the host country In the transformed international securityexperience on the MA and evidence of the benefit and acquiring an appreciation of the cultural environment of the 21st century, it is no longerfrom the programme with its various modules and sensitivity of other nations are essential elements primarily about armies and states, but alsodistinctive blend of theory and application. It is a for professionals operating in any cosmopolitan about dealing with irregular forces and a newdetailed and substantive evidence of a relatively environment. The module examines the various constellation of asymmetrical threats as a resultlong process of study and research aided by theories of culture and intercultural communication, of the declining credibility of deterrence and thesupervision at the various stages. primarily within the framework of global diplomacy limits of coercive diplomacy. and business. The module design is framed around the post-Optional modules Cold War strategic requirements that have Public International law (20 credits) confronted the role of the armed forces. In additionYou are to choose three optional modules (60 This module examines major areas of International to defending their home nation and nationalcredits); at least two from the following and one Law and Diplomacy such as diplomatic privileges interests, armed forces are increasingly beingfrom a range of modules offered by the Academy: and immunities, environmental law, international regarded and used as a tool which could contribute conventions and treaties and Institutions of to conflict prevention and containment. The conceptIntelligence Studies (20 credits) International Diplomacy. More particularly it looks at of defence diplomacy has thus emerged to illustrateUnderstanding the nature of intelligence is essential the following areas: the growing centrality of conflict prevention andfor a rounded view of the policy and operational • sovereignty peacetime diplomacy as defence priorities.options available to governments. In this module, • recognition in general, both de jure and de facto Defence diplomacy encompasses severalyou will study the nature of intelligence and its role in recognition; legal effects of recognition; recognition issues which pose a challenge to the traditionalpolicy formulation; its advantages and shortcomings of insurgency and belligerency non-recognition understanding and modus operandi of nationaland how different systems of government, historical • the principles of State responsibility: Nature and armed forces. It raises questions regarding thecontext, the changing nature of societies and kinds of State responsibility; responsibility for role of the military in peacetime operations; howtechnological change will affect intelligence. breach of treaty; contractual obligations; soldiers should interact with a foreign culture The syllabus addresses how intelligence is expropriation of property; responsibility for to win ‘hearts and minds’ and not merely toobtained and the different forms of intelligence; international acquisitions and claims establish security cordons; how strategic andhow intelligence has evolved; and how it continues • the State and the Individual: Nationality; rights and operational military concerns are impacted by theto adapt to changing needs and requirements. It duties of States with regard to aliens; extradition, role of private contractors; and how the armedexamines the expectations placed on intelligence rendition and asylum; human rights and forces and security organisations can be used toand the extent to which these are realistic. fundamental freedoms build confidence measures as opposed to being The module examines: the advantages and • war, armed conflicts and other hostile relations presented as an outright threat.disadvantages of intelligence; so-called intelligence • the procedures for seeking remedies in the eventfailures; the skills required to be an informed user of of any breach of the principles of publicintelligence; the relationships between intelligence international law.producers and users; threat analysis and horizonscanning; intelligence assessment, tasking intelligenceservices and evaluating their performance. The challenges of secrecy will also be covered,with particular attention to the scrutiny andoversight of security and intelligence services andhow they are held to account. The module will alsoaddresses the moral and ethical dimensions ofintelligence work. HE Mrs Frances Guy, British Ambassador to Lebanon (centre front row), Professor Nabil Ayad, Director, London Academy of Diplomacy, Professor Daryl Copeland, Senior Adviser, Strategic Planning and Policy, Foreign Affairs Canada (right) and a group of candidates on the Diplomacy programme. Ambassador Guy gave a talk on the Role of Diplomacy in Science and Technology’. 09 April 201116
  • London Academy of DiplomacyMedia Communication Strategies (20 credits) Religion, Diplomacy and Security (20 credits) The data and insights provided, critiqued, andThe module covers the various facets of Media Given the increasing role or visibility of religion in communicated are designed to equip you withCommunication Strategies. It identifies and critiques world affairs, the need to examine and understand knowledge, perspectives and methods aimedthe major theoretical approaches to the media, its links with and impact on the various strands and at enhancing your critical awareness and skillsand how they relate to the broader themes of agents of international and global interactions is vital. in areas such as intercultural communicationdiplomacy, security and business. It will demonstrate Religion, described by Johnston and Sampson as and cooperation, interfaith dialogue, negotiation,understanding and evaluation of contemporary the ‘missing dimension of statecraft’ as it seemed mediation, problem solving, and policy capability.journalistic practices, the way our perceptions of the to be during much of the twentieth century, sawworld and its affairs are constructed and depicted by a remarkable resurgence in the latter days of thethe news media, and the issue of media objectivity. cold war and the period following. The spiritual and The module also lends itself to a thorough other often complex roots of that resurgence will beanalysis of the impact of ‘New Media’ on explored at some length in the module. Also, thediplomacy, security, business, and communication. doctrinal extremism and violent and terrorist activities which came to be associated with some religiousScience Technology and International Policy movements, along with State and international(20 credits) responses to them, will be subjected to scrutiny andThis module examines the various ways of bridging assessment.the gap between scholars and practitioners Paradoxically, while the above activities broughtby exploring the place and role of science and a variety of threats and harm to the internationaltechnology (S&T) in international policy and relations. system, they have also created opportunities Premiums are placed on interaction, innovation, in both the diplomatic and security spheres. Ainsight and initiative. The module examines a range number of case studies will illustrate how newof issues and some critical examples currently in forms of international cooperation and inventiveplay and evaluate national and multilateral responses types and tracks of diplomacy by States andas well as contributing high quality assessments non-State actors have emerged. At a conceptualand recommendations for consideration by decision- and intellectual level, postulates such as themakers and opinion-leaders. It demonstrates how Clash of Civilisations and the various responsesto conduct innovative, policy-relevant research to it, including the role of the United Nations inand analysis. promoting the Alliance of Civilisations movement, will also be examined. Dr Richard Harvey, Director of Admissions, University of East Anglia and Dean London Campus; Mr Martin Halsall, Chief Operations Officer, INTO UEA London (back row); Professor Nabil Ayad, Rector, London Academy of Diplomacy; Mr Roger McNally, Course Leader MA International Security and Diplomacy (second row centre); Miss Angel Fu, Consultant and Interpreter with a group of 22 Chinese officials who are attending a training programme in Environmental Tax Policy and Legislation at the London Academy of Diplomacy, University of East Anglia. The group are sponsored by the National Development and Reform Commission, People’s Republic of China. August 2011. 17
  • MA International Communication and DiplomacyMA International Communication and Diplomacy From left to right: Professor Dr Joseph Mifsud, President of the Euro-Mediterranean University (EMUNI) and former Chief of Cabinet to the Foreign Minister of Malta; Professor Nabil Ayad, Director, London Academy of Diplomacy; HE Dr Michael Frendo MP, Speaker of the Maltese Parliament and Former Foreign Minister of Malta.18
  • London Academy of DiplomacyThis is the only course of its kind offered in the world. The MA Key course factsin International Communication and Diplomacy course focuses on Start datesapplied languages and their relevance to effective communication, October and Januarydiplomacy, international liaison, mediation and advocacy. Course dates 2011 – 2012 Mon 03 Oct 2011 – Fri 28 Sep 2012Compulsory modules Other subjects will include the impact of certain Mon 09 Jan 2012 – Fri 31 Jan 2013 domestic and global issues, such as the 2012 – 2013You will be required to attend the following environment, defence, nuclear proliferation, trade, Mon 01 Oct 2012 – Mon 30 Sep 2013compulsory modules: aid, terrorism, narcotics, ethnic and territorial Mon 28 Jan 2013 – Fri 31 Jan 2014 disputes and the issue of human rights, on external Programme lengthInternational Communication: Concepts and relations. Furthermore, the module will cover the 1 year or approximately 12 months (full-time)Strategies (20 credits) areas of decision-making and patterns of influence 2 years or approximately 24 months (part-time)The process of globalisation, the increasing in international and regional organisations. Academic entry requirementsmobility of individuals and businesses, the growing Applicants should possess one of the following:role of multinational and global corporations Research Methodology (10 credits) • a degree from a recognised UK or overseas institution Critical thinking is the central intellectual skill • a postgraduate degree or professional qualification in ahave highlighted the interdisciplinary nature of relevant disciplineinternational communication. that LAD seeks to develop in students. You are • knowledge and skills at a university degree standard, This module offers good grounding in the key encouraged to demonstrate independent research normally obtained through five years’ relevant workconcepts relevant to this field including public involving critical analysis and evaluation of data experience.diplomacy and international broadcasting. It from a wide range of sources. Understanding Applicants may be exempt from attending certainfocuses on the skills, competencies and strategies the argument in a text and awareness of bias are modules (up to 40 credits) if they qualify under either therequired to achieve successful communication in additional important skills. You need to develop Accreditation of Prior Learning or Accreditation of Priorinternational and global contexts. This combination your ideas clearly and logically and acquire the Experiential Learning scheme.of theory and practice approach is enhanced necessary skills to meet the academic rigour of English language requirementsby the opportunity given to you to apply your preparing, structuring and writing your dissertation. IELTS 6.5 or equivalentconceptual knowledge and the skills acquired to This involves the judicious use of the internet and In addition to English, students attending this coursea research project corresponding to your field of other sources as well as an understanding of the must be fluent in one of the following languages: Arabic,interest and career aspirations. key research methods available. Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Polish, Romanian, or Spanish. Other languages may be included subject to demand.Diplomacy: Theory and Practice (40 credits) Dissertation (50 credits)This module covers the essentials of modern The Dissertation is the culmination of your Tuition fee experience on the MA and evidence of the benefit 2011 – 2012diplomatic needs and practice, the qualities and • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £7,560 (full-time)skills required for the formation of the international from the programme with its various modules and • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £3,780 per yeardiplomat, diplomatic practice and the concept distinctive blend of theory and application. It is a (part-time)of policy capability. Areas studied within this detailed and substantive evidence of a relatively • International students: £11,200 (full-time)module include diplomatic and consular law and long process of study and research aided by 2012 – 2013practice, diplomatic missions and the media, supervision at the various stages. • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £9,000 (full-time)diplomatic practice in the information age, foreign • Home/EU/Accredited Diplomats: £4,500 per yearpolicy analysis, strategic public diplomacy; and (part-time) • International students: £11,700 (full-time)international relations theory. For further information please contact your education agent or email the Manager at the London Academy of Diplomacy at diplomacy@uea.ac.uk MA International Communication and Diplomacy CoMPulSoRy MoDulES oPTIoNAl MoDulES (you WIll STuDy THREE oPTIoNAl MoDulES FRoM THE lIST BEloW) • inTernaTional communicaTion: concepTs anD • inTernaTional liaison anD public Diplomacy • religion, Diplomacy anD securiTy (20 creDiTs) sTraTegies (20 creDiTs) (20 creDiTs) • economic Diplomacy (20 creDiTs) • Diplomacy: Theory anD pracTice (40 creDiTs) • culTural awareness (20 creDiTs) • a choice oF any oTher moDule oFFereD • research meThoDology (10 creDiTs) • DiplomaTic Discourse by The acaDemy (20 creDiTs) • DisserTaTion (50 creDiTs) • meDia communicaTion sTraTegies (20 creDiTs) 19
  • MA International Communication and DiplomacyMA International Communication and DiplomacyOptional modulesYou are to choose three optional modules (60 Cultural Awareness (20 credits) Media Communication Strategies (20 credits)credits); at least two from the following and one Understanding the culture of the host country The module deals with the various facets offrom a range of modules offered by the Academy: and acquiring an appreciation of the cultural Media Communication Strategies. It identifies sensitivity of other nations are essential elements and critiques the major theoretical approachesInternational liaison (20 credits) for professionals operating in any cosmopolitan to the media, and how they relate to the broaderGlobal communication, international co-operation environment. The module examines the various themes of diplomacy, security and business.and the expansion of NGOs have increased the theories of culture and intercultural communication, It demonstrates understanding and evaluationneed for bilingual professionals who can offer more primarily within the framework of global diplomacy of contemporary journalistic practices, the waythan linguistic competence in order to facilitate and business. our perceptions of the world and its affairs areinteractions between people who do not share the constructed and depicted by the news media, andsame language, culture and procedural practices. Diplomatic Discourse (20 credits) the issue of media objectivity. This module provides a theory-grounded as well This module focuses on the nature and features The module also lends itself to a thoroughas a skill-based training in the fast growing field of diplomatic discourse and the conventions and analysis of the impact of ‘New Media’ onof international liaison with a particular focus on protocols of diplomatic exchanges both verbal diplomacy, security, business, and communication.perspectives of bilingual communication in a global and written.context. Mediation, advocacy, conflict resolution It draws on the latest developments in discourse Religion, Diplomacy and Security (20 credits)and peace-building are some of the topics where analysis theories and explores concepts of Given the increasing role or visibility of religion intheory is put into practice through simulation and language and power, international communication, world affairs, the need to examine and understandrole plays. It covers various aspects of international bargaining, negotiation and the art of persuasion its links with and impact on the various strandsliaison ranging from techniques and strategies and dissuasion in a diplomatic context. It will also and agents of international and global interactionsof bilingual communication to intervention and deal with the development of your drafting skills. is vital. Religion, described by Johnston andnegotiation skills. It also examines the dynamics The module examines at length the tactful and Sampson as the ‘missing dimension of statecraft’at play in bilingual interactions specific to political, tactical uses of language in international diplomacy as it seemed to be during much of the twentietheconomic, legal and social settings. and the political implications of such linguistic century, saw a remarkable resurgence in the latter choices. Various diplomatic discourses, ranging days of the cold war and the following period. from human rights, to democracy and globalisation The spiritual and other often complex roots of are analysed. that resurgence are explored at some length in the module. Also, the doctrinal extremism and violent and terrorist activities which came to20
  • London Academy of Diplomacy Far left: Visit to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, June 2008. From left to right: HE Dr Suad Shalabi, Assistant Minister and Director of the Cairo Diplomatic Institute, Egyptian Ministry for Foreign Affairs; (centre) Ambassador Mustafa Al Remaly (to her left) and Programme Organiser, Professor Nabil Ayad, (to her right) with the group of 22 Egyptian diplomats who attended a training programme on the Dynamics of Diplomacy. left: The 5th World Public Relations Conference and Festival. Members of the panel on Repairing damage – the Role of PR in Public Diplomacy. From left to right: Mr Peter Walker FCIPR, Executive Chairman, Pielle Consulting Group; Mr Lou Capozzi, Chairman, Emeritus Publicis PR and Corporate Communications Group, Chairman ICCO; and Professor Nabil Ayad. The event was organised by the Chartered Institute of Public Relations to celebrate the 60th anniversary of the CIPR Public Relations Centre. Professor Ayad gave a presentation on Public Diplomacy: Image Protection and Reputation Management – Universal Values versus National Interest.be associated with some religious movements, Economic Diplomacy (20 credits)along with State and international responses to This module addresses the developments inthem, are subjected to scrutiny and assessment. economic diplomacy, which is increasingly linked Paradoxically, while the above activities brought to international business. This type of diplomacy,a variety of threats and harm to the international also referred to as economic diplomacy, aims tosystem, they have also created opportunities increase total welfare among others by stimulatingin both the diplomatic and security spheres. A free trade and a favourable investment climatenumber of case studies illustrate how new forms inside and outside countries’ borders. Towardsof international cooperation and inventive types the end of the last century, countries’ role inand tracks of diplomacy by States and non-State international relations was challenged by the riseactors have emerged in response. At a conceptual of multinational companies. Furthermore, dueand intellectual level, a postulate such as the to the emergence of new economic powers,Clash of Civilisations and the various responses governments play an increasingly important roleto it, including the role of the United Nations in in the development of the national economiespromoting the Alliance of Civilisations movement, and the world economy, for example by providingare also examined. governmental support to open markets abroad, The data and insights provided, critiqued, and both developments leading to an increase incommunicated are designed to equip you with economic diplomacy. The module will alsoknowledge, perspectives and methods aimed focus on economic diplomacy and its impactat enhancing your critical awareness and skills on international business e.g. with regard toin areas such as intercultural communication companies participating in trade missions and theand cooperation, interfaith dialogue, negotiation, way they incorporate export and FDI policies intomediation, problem solving, and policy capability. their international growth strategies. 21
  • Research degreesResearch degreesResearch and research degrees(MPhil and PhD)LAD staff are involved in a variety of researchareas such as diplomacy, culture, language, themedia, religion, political and social history, foreignpolicy, management and international security.Our suite of Masters degrees will help you todevelop independent investigation, reporting,conceptual analysis and research skills whichare necessary requirements for those who wishto read for an MPhil or PhD degree in the future.Supervisors of the MPhil and PhD researchdegrees will include staff drawn from the Universityof East Anglia Faculties and you will enrol for aUniversity of East Anglia qualification. Some of the PhD Degrees which weresuccessfully completed and supervised by LAD’sstaff include:• The Conflict in the Western Sahara• A Critical Study of Hamlet’s Arabic Translations• The Construction and Representation of the European Union’s International Identity• The Vienna Conventions on Diplomatic and Consular Relations and State Practice: a Critical Analysis• A New Conceptual Approach to Conflict Resolution in the Post Cold War World with Reference to the Dayton Agreement• Regional Integration and Co-operation in Sub- Saharan Africa• Towards an E-Government: The case of Dubai• Diplomatic Negotiations: Romania’s Accession to the European Union, a case study.• Effective Diplomacy and Nation-Building: A critical study of the Tribal Diplomacy adopted by three Arabian Gulf clans and its contribution to the Establishment of two modern nation states (1716-1826)• Paradigms in Caribbean Trade Diplomacy: Negotiating the Economic Partnership with the EU• Sudanese Literature in English Translation: a Historical and Analytical Study.We also have close links with Nyenrode BusinessUniversity, so it may be possible to enrol for aNyenrode qualification. Students have access to cutting edge multi-media suites and wireless internet throughout the INTo centre22
  • University preparation courses for international studentsUniversity preparation courses for international studentsFor international students who do not meet the There are two pathways in: English for University Studyacademic and English language requirements • Economics A year-round academic English language coursesfor direct entry to the Diplomacy courses at UEA • Business for students who need to improve their EnglishLondon, the INTO UEA London Centre offers a language level before starting their degree at UEArange of pre-university academic preparation and Successful completion of the Graduate Diploma, London. The course covers English language,English language courses. subject to meeting the specified grades for entry to academic study and subject-specific postgraduate your chosen degree programme, offers guaranteed research skills.Graduate Diploma programme entry to the Masters courses offered by the London Academy of Diplomacy. Pre-Sessional EnglishThe INTO UEA London Graduate Diplomaprogramme is designed for students who have English language courses These courses are designed to help you improvecompleted a first degree or diploma but have not your English if you already hold an offer toachieved the necessary academic qualifications INTO UEA London also offers a range of start a postgraduate degree at UEA London.for direct entry to the Masters courses. It is also year-round and intensive summer courses in Pre-Sessional courses are 12, 8 or 4 weeks insuitable for students who have studied a different academic English to prepare international students length and are only offered in the summer periodsubject at undergraduate level and have insufficient for successful study at a UK university. (June to September).knowledge of their intended field of postgraduatestudy. The programme combines subject modules, For more information or to apply please visitacademic English study and the development of www.intohigher.com/uea-londonessential advanced-level study skills. our student support team are here to welcome you and answer your questions on living in london, no matter how big or small 23
  • Location and facilitiesUnrivalled facilities in the heart of London24
  • London Academy of Diplomacy UEA London provides first-class teaching and Learning Resource Centre Computing and IT facilities learning facilities in the heart of London’s financial district. Offering a mixture of university preparation The Learning Resource Centre is located on the At the Centre you will enjoy the latest technologies courses and degree programmes for over 1,200 first floor of the London Study Centre and offers a to support your studies. All of the classrooms have students, UEA London offers a diverse student range of support materials for students, including interactive whiteboards, and there are networked community and dynamic learning environment. books, DVDs, journals, CDs and newspapers as computer clusters and free wireless throughout, The Centre is surrounded by a wide range of well as printing and scanning facilities. These are along with two multimedia suites equipped with shops, restaurants and cafés and within a few accessed via an online catalogue and can be ISIS flip-screen computers. Once you have minutes’ walk of Liverpool Street station, which borrowed using the self-issue machine. registered on your course you will be issued with a offers excellent transport links across London and university email account. You will also have access throughout the UK. Nearby you will find Brick Lane, to the full range of software applications including E-learning facilities famous for its South-Asian cuisine, and the historic Microsoft Office and a number of statistical and Spitalfields and Leadenhall Markets. mathematical applications. All students have access to the Virtual Learning In addition to the Centre’s state-of-the-art Environment, for downloading lecture notes and facilities, INTO UEA London students benefit other useful course content, as well as taking part Masters students from access to the world-class facilities on the in online discussions with teachers and classmates. City University London campus, including the The experienced and friendly Learning Resource Masters students benefit from a range of resources University Library, Saddlers Sports Centre and Centre staff provide advice and training to help make designed to meet the needs of postgraduate the Students’ Union. the most of resources available. This includes group students, including break out spaces, computer or individual tutorials on UEA‘s wide range of facilities, areas for private study and comfortable A ground-breaking study centre electronic resources, which provide 24-hour access seating areas for group discussion or relaxation to over 5,000 e-books, 12,000 e-journals and more between lectures. Wireless access throughout The teaching facilities are flexible to respond to a than 80 specialist online databases. ensures postgraduate students can benefit from variety of learning requirements and include: the extensive range of e-journals available through • a multi-purpose lecture theatre the University’s online resources. • state-of-the-art IT, multimedia and language laboratories • a learning resource centre • access to University Virtual Learning Environment • modern tutorial and teaching classrooms • comfortable communal areas • dedicated student support services • a friendly welcome desk. ANGELKING’S CROSS BETHNEL GREEN OLD STREET S TE INU FARRINGDON 15 M STEPNEY LONDON WHITECHAPEL GREEN BARBICAN HOLBORN CHANCERY LANE STUDY CENTRE MOORGATE ST PAULS CATHEDRAL TOWER 42 LIVERPOOLOINT ST PAULS STREET ALDGATE EAST 15 M BANK ALDGATEN INU MANSION HOUSE THE GHERKIN TE FENCHURCH MONUMENT S BLACKFRIARS STREET TEMPLE CANON STREET SHADWELL OXO TOWER OF TOWER LONDON TOWER HILL GLOBE TOWER BRIDGE TATE NATIONAL THEATRE MODERN THEATRE LONDON RI WAPPING LONDON EYE BRIDGE VE SOUTHWARK CITY HALL R TH AM WATERLOO ES ROTHERHITHE LAMBETH BERMONDSEY CANADA WATER NORTHT 25 SURREY ELEPHANT QUAYS & CASTLE APPROXIMATE WALKING TIME FROM 15 THE LONDON STUDY CENTRE SOUTHWARK
  • International SymposiaInternational SymposiaSince 1995, our staff have been involved in theorganisation of the series of international symposiaentitled Diplomacy Beyond 2000 and Diplomacyin the 21st century in London and Paris for thebenefit of the student body. Each theme has been challenging and far-reaching and has given the participants anopportunity to network and exchange ideas andexperiences. The students play an important role inthe planning, organisation and implementation ofthe symposia, which have attracted members of theLondon and Paris Diplomatic Corps, senior UKgovernment officials, academics and decisionmakers from overseas governments.• Diplomacy Beyond 2000, April 1995• Are Diplomats Really Necessary?, April 1996• The Information Explosion: A Challenge for Diplomacy, April 1997• Diplomacy and Divinity: Religion in International Relations, April 1998• The Impact of Technology on Intelligence and Security, March 1999• Ethics in International Practice, April 2000• Divinity, Diplomacy and Development, May 2000, Paris From left to right: Eugineer Hishan Mustapha, Director of Studies (RITI); Richard Harvey, Director of Admissions and Dean of UEA London; HE Dr Mohamed Shaker, Chairman of Foreign Affairs Council; Professor Nabil Ayad, Director, London Academy of Diplomacy; During a visit• Refugees and Minorities in International to Regional IT Institute (RITI). LAD is planning to set up branches in Cairo, Paris and Rome. Relations, April 2001• Institutional Corruption and Good Governance, May 2001, Paris Members of the Advisory Board External Advisors• Media and Terrorism, December 2001, Paris Professor Edward Acton, Vice-Chancellor, Chair HE Dr Michael Frendo, Speaker of the Maltese• The UN and the Media in War and Peace, Parliament and Former Foreign Minister of Malta October 2002 Dr Richard Harvey, Director of Admissions and• Diplomacy and Gender, April 2003 Dean, UEA London Campus The Rt. Hon. Mr. Tony Baldry MP, former• Reforming the UN and the Future of Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Professor Hussein Kassim, Head of School Multilateralism, March 2004 Office) and Head of the International of Politics, Social and International Studies• International Security and the Dynamics of the Development Select Committee, House of Professor Nabil Ayad, Director, London Commons, London New Diplomacy: Image Projection and Academy of Diplomacy Reputation Management, May 2006 (organised Sir David Miers, KBE CMG former British in conjunction with Foreign Affairs Canada) Ms Mami Mizutori, Executive Director, The Ambassador to the Netherlands, Greece and• The International Dimensions of European Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Lebanon; Private Secretary to the Minister Values, May 2007 Arts and Cultures, University of East Anglia and of State and Head of the Middle Eastern• Transformational Public Diplomacy: Shaping the former Director for Financial Affairs, Japanese Department, FCO Future of International Relations, April 2008 Ministry for Foreign Affairs Professor Dr Maurits Van Rooijen, Rector (organised in conjunction with the American Martin Halsall, Chief Operations Officer, INTO Magnificus, Nyenrode Business University Embassy, London and University of Southern UEA London California, centre on Public Diplomacy.) Professor Margaret Blunden, former Deputy• Rethinking Diplomatic Practice, Global Vice-Chancellor and Provost Regent Campus, Commerce and International Security in the Age University of Westminster of Hetropolarity (forthcoming March 2012) Dr Sameh Aboul-Enein, Minister Plenipotentiary, Deputy Chief of Mission, Egyptian Embassy, London Professor Joseph Mifsud, President, EMUNI University, Slovenia26
  • Staff and contributorsStaff and contributorsDr Sameh Aboul-Enein, Minister Plenipotentiary, HE Dr Michael Frendo MP, Speaker of the Maltese HE Professor Dr Muhammad Shaaban, UNDeputy Chief of Mission, Egyptian Embassy, London Parliament and Former Foreign Minister of Malta. Under-Secretary General for General Assembly Affairs and Conference Management and formerAmbassador Mansoor Alam, former Ambassador Dr Johan Frenzen, Lecturer in Middle East Assistant to the Egyptian Foreign Minister;of Pakistan to Russian Federation, Egypt, Mexico Politics, School of Political, Social and International Ambassador to the European Union, Denmark,and United Arab Emirates, and Director of the Studies (PSI) Lithuania, Luxembourg and BelgiumForeign Service Academy of Pakistan Robin Gorham, former Head, Protocol Ambassador Dr Mohammed Shaker, Chairman,Professor Nabil Ayad, Director of the London Department, FCO Egyptian Council for Foreign Relations and formerAcademy of Diplomacy (LAD), UEA London and Brian Hurn, Module Leader, Research Ambassador of Egypt to the Court of St James’sProfessor of Diplomatic Studies, Nyenrode Business Methodology, Former Director of Programmes, and AustriaUniversity, The Netherlands Centre for International Briefing, Farnham Claire Smith, Module Leader Intelligent Studies,The Rt. Hon. Mr. Tony Baldry MP, former Castle, UK Member, Security Vetting and Appeals Panel,Minister of State, Foreign and Commonwealth Sir Peter Marshall KCMG; author of Positive Cabinet Office; former Head of Whitehall LiaisonOffice (FCO) and Head of the International Diplomacy and former Commonwealth Deputy Department, FCODevelopment Select Committee, House of Secretary General (Economic) and UK PermanentCommons, London Professor Gordon Smith, Director, Global Representative to the Office of the UN and other Studies Centre, University of Victoria, BritishProfessor Ronald Barston, author of Modern International Organisations in Geneva Columbia; former Canadian Deputy ForeignDiplomacy and Module Leader, Foreign Policy Stanley W F Martin CVo, JP; The Queen’s Most Minister and Chairman, International DevelopmentFormulation and Assessment Advanced Gentleman Usher; former First Assistant Research Centre, OttawaRob Baudewijn, Director of training, ECORYS Marshal of the London Diplomatic Corps and Ambassador Michael Smith, Director General,Academy, Associate Lecturer European Affairs Associate Head, Protocol Department, FCO Chartered Institute of Arbitrators, London andNyenrode Business University, Advisor European Roger McNally, Module Leader, Media former British Ambassador to TajikistanUnion Studies, NTI Communication Strategies, and International Professor Jack Spence, Module Leader,Professor Margaret Blunden, Professor Security Strategic Defence Diplomacy, Former Directorof International Security. Former Deputy Sir David Miers KBE, CMG; former British of Studies, Royal Institute of International StudiesVice-Chancellor and Provost Regent Campus, Ambassador to the Netherlands, Greece and (Chatham House) and Pro Vice-Chancellor,University of Westminster Lebanon; Private Secretary to the Minister of State University of LeicesterProfessor Charles Chatterjee, Module Leader, (1968); Head of the Middle Eastern Department, FCO Dr Deborah Swallow, Module Leader, ManagementInternational Law and Diplomacy and Global Professor Dr Joseph Mifsud, President of theEconomic Governance Barry Tomalin, Module Leader, Cultural Awareness Euro-Mediterranean University and former Chief deThe Rt. Hon. Mr. Charles Clarke, Visiting Cabinet to the Foreign Minister of Malta Prof. Dr Désirée M. Van Gorp, LL.M ModuleProfessor (British Politics and Security). Former Leader, Economic Diplomacy, and Professor Mami Mizutori, Executive Director, The SainsburyBritish Home Office Secretary and Secretary of in International Business Strategy, Nyenrode Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts andState for Education and Skills Business University Cultures, University of East Anglia and formerProfessor Daryl Copeland, Senior Adviser, Director of Financial Affairs, Japanese Ministry for Peter Walker, FCIRP, Executive Chairman, TielleStrategic Policy and Planning, Foreign Affairs Foreign Affairs Consultancy GroupCanada ; Adjunct Professor and Senior Fellow, Drs. Selwyn Moons, Deputy Module Leader and Robert Whalley, Former Director for CounterMunk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto Senior Lecturer Economic Diplomacy, Nyenrode Terrorism and Intelligence at the Home Office andand LAD Module Leader, Science, Technology and Business University, and Head of the Globalisation the Cabinet Office, LondonInternational Policy and Strategy Unit, Ministry of Economic Affairs, Administration:Professor Haico Ebbers, Module Leader, The Directorate-general for foreign economic relations, Mrs Fatmah lallmahamood, Manager, LondonDynamics of International Business; and Professor The Netherlands Academy of Diplomacyof International Economics; Chairman, Europe Professor Riad Nourallah, Director of Research,China Institute and Co-director IMBA, Nyenrode Ms Rachel Hall, Course Administrator, London London Academy of DiplomacyBusiness University Academy of Diplomacy Dr Biljana Scott, Module Leader, DiplomaticProfessor Dr Ali Fatemi, President and Professor Discourseof Economics, American Graduate School ofBusiness and Economics, ParisDr Ali Fisher, Director, Mappa Mundi Consultantsand former Director of Counterpoint, BritishCouncil, London 27
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