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Johnson & Wales University catalog - Intelligent Partners
 

Johnson & Wales University catalog - Intelligent Partners

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The mission of Johnson & Wales University is to empower its diverse student body to succeed in today’s dynamic world by integrating general education, professional skills and career-focused ...

The mission of Johnson & Wales University is to empower its diverse student body to succeed in today’s dynamic world by integrating general education, professional skills and career-focused education. For more information contact us at info@intelligentgulf.com

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    Johnson & Wales University catalog - Intelligent Partners Johnson & Wales University catalog - Intelligent Partners Document Transcript

    • 2011–2012 PRoVIDENCECatalog CaMPUS
    • Johnson & Wales University Providence Campus 2011-12 Undergraduate Day School Catalog 8 Abbott Park Place Providence, Rhode Island 02903 Phone: 1-800-DIAL JWU or 401-598-1000 Fax: 401-598-2948 (Business/Hospitality/Technology) or 401-598-4787 (Culinary Arts) www.jwu.edu Academic Calendar ........................................................................................2 Programs of Study (listing) ..............................................................................4 Accreditations and Affiliations .........................................................................7 More than Career Success ............................................................................13 About Johnson & Wales University..................................................................18 The Providence Campus ...............................................................................21 Additional Programs .....................................................................................27 JWU Campuses ............................................................................................28 Applying for Admission .................................................................................30 Financing Your Education ..............................................................................43 Academic Information ...................................................................................57 Student Services ..........................................................................................70 Student Activities .........................................................................................75 Programs of Study (curricula) ........................................................................77 Technical Standards ...................................................................................158 Course Numbering System...........................................................................160 Course Descriptions ...................................................................................161 University Directory ....................................................................................228 Index .........................................................................................................249This catalog is an official publication of Johnson & Wales University. As such, it is subject to revision at any time.The university reserves the right to add, withdraw or revise any course, program of study, provision or requirementdescribed within the catalog as may be deemed necessary.Occasionally, program requirements will vary by the printing date of the catalog. Requirements stated in the editionpublished closest to the September enrollment date will take precedence.Students should read and fully understand the rules, regulations and policies described in this catalog. Additionally,all enrolled students are expected to be familiar with the contents of the Providence Campus Student Handbook.The Providence Campus Student Handbook contains important information concerning the academic performance andpersonal conduct of students as well as university grievance procedures. It also outlines the conditions under which studentsmay be placed on probation or suspension from the university. The Providence Campus Student Handbook is availableonline at www.jwu.edu. Copies of the handbook are also available at Student Academic & Financial Services.
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    • Programs of StudyJohn Hazen White School of Arts & SciencesBachelor of Science DegreeCounseling PsychologyCollege of BusinessBachelor of Science DegreeAccountingCreative AdvertisingCriminal JusticeEntrepreneurshipEquine Business Management2Equine Business Management/Riding2Fashion Merchandising & Retail MarketingFinanceFood Service EntrepreneurshipInternational BusinessManagementManagement (accelerated B.S. degree)MarketingSecurity ManagementStrategic AdvertisingPrograms for Undecided Students (track into bachelor’s degree program)Business Administration (one-year program; tracks into College of Business bachelor’s degree)Undeclared (two-year program; tracks into College of Business bachelor’s degree)College of Culinary ArtsThe following associate in science degrees can track into any of the bachelor of science degrees listed to the right.Associate in Science Degree Bachelor of Science DegreeBaking & Pastry Arts 2 Baking & Pastry Arts 1, 2Culinary Arts 2 Culinary Nutrition 1, 2 Food Service Entrepreneurship 2, 31 Student may apply for entrance into these programs by submitting an application to the program director during their sophomore year.2 Program has technical standards. Students with disabilities should contact the Center for Academic Support.3 Offered through the College of Business.4
    • College of Culinary Arts and The Hospitality CollegeThe following associate in science degrees (College of Culinary Arts) can track into the bachelor of science degrees listed to the right.Associate in Science Degree Bachelor of Science DegreeBaking & Pastry Arts 2 Baking & Pastry Arts and Food Service Management2, 4Culinary Arts 2 Culinary Arts and Food Service Management2, 4The Hospitality CollegeBachelor of Science DegreeHotel & Lodging Management 2International Hotel & Tourism Management 1, 2Restaurant, Food & Beverage Management 2Sports/Entertainment/Event Management 2Travel-Tourism & Hospitality Management 2Programs for Undecided Students (track into bachelor’s degree program)Undeclared 2 (two-year program; tracks into Hospitality College bachelor’s degree)1 Student may apply for entrance into this program by submitting an application to the program director during their freshman year.2 Program has technical standards. Students with disabilities should contact the Center for Academic Support.4 Offered jointly through the College of Culinary Arts and The Hospitality College.School of TechnologyThe following associate in science degrees can track into the bachelor of science degrees listed to the right.Associate in Science Degree Bachelor of Science DegreeComputer Programming Software EngineeringComputerized Drafting Engineering Design & Configuration ManagementRobotic Engineering Technology Electronics EngineeringBachelor of Science Degrees Business/Information Systems Analysis Electronics Engineering Graphic Design & Digital Media Network EngineeringNOTE: Other programs and options are also offered at Johnson & Wales campuses in N. Miami, Fla.; Denver, Colo.;and Charlotte, N.C.Online Learning: The university offers a limited number of online courses. Courses with an online option are identi-fied in the Course Descriptions and Programs of Study sections of the catalog. Policies pertaining to online coursesare available in the Providence Campus Student Handbook. This catalog does not apply to students enrolled in theonline-only degree programs.IMPORTANT NOTE: Certain programs of study at Johnson & Wales University, including equine programs andprograms in the College of Culinary Arts and The Hospitality College, include technical standards in the academicrequirements essential to the program. Students with disabilities should contact the Center for AcademicSupport at 401-598-4660 for information about and descriptions of the applicable technical standards. Also seepages 158–159 for descriptions of the technical standards. 5
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    • Accreditations & Affiliations Johnson & Wales University (JWU) is accred- • Food Service Education & Secondary Specialited by the New England Association of Schools & EducationColleges, Inc. (NEASC), through its Commission on The following triple certification requiresInstitutions of Higher Education. This accreditation additional fieldwork and an additional eight weeksencompasses the university’s four campuses in of student teaching:Providence, R.I.; North Miami, Fla.; Denver, Colo.; • Elementary Education & Elementary Specialand Charlotte, N.C. Inquiries regarding JWU’s Education & Secondary Special Educationaccreditation status should be directed to the JWU, its faculty, and members of theDirector of Academic Accountability & Initiatives, administrative staff hold affiliations with numerousUniversity Provost’s Office, Johnson & Wales organizations, including:University, One Cookson Place, Sixth Floor,Providence RI 02903; or at 401-598-1345. General University AffiliationsIndividuals may also contact: Commission on Academie FrancaiseInstitutions of Higher Education, New England Academy of International Business Academy of ManagementAssociation of Schools and Colleges, American Association for Higher Education209 Burlington Road, Bedford, MA 01730-1433, American Association of Collegiate Registrars617-271-0022, e-mail: cihe@neasc.org. and Admissions Officers Legal control is vested in the Board of American Association of Presidents ofTrustees of Johnson & Wales University. Independent Colleges and Universities American Association of University Women The university is approved for the training American Bar Associationof veterans. JWU is an institutional member of American Booksellers AssociationService Members Opportunity Colleges. American College of Healthcare Executives The university is authorized under federal law American College Personnel Associationto enroll non-immigrant alien students. American Corporate Counsel Association American Council on Education JWU is listed in the Education Directory American Counseling Associationof Colleges & Universities issued by the U.S. American Culinary FederationDepartment of Education. American Dietetic Association The State of Rhode Island has chartered American Educational Finance AssociationJohnson & Wales University as a nonprofit American Educational Research Associationdegree-granting institution of higher learning. American Hotel & Lodging Association American Hotel & Lodging Education Foundation Johnson & Wales University will make American Institute of Architectsavailable for review to any enrolled or prospective American Institute of Certified Public Accountantsstudent, upon request, a copy of the documents American Institute of Wine and Fooddescribing the institution’s accreditation, approval American Library Associationor licensing. This information may be obtained by American Management Association American Marketing Associationcontacting the Director of Academic Accountability American Payroll Association& Initiatives, University Provost’s Office, Johnson & American Planning AssociationWales University, One Cookson Place, Sixth Floor, American Psychological AssociationProvidence RI 02903; or at 401-598-1345. American Society for Curriculum Development The Providence Campus Culinary Nutrition American Society for Training and Development American Statistical Associationprogram is accredited by the Commission on American Wine SocietyAccreditation for Dietetics Education (CADE) of ASIS Internationalthe American Dietetics Association, 120 South Associated PressRiverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606- Association for the Advancement of6995, 312-899-0040 ext. 5400. The Providence Computing in EducationCampus Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) meets Association for Career and Technical Education (ACTE)the standards of education set by CADE. Association for Institutional Research The Master of Arts in Teaching program is Association for Multicultural Counselingaccredited by the Rhode Island Department of and DevelopmentEducation. Graduates of the M.A.T. may apply for Association for Student Judicial Affairsdual certification in one of the following: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD)• Elementary Education & Elementary Special Association of College & Research Libraries Education Association of College & University Facility Officers• Elementary Education & Secondary Special Association of College & University Education Telecommunications Administrators• Business Education & Secondary Special Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges Education 7
    • Association of Independent Colleges & Universities National Association of College & University of Rhode Island AttorneysAssociation of International Education National Association of Administrators College & University Business OfficersAssociation to Advance Collegiate Schools of National Association of Business (AACSB) International College Admissions CounselorsBetter Business Bureau National Association of College StoresBoard of Bar Overseers National Association of Colleges & EmployersBread Bakers Guild of America National Association of Educational ProcurementBusiness Professionals of America National Association of Female ExecutivesBusiness Volunteers for the Arts NAFSA — Association of International EducatorsCampus Compact National Association ofCareer Counselors Consortium Independent Colleges and UniversitiesCenter for Academic Integrity National Association of Social WorkersClub Managers Association of America National Association ofCoalition of Library Advocates Student Financial Aid AdministratorsThe College Board National Association ofCollege & University Professional Association Student Personnel Administrators for Human Resources National Business Educators AssociationConfrerie de la Chaine des Rotisseurs National Commission for Cooperative EducationConsortium of Rhode Island Academic National Conference for Community and Justice & Research Libraries National Council of Teachers of EnglishCooperative Education Association National DECA Inc.Council for the Advancement and Support National Education Association of Education (CASE) National Restaurant AssociationDowntown Security Network National Restaurant Association EducationalEastern Association of Colleges and Employers Inc. FoundationThe Education Partnership National Society for Experiential EducationEducause National Society of Fundraising ExecutivesEmployment Management Association National Staff Development CouncilEscoffier Society New England Association for College AdmissionEuropean Council of Hotel Restaurant Counseling & Institutional Education New England Association for Cooperative EducationEuropean Council of Independent Schools and Field ExperienceFamily, Career and Community Leaders of America New England Association ofForum of Education Abroad College Admissions CounselorsFuture Business Leaders of America New England Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions OfficersFuture Farmers of America New England Association of SchoolsGreater Providence Chamber of Commerce and Colleges Inc. (NEASC)Higher Education Library Information Network New England Board of Higher EducationHigher Education Marketing New England Business Educators AssociationThe Honorable Order of the Golden Toque New England Faculty Development ConsortiumHospitality Resource Partnership of the Downtown New England Innkeepers’ AssociationImprovement District New England Inns and Resorts AssociationInstitute for International Human Resources New England Library AssociationInstitute of International Education New England Library NetworkInstitute of Management Accountants New England Museum Association (NEMA)International Association of Assembly Managers New England Regional Council of Hotel,International Association of Business Communicators Restaurant and Institutional EducationInternational Association of Campus Law New England Resource Center for Higher EducationEnforcement Administrators Northeast Association for Institutional ResearchInternational Association of Culinary Professionals Phi Delta KappaInternational Association of Hotel School Directors Professional Organization & Development NetworkInternational Career Counselors Public Relations Society of AmericaInternational Council on Hotel, Restaurant and Research Chefs Association Institutional Education Rhode Island Association ofInternational Food Service Editorial Council Admissions Officers (RIAAO)International Food Service Executives Association Rhode Island Association of Institutional ResearchersInternational Hotel & Restaurant Association Rhode Island Association ofInternational Special Events Society Student Financial Aid AdministratorsJames Beard Foundation Rhode Island Association of Colleges forJunior Achievement Teacher EducationLandmark Restaurants Advisory Board Rhode Island Bar AssociationLeadership Rhode Island Rhode Island Business Educators AssociationMalaysian American Commission on Rhode Island Campus Compact Education Exchange Rhode Island Catholic Diocese Advisory Board forModern Language Association the Protection of ChildrenMulticultural Foodservice & Hospitality Alliance Rhode Island Counseling AssociationNational Alliance for Business Rhode Island Criminal Justice Policy BoardNational Association for Counseling and Development Rhode Island Department of EducationNational Association for Developmental Education Rhode Island Higher EducationNational Association of Catering8
    • Rhode Island Higher Education Telecommunication Organization of American Historians Association Organization of Ancient HistoriansRhode Island Hospitality Association Popular Culture AssociationRhode Island Hospitality Education Foundation Rhode Island Association of Women in EducationRhode Island Library Association Rhode Island Council for the HumanitiesRhode Island Mandatory Continuing Legal Education Rhode Island Foreign Language Association Commission Rhode Island Mathematics Teachers AssociationRhode Island Payroll Association Rhode Island Natural History SurveyRhode Island Registrars Association Rhode Island Teachers of PsychologyRhode Island Society of Certified Public Accountants Sigma Xi Scientific Research SocietyRhode Island Student Loan Authority Society for College Science TeachingRhode Island Supreme Court Society for Industrial and Applied MathematicsRhode Island Technology Council Society for the Study of Symbolic InteractionRhode Island Telecommunications Association Society for Technical CommunicationSkills–USA South Asian Literary AssociationSmall Business Development Center Teachers of English to Speakers of Other LanguagesSociety for College and University Planning Teaching English in the Two-Year CollegeSociety for Human Resource Management (SHRM) World History AssociationSociety Organized Against Racism in Higher Education College of Business AffiliationsSociety of Wine Educators Academy of Criminal Justice SciencesUnited States Department of Education Ad Club of BostonUniversity Continuing Education Association (UCEA) Alpha Phi Sigma National Criminal JusticeUniversity Risk Management and Insurance Honor Society Association American Accounting AssociationWomen Chefs & Restaurateurs American Advertising FederationWomen’s Foodservice Forum American Collegiate Retailers AssociationWorld Association for Hospitality & Tourism Training American Horse Council American Production and Inventory Control SocietyThe John Hazen White School of Arts American Society of Women Accountants& Sciences Affiliations Association for Enterprise OpportunityAmerican Anthropological Association Association of American CollegesAmerican Association for the Advancement of and Universities Science Association of Certified Fraud ExaminersAmerican Council on the Teaching of Association of Collegiate Entrepreneurs Foreign Language Association of Government AccountantsAmerican Historical Association Association of Private Enterprise EducationAmerican Mathematical Association Collegiate Entrepreneurs’ Organization (CEO) of Two-Year Colleges Corporation for Enterprise DevelopmentAmerican Physical Society Costume Society of AmericaAmerican Political Science Association Decision Sciences InstituteAmerican Psychological Association Delta Pi EpsilonAmerican Society for Microbiology Direct Marketing AssociationAmerican Sociological Association Financial Management Association InternationalAssociation for Business Communication Information Systems Audit and Control AssociationAssociation for Educators in Journalism & Institute for Supply Management Mass Communication Institute of Internal AuditorsAssociation for the Study of Food & Society International Textile and Apparel AssociationAssociation for Teachers in Mathematics in Kappa Omicron Nu New England National Association of Tax PreparersAssociation of Psychological Science National Retail FederationAssociation of Teachers of Technical Writing New England Direct Marketing AssociationCollege Composition and Communication Northeastern Association of Criminal JusticeEastern Communication Association SciencesEstuarine Research Federation Providence Downcity Merchants AssociationEuropean Union Studies Association Purchasing Managers Association of Rhode IslandInternational Leadership Association Rhode Island Association of Accounting ProfessorsInternational Phycological Society Sales and Marketing Executives InternationalInternational Visual Sociology Association Small Business AdministrationLabor History Society Society for Human Resource ManagementNational Association of Alcohol & Drug Abuse Society for the Advancement of Management Counselors Society of Governmental Accountants and AuditorsNational Association for Multicultural Education Southeastern New England Ad ClubNational Council of Social Studies United States Dressage FederationNational Council of Teachers of English United States Equestrian FederationNational Council of Teachers of MathematicsNational Science Teachers Association College of Culinary Arts AffiliationsNational Writers’ Guild Académie Culinaire de FranceNew England Education Assessment Network American Academy of ChefsNew England Resource Center for Higher Education American Dietetic AssociationNortheast Association for Clinical Microbiology American Institute of Baking and Infectious Disease American School Food Service Association 9
    • The Bread Bakers Guild of America National Association of Real Estate AppraisersChaîne des Rôtisseurs: National, R.I. National Committee on Planned Giving and New England Chapters National Council of Compulsive GamblingEuro Gastronomy Societe National Environmental Health AssociationFederation of Dining Room Professionals National Recreation and Parks AssociationFrench Master Chefs Association National Society of Minorities in HospitalityInstitute of Food Technologists National Tour AssociationInternational Food Service Manufacturers Association New England Club Managers AssociationLes Amis d’Escoffier Society New England Educational Assessment NetworkLes Dames d’Escoffier Society New England Franchise AssociationL’Ordre Mondial North American Case Research AssociationNational Association of College Professional Convention Management Association and University Food Service Directors Professional Testing InstituteNational Certification Commission Registered Maine Guide AssociationNational Registry of Food Safety Protection Research Chef’s AssociationNutrition Council of Rhode Island Resort and Commercial Recreation AssociationResearch Chefs Association Roundtable for Women in Food ServiceRetail Bakers Association Society for Advancement of Food Service ResearchRhode Island Dietetic Association Society for Food Service ManagementRhode Island Restaurant Association Society of Parks and Recreation EducatorsServSafe Alcohol Travel Industry Association of AmericaSociete Culinaire PhilanthropiqueWSET Association (Wine & Spirit Education Trust) School of Technology AffiliationsWomen Chefs and Restaurateurs AIGA – The Professional Association for DesignWomen’s Food Service Forum American Conference of Academic DeansWorld Association of Cooks Society American Math Association of Two-Year Colleges American Society for Engineering EducationThe Hospitality College Affiliations Association for Computing MachineryAdventure Travel Trade Association Association of Information Technology ProfessionalsAmerican Camping Association College Art AssociationAmerican Canoe Association Corporate Design FoundationAmerican Society of Association Executives Help Desk InstituteAmerican Society of Travel Agents Industrial Technology Education AssociationAssociation for Casino Educators Institute of Electrical and Electronic EngineersAssociation for University Women International Association of Science and TechnologyAssociation of Luxury Suite Directors for DevelopmentAssociation of Quality Control International Technology Education AssociationClub Managers Association of America Internet Society Academy for Information TechnologyCornell Hotel Society National Business Education AllianceCouncil for Aid to Education National Business Education AssociationCruise Lines International Association New England Association of Technology TeachersDestination Marketing Association NERCOMP – Northeast Regional Computing ProgramEcotourism Society Novell Users InternationalEducational Foundation of the Phi Delta Kappa National Restaurant Association Project Management InstituteEUHOFA (International Association of Providence Macromedia User Group Hotel School Directors) Rhode Island Business Educators AssociationFederation of Dining Professionals Rhode Island Economic Policy CouncilFood Service Consultants International Rhode Island Greater Chamber of CommerceHospitality Finance and Technology Professionals Rhode Island Information Technology AcademyHospitality Information Technology Association Rhode Island Shorthand Reporters AssociationHospitality Sales & Marketing Association International Society for Applied Learning TechnologyInstitute of Behavioral & Applied Management Society of Manufacturing EngineersInstitute of Certified Travel Agents Tech CollectiveInternational Association of Venue Managers Technology Educators Association of New JerseyInternational Food Service AssociationInternational Gaming Institute The Alan Shawn Feinstein GraduateInternational Society of Franchising School AffiliationsInternational Society of Meeting Planners American Association of Colleges forInternational Society of Travel and Tourism Educators Teacher EducationInternational Ticketing Association American Association of School AdministrationLicensed Beverage Education Consortium American Council on Technical EducationMaine Guide Association American Economic AssociationMassachusetts Dietetic Association American Evaluation AssociationMassachusetts Farm Association American Human Resource AssociationMassachusetts Lodging Association American Society for Training & Development —Master Brewers Association of America Bay Colonies ChapterMeeting Professionals International Association for Educational CommunicationsNational Academy Foundation and TechnologyNational Association for Experiential Education Association for Supervision andNational Association for Student Activities Curriculum DevelopmentNational Association of Food Equipment Association of School Business Officials Manufacturing10
    • Central and Eastern European Management Eastern Association of Colleges and Employers Development Association (CEEMAN) Eastern College Athletic ConferenceCouncil for Exceptional Children Employment Managers AssociationCouncil for Opportunity for Education FBI National Academy AssociatesCouncil of Graduate Schools Great Northeast Athletic ConferenceEastern Academy of Management Hospitality Resource PartnershipEastern Economic Association Institute for Recruitment of TeachersEducational Finance Association International Association for Property and Evidence Inc.Educational Institute of American Hotel & International Association of Campus Lodging Association Law Enforcement AdministratorsGraduate and Professional School Enrollment International Career Counselors Management Corporation International Law Enforcement EducatorsHospitality Sales & Marketing Association and Trainers Association International Leading Women, Southeastern New England (SENE)International Council on Education for Research Learning Assistance Association of New EnglandInternational Reading Association Learning Disabilities AssociationInternational Society for Technology in Education Massachusetts Council for Learning DisabilitiesMassachusetts Restaurant Association Middle Atlantic Career Counseling AssociationNational Association for Business National Academic Advising Association and Teacher Education National Association for the Advancement of ColoredNational Association of Elementary School Principals People (NAACP)National Association of Graduate Admissions National Association for Campus Activities Professionals National Association of Campus Card UsersNational Association of Secondary School Principals National Association ofNational Association of State Directors of College Admissions Counselors Teacher Education and Certification National Association of College Auxiliary ServicesNational Council of Teachers National Association ofNational Society for the Study of Education Collegiate Directors of AthleticsNew England Assessment Network National Association ofNew England Educational Research Organization Collegiate Women’s Athletic AdministratorsNortheast Human Resources Association National Association of Colleges and EmployersRhode Island Association for Supervision National Association of Division III and Curriculum Development Athletic AdministratorsRhode Island Hospitality Association National Association of Social Workers,Russian Association of Business Education Rhode Island ChapterSociety for Technical Communication National Athletic Trainers AssociationToastmasters International National Basketball Coaches Association National Collegiate Athletic AssociationStudent Affairs/Student Services Affiliations National Criminal Justice Training CouncilAdministrators Promoting Parent Involvement (APPI) National Intramural and Recreation Sports AssociationAmerican Baseball Coaches Association National Organization of WomenAmerican College Counseling Association National Orientation Directors AssociationAmerican College Health Association National Self-Defense Institute — S.A.F.E. ProgramAmerican College of Sports Medicine National Soccer Coaches AssociationAmerican College Volleyball Association National Wellness AssociationAmerican Council on Exercise National Women’s Studies AssociationAmerican Foundation for Suicide Prevention National Wrestling Coaches AssociationAmerican Hockey Coaches Association NCAA Division III Wrestling Coaches AssociationAmerican Society for Law Enforcement Training NCAA/Jamie Benton Men’s BasketballAmerican Volleyball Coaches Association New England Association of CollegeAsperger’s Association of New England and University Housing OfficersAssociated Locksmiths of America Inc. New England Collegiate Wrestling AllianceAssociation for International Educators New England Community Police PartnershipAssociation for Student Conduct Administration New England Holistic Counselors AssociationAssociation of College Administration Professionals New England Library AssociationAssociation of College & University New England Peer Tutor Association Housing Officers International New England Women’s Basketball AssociationAssociation of College & University Mail Service New England Women’s Volleyball AssociationAssociation of College Personnel Administrators North American Association of CommencementAssociation of Fraternity Advisors Officers (NAACO)Association of Higher Education and Disability Northeast Association of College – New England (AHEAD – NE) & University OfficersAssociation of Higher Education Northeast Colleges & Universities Parent/Family Professionals Security Association Inc.Association of Southern Baptist Campus Ministers Northeast Collegiate Volleyball AssociationAssociation of University and College Northeast Multicultural College Administrators Counseling Center Directors AssociationAthletic Publishing Professional Association for Volleyball OfficialsCatholic Campus Ministry Association Providence Human Relations CommissionCollege Athletic Trainers Association Providence Foundation’s Downtown ProvidenceCollege Media Advisors Security NetworkCollegiate Sports Information Directors of America Rhode Island Association forCrisis Prevention Institute Intercollegiate Athletics for Women 11
    • Rhode Island Association of Sportswriters, Sportscasters and Sports Publicists (Words Unlimited)Rhode Island Career Counselors GroupRhode Island College & University Public Safety DirectorsRhode Island Crime Prevention AssociationRhode Island Hospitality & Tourism Security AssociationRhode Island Police Chiefs AssociationRhode Island Psychological AssociationRhode Island Town/Gown PartnershipRhode Island Women in Higher EducationTrade Show Exhibitors AssociationUSATF/AAU Track & Field/Cross CountryWashington Park FoundationWomen in SportsWomen in Technology InternationalWomen’s Basketball Coaches AssociationWorld Association for Cooperative EducationA description of written arrangements that theuniversity has with other organizations to provide aportion of any university program of study is avail-able upon request. For more information, pleasecontact Student Academic & Financial Services.12
    • More than Career SuccessTHE JWU DIFFERENCE CAREER-FOCUSED PROGRAMSJohnson & Wales University is a recognized JWU’s educational approach is designed toleader in career education for driven students help students identify a field of interest andseeking a competitive advantage in the acquire the knowledge, skills and experience toglobal economy. Our pioneering education excel in that field. Students develop academicmodel combines academics with hands-on schedules and work experience plans relevantlearning, related work experiences, leader- to their career goals, starting in their firstship opportunities and career services. Our term. To learn more about our undergraduateindustry-experienced faculty brings real-life programs of study in business, hospitality,knowledge to the classroom, adding culinary arts, technology, and arts and sciences,mentorship, networking opportunities and see pages 77–144 or visit www.jwu.edu.current business practices to the academicexperience. The John Hazen White School of Arts & SciencesFounded in 1914, JWU is a nonprofit, private, Today’s employers want employees who,accredited institution with distinct campuses along with specialized job skills, have thein Providence, R.I.; North Miami, Fla.; Denver, ability to think critically, communicate clearly,Colo.; and Charlotte, N.C. More than 17,000 manage ethically and contribute to thestudents from all 50 states and 93 countries community. To meet these needs, JWU offers aare pursuing accredited undergraduate and wide selection of liberal arts courses includinggraduate degrees in business, hospitality, logic, psychology, communication skills, lead-culinary arts, technology and education. ership studies, environmental science andOur graduates join a network of more than ethics. Our students take at least one-third83,000 alumni from 140 countries. of their credits in arts and sciences to help develop the skills necessary for long-termA variety of undergraduate degree programs career progression.permit students to select the educationalpath best suited to their career interests Many courses offered by the School of Artsand objectives. Graduate programs leading & Sciences are designated writing intensiveto the degrees of master of arts in teaching, (WI). The Writing Across the Curriculum pro-master of education, master of business gram at JWU was developed to integrate theadministration and doctor of education are “writing to learn” concept across all majors.also offered at JWU’s Providence Campus. Students are encouraged to use writing bothFor details on these programs, request to learn and to communicate, and as a toolthe graduate and doctoral catalogs or visit to develop and refine skills needed forwww.jwu.edu/graduate. professional success.Other features of the JWU difference include The School of Arts & Sciences offers twoour career-focused programs, hands-on minors (22.5 credits) that are designed tolearning, a suite of career services and a enhance the qualifications of graduates:variety of opportunities for students to build Environmental Sustainability and Technicaltheir leadership skills. Communications. Real-world applications are incorporated in each of these minors, which give students opportunities to develop exper- tise in an area that complements their major. 13
    • Students at JWU may study a subject in more Three-Term Scheduledepth by electing concentrations. See Page While most schools’ academic calendars are63 for a complete list of the concentrations divided into two semesters, Johnson & Walesoffered. Concentrations vary by campus. University’s academic year is divided into three terms. These 11-week sessions enableTo learn more about the School of Arts & students to take three or four classes at aSciences at JWU, including honors courses, time, instead of the usual four or five.cultural events programming, internships,study abroad and degree programs, visit Upside-Down Curriculumwww.jwu.edu. JWU students take classes in their major from day one. From their first term they areStudy Abroad and International Programming immersed into courses and experiencesJWU responds to the increasingly global directly related to their field of study, whichnature of business by fostering multicultural- also means getting a head start on theirism and providing an international educational career choice.experience. An important component of thisexperience is the opportunity to study abroad. Academic SupportStudents choose from a range of options The Center for Academic Support is dedicatedincluding four-week summer programs, three- to providing students every opportunity formonth spring term programs or four-to-five success by offering tutoring and workshops.month independent exchanges. Each has Students with disabilities can also find assis-its own academic focus and prerequisites. tance with reasonable accommodations atAfter selection into a study abroad program, the center. Certain accommodations requirestudents engage in orientation and academic more time to arrange; students are urged topre-departure work before embarking on their provide as much advance notice as possibleimmersion into foreign cultural and business to the center. These services are availablesettings. In some cases, JWU faculty lead the without extra charge to all Johnson & Walesprogram and travel with students. In other students.cases local hosts lead the program, but inall programs students participate in a rigor-ous study and travel experience. These study LEARNING By DOINGabroad experiences increase students’ global Experiential education plays a major roleawareness as they explore their program’s in every student’s JWU education. Throughspecific academic focus. Course delivery hands-on learning and work experiences relatedconsists of lecture, industry visits and cultural to their field of study, students may learnexcursions. Study Abroad guides eligible stu- more about their chosen field, gain on-the-jobdents to register for the appropriate course(s) experience and develop networking contactsspecific to their program. for future employment. Examples of hands-on learning include internships, study abroad,Visit www.jwu.edu/studyabroad for program community service-learning relevant to theirinformation and applications. Interested field of study, and directed work experiences.students may contact Study Abroad at Applying classroom knowledge to real-life401-598-1406 for personal study abroad settings advances students toward careers bycounseling. developing self-confidence and the skills and knowledge necessary to hit the ground running.In addition to study abroad, students canparticipate in on-campus experiences that Work Experience Programsadd an international component to their Through the types of work experience programseducation. Opportunities vary by campus. described below, JWU students gain valuableContact your campus international advisor career skills by integrating their classroomfor more information. studies with practical work experiences in a field related to their academic and career goals.14
    • INTERNSHIPS The R.I. SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENTInternships are term-long work experiences CENTER, located in the Richmond Building,in a student’s field of study for which the houses a resource center for students, entre-student earns academic credit. Internships preneurs and small businesses. The center• are conducted in a university-approved, provides small businesses space, technology professional setting under supervision and access to business professionals and students. Projects range from developing• meet specific educational objectives based websites to creating marketing plans to on the academic program requirements full-scale business strategy planning.• are generally administered and monitored by Experiential Education & Career Services The JOHNSON & WALES INN, located in• may be paid or unpaid nearby Seekonk, Mass., and open to the• provide an in-depth work experience in a public, provides culinary, hotel and restau- professional role at the employer’s organi- rant interns with experience in all areas of zation. Students have the opportunity to hotel operations. Culinary and hotel interns develop professional skills and positive are also exposed to food service operations work-related habits while gaining first-hand in Audrey’s Restaurant and in banquet and insight into an organization’s operation. room service departments.DIRECTED WORK EXPERIENCES Equine students study horse care andDirected work experiences provide an oppor- management at the CENTER FOR EQUINEtunity to apply newly acquired skills and STUDIES, a JWU-owned stable, paddock andknowledge in a supervised, non-paid industry ring in Rehoboth, Mass., reserved for thesetting. The experience focuses on a specific university’s exclusive use, with limited spaceindustry-based or functional area-based project. for students to board their own horses.Refer to specific programs of study on Pages In SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGY LABS including77–144 for examples of the work experiences the Feinstein Center for Technology & Design,that JWU provides its students. Opportunities students perform graphics, Web, programming,to participate vary by campus. networking, database and other technology- based services for a number of clients.University-owned or -operated PracticumEducational Facilities In UNIVERSITY FINANCE AND ACCOUNTING,Unlike other colleges and universities, JWU is accounting students have the opportunity toin a unique position to offer students hands-on gain experience in a variety of accounting andlearning in a variety of industry-related busi- financial functions including student payroll,nesses. The following practicum educational accounts payable, accounting clerk functionsfacilities are owned or operated by JWU and in inventory and sales reporting, generalprovide students with internships in their field ledger, financial reporting and budgeting,of study. and accounting cycle functions.The RADISSON HOTEL PROVIDENCE AIRPORT, The food service industry spans a range oflocated in Warwick, R.I. near T.F. Green State operational facilities and outlets. Johnson &Airport, offers internships in restaurant, food Wales University provides a variety of foodservice and lodging operations. service outlets that serve as practicum edu- cational facilities for students participatingIn the T.F. Green State Airport, the university’s in internships. The spectrum of food serviceINFORMATION BOOTH helps travelers to operations varies from high quantity, volumeRhode Island find their way to the state’s production to specialized coffee and retailbest attractions, as well as lodging and trans- outlets. Some of the practicum educationalportation options. Staffed by travel-tourism facilities available for internships include:internship students, this facility serves thepublic in a unique way. 15
    • CITY BURGER, located at the corner of Experiential Education & Career ServicesChestnut and Pine streets, is the best place components includeto grab a fresh-ground hamburger, hand-cut • a career capstone course for juniors andfries and a milkshake. seniors that prepares them to navigate the job search process.HARBOR VIEW at the Harborside Campus is a • career workshops that allow students toquantity-food facility. It serves a wide variety select specific skill-building topics.of fresh foods daily. • networking opportunities with industry professionals through on-campus recruitingMARKET PLACE is located in the John Hazen events.White Center at the corner of Pine and Chestnutstreets. It serves great food cooked to order, • career coaching resources providingand features Nature’s Bounty Grill, where all personalized advising on a variety ofitems are sustainable, all natural or organic. career-related topics. • work experience programs designed toRED SAUCE PIzzA & PASTA, located in the provide practical experience in a student’sAcademic Center at the Harborside Campus, chosen field of study while they earnis the new lunch, dinner and late-night dining academic credit.option. The menu features made-to-order • online job postings by employers who arepastas, grilled pizzas, calzones, sandwiches looking to hire students for part-time andand farm fresh salads. full-time jobs (on and off campus) as well as internships. Go to http://link.jwu.edu >SNOWDEN DINING CENTER is located on Careers > Find a Job.Weybosset Street, and specializes in a • hundreds of employers, representing thevariety of grilled and made-to-order items business, hospitality, culinary and technol-and signature sandwiches. ogy fields, that visit campus each year to participate in recruiting events and serveSTARBUCKS® store, operated by Johnson & as guest lecturers and classroom speak-Wales University pursuant to a license fromStarbucks Corporation, is located next to City ers. These activities provide students withBurger at the corner of Chestnut and PIne a real-world view of industry as well asstreets. A second Starbucks store is located opportunities to connect with industryon the Harborside Campus. Menu items professionals and career options.include coffee, tea and pastry selections. LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITIESThe WEYBOSSET STREET CAFÉ, located onthe corner of Page and Weybosset streets, Clubs and Organizationsfeatures a variety of sandwiches, personal Student Activities provides many ways forpizzas, juices and energy drinks. students to connect with their campus. More than 110 clubs and organizations rangeCAREER SERvICES from cultural arts, academic and community service to leadership programs, studentAt JWU, we’re dedicated to building careers. government and Greek life.Unlike other universities, our approach isdesigned to help students identify a field of Participating in a student club or organizationinterest and acquire the knowledge, skills helps students build their leadership skillsand experience to excel in that field. and career-related experience while making friends and taking part in activities they’reExperiential Education & Career Services passionate about. See Page 75 or visitoffers a variety of internship programs and www.jwu.edu/studentlife and click on Getcareer services to assist students in building Involved to find out more.career skills to obtain employment and inde-pendently navigate their careers.16
    • Leadership Development Center In addition, the center helps oversee andIn addition to academic courses, one of the implement the universitywide Communityuniversity’s priorities is to equip students to Leadership Initiative, designed to developbe strong, ethical leaders in industry and in students into community leaders and totheir communities. Working with the Feinstein model community leadership as an institutionCommunity Service Center to develop leader- in alignment with the university’s strategicship initiatives on the Providence Campus, initiatives.the Leadership Development Center providesopportunities for students to complementtheir classroom education with the leader-ship knowledge, skills and abilities necessaryto succeed in a competitive workplace. Thecenter also provides leadership training tointernal and external constituents.Community Service-Learning (CSL)Community service is integral to oureducational philosophy; students at theProvidence Campus performed more than100,000 hours of community service workduring the 2009–10 academic year. Thecampus has been named to the President’sHigher Education Community Service HonorRoll and has also been recognized by theCarnegie Foundation for the Advancementof Teaching for its work in the Rhode Islandcommunity.As part of the Feinstein Enriching AmericaProgram, undergraduate students participatein CSL. CSL applies career skills and class-room concepts to real-life challenges facedby community-based organizations and localschools.The Feinstein Community Service Center• offers support for student-initiated service effort and volunteerism• implements co-curricular programming for staff and students in conjunction with Student Activities, National Student Organizations and the Leadership Development Center• encourages volunteer and in-kind assistance for community-based organizations and local schools• develops civic initiatives to address community needs. 17
    • About Johnson & Wales UniversityHISTORy OF THE UNIvERSITy A new career emphasis was introduced at JWU in 1972 and 1973, when the universityThe special approaches to career education announced the addition of new associateat Johnson & Wales University (JWU) have degree programs in the fields of hospitalityevolved for more than 90 years and continue and culinary arts. This proved to be one of theto adapt as the university responds to the most far-reaching changes in the educationalchanging needs of business and industry. expansion of the university, leading toJWU was founded as a business school in additional two- and four-year degree programs1914 in Providence, R.I. by Gertrude I. Johnson in the hospitality and food service fields.and Mary T. Wales. From its origins as aschool devoted to business education, JWU In 1984, a JWU campus was established inhas grown to a junior college, to a senior Charleston, S.C., which offered a variety ofcollege, and ultimately to university status. two- and four-year programs in food service, hospitality and travel-tourism. A JWU campusThe university is well established because opened in Norfolk, Va. in 1986. It offeredof its strong commitment to specialized one- and two-year food service programs.business education and the high ideals ofits founders. In 1993, JWU received regional In 1985, graduate degree programs wereaccreditation from the Commission on Institu- introduced at the university. Today the Alantions of Higher Education of the New England Shawn Feinstein Graduate School offers anAssociation of Schools and Colleges (NEASC). MBA degree program with optional concentra-Accredited since 1954 by the Accrediting tions in accounting and hospitality, as well asCouncil for Independent Colleges and Schools an M.S. degree program in criminal justice.(ACICS), the university consolidated its insti- It also offers an M.A.T. in Teacher Educationtutional accreditation efforts under NEASC on leading to certification in business education,June 30, 2000. culinary arts, food service education, elemen- tary education, elementary special educationIn 1963, the State of Rhode Island granted or secondary special education, as well as ana charter which authorized the university M.Ed. in Teaching and Learning and an Ed.D.to operate as a nonprofit, degree-granting in Educational Leadership.institution of higher learning and to awardassociate degrees in the arts and sciences. In 1992, a joint educational agreementIn 1970, the State of Rhode Island approved allowed the university to begin programsa revision in the university’s charter to award on the campus of the Institute of Higherbaccalaureate degrees. In 1980, the governor Marketing (IHM) Business School in Göteborg,and General Assembly of the State of Rhode Sweden. JWU established a formal, indepen-Island granted a legislative charter to dent learning site there from 1994–2004,the university, authorizing the awarding of giving business and hospitality students theadvanced degrees. opportunity to complete one year of study in Sweden and finish their degrees at one of theThe charter was amended in 1988, changing university’s domestic campuses.the institution’s name to Johnson & WalesUniversity. In 1992, the governor of the State Also in 1992, JWU opened a campus in Northof Rhode Island signed into law a new legisla- Miami, Fla., offering two- and four-year foodtive charter with university status. service, business and hospitality programs.18
    • That year also marked the university’s formal In keeping with its tradition of focusing on theestablishment of the College of Business, best interests of students and respondingThe Hospitality College, the College of to industry, it was determined in April 2006Culinary Arts and the School of Technology. that beginning with the 2008–2009 academicA new emphasis on general studies was intro- year, JWU’s College of Business and The Hos-duced in 1992 as well, with the development pitality College would move away from offeringof the School of Arts & Sciences. associate degrees and instead have students customize their education through specializa-The university’s School of Technology also tions or concentrations at the baccalaureateoffered courses in Worcester, Mass. from level alone. This decision did not impact the1992–2002. College of Culinary Arts and the School of Technology where the two-year degree contin-In 1993, JWU opened a campus in Vail, Colo., ues to be relevant.which offered an accelerated associate degreeprogram in culinary arts to college graduates. In 2009–2010 JWU recruited, admitted andThat year also marked the beginning of a four- enrolled the entering class for the onlineyear bachelor’s degree offering in culinary arts. bachelor’s degree programs in Culinary Arts and Food Service Management and Baking &In 1995, the university created an International Pastry Arts and Food Service Management. InHotel & Tourism Management program which September 2010 students started in the fullyoffers unprecedented opportunities in interna- online programs.tional hotel management education. Studentsfrom around the world may choose from a JWU’s Denver Campus also launched its Adultvariety of options both at JWU and abroad. & Continuing Education program in September 2010.Technology programs offered by the universityinclude Engineering Design and Configuration Each year the university grows in programManagement, Graphic Design & Digital Media, offerings and physical facilities. At the sameNetwork Engineering, Robotic Engineering time, JWU also grows in recognition and pres-Technology and Software Engineering. tige, making contributions to the community, government and industry.September 2000 marked the opening of theDenver, Colo. campus, which offers two- andfour-year degrees in baking & pastry arts,culinary arts, hospitality, business and criminaljustice, as well as the “Garnish Your Degree”accelerated associate degree program origi-nally offered in Vail. In 2000, the Vail Campuswas merged with the Denver Campus.In 2002, the university made a strategic deci-sion to consolidate its smaller Charleston andNorfolk campuses to build a campus in Char-lotte, N.C. JWU’s Charlotte Campus opened infall 2004 and offers associate and bachelor’sdegree programs in business, culinary artsand hospitality. The Charleston and Norfolkcampuses officially closed in May 2006. 19
    • THE MISSION STATEMENT OF THE CORE vALUESUNIvERSITy Johnson & Wales University isThe mission of Johnson & Wales University Student Centeredis to empower its diverse student body to We are strongly student centered, stressingsucceed in today’s dynamic world by integrat- personal development as well as careering general education, professional skills management skills.and career-focused education. To this end,the university employs its faculty, services, Experientially Basedcurricula and facilities to equip students with We integrate hands-on learning with athe conceptual and practical tools required to career-focused curriculum, to enable ourbecome contributing members of society. students to gain real-world experience.PURPOSES OF THE UNIvERSITy Industry Relevant We are industry relevant, focusing both onJohnson & Wales University supports the the needs of our students and the needs offollowing purposes in accordance with the our students’ future employers.mission:•to enroll students with potential from varied Employment Focused backgrounds and to give them every opportu- Our business is developing employment-ready, nity to excel in their academic and profes- motivated graduates for world-class employers. sional lives;•to develop and assess sound programs and Globally Oriented curricula that allow students to attain profi- We respond to the increasingly global nature of ciencies in general education and relevant business by fostering multiculturalism and pro- professional disciplines; viding an international educational experience.•to evaluate and assess regularly the rigor of all academic programs; OUTCOMES ASSESSMENT STATEMENT•to provide experiential education opportuni- OF PURPOSE ties that are curriculum-driven and include practical experiences for students in every The definition of a well-educated college program; graduate will continue to evolve throughout•to support diversity in the curricula, this new millennium. In accordance with our activities and services for students, and in mission to empower students to succeed in the employment of faculty and staff; today’s dynamic world, and to become contrib-•to provide students with opportunities that uting members of society, Johnson & Wales support intellectual development, personal University integrates general education, profes- growth and civic engagement; sional skills and career-focused education.• to monitor the external and internal environ- ment of the university through regular and Johnson & Wales University is committed to effective planning and assessment; outcomes assessment. Faculty and students•to hold each academic, administrative and are therefore part of an ongoing effort to support department accountable for the determine and refine the effectiveness of achievement of the mission; instruction and learning.•to plan for and provide facilities and resources that meet the needs of students, faculty and staff.20
    • The Providence CampusTHE CITy The nearby Harborside Campus sits on 80 scenic acres along Narragansett Bay, andProvidence offers big-city sophistication on houses the College of Culinary Arts, thea welcoming scale, and is often voted one of Alan Shawn Feinstein Graduate School, thethe country’s best places to live. A historic Harborside Recreation Center (home of theyet fast-paced city, Providence is located NCAA Division III Wildcats), and the Culinarywithin the highest per capita concentration of Arts Museum at JWU. Residential facilities arecolleges and universities in the U.S., so it’s located throughout Providence and Cranston.alive with things to do. JWU provides free shuttle bus service between the campuses and residence halls.The major business, financial and retail dis-tricts of the city are all within walking distance Academic Facilities and Administrativeof the Downcity Campus, which is convenient Offices — Downcity Campusfor students who want to look for part-time THE ACADEMIC CENTER at 138 Mathewsonjobs. Also within walking distance are the Street houses the School of Technology andProvidence Performing Arts Center, Providence features classrooms; the media/graphicsPublic Library, Dunkin’ Donuts Center, Rhode department; computer, engineering and sci- ence laboratories; faculty offices; the dean’sIsland Convention Center, Trinity Repertory office, Alan Shawn Feinstein Technology &Company, Providence Place, outdoor skating Design Center, and the School of Technologyat the Bank of America City Center, the Rhode Presentation Room.Island State House, Rhode Island School ofDesign, Brown University and places of wor- THE CITIzENS BANK CENTER FOR STUDENTship of many major religious denominations. INVOLVEMENT at 232 Weybosset StreetRestaurants for every taste and budget, many houses Student Activities (including theowned or operated by JWU alumni, can be Campus Herald and Johnsonian yearbookfound throughout the city as well. offices), Greek Councils, New Student Orientation & Support Programs, ParentProvidence’s unique geographic location — Relations and Spiritual Life.only an hour’s drive from both Boston andCape Cod, and three hours’ drive from New COOKSON PLACE, located at One WeybossetYork City — makes it an inviting place to live. Hill, houses the central administration officeInterstate bus and train stations are within of the university on the sixth floor. It is alsoeasy reach of the Downcity Campus, and the home of the University Bookstore, locatedthe state airport in Warwick is only about 10 on the first floor.miles to the south. The Rhode Island PublicTransit Authority (RIPTA) provides free trans- 3 DAVOL SQUARE, located at the corner ofportation within Rhode Island to students Point and Eddy streets, contains Universitywith a valid ID. Alumni Relations, the University Creative Services Group, University Admissions and National Student Organizations.THE CAMPUS THE DEL SESTO BUILDING, located atThe Downcity Campus is anchored by Gaebe 274 Weybosset Street, houses InformationCommons, a popular hub of student activity, Technology Operations.and surrounded by a variety of shops, restau-rants, cafés, music venues and a picturesque The JOHN HAzEN WHITE CENTER FOR ARTS & SCIENCES, located at 30 Chestnut Streetriverfront. This campus is home to students (the corner of Pine and Chestnut streets),in the College of Business, The Hospitality contains the departments of English, EnglishCollege, the School of Technology and the as a Second Language (ESL), Humanities,School of Arts & Sciences. 21
    • Mathematics and Social Sciences, as well as The XAVIER COMPLEX, located at 259 Pinethe Language Laboratory and Arts & Sciences Street at Broad and Claverick streets, housesclassrooms. It also houses the Market Place classrooms, faculty offices, a variety ofcampus dining facility, Inactive Records, the computer and word processing labs, andCenter for Academic Support for the Downcity Xavier Auditorium. This complex also housesCampus, the Leadership Development The Hospitality College and most of theCenter, Experiential Education & Career College of Business.Services for the Downcity Campus, the dean’soffice and faculty offices. The Hospitality College deans, chairs and faculty reside on the lower three floors.JOHNSON HALL, located at 59 Chestnut The Statler Dining Room, a hospitality kitchenStreet, includes the Accounting department, lab, is on the first floor.faculty offices, several accounting classrooms,City Burger (a snack bar and grill for students, The College of Business deans, andfaculty and staff) and Starbucks®. chairs and faculty for the Equine Studies, Management, Marketing and Legal StudiesThe RICHMOND BUILDING is located at departments reside on the upper three floors.270 Weybosset Street. It currently housesInformation Technology, Campus Dining Xavier Hall in the Xavier Complex includes(including Student ID cards), the Employee an interdenominational chapel and theDevelopment Institute, and the Rhode Island Intercultural Center, Online Learning, as wellSmall Business Development Center. as a residence hall with laundry facilities.The administrative and operations headquar- THE YENA CENTER, located at 111 Dorranceters for CAMPUS SAFETY & SECURITY are Street in Downcity Providence, houseslocated at 264 Weybosset Street. the Office of the President and Providence Administration, main library and library admin-The STUDENT SERVICES CENTER, located at istrative offices, Admissions (except Culinary),274 Pine Street, houses Student Academic Alumni Relations for the Providence Campus,& Financial Services, International Student Advancement Relations for the ProvidenceServices and Study Abroad. Campus, Communications and Media Relations, Catering and Special Events, andThe TACO CENTER FOR BUSINESS AND ARTS the university’s Accounts Payable, Accounting& SCIENCES, located at 10 Abbott Park Place, and Procurement.houses classrooms and faculty offices for theEconomics department, the Science depart- Academic Facilities and Administrativement and the Larry Friedman International Offices — Harborside CampusCenter for Entrepreneurship. The Alan Shawn THE CUISINART CENTER FOR CULINARYFeinstein Community Service Center and the EXCELLENCE, located at 333 ShipyardHonors Program office are on the fifth floor. Street, is where the College of Culinary Arts is based. This also includes College ofWALES HALL, located at 8 Abbott Park Place, Culinary Arts faculty offices, the deans’ andhouses the fitness center, shower and locker administrative offices, the Coors Brewingrooms on the lower level; the Pepsi Forum Laboratory and the International Baking &auditorium, Student Payroll, Health Education Pastry Institute.and the Gender Equity Center on the first floor.The second floor houses the Chancellor’s The center includes hot and cold kitchens,Office, Counseling Services and Community bakeshops and pastry shops, dining rooms,Relations. The third floor houses Health meatcutting and meat processing rooms,Services for the Downcity Campus. The fourth receiving and storeroom, an oenology andand fifth floors are home to JWU’s Human beverage service laboratory, and culinaryResources and Payroll. purchasing offices.22
    • The DAVID FRIEDMAN CENTER, located at THE FRIEDMAN CENTER, located at 3211 Washington Avenue, includes College of Harborside Boulevard, houses several studentCulinary Arts faculty offices, hot and cold services that have been located together forkitchens, bakeshops and pastry shops, student convenience.a dining room, receiving and storeroom. These offices and their hours of operation areThe GRACE WELCOME CENTER at 120 Residential LifeHarborside Boulevard is the new location Monday–Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.for Culinary and Graduate Admissions. The Experiential Education & Career Servicesfacility includes a 70-seat presentation room, Monday–Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.Galleria of Culinary Artifacts, conference room Student Academic & Financial Servicesand welcome area, as well as staff office Monday–Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.space. Friday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m. to noon (first Saturday ofHARBOR VIEW, located at 1150 Narragansett each month)Boulevard in Cranston, houses a large studentdining hall, kitchen and bakeshop labs and aresidence hall with laundry facilities. Also located in this building are the Alan Shawn Feinstein Graduate School, theThe HARBORSIDE ACADEMIC CENTER (HAC), Center for Academic Support, the Culinaryat 265 Harborside Boulevard houses depart- Arts Museum at JWU, the Harborside Campusment faculty offices for the John Hazen White Library, Printing & Mailing Services, theSchool of Arts & Sciences, as well as the Harborside Substation of Campus Safety &department chairs of culinary arts, food Security, the warehouse, the administrativeservice and academic studies. offices of Facilities Management, Facilities Engineering and Maintenance, two classroomsAcademic facilities include classrooms, and offices on the second floor.the chocolate and sugar lab, the baking tech-nology lab and the university’s Harborside THE ALUMNI HOUSE, at 1146 NarragansettBookstore (operated by Barnes & Noble Boulevard in Cranston, is utilized forCollege Bookstores Inc.). CAFE, the Culinary distinguished visiting professor lodging.Arts Foodservice Exposition, is an addition tothe Harborside Academic Center and features University Library Networkstate-of-the-art kitchens and laboratories, The Johnson & Wales University Librarybakeshops, a food science and product Network is comprised of the libraries of thedevelopment lab, and the Cintas Dining Room Providence, R.I.; North Miami, Fla.; Denver,used by culinary arts students. HAC also Colo.; and Charlotte, N.C. campuses.contains a Starbucks®, Red Sauce Pizza An important aspect of the network is the& Pasta, the University Office of Culinary access it provides to resources, servicesEducation, microbiology lab, a multimedia and facilities shared by the Higher Educationcenter, the H.A.C. Amphitheater, Culinary Library Information Network (HELIN), a consor-Special Services and the Harborside Computer tium of academic, law, and health sciencesCenter, containing 156 computers, five com- libraries in southern New England. Johnson &puter labs and an administrative staff area. Wales University Library is also a key partner with the university’s academic programs inThe HARBORSIDE RECREATION CENTER, the enhancement of student research skillslocated at 305 Shipyard Street, houses through the delivery of classroom instruction,Health Services for the Harborside Campus, online information literacy tutorials, Web-basedAthletics, two gymnasiums, student life pro- guides customized to the research outcomesgramming space, game room, fitness center, of specific courses and curricula, plus person-Student Activities, the Office of the Vice alized reference services delivered to studentsPresident of Student Affairs, Student Conduct in person, over the phone, through e-mail,and a convenience store. online chat, or SMS. In addition, the library hosts the Scholar’s Archive@JWU (http://scholarsarchive.jwu.edu), an open 23
    • access digital commons dedicated to preserv- Culinary Arts Museum at Johnson & Walesing and promoting examples of scholarly or Universityartistic works produced at or belonging to the Located in The Friedman Center atuniversity. 315 Harborside Boulevard on the Harborside Campus, the Culinary Arts Museum at JWUThe main Johnson & Wales University Library is an educational resource for Johnson &facility in Providence occupies the first two Wales University, the community-at-large, foodfloors of The Yena Center at 111 Dorrance scholars and the food service industry. TheStreet. It houses the largest of the University Culinary Arts Museum at JWU seeks to bothLibrary Network’s book, periodical and audio- preserve and interpret the broad culinary andvisual resource collections, as well as the hospitality heritage addressed by the univer-administrative offices of the university dean sity. It is a showcase for the work of students,of libraries. Other resources include access faculty, alumni and distinguished visiting chefs.to numerous online databases, computer Through exhibitions and special events, theworkstations, group study rooms, private museum strives to interpret the evolution ofstudy carrels, soft seating, an electronic food preparation and presentation, the devel-classroom and wireless Internet connectivity opment of culinary equipment and technology,throughout the facility. During the academic the diverse menus offered and the placesyear the library’s hours are Monday through where people dine.Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to midnight; Friday,7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to Current and upcoming exhibits include7 p.m.; and Sunday, 11 a.m. to midnight. “Diners: Still Cookin’ in the 21st Century,”Professional reference services are available “Serving the World with Worcester DiningMonday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Cars,” “Country Fair to Culinary Olympics,”Friday and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and “Kitchen Stoves and Ranges: From the OpenSunday, 2 to 10 p.m. Note that schedules Hearth to the Microwave,” and “Dinner at theare subject to change during exam weeks, White House.”term breaks, holidays and over the summer. Operated by JWU, admission to the museum isLibrary collections and services at the free for JWU students, staff and faculty.Harborside Campus are located in TheFriedman Center at 321 Harborside Computer LaboratoriesBoulevard and primarily support the curricula Johnson & Wales University has computerfor the College of Culinary Arts, with ancil- labs available for students to use e-mail,lary resources available for the Alan Shawn Internet Explorer, Microsoft Office, jwuLinkFeinstein Graduate School. Like its downcity and more. Additional labs are available toaffiliate, this facility provides access to online students enrolled in classes that teachdatabases, computer workstations, group specialty software or technology.study rooms and wireless Internet connectiv-ity, as well as numerous books, periodicals Students must have an active JWU e-mailand audiovisual resources. In addition, this account to access lab computers. Documentslibrary holds an important collection number- can be saved to student-acquired USB drivesing in the thousands of restaurant menus or documents can be attached to and sentfrom around the world. Hours of operation through e-mail. Students cannot save files ontoduring the academic year are Monday through computers in the labs.Thursday, 7:30 a.m. to midnight; Friday,7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m. to Lab hours and a complete list of software7 p.m.; and Sunday, 11 a.m. to midnight. installed at each location are available atProfessional reference services are available www.jwu.edu. Click on Student Life, thenMonday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.; select the Providence Campus.Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m. to3 p.m. and Sunday, 2 to 10 p.m.24
    • Lab locations are: rooms on the second and third floors have private baths, at a slightly higher cost thanDowncity Campus the first floor. The first floor of Imperial offersAcademic Computer Labs community bathrooms as well as an on-siteAcademic Center — 4th floor kitchen, plus community space on the lower138 Mathewson Street, Providence, R.I. level. It is reserved primarily for upperclass-(598-1504) men. There is no university parking.Xavier Computer Labs MCNULTY HALLXavier Academic Complex — 2nd floor 101 Pine Street, Providence, R.I.259 Pine Street, Providence, R.I. (598-4797)(598-1537) McNulty Hall is located adjacent to The YenaHarborside Campus Center (library) at the Pine Street perimeter ofHarborside Computer Labs Gaebe Commons. McNulty houses first-yearHarborside Academic Center and international technology, business, hospi-265 Harborside Boulevard, Providence, R.I. tality and culinary arts students, and features(598-1592) double- and triple-occupancy rooms, all of which are air conditioned and have private baths. Also, McNulty features laundry roomsRESIDENCE HALLS and a variety of common areas for study and recreational use. There is no university studentNOTE: All halls are coeducational and smoke parking at this hall, although private parking isfree. All are cable and Internet ready. During available from vendors in nearby lots.the first two weeks of the fall term, each roomis provided with a MicroFridge, which students RENAISSANCE HALLmay opt to rent for the rest of the year, with 101 Cedar Street, Providence, R.I.the exception of Renaissance Hall, The Cove (598-2800)and Harborside Village, which feature full-size Renaissance Hall is located at the cornerrefrigerators. of Dean and Cedar streets, near the his- toric Federal Hill section of Providence.Downcity Campus Renaissance houses first-year, international and upperclass students. On a regular univer-THE COVE1 Park Row West, Providence, R.I. sity bus route, it is close enough to classes that many students choose to walk together(680-7780) to class. This facility provides suite-style liv-The Cove is open to sophomores, juniors and ing with primarily four residents in each unit.seniors and is located downcity near the train Equipped with kitchens and private baths,station and a short walk from campus. This this facility also maintains a recreation roomhall has two-, three- and four-person apart- and study rooms, as well as a laundry room.ments which feature gourmet kitchens, stain- Limited university student parking is availableless steel appliances, granite countertops and through a lottery process for upperclassmen.hardwood floors. Bedrooms are carpeted anda washer/dryer is provided in each apartment SNOWDEN HALLunit (no card or coin required). Residents of 32 Page Street, Providence, R.I.The Cove are required to agree to abide by a (598-1025)community policy agreement as a condition to Snowden Hall, available at a slightly higherresiding in The Cove. cost, contains double- and triple-occupancyIMPERIAL HALL rooms with private baths and air conditioning.15 Hospital Street, Providence, R.I. Residents of this hall are a mix of first-year(598-1166) and upperclassmen. It also houses a diningImperial is a residence facility containing center featuring grilled-to-order items andsingle, double, triple and some quad occu- signature sandwiches. There is no universitypancy rooms. Single and double occupancy parking at this hall. 25
    • XAVIER HALL room; and a washer/dryer unit (no card or60 Broad Street, Providence, R.I. coin required). An on-site community building(598-1496) houses village resident mailboxes, a functionXavier Hall, adjacent to the Xavier Academic room, a game room, and the communityComplex, has a limited number of single management office. Parking is availableoccupancy rooms for upperclass students, through a lottery process. Residents ofand double-, triple- and quad-occupancy rooms Harborside Village are required to agree toavailable for first-year students. Because of abide by a community policy agreement as aits proximity to the university’s transportation condition to residing in Harborside Village.network, Xavier is recommended for equinestudents who travel regularly to the university’sCenter for Equine Studies. Student parking is CAMPUS DININGnot available at this hall. JWU is in a unique position to provide stu-Harborside Campus dents with quality food service. Culinary artsEAST HALL (598-1189) and hotel students, as part of their laboratoryWEST HALL (598-1155) training, provide much of the food serviceSOUTH HALL (598-4720) at the university, under the supervision of2 Washington Avenue, Providence, R.I. professional chef-instructors.East, West and South halls are neighboringresidence halls located on the Harborside The following dining centers are availableCampus near academic and student service for students on a meal plan and their guests:facilities. Primarily for culinary and baking & Harbor View Dining Center, Market Place, Redpastry arts students, rooms in East Hall and Sauce Pizza & Pasta, Weybosset Street Café,South Hall house four residents. West Hall Snowden Dining Center, City Burger, as welloffers triple rooms. Each hall has community as two Starbucks® which are located on thebathrooms, a laundry room, study room and Downcity and Harborside campuses.recreation room. Students are allowed onlyone MicroFridge per room. University student All resident students, except for those living inparking is available to all with a valid sticker. The Cove and Harborside Village, are required to subscribe to the university’s Room andHARBOR VIEW Board plan, which provides 15 meals per1150 Narragansett Boulevard, Cranston, R.I. week. Commuter and all resident students(598-1154) may make use of the campus dining facili-Harbor View is located on the Cranston- ties as well by purchasing commuter meals.Providence line and overlooks Narragansett Meals can be purchased individually or at aBay. It is within walking distance of the discounted price in blocks of 10, 25 or 50 atHarborside Campus. Harbor View contains Campus Dining, located at 270 Weybossettriples and some quads with private baths, as Street next to Campus Safety & Security. Forwell as a dining center, recreation room with a more information, contact Campus Dining atlarge-screen TV, and study room. It is reserved 598-1433.for upperclassmen and some first-year students.There is limited parking available. CAMPUS CONvENIENCEHARBORSIDE VILLAGE Campus Convenience is located in the Delaney100 Harborside Boulevard, Providence, R.I. Complex adjacent to the Harborside Recreation(808-6000) Center and near the Harborside bus stop.Open to juniors and seniors, Harborside The store offers a large variety of snacks,Village is comprised of 12 individual buildings juices, ice cream and amenities. Convenientwith 12 four-person apartment units in each. meal plan options are also available.Apartments are fully furnished and featurefour single, private bedrooms; two privatebathrooms; an eat-in kitchen; a common26
    • Additional ProgramsADULT & CONTINUING EDUCATION GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMSA variety of certificate, diploma, degree, Johnson & Wales University’s Providenceenrichment, credit and non-credit programs Campus also offers graduate degreeare available through Johnson & Wales programs from the Alan Shawn FeinsteinUniversity’s undergraduate colleges and Graduate School. Approximately 950schools. For more information, contact students from 55 countries enroll in JWUAdult & Continuing Education Admissions, graduate programs.toll free, at 1-800-225-2454. In Rhode Island,call 401-598-2300 or go to www.jwu.edu/ Programs offeredprovidence and click on Adult & Continuing MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (MBA)Education. Optional concentrations in Accounting HospitalityONLINE LEARNINGThe university offers a limited number of MASTER OF SCIENCE (M.S.) Criminal Justiceonline courses to students enrolled at anyJWU campus. Courses with an online optionare identified in the Course Descriptions and MASTER OF ARTS (M.A.T.)Programs of Study sections of the catalog. Teacher Education leading to certification inPolicies pertaining to online courses are Business Education and Secondaryavailable in the Providence Campus Student Special Education Elementary Education and ElementaryHandbook. Students interested in registering Special Educationfor an online course should consult with their Elementary Education and Secondaryacademic counselor. Special Education Elementary Education and Elementary/Secondary Special EducationThis catalog does not apply to students Food Service Educationenrolled in online-only degree programs.The university offers online degree MASTER OF EDUCATION (M.Ed.)completion programs for individuals with Teaching and Learning (designed for practicing teachers)associate degrees in culinary arts and baking& pastry arts. For more information on these DOCTOR OF EDUCATIONprograms, contact Online Admissions at Educational Leadership (Elementary-Secondary)1-800-225-2454 or visit Educational Leadership (Higher Education)www.jwu.edu/onlinelearning.In Rhode Island, call 401-598-2300. For a catalog and more information: Graduate Admissions Johnson & Wales University 8 Abbott Park Place, Providence, RI 02903 1-800-DIAL-JWU ext. 1015 Ph: 401-598-1015, Fax: 401-598-1286 E-mail: gradschool@admissions.jwu.edu Web: www.jwu.edu/graduate 27
    • JWU CampusesJohnson & Wales University has distinct College of Culinary Arts andcampuses in vibrant cities throughout The Hospitality Collegethe country. For more information, consult The following associate in science degrees (College of Culinarythe catalog for each campus at www.jwu.edu Arts) track into the bachelor of science degrees listed to the> Academics > Catalogs or contact the right (College of Culinary Arts and The Hospitality College).campus directly. ASSOCIATE DEGREE BACHELOR’S DEGREE Baking & Pastry Arts Baking & Pastry Arts and Food Service ManagementNORTH MIAMI, FLORIDA Culinary Arts Culinary Arts and Food Service ManagementThe North Miami Campus offers undergradu-ate degree programs in business, culinary The Hospitality Collegearts and hospitality. This campus is conve- BACHELOR’S DEGREESniently close to the tourism-rich areas of Fort Hotel & Lodging ManagementLauderdale and Miami, offering a superb Restaurant, Food & Beverage Managementsetting for a JWU education. Sports/Entertainment/Event Management Travel-Tourism & Hospitality ManagementFor more information about the Johnson &Wales North Miami Campus, contact DENvER, COLORADOAdmissions, Johnson & Wales University,1701 N.E. 127th Street, North Miami, FL JWU’s Denver Campus offers undergraduate33181 at 1-866-JWU-FLORIDA (598-3567) culinary arts, business and hospitality pro-or go to www.jwu.edu/northmiami. grams. Denver, named the “second best city in America to work and live” by Fortune maga-Campus President zine, offers an exciting range of experiential education opportunities in fine restaurantsLoreen M. Chant, ’89 MBA and mountain resorts.Programs offered For more information about the Johnson & Wales Denver Campus, contactCollege of Business Admissions, Johnson & Wales University,BACHELOR’S DEGREES 7150 Montview Boulevard, Denver, CO 80220Criminal Justice at 1-877-JWU-DENVER (598-3368) or go toFashion Merchandising & Retail Marketing www.jwu.edu/denver.ManagementManagement (accelerated B.S. degree) Campus PresidentMarketing Bette M. MatkowskiPROGRAMS FOR UNDECIDED STUDENTS Programs offeredBusiness Administration (one-year program; tracks College of Businessinto College of Business bachelor’s degree) BACHELOR’S DEGREES Criminal Justice Entrepreneurship Fashion Merchandising & Retail Marketing International Business Management Management (accelerated B.S. degree) Marketing PROGRAMS FOR UNDECIDED STUDENTS Business Administration (one-year program; tracks into College of Business bachelor’s degree) Undeclared (two-year program; tracks into College of Business bachelor’s degree)28
    • College of Culinary Arts CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINAThe following associate in science degrees track into thebachelor of science degree listed to the right. Opening its doors in fall 2004, JWU’s newestASSOCIATE DEGREE BACHELOR’S DEGREE campus in Charlotte, N.C. offers undergradu-Baking & Pastry Arts Culinary Nutrition ate degree programs in business, hospitalityCulinary Arts and culinary arts. Though Charlotte is theCollege of Culinary Arts and second largest business center in the UnitedThe Hospitality College States, it maintains a distinctive small townThe following associate in science degrees (College of Culinary feel. It offers easy access to beaches,Arts) track into the bachelor of science degrees listed to the mountains, an international airport, and is aright (College of Culinary Arts and The Hospitality College). hub of athletic and cultural activity.ASSOCIATE DEGREE BACHELOR’S DEGREEBaking & Pastry Arts Baking & Pastry Arts and For more information about the Johnson Food Service Management & Wales Charlotte Campus, contactCulinary Arts Culinary Arts and Food Service Management Admissions, Johnson & Wales University, 801 West Trade Street, Charlotte, NC 28202The Hospitality College at 1-866-JWU-CHARLOTTE (598-2427)BACHELOR’S DEGREES or go to www.jwu.edu/charlotte.Hotel & Lodging ManagementRestaurant, Food & Beverage ManagementSports/Entertainment/Event Management Campus President Arthur J. Gallagher, M.A.PROGRAMS FOR UNDECIDED STUDENTSUndeclared (two-year program; tracks into Programs offeredHospitality College bachelor’s degree) College of Business BACHELOR’S DEGREES Fashion Merchandising & Retail Marketing Management Accounting Management Management (accelerated B.S. degree) Marketing PROGRAMS FOR UNDECIDED STUDENTS Business Administration (one-year program; tracks into College of Business bachelor’s degree) College of Culinary Arts and The Hospitality College The following associate in applied science degrees (College of Culinary Arts) track into the bachelor of science degrees listed to the right (College of Culinary Arts and The Hospitality College). ASSOCIATE DEGREE BACHELOR’S DEGREE Baking & Pastry Arts Baking & Pastry Arts and Food Service Management Culinary Arts Culinary Arts and Food Service Management The Hospitality College BACHELOR’S DEGREES Hotel & Lodging Management International Hotel & Tourism Management Restaurant, Food & Beverage Management Sports/Entertainment/Event Management 29
    • Applying for AdmissionJohnson & Wales University seeks students An official application form is available onlinewho have a true desire for practical career at www.jwu.edu/apply. No application fee ispreparation in their chosen fields and who required.have the ability to achieve academic success. In completing the application form, studentsAlthough academic qualifications are important, must indicate the term in which they wishstudents’ motivation and interest in succeed- to enroll. Applications are accepted foring in their chosen careers are given strong terms beginning in September, Decemberconsideration. The educational methods of the and March.university are designed to assist students who NOTE: Equine majors may only enter in thequalify for admission to succeed in the career September term.programs of their choice. Certain bachelor’s degree programs are selec-Students are also recommended to submit tive and require submission of an applicationemployment information and letters of recom- at the end of the associate degree programmendation for admission consideration. before acceptance into a program. Students should check program descriptions if they areDue to the technical standards and require- interested in applying for both an associatements essential to certain technical programs and a bachelor’s degree program.at the university, applicants with disabilitiesshould inquire of the Center for Academic After completing the application form, studentsSupport prior to enrolling at the university. are responsible for requesting that their highFor more information about technical school guidance office forward to the universitystandards see Pages 158–159. Copies of an official copy of the secondary school recordthe technical standards applicable to various for admissions consideration.programs are available from the Center forAcademic Support. HIgh School Completion verification Graduation from high school or equivalent education as certified by state departments ofAPPLICATION PROCEDURE education is required for undergraduate admis- sion. Graduation verification documents mustApplications for admission should be be submitted to Admissions. Verification docu-completed in full and sent to Admissions, ments include at least one of the following:Johnson & Wales University, 8 Abbott Park a letter from an authorized high school admin-Place, Providence, RI 02903. istrator, a high school diploma recognized by their state department of education or aStudents applying for admission to the North G.E.D. certificate. For additional methods ofMiami, Denver or Charlotte campuses — or verification of high school completion for home-for Adult & Continuing Education at JWU’s schooled students, see Page 32. It is theProvidence Campus — should refer to their student’s responsibility to provide verification ofcampus catalog for admissions information. high school completion. Without such verifica- tion, the student may not be allowed to registerThere is no deadline for submitting applica- for the current term or continue enrollment.tions, but students are advised to apply asearly as possible before their intended date When possible, Johnson & Wales Universityof enrollment for full consideration, as some would prefer to receive the applicant’s highprograms may fill up. school transcripts at the same time as the application for admission. Transfer students must also submit official transcripts from all colleges attended.30
    • Test Scores Requests for refunds of the reservation feeSAT and ACT scores are not required for will be granted upon written request togeneral admission to the university, but are the university prior to May 1, 2011. Afterstrongly recommended. May 1, 2011 the reservation fee of $300 (or $150 of such fee in the case of applicantsCandidates for the university’s honors to the North Miami Campus) is nonrefundable.program must submit SAT or ACT scores foracceptance consideration. Admission stan- The university may revoke any student’sdards may vary for international and transfer acceptance or enrollment if any informationstudents. or documentation provided by the student is false or incomplete or if the university learnsMinimum Grade Requirements of any past or present misconduct by theFor certain technology majors, a “B” average student that would affect the student’s abilityor better in math is required. Other majors to represent and uphold the high standardsmay have specific grade requirements. of the university.For Counseling Psychology majors, an overall Deferred Enrollment“B” average and a college preparatory Johnson & Wales offers a two-year deferredcurriculum are required. enrollment to students who have applied and been accepted to the university but, for vari-Students within The Hospitality College who ous reasons, wish to postpone their enroll-are interested in pursuing a bachelor’s degree ment. Johnson & Wales University retainsin International Hotel & Tourism Management student application material and will honormust apply through their department chair. the admissions decision for up to two years;Preference is given to students who achieve after that time frame, the applicant will needa 3.20 GPA or higher upon completion of to submit a new application and transcripttheir freshman year. for review. Reservation fees will remain effective during the deferment period. MeritAdmissions Decision scholarships awarded through the applicationThe rolling admissions policy of the university process will be honored for up to two yearsmakes it possible to notify students of the from the time of initial acceptance. Federaladmissions decision, of their acceptance or student aid monies are awarded annually;of any additional conditions necessary for a student may need to reapply for federaladmission, soon after all of their academic funds through the Free Application for Federalrecords have been received and reviewed. Student Aid (FAFSA).The $300 reservation fee is payable upon Advanced Placement Creditacceptance to the university. The university Students entering Johnson & Wales Universityobserves the May 1 reservation fee/deposit with an Advanced Placement test score of “3”deadline and encourages students to research or greater will be granted 4.5 quarter creditsall schools before placing a reservation fee. for the equivalent JWU course. Students mustReservation fees received after May 1, 2011 submit an official AP Grade Report from thewill be accepted on a space available basis. College Board Advanced Placement Program.Reservation fees received prior to May 1, For more information about AP credit contact2011 are refundable. The student’s account University Testing & Transfer.must also be cleared by Student Academic &Financial Services by the July payment dead- Transfer Studentsline to guarantee a room assignment. Transfer students are eligible to apply for most JWU majors; however, they are notIn addition, Equine Riding students are asked guaranteed credit. Credit is usually grantedto submit a $500 reservation fee. These fees for courses completed with a grade of “C” orare credited to students’ initial billings. better (with a numeric value of 2.00) at another accredited institution (U.S. Department of 31
    • Education). Grades of “pass” are also accept- or, with respect to home-schooled studentsable for transfer if credit was awarded (and who are above the compulsory age of schoola grade of “P” has the numeric value of 2.00 attendance,or greater). Credits earned in developmental • a secondary school completion credentialand remedial courses or CEUs are nontrans- for home school (other than a high schoolferable. Transfer credit evaluations are based diploma or its recognized equivalent)on previous college work as it relates to the provided for under state law;student’s intended field of study. orAs with prospective freshmen, acceptances • if state law does not require a home-are made on a rolling basis as an application schooled student to obtain the credentialbecomes complete. described in the preceding bullet, a cer- tification that the student has completedTransfer candidates must submit official a secondary school education in a homecollege transcripts from all colleges previously school setting that qualifies as an exemptionattended prior to enrolling at JWU. Students from compulsory attendance requirementsmust also submit final official high school under state law.transcripts. It is the student’s responsibility to provideIt is the responsibility of those candidates who verification of high school completion.are currently attending another college to have Without such verification, the student maytheir updated transcripts sent to JWU as soon not be allowed to register for the current termas final grades become available and no later or continue enrollment.than the first term of enrollment. If officialtranscripts or other requested materials are Early/Dual Enrollment Studentsnot received within that designated time period, The Early Enrollment Program gives hightentative transfer credit will be forfeited. school seniors an opportunity to enroll full time in college courses at JWU during theirThe university reserves the right to substitute senior year of high school. Students shouldcourses at the discretion of the department apply for admission to the Early Enrollmentchairs, directors or deans. Program during their junior year of high school.Home-schooled Students The Early Enrollment Program is the firstHome-schooled students will be required to program of its kind in Rhode Island. It wasprovide a high school transcript and a copy of designed to help students investigate thetheir ACT or SAT test scores. Both the grades variety of college and career options availableon the transcript and the ACT/SAT test to them. Early Enrollment Program studentsscores will be reviewed to determine admis- earn college credits while completing highsions and scholarship eligibility. Combined school graduation requirements.SAT scores of 1000 (reading and math,500 each) or ACT equivalent are required For more information on the Early Enrollmentfor admittance. Program, request a brochure from Admissions.A home-schooled student must be able to Honors Programdocument that he or she has completed high This program offers academically talentedschool. Verification documents for home- students the opportunity to explore challengingschooled students include at least one of the and stimulating courses. Eligible applicantsfollowing: must have taken a college prep curriculum,• a high school diploma recognized by their maintained an average of B or better, placed state department of education; in the top 25 percent of their high school grad-• a G.E.D. certificate uating class and submitted SAT/ACT scores above the national average. For more informa- tion on the Honors Program, see Page 62.32
    • SHARP 401-865-2471. For more information aboutStudents who wish to accelerate their studies military science courses, see Page 226. Forcan apply for SHARP (Special Honors And information regarding when and how JWU creditRewards Program). See Page 64 for more may be obtained for such courses, contactinformation on SHARP. Student Academic & Financial Services.Undeclared ProgramAll students who enroll in the Undeclared INTERNATIONAL STUDENTSprogram at Johnson & Wales University International Admissions Requirementspursue a general studies program for the first Listed below are the requirements for apply-two years. In addition, they will take introduc- ing for undergraduate admission to Johnsontory courses in management and hospitality & Wales University. In order to expedite theto help them focus on a career path and admissions process, students must enclosechoose a major. During the fifth term, ORIGINAL or CERTIFIED documents whenthey must select a major from a variety of submitting an application. Please note thatbusiness or hospitality programs. photocopies, fax copies, scanned or e-mailed documents are not valid.4+1 B.S./MBA Program 1. An accurate, complete and legibleThe five-year B.S./MBA program allows International Application form that hasstudents to earn a bachelor of science degree been signed and dated by the applicant.through the College of Business plus an MBA All schools attended must be listed, within five years. Students in this program take dates of attendance.graduate-level courses during their senior 2. Certified bank statement or governmentyear while completing their bachelor’s degree. sponsorship letter verifying financialThese courses include support for one academic year.• COMM5500 Strategic Communications 3. The results of the Test of English as a• MRKT5500 Strategic Services Marketing Foreign Language (TOEFL), IELTS or other• MGMT5800 Effective Leadership proof of English proficiency. (See “English Language Proficiency” and “TOEFLStudents not only save graduate school tuition, Requirements” on next page)but also earn their MBA within 12–15 months of 4. Official secondary school transcript show-completing the bachelor’s degree program. ing subjects and marks received with grad-For more information, contact Admissions at uation date. External examination resultspvd@admissions@jwu.edu or 401-598-2310. should be submitted, if applicable. If you have not yet graduated from secondaryFACTS FOR MILITARy school, a transcript showing all completed work and expected results/graduationJohnson & Wales University is approved date may be submitted for review.for the training of veterans by the state 5. Transfer candidates must submit tran-approving agency. scripts, marks sheets, diplomas or certifi- cates from all post-secondary institutionsEligible veterans should contact the Department attended, along with course descriptionsof Veterans Affairs toll free at 1-888-442-4551 for transfer review.or online at www.gibill.va.gov. 6. Copy of biographical section of applicant’s current passport.JWU students enrolled at the Providence 7. Certified word-for-word translations of allCampus are eligible to participate in the Army credentials issued in any other languageROTC program at Providence College, subject other than English must be submittedto eligibility requirements. Scholarship opportu- along with those credentials.nities are available through this program.For more information, contact the professor of All documents and information should be clearmilitary science at Providence College at and legible; if important information cannot be 33
    • read by the International Admissions staff, the Designated Institution (D.I.) code is: 3465.admissions process is delayed and, as a This code should be used on your TOEFLresult, so is the acceptance/Form I-20 process. registration form so that your scores will be sent to us directly.All documents must be sent toJohnson & Wales University Minimum TOEFL requirements (all levels,International Admissions undergraduate and graduate) are as follows:8 Abbott Park Place TOEFL score of 80 (Internet-based or IBT)Providence, RI 02903 USA TOEFL score of 550 (pen/paper or PPT)Telephone: 401-598-1074 Individual section scores must also meetFax: 401-598-4641 minimum score requirements.E-mail: intl@admissions.jwu.edu Acceptable proof of English proficiency mayEnglish Language Proficiency also include one of the following comparableApplicants whose native language is not English English proficiency examinations:must provide proof of English proficiency. •IELTS (Cambridge), Band 6.5English language proficiency is required for •ELS Level 112 Certificate of Completionadmission to all programs of study at Johnson and Academic Report& Wales University, regardless of country of •City & Guilds Pitman ESOL Examinations –citizenship or residency. Higher Intermediate or Expert Level •The London Tests of English LTE, Level 4Students who need to develop English (Advanced)proficiency are accepted into the English as a •MELAB (Michigan English Language Battery)Second Language program (ESL) at Johnson & – 77Wales University’s English Language Institute •S.T.E.P. Eiken – (Society for Testing Englishprior to beginning regular degree studies. Proficiency) – Grade 1Johnson & Wales University’s English as a Other English language examination resultsSecond Language (ESL) program allows stu- will also be considered, and experiencedents to focus on the areas where they need studying in the English language, asthe most improvement, and some advanced- documented through school transcripts,level ESL students may take a regular under- will be taken into consideration.graduate degree class in place of an ESLclass which has been exempted because of To meet English proficiency requirements,proficiency in a particular area. This flexibility all English language examination results mustprovides students with the most efficient be submitted on an official test transcripttransition into college. which is no more than two years old.English Language Placement testing for newESL students will be given before the begin- Students may be exempted from individualning of each term. JWU uses the students’ ESL classes based on their individual TOEFLscores from this testing to place students into Test (or equivalent test) section scores.the appropriate level of ESL. The Institutional Individual section scores and total scoresTOEFL will be also offered to students who must also meet minimum score require-score at a high level in their ESL placement ments; Johnson & Wales University alsotests, to be determined by the English reserves the right to require ESL classesLanguage Institute’s departmental policy. to increase proficiency in a particular area, regardless of total TOEFL or other test scores.TOEFL RequirementsJohnson & Wales University recognizes Students who do not submit one of the abovethe TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign tests at the required level of proficiency will beLanguage) as proof of English proficiency. enrolled in the English as a Second LanguageTOEFL scores must be received as official program (see “English Language Proficiency”ETS scores. The Johnson & Wales University on this page) and registered for ESL classes.34
    • International Transfer Credit colleges, universities and educationalStudents who wish to transfer to JWU should organizations throughout the world. Some ofsubmit an application for admission listing all these includeschools attended with dates of attendance anddegrees or diplomas completed or in progress. Educational Institute of the American Hotel & Lodging Association (E.I. of AH&LA)Certified word-for-word translations of all Caribbean Examinations Council — Advancedcredentials issued in any other language Proficiency (CAPE) Examinations ACT Education Solutions Ltd. — Global Assessmentother than English must be submitted along Certificate (GAC)with those credentials. EDEXCEL International, Higher National Diplomas (HND) Industrie — und Handleskammer (IHK), Germany —To assist with the transfer credit review Professional Diplomas in Culinary Arts,process, course descriptions, syllabus and Hotel Management, Restaurant Managementprogram information should also be submitted. National Council for Hotel Management and Catering Technology (IHMCTAN), India —Credit is generally awarded for courses a Hotel Management Diplomastudent completed with grades of “C” or bet- Failte Ireland, National Tourism Developmentter (or equivalent) which are similar in level, Authority, Ireland — Certificate incontent and duration to JWU courses in the Professional Cookerystudent’s intended major. Accepted transferstudents will be sent a copy of their degree Traveling to Providenceaudit showing the credit accepted toward The nearest international airports aretheir chosen major. Providence, Rhode Island and Boston, Massachusetts. Train and bus services fromArticulation Agreements Boston to Providence are also available.JWU is proud to have a large number of inter-national articulation agreements and transfer STANDARDIzED TESTINGcredit equivalencies in place with schools and AFTER ADMISSIONprograms which facilitate student transfer toJohnson & Wales University for bachelor’s PLACEMENT TESTS (non-credit, no fees): Thesedegree completion. The university is continu- tests are administered for placement purposesously working to develop partnerships with only to all new students, including transferschools around the world for the purpose of students, upon entrance. In situations whereoffering diverse educational opportunities for two or more levels of a subject are requiredtransfer students. International Articulation for graduation, the student’s academic careerAgreements include in this subject begins at the level determinedAt-Sunrice Global Chef Academy, Singapore by the placement test. This is particularly trueCIBT School of Business (AH&LA Hospitality when a student has previous academic Management Diploma), China experience in a subject. Placement tests areWoosong University, Korea currently administered to determine math andTaylor’s University College, Malaysia foreign language placement. For a studentBarbados Community College, Barbados placing out of all required levels of a foreignBermuda College, Bermuda language, departmental policy and recom-College of the Bahamas, Bahamas mendation will determine if a DepartmentalDCT, International Hotel & Business Management Challenge Examination is in order for credit. School, Switzerland Students with documented disabilities mustSeojeong College, Korea provide documentation two weeks prior toTurks and Caicos Islands Community College (TCICC), Turks & Caicos Islands testing to receive accommodations.In addition, JWU recognizes and grants transfercredit exemptions for a number of diplomasand qualifications provided by accredited 35
    • PRIOR LEARNING ASSESSMENT DEPARTMENTAL CHALLENGE EXAMINATIONS (credit by examination: for-credit, with fees):PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT: Students may Departmental exams may be taken forearn credits for the knowledge or skills they specifically designated courses within ahave mastered outside the classroom through department. Because of previous academicvolunteer work, employment, travel programs, and/or work experience, all matriculatingorganizations or other comparable sources. students may request such an exam when they feel they have completed the require-To apply for a Portfolio Assessment, students ments of a specific JWU course. Some testingmust meet the university’s residency options require specific criteria in order torequirements and complete the Portfolio take tests. Refer to the Standardized TestingDevelopment non-credit seminar. This semi- and Prior Learning Assessment Brochure,nar will meet for three two-hour sessions. available at Student Academic & FinancialStudents must discuss this option with an Services, for criteria and fees.academic counselor before they are eligibleto enroll. For annual examination schedules with examination dates and application deadlines,The seminar assists students with the refer to the university’s Standardized Testingdevelopment of a portfolio that describes and Prior Learning Assessment Brochure.and documents how the learning took place. This brochure may be obtained from StudentThe completed portfolio is submitted to the Academic & Financial Services.appropriate department designee for review.The assessor will review the portfolio and In all cases, the academic departmenteither validate the student’s learning by determines policy as it relates to the testingawarding college credits, request additional options for each course in the department.information, or deny the request for credits. Several options may be available to students,Portfolios will not be returned to the students; and it is recommended that students seekthey become property of the university. the advice of an academic counselor.Once the seminar is completed, eligible Policies for Portfolio Assessment, Challengestudents, in consultation with an academic and CLEP Examinations:counselor, may submit additional portfolios. 1. Portfolio Assessment and ChallengeRefer to the Standardized Testing and Prior Examinations cannot be repeated if failed.Learning Assessment Brochure, available at 2. CLEP Exams, if failed, can be repeated inStudent Academic & Financial Services for six months.more information on required fees. 3. Portfolio Assessment, CLEP Exams and Challenge Exams may not be substitutedCLEP EXAMINATION (for-credit, with fees): for a class previously failed or one whereThe College-Level Examination Program of a withdrawal (W) or a withdrawal/fail (WF)the College Board tests are widely accepted grade has been issued. They may not benational examinations in various subjects. substituted for a class previously taken orThe American Council on Education’s recom- a class in which the student is presentlymended score is required to earn credit. JWU scheduled.subject equivalencies are determined by each 4. The standardized examinations or portfoliosdepartment for each exam. These exams are mentioned above must fall within thetreated as transfer credit for entering fresh- residency requirement for each degree.men and juniors transferring to JWU, or from 5. Seminar, application and processing feesone JWU college or school to another. JWU are nonrefundable.is a national CLEP examination site. Consult 6. The university recognizes up to a maximumthe CLEP application for required fees. of 45 quarter credits earned through Prior Learning Assessment. 7. Students must present a valid picture ID when testing.36
    • After being determined eligible to test or For more information about the Freshmanenroll in a seminar, students will be notified Advanced Studies Track, articulation agree-by e-mail of the time and location of their test ments or Credit for College programs, contactor seminar. The Standardized Testing and Admissions.Prior Learning Assessment Brochure listingcourse options may be obtained from Student International BaccalaureateAcademic & Financial Services. For additional Johnson & Wales University recognizes thepolicies/information for Portfolio, Challenge International Baccalaureate Diploma andand CLEP options, refer to the brochure. Certificate Examination. JWU will award 4.5–9.0 quarter credits for standard andCulinary Advanced Standing higher-level exams with a score of 4 or betterProspective students who possess advanced as applicable for the intended JWU major.knowledge and skills in these food-related Students must submit an official I.B.O.areas may apply for the Culinary Arts or examination transcript from the InternationalBaking & Pastry Arts Advanced Standing Baccalaureate Organization.Examination. The results of the examina-tion are considered in addition to academic GENERAL CERTIFICATE OF EDUCATION ADVANCED LEVEL (A-LEVEL)records and a letter of recommendation from Johnson & Wales University will award upa food-related employer and/or teacher. to 12 quarter credits per subject for GCE Advanced Level Examinations (excludingIt is generally recommended that applicants General Paper) passed with grade equivalentshave completed an advanced food service of C or better. Up to 6 quarter credits may becurriculum or have a minimum of two to awarded for GCE A.S. (Advanced Subsidiary)five years of extensive food service work examinations. Students must submit anexperience. official or verified certificate or statement of results issued by the U.K. examinations board.Students who are selected for this acceler-ated program are required to complete a CARIBBEAN ADVANCED PROFICIENCY10-week summer program. Upon successful EXAMINATIONS (CAPE)completion of the summer program, students Johnson & Wales University will award up toattain sophomore standing in the fall. 13.5 quarter credits per subject for two-year CAPE examinations passed with a grade ofStudents must be accepted for admission to IV or better. Up to 4.5 quarter credits may beJohnson & Wales University prior to applying awarded for single unit CAPE examinations.for Advanced Standing. Contact Admissions Students must submit an official or verifiedfor further information. statement of results issued by the CaribbeanFAST and Credit for College Programs Examinations Council (CXC).Johnson & Wales University offers studentsan opportunity to earn credits toward a JWUdegree while they are still in high schoolthrough approved articulation agreementsbetween Johnson & Wales University and thestudent’s high school. Culinary Arts studentsenrolled in approved tech-prep programs whomeet academic requirements may be eligibleto earn up to 9 quarter credits toward theirCulinary Arts associate degree through ourFreshman Advanced Study Track (FAST).Students enrolled in approved hospitality,business and technology programs who meetthe academic requirements may also be eligi-ble to earn transfer credits through our Creditfor College Program. 37
    • REGIONAL ADMISSIONS CAN I REQUEST A SPECIFIC RESIDENCE HALL?REPRESENTATIvES The online housing system allows you to filter for the hall of your choice, provided it is avail-The admissions staff of the university able at the time you select a room and it isincludes regional admissions representatives a hall in which you are eligible to live. Pleasewho visit high schools and personally assist note that space on campus fills up quickly,students from their areas. so the sooner you log on to select, the better your chances of securing your preferred hall.The admissions representative from your CAN I LIVE OFF CAMPUS?area will be happy to meet with you and Generally, you may live off campus as aanswer any questions you may have about freshman if you meet at least one of thethe university, application procedures and following criteria: you are married or have afinancial aid programs. A full listing of the same sex domestic partner relationship thatregional admissions representatives meets certain eligibility requirements; are aand their phone numbers can be found at parent; are at least 21 years of age; arewww.jwu.edu. Click on Admissions & Aid, living at home with a relative, parent, orthen Your Admissions Rep. guardian and commuting within a 50-mile radius of campus; are a transfer student; are not a U.S. citizen, a permanent resident,QUESTIONS & ANSWERS or an eligible non-citizen able to receive fed- eral financial aid; or are not eligible to live onWhen students come to JWU for admissions campus.interviews, they ask a variety of questionsabout the university. Here are some of the WHERE DO I WASH MY CLOTHES?most commonly asked questions. All residence halls have card-operated laundry facilities. Harborside Village and The CoveHOW WILL CLASSES BE SELECTED MY have a washer and dryer in each unit and doFIRST YEAR? not require a card or coins to operate.All freshmen are registered for courses firstterm by Student Academic Services. Students DO I BRING MY OWN BED LINENS AND TOWELS?register for courses online via jwuLink, the Yes. All beds are twin-size (extra long), exceptuniversity’s Web services site, in their second at Harborside Village, which are full-size. Youterm and throughout their JWU academic should also bring a pillow, bedspread and/career. or quilt, desk lamp, mirror and coat hangers. Limit what you bring until you see the size ofCAN I REQUEST A PARTICULAR ROOMMATE? your room and what your roommates bring.Yes, you may request with whom you wouldlike to live. You and your preferred roommate WHAT KIND OF CLOTHES SHOULD I BRING?must have paid the university reservation Closet and drawer space is limited, so youfee and have completed the online housing should bring seasonal clothing. You’ll findapplication. Your preferred roommate must that you will wear mostly casual clothing.also accept your request in order for you beplaced into the same room. The university Culinary Arts and Baking & Pastry Arts studentsdoes not accept or place co-ed room requests. receive three chef coats and two pairs of chefRoommate requests are not guaranteed. pants, and are responsible for keeping them clean. When in academic classes, CulinaryHOW DOES THE UNIVERSITY MATCH Arts and Baking & Pastry Arts students mustROOMMATES? wear the chef’s uniform, with the exceptionWhen you complete the Residential Life online of the hat, apron and side towel. Thesehousing contract, you will be asked to submit students will be provided with new uniformscertain personal preferences. The information at each academic level. Additional chef’syou provide will be used to match you with uniforms may be purchased at the Harborsidea roommate. Bookstore.38
    • WHAT’S THE CLIMATE LIKE IN RHODE ISLAND? desk while the visitor is in the residence hall.As the saying goes, “If you don’t like the Visitors may only stay for three consecutiveweather in New England, wait a minute.” nights prior to non-class days. Johnson &Rhode Island’s climate is moderated some- Wales University reserves the right to denywhat by the ocean, so winters are not as and/or limit this visitation privilege.severe as in, for instance, upstate New Yorkor even western Massachusetts. However, CAN I HAVE A REFRIGERATOR?occasionally there are bad snowstorms Students may opt to rent a MicroFridge (aand extreme cold in the winter (there are refrigerator, freezer and microwave in one unit)downhill ski areas within a three- to four- through the MicroFridge company, with thehour drive in Vermont, New Hampshire and exception of The Cove, Harborside Village andMassachusetts). Autumn and spring are often Renaissance Hall residents. These residencerainy, with the temperature ranging from 50 halls have a full-size fridge in the kitchen.to 70 degrees. WHAT IS THE UNIVERSITY’S POLICY REGARDINGWHAT KIND OF SECURITY IS PROVIDED ON ALCOHOL AND DRUGS ON CAMPUS?CAMPUS? In accordance with the Federal Drug-FreeAll residence halls have 24-hour supervision Workplace Act and Drug-Free Schools andand no one is authorized to enter unless he Communities Act, Johnson & Wales Universityor she has a student ID or is accompanied prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribu-by a student living in the building. For more tion, dispensation, possession or use ofinformation on Campus Safety & Security, narcotics, drugs, other controlled substancessee Page 70. or alcohol at the workplace and in the educa- tional setting. Possession or use of alcoholicCAN I HAVE OVERNIGHT GUESTS? beverages anywhere on university premisesStudents residing in East, South, West, is prohibited except for lawful use at events,McNulty, Snowden or Xavier Hall are not per- operations or programs sanctioned by uni-mitted to host overnight guests on university versity officials. Unlawful for these purposesschool nights (i.e., nights when university means in violation of federal, state or localclasses will be held the next day). Guests statutes, regulations or ordinances. Workplacemust be checked out by midnight and can- is defined as either university premises or anynot re-enter the residence hall until 9 a.m. place where university business is conductedthe next day. No overnight visitor can remain away from university premises. Educationalin a residence hall for more than three con- setting includes both university premisessecutive nights in a calendar week (Sunday– and approved educational sites off campus.Saturday). Possession or use of illegal drugs, narcotics or drug paraphernalia is absolutely forbidden.Students residing in The Cove, Harborside Johnson & Wales is not, and cannot be con-Village, Harbor View, Imperial or Renaissance sidered, a protector or sanctuary from theHall are permitted to host overnight guests in existing laws of the city, state and federalthe residence hall provided that no overnight governments. To review the university’s Drugvisitor remains in a residence hall more than and Alcohol Policy, please see the Studentthree consecutive nights in a calendar week Handbook available at www.jwu.edu.(Sunday–Saturday). IS THERE A CURFEW?A student may sponsor a visitor to the resi- There is no curfew, but students mustdence hall provided that the student advises respect quiet hours, which are fromthe visitor of university rules and the visitor 11 p.m. to 9 a.m., Sunday throughagrees to follow those rules. All visitors must Wednesday; and midnight to 10 a.m.,sign in and out on the visitor’s log at the resi- Thursday through Saturday. During final examdence hall front desk. weeks, 24-hour quiet hours are in effect.Both the visitor and his or her sponsoringresident must leave a picture ID card withthe attendant at the residence hall front 39
    • WHAT’S THE FOOD LIKE? Episcopal: Grace Church, 175 MathewsonAlthough it is not always possible to provide Street, Providence, 401-331-3225special menus for religious, health or personalreasons, Johnson & Wales University’s dining Hindu: Shri Laxmi Narayan Temple,centers make every effort to accommodate 117 Waverly Street, Ashland, Mass.,students in need of such diets. A wide variety 508-881-5775of food is available in the university’s diningcenters, providing students with many oppor- Jewish: Temple Beth El, 70 Orchard Avenue,tunities to find the types of foods they enjoy. Providence, 401-331-6070WHERE CAN I CONDUCT PERSONAL BANKING? Lutheran: Gloria Dei Lutheran Church,The following are some of the larger banks in 15 Hayes Street, Providence, 401-421-5860the area. Methodist: Mathewson Street UnitedFor students living in Downcity Campus Methodist Church, 134 Mathewson Street,residence halls Providence, 401-331-8900Bank of America, 100 Westminster Street,Providence, 401-278-6000 Muslim: Masjid Al-IslamBankRI, One Turks Head Place, Providence, 195 Beverage Hill Rd., Pawtucket401-456-5152 (There is a BankRI ATM 401-762-0107located in McNulty Hall.)Citizens Bank, 63 Westminster Street, Presbyterian: Providence Presbyterian Church,Providence, 401-456-7010 (There is a 500 Hope Street, Providence, 401-861-1136Citizens Bank ATM located in Xavier Hall.) Unitarian-Universalist: First Unitarian ChurchSovereign Bank, One Financial Plaza, of Providence, One Benevolent Street,Providence, 401-752-1900 Providence, 401-421-7970For students living in Harborside Campus WILL I BE PENALIzED FOR MISSING CLASSresidence halls BECAUSE OF A RELIGIOUS OBSERVANCE?Citizens Bank, 1477 Broad Street, Providence, As with all academic matters including401-784-8960 (There is a Citizens Bank ATM attendance, extenuating circumstances arelocated in the Commons.) handled on an individual basis. The intentSovereign Bank, 1750 Broad Street, of the attendance policy is not to penalizeCranston, 401-941-4600 students but to help them develop a businesslike attitude toward their studies.WHERE CAN I ATTEND RELIGIOUS SERVICES? The university believes that such an atten-The following are churches representing dance policy serves the student population’ssome of the major religious denominations. best interest. With appropriate planning,Students who are looking for a place of worship, students should be able to observe religiousa minister of their faith or a community that holidays within the absence policy. Excessiveshares similar faith values, may also contact absences may result in reduction of gradesSpiritual Life for assistance. For a complete in accordance with stated faculty policy givenlisting of places of worship, consult the at the beginning of each course and mayProvidence Yellow Pages. also result in a punitive withdrawal or withdrawal/pass from the course. AttendanceBaptist: Calvary Baptist Church, 747 Broad policies for experiential education assign-Street, Providence, 401-461-7507 ments and laboratories are more rigid and will be fully explained during orientations.Catholic: Xavier Chapel, Xavier Complex,Providence, 401-598-1830Congregational: Beneficent CongregationalChurch, 300 Weybosset Street, Providence,401-331-984440
    • WHAT KIND OF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION IS WHERE ARE THE BEACHES?AVAILABLE IN PROVIDENCE? Rhode Island has some beautiful beachesThe Rhode Island Public Transit Authority in the South County area, located about(RIPTA) is a statewide bus system used by 40 minutes south of Providence.many commuters to and from the city of Narragansett, Sand Hill Cove, ScarboroughProvidence. Students can ride these public and Matunuck beaches are among those youbuses free with a JWU student ID. For more might like to visit. First, Second and Thirdinformation or to receive a bus schedule, call beaches in Newport are also popular.401-781-9400. WHAT DO I DO IF I GET SICK WHILE INDOES THE UNIVERSITY HAVE ITS OWN SCHOOL?TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM? There are two Health Services offices onYes. Because the university has facilities in campus: one at Wales Hall in Downcityseveral locations in and around the city of Providence and one at the HarborsideProvidence, it maintains free bus service. Recreation Center at the Harborside Campus.These buses run regularly to and from all Both resident and commuter students mayresidence and academic facilities, as well as use these facilities.to special university functions and athleticprograms. Bus schedules are posted in each Should you become ill when a nurse isresidence hall and in academic buildings, not on duty, speak to your resident assistantand are available at University Transportation, — he or she will seek help if necessary.located at the Harborside Campus on321 Harborside Boulevard. Commuting students can likewise seek assistance from the resident assistant atWHERE ARE THE LOCAL AIRPORT, BUS AND any residence hall when a nurse is not onTRAIN STATIONS? duty. Cases not treatable by the nursesT.F. Green State Airport is located in Warwick, will be referred to the university physician.R.I. Most major airlines fly in and out of Emergency cases will be transported toT.F. Green. To make travel arrangements, an area hospital. Local hospitals includecontact your local travel agent or the airlineof your choice. Kent Hospital: 455 Toll Gate Road, Warwick, 401-737-7000The Peter Pan bus terminal is located atOne Peter Pan Way in Providence, a short Rhode Island Hospital (near both the DowncityRIPTA bus ride from the Downcity Campus. For and Harborside Campuses):a Peter Pan bus schedule, call 401-751-8800. 593 Eddy Street, Providence, 401-444-4000The Greyhound Bus Lines terminal is locatedat One Kennedy Plaza. For a Greyhound Bus Roger Williams Hospital (near the Downcityschedule, call 401-454-0790. Campus): 825 Chalkstone Avenue, Providence, 401-456-2000Amtrak Inter-City Rail Passenger Servicehas a Providence terminal located in thedowncity area. For general information andreservations, call 1-800-872-7245. 41
    • CAN I HAVE A CAR ON CAMPUS?Your decision to bring a car on campusshould be a well-informed one since parkingspace is extremely limited. We recommendthat freshman resident students do not bringcars to campus.Parking for freshmen is available at theHarborside Campus only. Students, bothresidents and commuters, who plan to bring avehicle on university property must register thisvehicle with Campus Safety & Security uponarrival. Overnight parking on campus isrestricted to residential students with theappropriate permit.The issuance of parking permits forRenaissance Hall, Harbor View, HarborsideVillage and The Cove is strictly limited toupperclassmen.Parking permits must be obtained fromCampus Safety & Security and may be pur-chased on a yearly or term basis. The fee forresidents is $100 per year or $40 per term.The commuter student parking permit fee is$65 per year or $25 per term. The fee forparking at The Cove is $375 per term.Parking rules are strictly enforced and failureto adhere will result in sanctions, includingremoval of the vehicle from campus and/orsuspension or revocation of parking privileges.The university is not responsible for anyvehicle or its contents while it is parked onuniversity property.IS THERE PARKING AVAILABLE OFF CAMPUS?There are several parking lots and garagesin Downcity Providence. Plan to spend $75to $150 a month to rent a space. A fewlocal service stations also lease spaces ata somewhat lower cost.42
    • Financing Your EducationTuiTion and Fees ReseRvaTion Fee and oTheR FeesThe following tuition and fees schedule is Reservation Fee $300effective for the 2011–2012 academic year. The $300 reservation fee is payable uponTuition and fees are subject to change annually. acceptance to the university. The university observes the May 1 reservation fee/depositannual Tuition $23,955 deadline and encourages students to researchGeneral Fee $1,152 all schools before placing a reservation fee.Room and Board* Reservation fees received after May 1, 2011 Value Room $9,261 will be accepted on a space available basis. Apartment (no board) $9,603 Reservation fees received prior to May 1, 2011 Standard Room $10,314 are refundable. Students must also have an Premium Room $11,541 approved payment plan with Student Academic * The fee for certain residence halls may include board. & Financial Services by July 8, 2011 in order For more information contact Residential Life at to guarantee a room assignment. Students 401-598-1141. who establish an approved payment plan after July 8, 2011 could be placed in aTuition is applicable to all students, including temporary assignment regardless of feethose on approved off-campus programs payment date, although Residential Life willincluding study abroad and internships. make every effort to assign students toStudents enrolled in courses in excess of a permanent room assignments.normal full-time schedule will be assessedan additional tuition charge. For purposes of Requests for refunds of the reservation feetuition billing and financial aid eligibility, will be granted upon written request to thefull-time status is determined on a term university prior to May 1, 2011. After May 1,basis and consists of 12 to 21 quarter credit 2011 the reservation fee of $300 (or $150hours per term. Students carrying more than of such fee in the case of applicants to the21 quarter credit hours will be charged for North Miami Campus) is nonrefundable.each quarter credit over 21. When repeatingcourses already attempted, students may be orientation Fee $300assessed a fee for those courses. Students This nonrefundable fee, which is uniformlyare fee assessed tuition upon course regis- charged, is required of all new students fortration each term. Summer is considered a orientation and term start activities. It isseparate term. charged to students who start during the fall, winter or spring term.The General Fee, which is nonrefundable,includes social and athletic activities, student extension studentshealth and accident insurance and student Tuition rates for extension students are billedpublications. based on the number of quarter credit hours scheduled.Room only is for the academic year andincludes residence hall accommodations and early enrollment Program Tuitiondoes not include meals. Early Enrollment Program tuition is 50 percent of the 2011–2012 tuition charge.Room and Board is for the academic year and Refer to Page 32 for a description of theselected rooms have access to 15 meals per early enrollment Program. Early Enrollmentweek. This does not apply to all residence Program students are also subject to appro-halls. For more information contact Residential priate university fees, including full generalLife at 401-598-1141. fee and full room and board charges. Early Enrollment Program students are not eligible 43
    • for any federal financial aid or institutional PaymenT oPTionsneed-based aid while enrolled in the program.Early Enrollment Program students should i. annual Paymentscontact Student Academic & Financial The student may make one payment in fullServices for information on alternative fund- for the entire academic year. Students areing and to determine how eligible scholar- responsible for paying all charges in fullships will be affected while in the Early or making appropriate arrangements by theEnrollment Program. published due date of July 8, 2011.english as a second Language (esL) ii. Term Paymentsstudents Students may choose to make threeStudents who are studying in the English payments a year, which are payable by theas a Second Language (ESL) program will publicized due dates established prior tobe charged $5,300 tuition per term. This each term. The due date for September 2011program charge will be applied for each term is July 8, 2011.the student remains in the ESL program. ESLstudents are not eligible for Johnson & Wales iii. monthly PaymentsUniversity scholarships or grants. Students may choose to pay the annual amount due in convenient monthly payments. Thisstudent health and accident insurance option is available through Tuition ManagementAll registered day program and graduate Systems (TMS) at www.afford.com. There is anstudents taking credit hours are covered by enrollment fee to participate. Many such plansa health and accident insurance plan for the are essentially interest free, but some accountsterms enrolled during the academic year. This may incur late fees, reinstatement fees or otherdoes not include the summer term. Insurance fees. Students interested in this option mustbrochures are available at several locations contract with TMS and pay the first payment, inthroughout the university. Refer to the insur- addition to the enrollment fee, by the publishedance brochure for a definition of the effective due date of July 8, 2011.date of coverage, policy limits, policy termina-tion and the opportunity to continue coverage All Johnson & Wales University studentsover the summer. Online courses do not must fulfill their financial obligations to thefulfill this requirement. Students that are not university by the published due date ofeligible for the university Student Health and July 8, 2011 (all off-term entrants must meetAccident program can apply for short term the financial obligation by the published datemedical insurance through the Gallagher for that term).Koster website: www.gallagherkoster.com. To meet your financial obligation you must doBooks and supplies one of the following by the published due date:The cost of books and supplies is approxi- • Make a full term payment.mately $1,800 per academic year. These • Contract with TMS and pay the firstcosts are not applied to the student’s monthly payment, as well as theinvoice. Books and supplies must be paid for enrollment fee.at the university’s bookstores at the time of • Have an approved loan which coverspurchase. The bookstores operate a textbook the annual balance.sales/buy-back program to help students • Have an approved payment plan withminimize these costs. Student Academic & Financial Services using a combination of the aboveGeneral Transportation expenses options.The cost of attendance includes a reasonabletransportation allowance. These costs are If you do not fulfill your financial obligation bydetermined annually by the university and are the published due date, your housing assign-not applied to the student’s invoice. ment will be removed. In addition, your accep- tance to enroll for the 2011–2012 academic year may also be revoked.44
    • ReFund PoLicies University enrollment disputes must be submit- ted online within 30 days after the end of theGeneral Policy: To the extent that any charges term during which the student was enrolled.due to the university remain unpaid, no To submit a dispute, students must completerefund check will be issued. No tuition or the appropriate form online. No adjustmentsfees (other than the reservation fee) will be to tuition and fees or financial aid will beassessed for terms that the student does made until the dispute is researched andnot begin. Students who withdraw from the either approved or denied. No disputes will beuniversity prior to the end of the academic considered after 30 days from the end of theyear will have their financial aid adjusted.* term in which the student was enrolled. Deci-Institutional grants and scholarships sions will be made within 10 business dayswill be reduced in proportion to any tuition and students will receive notification via thecredit received as defined in the university’s e-mail address provided on the dispute form.Withdrawal Credit Policy. Full-term eligibil-ity for institutional loans will be credited to Refund Policy for Georgia Residentsthe student’s account to the extent that any The following refund policy is applicable tocharges are due the university. The distribu- prospective students and students attendingtion formula for the institutional refund to the Johnson & Wales University who are legalFederal Student Financial Aid program will be residents of the state of Georgia.calculated according to federal regulations. 1. An accepted applicant will receive a refundThe university’s Withdrawal Credit Policy of any amount paid to the university withapplies to all withdrawals from the university, respect to a term if, prior to the commence-voluntary or involuntary. ment of classes for that term, he or she makes a request for a refund to StudentTerm charges, institutional merit scholarships Academic & Financial Services within threeand institutional aid are subject to the business days after making the payment.university’s Withdrawal Credit Policy uponwithdrawal from the university. Term charges 2. A student who provides official notice ofare defined as tuition, and if applicable, withdrawal following the commencementroom only, room and board, the general fee of the academic term will receive a proand orientation fee. Tuition is applicable to rata refund of tuition and fees (other thanall students, including those on approved the orientation fee which is used for theoff-campus programs including study abroad purposes of orientation) as follows:and internships. Merit scholarships andinstitutional aid are defined as any source Percent of total class Refund of Tuitionof funding from Johnson & Wales University. days in the academic and feesThe General Fee is nonrefundable. The offi- term elapsed prior tocial notice of withdrawal from the university date of official noticemay be done in person or by written notifica- of withdrawaltion through Student Academic & Financial 1 day – 5% 95%Services. Refunds are calculated by thedate of termination which is based on the 6% – 10% 90%date Student Academic & Financial Services 11% – 25% 75%receives notification of withdrawal from the 26% – 50% 50%student or faculty member. Any refund due More than 50% No refundwill be issued within 45 days after the datethat the university was first notified of thewithdrawal.* Any student enrolled solely in culinary lab courses, who fails to attempt any of the scheduled courses, will be considered to have withdrawn from the university. 45
    • In the event that a refund is made under this university Withdrawal credit Policypolicy, all institutional aid/scholarships for If a student terminates during:that term will be adjusted on a pro rata basis – the first or second week of the term, thebased upon the applicable refund. university will credit 90 percent of the term charges. If eligible, all institutional aid/Official notice of withdrawal must be made scholarships for that term will be adjustedby a student under this policy in person or by to 10 percent.written notification to Student Academic & – the third or fourth week of the term, theFinancial Services. The date of an official university will credit 50 percent of the termnotice of withdrawal is the date that it is charges. If eligible, all institutional aid/received by Student Academic & Financial scholarships for that term will be adjustedServices. to 50 percent. – the fifth or sixth week of the term, theRefunds are paid to students within 30 days university will credit 25 percent of the termof the official notice of withdrawal. charges. If eligible, all institutional aid/ scholarships for that term will be adjusted3. In the event that the University Withdrawal to 75 percent. Credit Policy is more favorable than this Refund Policy for Georgia Residents, After the sixth week of the term, students will the university will refund to the student be responsible for 100 percent of the term the greater amount in accordance with charges and will receive 100 percent of that the university Withdrawal Credit Policy. term’s eligible institutional aid/scholarships.notice Regarding Georgia nonpublic Examples of university refund policies arePostsecondary education commission available upon request in Student Academic(nPec) student complaint Process & Financial Services. Refer to Page 51 forAny person/student claiming damage or loss the Federal Withdrawal Policy.against Johnson & Wales University may file averified complaint with the executive directorof NPEC after going through the university FinanciaL oBLiGaTionsComplaints and Grievances process. The Continued enrollment as a student in goodcomplaint must contain a detailed description standing and certain other student benefitsof the claim, including dates, times, and full (diplomas, transcripts, etc.) are conditionednames of all involved. Verification means that upon being current in all financial obligationsthe complaint must be signed by the student/ to the university, including loans in which theperson filing the complaint and notarized, university appears as a holder or guarantor.and state that the matters set forth in thecomplaint are true and correct. The complaintshall be investigated by the appropriate sTudenT FinanciaL seRvices (sFs)Standards Administrator (SA) of NPEC.The SA shall attempt to resolve the complaintbetween the university and the student. FinanciaL PLanninGIf the complaint cannot be resolved, the SA The university understands that financing anwill issue a decision and inform each party education can be a very complex process forthat either has a right to request a hearing in many students. To assist with this process,writing before the executive director of NPEC financial planning counselors are available towithin 10 days of receipt of the SA’s decision. work with students and their families on anThe executive director may set a date and individual basis to help them best utilize theirtime for a hearing which shall be delivered to own funds and other available resources toboth parties by certified mail. meet educational expenses. For more infor- mation and assistance call 1-800-343-2565 or 401-598-1468.46
    • FinanciaL aid FAFSA information online. Both the student and at least one parent must apply for a PIN.To assist students in meeting their educa-tional expenses, Johnson & Wales University 2. Free application for Federaloffers several types of financial assistance student aid (FaFsa)— scholarships and grants, low-interest The Free Application for Federal Student Aidloans and employment opportunities. In many is available online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Thiscases, qualified students receive a financial form must be completed as soon as possibleaid package which includes all three types of after January 1. The information for financialfinancial aid. Financial aid is awarded on an assistance is then processed by the Federalannual basis and is disbursed in three equal Processor and sent to Student Academic &installments (fall/winter/spring). Financial Services at the university. The FaFsa code is 003404.Descriptions of Johnson & Wales financialassistance scholarship and work programs 3. independent studentsare included in this catalog. To be considered independent for financial aid purposes for the 2011–2012 academicStudents participating in Study Abroad year, students must answer yes to one ofprograms may be eligible for financial aid. the following questions:For more information, please contact 1. Were you born before January 1, 1988?Student Academic & Financial Services. 2. As of today, are you married? (Answer yes if you are separated, but not divorced.)In an effort to reduce the loan burden during 3. At the beginning of the 2011–2012the student’s first year, Johnson & Wales school year, will you be working on aUniversity will attempt to package students master’s or doctorate program (such aswith a higher percentage of grant aid. an M.A., MBA, M.D., J.D., Ph.D., Ed.D. or graduate certificate, etc.)?important note: There is a cap on the 4. Are you currently serving on active dutytotal dollar amount of scholarships, grants, in the U.S. Armed Forces for purposesawards, prizes and other aid that the univer- other than training?sity will award to a single student during a 5. Are you a veteran of the U.S. Armedgiven academic year. The maximum amount Forces?is determined prior to each year’s financial 6. Do you have children who will receiveaid awarding process and includes both more than half of their support fromuniversity funded and university administered you between July 1, 2011 andmonies. Please contact Student Academic June 30, 2012?& Financial Services for further information 7. Do you have dependents (other thanregarding this cap. your children or spouse) who live with you and who receive more than half ofHOW TO APPLy their support from you, now and throughTo be considered for financial assistance, June 30, 2012?complete the steps listed below and submit 8. When you were age 13 or older, wereall required documentation as soon as both your parents deceased, were youpossible after January 1. students must in foster care or were you a depen-reapply for financial aid each year. Student dent/ward of the court?Academic & Financial Services holds all 9. As of today, are you an emancipatedinformation in strict confidence. minor as determined by a court in your state of legal residence?1. Personal identification number (Pin) 10. As of today, are you in legal guardian-Students and their parents can apply for ship as determined by a court in youra PIN at www.pin.ed.gov. The PIN allows state of legal residence?students and parents to sign the FAFSA elec- 11. At any time on or after July 1, 2010,tronically and to correct previously processed did your high school or school district 47
    • homeless liaison determine that you student and his/her family. The student’s were an unaccompanied youth who total family contribution is based on an was homeless? analysis of the information which the student 12. At any time on or after July 1, 2010, and/or parent supplied on the FAFSA. Some did the director of an emergency shelter of the items considered are total family program funded by the U.S. Department income, assets, the number of people in the of Housing and Urban Development household, the number of siblings in college, determine that you were an unaccom- and the student’s own resources, such as panied youth who was homeless? earnings, savings, and untaxed income which 13. At any time on or after July 1, 2010, the student may receive. Johnson & Wales did the director of a runaway or home- University also considers these items when less youth basic center or transitional determining eligibility for university funds. living program determine that you were an unaccompanied youth who was Campus-based financial aid programs, homeless or were self-supporting and including the Federal Supplemental at risk of being homeless? Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG), Federal Perkins Loan and Federal Work-StudyStudents who cannot answer yes to one of programs are administered by Johnson &the above questions are considered dependent Wales University. Students apply for theseand must complete their Free Application for programs through the filing of the FAFSA.Federal Student Aid as a dependent student.Please feel free to contact Student Academic Federal Pell Grant& Financial Services with any questions. The Federal Pell Grant is a federally funded entitlement program to assist needy under-4. verification and other documentation graduate students. Eligibility for these grantsStudent Academic & Financial Services may is determined by the U.S. Department ofrequest additional documentation to verify infor- Education based on the information providedmation provided on the FAFSA (i.e. verification on the FAFSA. Pell recipients can attend atworksheet and untaxed income worksheet). less than half-time status and remain eligibleThe student and his/her parents may be for a portion of their Pell Grant. Students withrequired to submit signed and dated copies a previous bachelor’s degree are not eligibleof their Federal Income Tax Returns (1040). for a Federal Pell Grant.The student’s financial aid package will not becomplete until all requested documentation The maximum Pell Grant award for thehas been received and reviewed by Financial 2010–11 award year (July 1, 2010 to JuneAid. In addition, all student loan borrowers 30, 2011) was $5,550. The maximum Pellmust attend an entrance and exit counseling Grant award can change each award yearsession during which the student will and depends on program funding. Furtherbe advised on his/her loan obligations. information may be obtained by visiting the website of the U.S. Department of EducationSTUDENT ELIGIBILITy REqUIREMENTS at http://studentaid.ed.gov.Financial aid will be distributed to the studentbased upon the student’s financial need. Federal supplemental educationalAll students seeking financial assistance opportunity Grant (seoG)must file a FAFSA with the Federal Processor. This federally funded program provides finan-The FAFSA form is used to determine the cial assistance to students who demonstratestudent’s financial need. exceptional financial need. The amount Johnson & Wales University awards rangesFinancial need is the difference between the from $100 up to a maximum of approximatelycost of the student’s education (tuition and $500 per academic year and is based onfees, room and board, books and supplies, financial need and the availability of funds.transportation and personal expenses) Students with a previous bachelor’s degreeand the total contribution expected from the are not eligible for a Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant.48
    • Federal Work-study Program First-time borrowers are required to completeFederal Work-Study is a federally funded an entrance interview at www.studentloans.gov.program that provides part-time employmentto students with financial need. Positions Students may borrow up to a maximum ofare available throughout the university $3,500 per academic year for the first year ofand with selected off-campus community undergraduate study, $4,500 for the secondservice agencies. year and $5,500 per year for the third and fourth years. The student must begin repay-Work-study gives students the opportunity to ment six months after he/she leaves the uni-earn money to help pay educational expenses. versity or drops below half-time status. TheStudents are paid an hourly rate for actual hours amount of the student’s monthly paymentworked. The amount earned cannot exceed will be determined based upon the amountthe total work-study award. Work-study funds of student debt and the length of the repay-are paid biweekly directly to the student; there- ment period. Please contact Direct Lendingfore, funds will not be applied to the student’s at 1-800-557-7394 for more information onaccount unless arrangements are made with repayment options.Student Academic & Financial Services. William d. Ford Federal direct unsubsidizedFederal Perkins Loan stafford LoanThis low-interest loan is funded by the fed- Like the Direct Subsidized Stafford Loan pro-eral government and administered directly gram, this Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loanby the university. Master Promissory Notes program also offers low-interest loans to stu-for this loan are available at www.jwu.edu dents. While most of the loan terms are the> Admissions & Aid. Select Financial Aid > same as the Subsidized Loan program, thereForms & Applications. Students may borrow are several major differences: (1) studentsup to $4,000 for each year of undergraduate do not have to demonstrate financial need tostudy (the total a student can borrow as an receive a Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loan,undergraduate is $20,000). However, the and (2) the federal government does not payamount a student may borrow may be less interest on the borrower’s behalf while the bor-than the maximum available. The university rower is enrolled in school. During that time,is authorized to award a certain amount the student borrower can choose betweenof Perkins funds each year from the U.S. making quarterly interest payments or “capital-Department of Education. When all avail- izing” interest. “Capitalizing” interest meansable funds for that award year have been that the lender will add interest accrued to thedistributed, no additional award funds can be principal balance. This will eliminate the needmade for that year. The amount a student will for interest payments while in school, but willreceive depends on financial need and the result in a larger principal amount owed uponavailability of funds. repayment.Students must begin to repay this loan nine William d. Ford Federal direct Parent Loanmonths after they leave the university or drop Program for undergraduate students (PLus)below half-time status. The repayment of princi- The Direct PLUS Program provides loans topal and interest may be extended over a 10-year parents of dependent students to attendperiod. The amount of each payment depends college. PLUS borrowers do not have toupon the amount of the student’s debt and the demonstrate need, but are subject to alength of the student’s repayment period. credit analysis by the Department of Education. The parent applying for the loanWilliam d. Ford Federal direct subsidized must fill out a Direct PLUS Master Promissorystafford Loan Note (MPN); an MPN can be completedThis loan program provides low-interest loans online at www.studentloans.gov. In additionto students who demonstrate financial need. the parent must indicate how much they wantA Master Promissory Note for these loans is to borrow. Repayment of this loan will beginavailable on line at www.studentloans.gov. within 30 days of the time the loan is fully 49
    • disbursed annually, or the borrower can con- is not successful in completing the educationaltact the Department of Education to request program and/or obtaining employment.a deferment. The borrowing limit is the total No student is required to apply for, or accept,cost of attendance, minus any financial aid any particular type of financial aid.being received. Johnson & Wales University participatesincreased unsubsidized stafford Limits for in the William D. Ford Federal Direct Loanindependent students and dependent students Program. All Direct Stafford Loans and parentWhose Parents don’t Qualify for a PLus PLUS loans will be borrowed from the U.S.There are higher additional unsubsidized Department of Education.annual loan limits for independent under-graduate students. These higher additional Please note that the loan informationunsubsidized loan limits also apply to depen- described in this catalog is based upon thedent undergraduate students whose parents available information as of the date of theare unable to borrow PLUS loans due to production of this catalog. Updated informa-adverse credit or other documented excep- tion regarding federal grants and loans maytional circumstances. be obtained by visiting the U.S. Department of•$3,500 combined subsidized and/or unsub- Education website at http://studentaid.ed.gov. sidized plus $6,000 additional unsubsidized for independent first-year undergraduates; Applications for these loans are available• $4,500 combined subsidized/and or in Student Academic & Financial Services unsubsidized plus $6,000 additional or on the Direct Lending website at unsubsidized for independent second-year www.studentloans.gov. undergraduates; and Aid from these programs is awarded on the• $5,500 combined subsidized and/or basis of financial need. In order to receive maxi- unsubsidized plus $7,000 additional mum consideration for financial assistance, it is unsubsidized for independent third-, recommended that the student apply as soon fourth- or fifth-year undergraduates. as possible after January 1. The award process for first-year students begins in March of eachsubsidized Total (subsidized and unsubsidized) academic year. Renewal of financial aid is notDEPENDENT UNDERGRADUATES (excluding automatic. Recipients are required to reapplydependent students whose parents don’t each year by the announced deadline.qualify for a PLUS) To be eligible for these programs, studentsFirst year: $3,500–$5,500 must meet the following criteria:Second year: $4,500–$6,500 1. demonstrate financial need; 2. maintain satisfactory academic progressThird year and Beyond: $5,500–$7,500 (financial aid will be suspended until satisfactory academic progress is againINDEPENDENT UNDERGRADUATES AND achieved);DEPENDENT STUDENTS WHOSE PARENTS 3. be enrolled in an eligible degree orDON’T qUALIFy FOR A PLUS certificate program; 4. be enrolled on at least a half-time (at leastFirst year: $3,500–$9,500 6.0 quarter credit hours) basis (studentsSecond year: $4,500–$10,500 enrolled on a less-than-full-time basis may have their financial aid reduced; someThird year and Beyond: $5,500–$12,500 students enrolled on a less-than-half-time basis may qualify for a Federal Pell Grant);noTe: All undergraduate annual loan amounts 5. be a U.S. citizen, permanent resident, orare subject to proration. eligible non-citizen; 6. not owe a refund on a Federal Pell GrantPlease note that a student/borrower remains or be in default on a Federal Perkins Loan,responsible for the repayment of educational Federal Subsidized Stafford Loan, Federalloans that he/she borrows even if the student Unsubsidized Stafford Loan, Parent Loan50
    • for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) or must return a portion of the excess equal to Supplemental Loan for Students (SLS); and the lesser of7. sign a Statement of Educational Purpose, • the student’s institutional charges a Statement of Registration Status and a multiplied by the unearned percentage Statement on Overpayments and Defaults. of the student’s funds • the entire amount of the excess fundsStudents are eligible to receive financial aid aslong as they maintain satisfactory academic If the university is not required to return allprogress as defined on Page 56 of this catalog, excess funds, the student must return theand in the Providence Campus Student remaining amount. Any loan funds that theHandbook. Students who fail to maintain student must return, must be repaid by thesatisfactory academic standing will be notified student (or his or her parents for a PLUSby Student Academic & Financial Services. Allfinancial aid will be suspended until satisfac- Loan) in accordance with the terms of thetory academic progress is again achieved. promissory note.Return of Title iv Funds (federal aid) If a student is responsible for returning grantWhen a student withdraws (or becomes with- funds, the student does not have to returndrawn) during a payment period or period of the full amount. Students are not requiredenrollment, the amount of student financial to return 50 percent of the grant assistanceaid program assistance earned is determined received that is the student’s responsibilityby a specific formula. If the student receives to pay. Any amount not returned is a grant(or the university receives on the student’s overpayment and the student must makebehalf) less assistance than the amount arrangements with the university or Departmentearned, the student may be able to receive of Education to return the funds.those additional funds. Students whoreceived more assistance than what they Federal regulations establish the followingearned must return the excess funds. allocation for students who receive Title IV, HEA program funds:The amount of federal assistance earned is A refund owed to a student who receiveddetermined on a pro-rata basis. That is, if a stu- funds under any Title IV, HEA program willdent completes 30 percent of the payment peri- be returned to the Title IV, HEA programsod or period of enrollment, the student earns from which the student received aid in the30 percent of the federal assistance he or she following order until the amounts receivedwas originally scheduled to receive. Once the by the student from these programs is elim-student completes more than 60 percent of the inated: the Perkins Loan, the Unsubsidized/payment period or period of enrollment, the stu- Subsidized Stafford Loan, the Parent PLUSdent earns all scheduled federal assistance. Loan, the Pell Grant, the FSEOG program, all other sources of aid, and the student.The student’s loan monies (subsidized,unsubsidized and PLUS) must be received FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMSby Johnson & Wales University before the The following programs are the major financialstudent’s notification date, in order for the aid resources available to students. Studentsmoney to be considered within the formula. may receive assistance from any one ofIf the student is eligible for a post-withdrawal these, or from a combination of all of thesedisbursement, a written notice will be mailed programs, in what is called a financial aidrequesting the consent of the borrower to post package. Student eligibility for these programsto the student’s account. The amount of insti- is based on completion and submission oftutional assistance earned is based on the the form(s) described in the how to applyweek that the student withdraws from the uni- section. Since awards are not automaticallyversity and follows the percentage the univer- renewable, students must reapply each year.sity credits the student’s charges (Page 46). All financial aid awards are determined based on an academic year (fall/winter/springIf a student receives excess funds that must terms). Financial aid awards are disbursedbe returned, Johnson & Wales University 51
    • based on this term system, which equates students who are members of Alpha Betato three disbursements. All annual awards Gamma. The application for this scholarship isare posted in three equal amounts. the application for admission to the university.Federal loan programs are applied to the Business Professionals of americastudent’s account with the university in equal scholarship (BPa): The university offers adisbursements per term based on the loan number of BPA scholarships ranging fromperiod and the student’s entrance date. $1,000 up to full tuition. Awards are based on BPA activities and academic record, and areJohnson & Wales university Grant renewable based on continued involvement inThis grant is awarded to students based on and support of BPA. Apply for admission onlinethe annual financial aid awarding process and at www.jwu.edu/apply and indicate member-the student’s financial need. ship. The deadline for full tuition scholarship eligibility is February 1, prior to enrollment.FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE, SCHOLARSHIPSAND WORK PROGRAMS careers through culinary arts Program (c-caP)Last year, Johnson & Wales University awarded scholarship: The university awards scholarshipsmore than $120 million in institutional aid of up to full tuition to incoming students whoto students. Awards range from $500 to full participate in C-CAP’s competition events.tuition. Scholarships, grants, loans and work Applications are available through C-CAP.programs awarded depend on the university All documentation must be submitted to C-CAPbudget, and are dependent on students meet- and all finalists are selected by C-CAP.ing program eligibility requirements. These pro-grams are only available to full-time, undergrad- The circle of academic excellence awardsuate, day school students during the academic include the Pioneer’s Award, the Founder’syear and are not available during the summer Award and the President’s Award. The University Awards Committee, working withterm. Note: Scholarship funds are applied to the Student Financial Services, selects studentsstudent’s account with the university in three for these awards, which are given to enrolledequal disbursements by term (e.g., a $3,000 upperclass students who are excelling aca-Presidential Academic Scholarship recipient demically and who meet certain minimumwould receive $1,000 per term). academic criteria. These renewable scholar- ships are up $5,000 per academic year. ForMost scholarships are renewable for up to four more information on the Circle of Academicconsecutive years of enrollment. For many of Excellence Awards, please see Page 65.the programs listed below, a minimum gradepoint average is required for continued eligibil- culinary essentials scholarship: The univer-ity. Scholarships and grants are not awarded sity awards a number of $1,000 renewablebased on athletic ability or participation. scholarships to students who have participated in the Culinary Essentials program. Apply forimportant note: There is a cap on the total admission online at www.jwu.edu/apply anddollar amount of scholarships, grants, awards, indicate your participation. Amount of scholar-prizes and other aid that the university will ships awarded for participation in specific highaward to a single student during a given aca- school curricula is limited to one per student.demic year. The maximum amount is deter-mined prior to each year’s financial aid award- deca scholarship: The university awards aing process and includes both university funded number of DECA scholarships ranging fromand university administered monies. Please $1,000 up to full tuition. Awards are basedcontact Student Academic & Financial Services on DECA activities and academic record, andfor further information regarding this cap. are renewable based on continued involve- ment in and support of DECA. Apply foralpha Beta Gamma (international honor admission online at www.jwu.edu/apply andsociety) scholarship: A scholarship worth up to indicate membership. The deadline for full$5,000 is awarded to outstanding transfer tuition scholarship eligibility is February 1, prior to enrollment.52
    • distinguished visiting chef scholarship: Future Business Leaders of america (FBLa)Culinary Arts and Baking & Pastry Arts stu- scholarship: The university awards a numberdents are eligible to receive this up-to-$2,000 of FBLA scholarships ranging from $1,000scholarship based upon academic standing up to full tuition. Awards are based on FBLAand faculty recommendations. Financial need activities and academic record, and areis considered. renewable based on continued involvement in and support of FBLA. Apply for admissiondistinguished visiting Professor scholarship: online at www.jwu.edu/apply and indicateThe School of Arts & Sciences, The Hospitality membership. The deadline for full tuitionCollege and the College of Business offer this scholarship eligibility is February 1, prior totuition scholarship of up to $2,000 to enrolled enrollment.hospitality and business students based uponacademic standing and faculty recommendation. Gaebe eagle scout scholarship: A number ofFinancial need is considered. The scholarship renewable scholarships of $1,000 are avail-is renewable for up to two years. able to entering freshmen who have achieved the rank of Eagle Scout in the Boy Scouts ofemployee Tuition scholarship: These scholar- America. Visit www.jwu.edu/scholarships andships are based on institutional policy, with click on the “membership” link for an applica-qualifying criteria stated in the Johnson & tion. The deadline for application is February 1,Wales University staff handbook and faculty prior to enrollment.manual. Applications are available in HumanResources & Payroll. Girl scout Gold award scholarship: A number of renewable scholarships of $1,000 areFaculty scholarship: Johnson & Wales available to entering freshmen who haveUniversity awards a number of scholarships earned the Girl Scout Gold Award. Visitto upperclass students, based upon merit www.jwu.edu/scholarships and click on theand GPA. These nonrenewable awards range “membership” link for an application. Theup to the amount of one term’s tuition, which deadline for application is February 1, prior tois distributed over three terms. enrollment.Family, career and community Leaders of Junior achievement (Ja) scholarship: Theamerica (FccLa) scholarship: The university university offers a number of JA scholarshipsawards a number of FCCLA (formerly FHA-HERO) ranging from $1,000 up to full tuition. Awardsscholarships ranging from $1,000 up to full are based on JA activities and academictuition. Awards are based on FCCLA activities record, and are renewable based on continuedand academic record, and are renewable involvement in and support of JA activities.based on continued involvement in and Apply for admission online at www.jwu.edu/support of FCCLA activities. Apply for apply and indicate membership. The dead-admission online at www.jwu.edu/apply and line for full tuition scholarship eligibility isindicate membership. The deadline for full February 1, prior to enrollment.tuition scholarship eligibility is February 1,prior to enrollment. Lodging management scholarship: JWU offers a number of $1,000 renewableFamily scholarship: If two or more members scholarships for students who haveof your family are simultaneously enrolled in participated in the Hotel & Lodgingfull-time undergraduate day school degree Management program. Apply for admissionprograms at Johnson & Wales University, online at www.jwu.edu/apply and indicateeach enrolled student is granted as much as your participation. Amount of scholarshipsa $2,000 university scholarship per academic awarded for participation in specific highyear (September–May). For more information, school curricula is limited to one per student.contact Student Academic & Financial Services. 53
    • national academy Foundation (naF) Technology student association (Tsa)scholarship: The university awards a number scholarship: The university awards a numberof $1,000 renewable scholarships to students of TSA scholarships ranging from $1,000who have participated in a National Academy up to full tuition. Awards are based on TSAFoundation program. Apply for admission activities and academic record, and are renew-online at www.jwu.edu/apply and indicate your able based on continued involvement in andparticipation. Amount of scholarships awarded support of TSA. Apply for admission online atfor participation in specific high school curricula www.jwu.edu/apply and indicate membership.is limited to one per student. The deadline for full tuition scholarship eligibility is February 1, prior to enrollment.national FFa scholarship: Johnson & WalesUniversity awards a number of FFA scholar- Transfer scholarship: An unlimited number ofships ranging from $1,000 up to full tuition. transfer scholarships up to $3,000 are award-Awards are based on FFA activities and ed to students who plan to continue theiracademic record, and are renewable based education at Johnson & Wales in an associateon continued involvement in and support or bachelor’s degree program. Students mustof FFA. Apply for admission online at have completed 30 semester hours at anotherwww.jwu.edu/apply and indicate membership. institution and maintained a minimum 3.00The deadline for full tuition scholarship eligi- cumulative average. Students must maintainbility is February 1, prior to enrollment. a GPA of 2.75 in order for the scholarship to be renewed. The scholarship application is thePhi Theta Kappa (international honor application for admission to the university.society) scholarship: A scholarship up to$5,000 is awarded to outstanding transfer Tuition exchange scholarship: Johnsonstudents who are members of Phi Theta Kappa. & Wales University extends to children ofThe application for this scholarship is the eligible employees at participating Tuitionapplication for admission to the university. Exchange (TE) institutions the opportunity to apply for a TE scholarship. TE is a reciprocalPresidential academic scholarships: scholarship program for qualified childrenJWU awards academic scholarships to incoming of faculty and staff employed at more thanstudents who are in the top third of their class, 600 participating colleges and universities.have a 3.00 high school GPA and demonstrate A student accepted as a Tuition Exchangeacademic excellence. Awards range from $2,500 scholarship recipient may be awarded up toto full tuition and are renewable provided the full tuition at JWU. Applications are availablerecipient’s GPA does not fall below 2.75. at the participating institution. A completeProstart® scholarship: JWU offers a number list of colleges and universities that areof $1,000 renewable scholarships for stu- part of the program is available atdents who have participated in the ProStart http://tuitionexchange.org.program. Apply for admission online atwww.jwu.edu/apply. Amount of scholarships FUNDED/DONATED SCHOLARSHIPSawarded for participation in specific high Johnson & Wales University administersschool curricula is limited to one per student. donated scholarships which are funded by businesses, individuals and professionalskillsusa scholarship: The university awards organizations. In many cases, students musta number of SkillsUSA scholarships ranging have completed at least one term of enroll-from $1,000 up to full tuition. Awards are ment at Johnson & Wales to be considered.based on SkillsUSA activities and academic These funds are awarded to eligiblerecord, and are renewable based on continued candidates based on established criteria.involvement in and support of SkillsUSA. Applyfor admission online at www.jwu.edu/applyand indicate membership. The deadline forfull tuition scholarship eligibility is February 1,prior to enrollment.54
    • OUTSIDE SCHOLARSHIPS Contact the higher education authority in yourThere are many other potential scholarship home state for more information.sources that students should consider to helpfinance their education. Students should con- The american hotel Foundation: Scholarshiptact the Higher Education Assistance Agency aid is allocated each year by the foundationin their home state for information about the to The Hospitality College. Awards are madepossibility of state grants or scholarships. on the basis of student intent to work in theIt is recommended that students apply for hotel industry, cumulative average and need.outside scholarships as soon as possible Sophomores who are continuing their educa- tion should contact their hospitality advisorbecause most organizations have an applica- for further information.tion deadline as early as March 10th. connecticut chef’s association: ScholarshipsScholarship aid is often available from high are reserved for second-year culinary artsschool and community organizations with students who reside in Connecticut. To apply,which students or their parent(s) may be affili- submit a Free Application for Federal Studentated. Local libraries are an excellent resource Aid (FAFSA), letters of recommendation fromfor finding information on scholarships from instructors and a copy of your academic recordorganizations throughout the United States. to the Scholarship Chairman, ConnecticutThere are also a number of websites avail- Chef’s Association Inc., P.O. Box 136,able to assist students in the scholarship Wethersfield, CT 06109.search. To view a guide to free scholarshipsearches online, please visit the Johnson & dollars for scholars: Johnson & WalesWales website at www.jwu.edu. University will match scholarship awards made to entering students by affiliated Dollars for Scholars chapters of Scholarship America.Many companies provide scholarship aid forchildren of their employees, while others The educational Foundation of the nationalprovide aid directly to students who work for Restaurant association: The Educationalthem part time while in school. Foundation administers approximately 150 scholarships, ranging from $750 to $2,000,Rhode island state scholarship and Grant with one $10,000 tuition-only award. TheseProgram: The state of Rhode Island provides scholarships are awarded to qualified under-scholarships and grants for Rhode Island graduate students of food service/hospitalityresidents who demonstrate financial need. management. Eligibility requirements includeTo apply, you must submit the Rhode Island full-time status for each term in a degree-version of the Free Application for Federal granting program starting with the fall term,Student Aid (FAFSA) by March 1 for the attendance at one college or university for afollowing academic year. For more information, full academic year starting with the fall term,contact Johnson & Wales Student Academic & and interest in food service as demonstratedFinancial Services or the Rhode Island Higher through industry work experience. A com-Education Assistance Authority, 560 Jefferson pleted application package must be receivedBlvd., Suite 100, Warwick, R.I. 02886-1304 by March 1. For more information, pleaseor call 401-736-1170. contact the Educational Foundation at 175 West Jackson Blvd., Suite 1500, Chicago, ILstate Grants/scholarships: In addition, 60604-1010; 312-715-1010.students from the following states may be international association of culinaryeligible for state grant money: Professionals Foundation scholarship Connecticut (iacP): The IACP Foundation awards one Delaware $2,500 scholarship per campus, which is Maine matched by Johnson & Wales. All criteria Maryland are determined by IACP. Applications are Massachusetts available through IACP, with an application New Hampshire deadline of December 1. Pennsylvania Vermont 55
    • international Food service executives student assistant employment Program:association (iFsea): Scholarship aid is Scholarships are awarded to all studentsavailable to students enrolled full time in selected for this program. No application isfood service and hospitality programs. For necessary, but a résumé is requested by themore information, contact the International hiring department for consideration. SelectionFood Service Executives Association, is based on strong academic performance1100 South State Road, #7, Suite 103, and the possession of necessary skills.Margate, FL 33065, or call 305-977-0767; Awards for 2011–2012 are up to $3,000 andfax 305-977-0884. are renewable based on annual employee performance and 2.50 GPA maintenance.WORK PROGRAMSassistant Resident director: Selection for Teaching assistant Program: Selection forthis program is based on strong academic this program is based on strong academicperformance along with experience as a performance and successful completion ofresident assistant. Applications are available the internship. Applications are availableat Residential Life. Awards are up to $3,000 at Practicum Educational Facilities or Culinaryplus room and board and are renewable Administration. Awards for 2011–2012 arebased on annual employee performance. up to $7,500 and are renewable based on annual employee performance and 2.75 GPAFellowship Program: Selection for this program maintenance.is based on strong academic performanceand successful completion of the internship. important notice for international students:Applications are available at Practicum Please be aware that some of the aboveEducational Facilities or Culinary Administration. programs offer a room and board grant forAwards for 2011–2012 are up to $9,000 and eligible summer participants. Non-residentare renewable based on annual employee alien students with an F-1, J-1 or q-1 visa willperformance and 2.75 GPA maintenance. be subject to U.S. income tax withholding on any grant received for room and board.Resident assistant Program: Students areselected for this program based on strongacademic performance and residence hall saTisFacToRy academic PRoGRessexperience. Applications are available atResidential Life. Awards range from $8,200 At the time of printing, the Satisfactoryto $9,500 and are renewable based on annual Academic Progress policy had not been final-employee performance. ized due to new federal regulations. The final- ized policy will be available in the 2011–2012 note: There are many complex IRS regulations Providence Campus Student Handbook and on regarding the taxability of scholarships and the Johnson & Wales University website, grants. The university is not in a position www.jwu.edu. If you would like a written copy of to determine the tax consequences of the policy please contact Student Academic & such awards in the case of any particular Financial Services. student. It is recommended that all students consult IRS publication 970 entitled “Tax Benefits for Education” and their tax advisor to determine how these rules apply to them. Non-resident alien students with an F-1, J-1 or q-1 visa will be subject to U.S. income tax withholding on any grant received for room and board.56
    • Academic InformationcLass scheduLes • The student may not have taken the course(s) previously at the university andUndergraduate classes for students are received a grade of “F,” “W,” “WF,”generally scheduled two to four days per “I” or “GP.”week, Monday through Thursday. The typical • Grades of “C” or better (2.00 or equivalent)schedule for all business, hospitality and from an accredited institution may betechnology students, and culinary students not accepted for transfer.taking labs, is three or four courses per term. • The course(s) must be taken within oneStudents who are eligible to Web register are year of permission being granted.advised to maintain full-time status (12 quarter • Courses cannot be taken locally unless JWUcredits) to be eligible for financial aid. does not expect to offer the class before the student’s anticipated graduation date.Occasionally, make-up classes are sched- • A student will not be granted credit (transferuled, due to holidays or other missed days, credit or otherwise) for any academic workto meet minimum classroom hour require- done during the period of a disciplinaryments. The dates of these rescheduled suspension.classes are available in jwuLink. It ispossible that at times a course may not be Students must submit a request to takerescheduled and the student will be respon- classes elsewhere form (which may be sentsible for all work as outlined in the syllabus. by fax or e-mail) which includes their ID number, descriptions of the courses they desire to take at another institution, the namesummeR sessions of the institution, and any other pertinent details of their situation.Optional summer session courses are offeredby the university. Individual courses may not Students, as always, are responsible forbe offered in the summer if student interest or meeting the requirements of satisfactoryenrollment is not sufficient; as a result, summer academic progress.degree completion cannot be guaranteed.Students matriculating at Johnson & Wales aTTendance and TaRdinessare not granted credit for summer sessioncourses taken at other institutions unless All students are expected to attend each meet-prior permission has been granted by Student ing of every class in which they are enrolledAcademic & Financial Services. on time. The maximum number of absences for valid reasons is based on the quarter credit hours for the course, with the exceptioncouRses TaKen aT oTheR of experiential education assignments andinsTiTuTions laboratories, which have their own specificUndergraduate students requesting to take attendance criteria. Absences beyond thecourses at another institution must submit stated maximum for each course may jeopar-their requests in writing to obtain prior written dize academic standing or financial aid.approval from Student Academic & FinancialServices. The following guidelines must be met: Student Academic & Financial Services• The student must have an overall grade should be notified immediately of any point average above 2.25. necessary prolonged absences. The• There is a limit of three courses which may Providence campus student handbook be taken during enrollment at the university. contains rules and regulations for frequent or• The course(s) must not be in the major field. prolonged absences from class. 57
    • Students are expected to familiarize them- Withdrawal (W), Withdrawal/Pass (WP),selves with attendance requirements Withdrawal/Fail (WF)outlined in the Providence campus student In order to record attempted credits (includ-handbook. The Providence Campus Student ing for purposes of determining satisfactoryHandbook can be found online at academic progress), a grade of W, WP, orwww.jwu.edu. Select the Providence WF is recorded when a student withdraws,Campus, then click on Student Life. or is withdrawn due to excessive absences, from a registered course after its add/drop period has ended. Students withdrawing fromundeRGRaduaTe GRadinG sysTem graduate and postgraduate level courses are eligible for a W grade only. A W is a punitiveThe grading system is as follows: and failing grade issued at the instructor’sLetter Grade Grade Range Quality Points discretion, and is entered permanently into A+ 95–100 4.00 the term and cumulative grade point averages. A 90–94 4.00 In order to qualify for a WP, the student must B+ 85–89 3.50 have an estimated grade of 60 or higher B 80–84 3.00 at the time of withdrawal. This grade is not C+ 75–79 2.50 entered into the term and cumulative grade C 70–74 2.00 D+ 65–69 1.50 point averages. If the estimated grade is D 60–64 1.00 below 60, the student will be issued a WF, F 0–59 0.00 which is entered into the term and cumula- W Withdrawal 0.00 tive grade point averages as a failing grade WF Withdrawal/Fail 0.00 until successful completion of the course at WP Withdrawal/Pass a later date. I Incomplete NC No Credit GP Grade Pending incomplete (i) AU Audit Issued to students if they are unable to com- P Proficiency plete course requirements (because of autho- S Satisfactory rized absences due to service commitment or U Unsatisfactory illness). Outstanding work must be completed PL Prior Learning Assessment within two weeks of the final exam class day CX Challenge Exam Credit or the grade will automatically become an “F” NG No Grade and the grade will be included in the grade point average. For classes graded “S/U”Grade reports are viewable in jwuLink. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory), an Incomplete (“I”) will change to a “U.”honors option (h)If a course was taken as an Honors Program no credit (nc)requirement, the grade received will be A non-punitive designation issued to afollowed by “H” (for example, AH, BH). student who has been authorized to withdraw from class, or the university, due to extenuat-Failure (F) ing circumstances.Issued if a student fails to achieve adequatescholastic progress. The grade is recorded Grade Pending (GP)permanently on the student’s academic A temporary mark given when the comple-record. Upon successful completion of the tion of course requirements is still underway.course at a later date, the cumulative aver- A grade pending is not calculated into theage is adjusted to reflect only the passing cumulative average and is generally usedgrade. However, both grades will appear on under extreme, extenuating circumstances.the academic transcript. This system allows If a grade is not submitted to replace thestudents to recover academically from poor “GP” within one year, it will automaticallyterms and graduate within a reasonable become an “F.”amount of time.58
    • audit (au) “not tested.” The purpose of a performanceAn audit occurs when no academic credit is transcript is to better represent the practicalgranted. This grade is not calculated into the skills obtained by the student.cumulative average. Official transcripts are printed on officialProficiency (P) paper and then placed in sealed envelopesGranted for achievement of multiple levels issued directly to the student or authorizedof skills in progression where the self-paced designee. Official transcripts may beapproach is in effect. This grade is not released only upon written request of thecalculated into the cumulative average. student; this is done in accordance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy ActPrior Learning (PL) (FERPA). The university does not charge a feeStudents may earn credits for the knowledge for transcripts. Students are only allowed 20or skills they have mastered outside the transcripts per year. Official transcripts willclassroom through volunteer work, employ- not be released if a student is not currentment, travel, professional training and in all financial obligations to the university.seminars or other comparable sources. Transcripts are not official if faxed. Allow three business days for processing. Studentssatisfactory/unsatisfactory (s/u) intending to pick up transcripts in personUsed for designated courses throughout must make the request in person at Studentthe university. Academic & Financial Services or complete a transcript request form.challenge exam (cX)Granted for specifically designated courses Unofficial transcripts may be obtained inupon successful completion of department jwuLink.challenge exams.no Grade (nG) academic sTandaRds“No Grade” is issued temporarily when there The university expects all students, part timeis no grade provided by the faculty member. or full time, to meet minimum standards ofThis grade is not factored into the student’s academic achievement. Students are in goodGPA. Once a grade is submitted, the cumula- academic standing if they maintain a cumula-tive average and transcript will reflect only tive GPA of 2.0 or better, which is a gradu-the new grade. If a grade is not submitted to ation requirement. All freshman studentsreplace the “NG” within one year, it will auto- begin in good academic standing.matically become an “F” and the grade will beincluded in the grade point average. ACADEMIC PROBATION The student will be placed on academic pro-academic and PeRFoRmance bation if his or her cumulative GPA is lessTRanscRiPTs than 2.0, but higher than suspension standards. All students placed on probationA transcript is a representation of a student’s will be counseled by their academic counselorentire academic record while at Johnson & and will be offered appropriate resources.Wales. The university employs two types of While on probation, a student may matriculatetranscripts: academic and performance. at the university and is eligible for financialAn academic transcript reflects a student’s aid. Students may matriculate on probationaryunabridged academic history at the institu- status for no more than three consecutive terms.tion, including all letter grades. A perfor-mance transcript identifies the practical skills, During the time of academic probation,including writing, associated with a student’s the student’s progress is monitored byacademic coursework. Skills are graded as the Committee on Academic Standing.“developing,” “validated,” “mastered” or This committee determines whether to 59
    • impose academic suspension or permanent APPEALSacademic dismissal if academic achievement Appeals regarding academic suspension orstandards are not met. dismissal can be made to the Academic Appeals Committee after one term of nonma-Students on probation who achieve a cumu- triculation if extenuating circumstances exist.lative GPA of 2.0 or better will return to good A student may appeal only once, and theacademic standing. Students on academic decision of the committee is final.probation must meet with their academiccounselor in order to register for courses. CONCENTRATIONSWeb registration is not available to students In programs of study that require a concen-on academic probation until they meet with tration, students will be given the followingan academic counselor. options in the event that they cannot suc- cessfully complete a concentration coursenoTe: At the time of printing, the Academic requirement at the third attempt:Achievement Standards had not been final- 1. Make an alternate concentration courseized due to new federal regulations. The selection (if available) orfinalized policy will be available in the 2011– 2. Select a new concentration to meet2012 Providence Campus Student Handbook degree requirements.and on the Johnson & Wales University web-site, www.jwu.edu. If you would like a written COURSES NOT REqUIREDcopy of the policy please contact Student If the attempted course is not a specificAcademic & Financial Services. degree requirement, the student will be unable to attempt the course again. The student must then select an alternateRePeaT oF couRses course to meet degree requirements.Undergraduate students will be allowed no GRADUATION REqUIREMENTSmore than three (3) attempts to successfully If the attempted course is a mandatedcomplete each course. Students who passed graduation requirement such as careerthe course but wish to improve their grade management course sequences or Sanitationmay repeat the course if it is available. The Certification, the student has nine (9) termshighest grade earned will be calculated into to complete the course.the grade point average. When a student hasrepeated a course previously applied to anawarded degree, both grades will be included academic counseLinGin the grade point average. Academic counselors are available inREqUIRED COURSES Student Academic & Financial Services toStudents who fail a course after a second assist students with preparation for gradu-attempt will be assigned an academic standing ation. Their goal is to assist students inhold and will be placed on academic probation. evaluating, developing, and maximizing theirStudents who fail the same course after a third potential by providing guidance and support.attempt may be academically dismissed. All students are encouraged to meet withStudents who attempt the same course three an academic counselor. Such a meeting istimes and earn a combination of “W”, “WF” required for students experiencing academicand “F” grades will be assigned an academic difficulty. Appointments are recommended.standing hold; these students may be subjectto academic suspension if the course isnot successfully completed during the nextcourse offering.60
    • uniT oF cRediT responsibility while participating in a hands- on service experience at a community-basedThe university measures academic progress organization or local school. CSL is done inusing the quarter credit hour system. Courses conjunction with an internship or academicare offered in three formats and may combine course. Students must select their service-two or more of those formats, which are: learning experience in consultation withlecture, laboratory and experiential. the Alan Shawn Feinstein Community Service Center staff and their instructors. SomeGenerally, one quarter credit represents real-life applications include marketing10 hours of instruction, which includes class students providing consulting services to R.I.lecture and additional activities; one quarter Small Business Development Center clients,credit hour equals two laboratory hours or accounting students preparing tax returnsthree experiential hours. Furthermore, all for low-income families, technology studentscourses require additional hours of study developing websites for community-basedand preparation outside of the classroom or organizations, and culinary students work-learning environment. ing with emergency food distribution sites. CSL1002 is a non-credit course that allows students to participate in additional serviceResidency ReQuiRemenT experiences beyond CSL1001.The undergraduate residency requirementrefers to the number of courses and credits GRaduaTion ReQuiRemenTsstudents must take at JWU, whether they aretransfer students or JWU students acquiring Each student is required to submit an onlinean additional degree. The residency require- diploma application at least two to threement for all students at Johnson & Wales terms prior to program completion. StudentsUniversity pursuing an associate degree is a must file one application for each expectedminimum of 31.5 quarter credit hours, half degree (i.e. associate, bachelor’s, master’s).of which must be within the major field. For The application ensures that the student’sstudents pursuing a bachelor’s degree, the name is printed correctly on the diploma, theminimum is 45 quarter credit hours, half of diploma is sent to the correct address andwhich must be within the major field. Upon the information is reviewed at the end of thereview, certain related professional studies correct term.courses and program electives may beconsidered when determining residency. Graduation requires successful completion ofStandardized testing credits are not consid- a prescribed sequence of study and a mini-ered when determining residency require- mum 2.00 grade point average. Studentsments. Diploma/certificate candidates will be with a cumulative GPA below 2.00 will beallowed to transfer a maximum of 9.0 quarter in noncompliance with the criteria for goodcredits (including JWU courses) towards academic standing and may be subjectdiploma/certificate program requirements. to academic dismissal. Furthermore, as required by their program, all students must successfully complete CAR0010 CareercommuniTy seRvice-LeaRninG (csL) Capstone, and any and all requirements as indicated in the catalog (for example,As part of the Feinstein Enriching America culinary/pastry/hospitality students areProgram, undergraduate day students at the required to take FSM1065 Food Safety andProvidence Campus of Johnson & Wales Sanitation Management and must pass aUniversity are eligible to participate in a national certification exam recognized byCommunity Service-Learning (CSL) experi- the Conference for Food Protection to fulfillence. CSL1001 is a one-credit course that graduation requirements.)introduces students to the concepts ofservice-learning, volunteerism, and civic 61
    • All associate-level degrees require the TRansFeR and caReeRcompletion of a minimum of 90 quarter PReReQuisiTescredits. All bachelor’s-level degrees require aminimum of an additional ninety (90) quarter Students who intend to transfer to othercredits, for a total of 180 quarter credits. colleges or enroll in graduate schools afterWhile most major programs have variations graduation must determine the requirementsthat require slightly more quarter credits for of those institutions and plan their programs ofcompletion, no program requires fewer than study accordingly. Johnson & Wales Universitythe 90/180 quarter credit minimum. makes no claim or guarantee for transfer credit to other academic institutions. Similarly,All students must be current in all financial students who intend to take state or foreignobligations to the university, including tuition, business, trade or professional licensingfees and other expenses, before a diploma examinations should determine the prerequi-will be issued. sites of those jurisdictions prior to selecting programs of study.Permission to participate in commencementexercises does not imply that graduation Students who are interested in transferringrequirements have been met. to JWU should see Page 31 for information on transfer admissions.WRITING REqUIREMENTStudents who graduate with a bachelor of modeRn LanGuaGesscience degree must leave Johnson & Waleswith effective writing skills. To help them All students who have studied more thanmeet this requirement, all students entering one year of French, German or Spanish areor transferring to the university are required required to take a placement exam. Thisto achieve a minimum score of “validated” examination is normally administered duringin a Performance Transcript assessment freshman orientation and testing. The place-prior to graduating with a bachelor of science ment examination will also be scheduled atdegree. Depending on the major, these writ- the beginning of each term for transfer anding skills will be assessed at the completion other incoming students.of either ENG1021 Advanced Composition orENG2010 Technical Writing. If a “validated”assessment is not achieved at this point, dean’s LisTstudents must successfully complete In recognition of scholastic achievement,ENG0001 Writing Workshop, a Performance full-time students (carrying a minimum ofTranscript Writing course, and achieve a “vali- 12 quarter credit hours) at Johnson & Walesdated” score. This, in effect, is a graduation University who have achieved a termwriting requirement for all students pursuing GPA of 3.40 or above receive Dean’s Lista bachelor of science degree from JWU. commendation.honoRs honoRs PRoGRamEligible degree candidates receive cum laude, This program offers academically talented stu-magna cum laude and summa cum laude dents the opportunity to explore challengingrecognition according to their academic pro- and stimulating courses. Eligible applicantsgram average. Students with the designated must have taken two college prep mathematicsgraduating GPA are eligible to receive honors courses and one college prep English course,as follows: cum laude, 3.40–3.60; magna cum maintained an average of B or better, placedlaude, 3.61–3.80; and summa cum laude, in the top 25 percent of their high school3.81–4.00. graduating class, submitted SAT or ACT scores above the national average, and entered JWU in the fall of their freshman year.62
    • Honors students enroll in honors sections of Honors students who also submit an acceptedsome general studies courses and may choose scholarly paper and successfully completethe honors option (H-option) in other courses. RSCH3001 Honors Advisory Seminar receiveEarly graduation is possible through acceler- the “University Honors Scholar” designation.ated course work in the SHARP program.Students enrolled in the Honors Program minoRsoften receive preference for on-campus inter-views, tutorial positions, resident assistant The John Hazen White School of Arts &positions, freshman housing and residence Sciences offers 22.5 quarter credit hourhall roommate assignments. minors in Environmental Sustainability and Technical Communications.Two honors designations are available upongraduation. To receive the “Honors Scholar” concenTRaTionsdesignation, graduating seniors must success-fully complete a number of general studies The College of Business offers 13.5 quarterhonors courses in addition to some H-option credit hour concentrations in Advertising,courses. To receive the “University Honors Business Communication, Business-to-Scholar” designation, graduating seniors must Business Selling, Creative Advertising,also submit an accepted Honors Thesis and e-Commerce, Entrepreneurship, Fashion,successfully complete RSCH3001 Honors Fashion Communications, FashionAdvisory Seminar. Product Development, Finance, Global Sourcing, Human Resources Management,Business/hospitality International Business, Investments,At the bachelor’s level, students must com- Management, Marketing Communications,plete a total of 12 honors/H-option courses Marketing Management, Marketing Research,for a designation as an “Honors Scholar.” Operations Management, Retail, RetentionHonors students who also submit an accepted Marketing, and Sports and Entertainmentscholarly paper and successfully complete Marketing.RSCH3001 Honors Advisory Seminar receivethe “University Honors Scholar” designation. The College of Culinary Arts offers 15.0 quarter credit hour concentrations in Bakingculinary arts/Baking & Pastry arts & Pastry Arts, Contemporary Pastry Arts,At the associate level, students must complete Culinary Capstone Labs, and 13.5 quartera total of nine honors/H-option courses to credit hour concentrations in Sommelier andreceive the Honors Scholar designation. Wellness & Sustainability.At the bachelor’s level, students must The Hospitality College offers 13.5 quartercomplete a total of 16 honors/H-option credit hour concentrations in Adventure, Sportcourses/labs to receive the Honors Scholar and Nature Based Tourism; Beverage Servicedesignation. Honors students who also sub- Management; Casino and Gaming Operations;mit an accepted scholarly paper and Cruise Line Management; Entertainmentsuccessfully complete RSCH3001 Honors Management; Entrepreneurship; Food andAdvisory Seminar receive the “University Beverage Management; Golf Management;Honors Scholar” designation. International Hospitality Operations Management; Meeting & Event Management;Technology On-site Food Service Management; ResortAt the associate level, students must com- Management; Rooms Division Management;plete a total of six honors/H-option courses Sales & Marketing Management; Sommelier;to receive the Honors Scholar designation. At Sports and Entertainment Facility Management;the bachelor’s level, students must complete Sports Management; Tour Managementa total of 12 honors/H-option courses to Operations; and Travel Agent.receive the Honors Scholar designation. 63
    • The John Hazen White School of Arts & the completed form to Student Academic &Sciences offers concentrations in Applied Financial Services. The following studentsMathematics, Arts, Biological Science, are eligible for SHARP:Career Writing, Economics, EnvironmentalScience, Global Perspectives, History, 1. Incoming freshmen who are honorsInterdisciplinary Studies, Leadership Studies, graduates of approved secondary schools,Legal Issues, Literature, Physical Science, have been elected to their state orPolitical Science, Psychology, Sociology and national honor society, or have maintainedWorld Languages. These concentrations a minimum GPA of 3.0allow students to pursue in depth areas of 2. New transfer students who maintainedgeneral studies in which they have special full-time enrollment at a previous institutioninterest or aptitude. and each term earned a cumulative GPA equivalent to Dean’s List status for thatThe School of Technology offers concentrations institutionin Computerized Drafting, Database 3. Students at Johnson & Wales who haveManagement, Desktop Publishing, Game maintained full-time enrollment and a 3.40Development, Print Media and Project cumulative GPA at the end of each termManagement. note: The only exception to this policy is thenote: Particular majors which are not eligible first term of enrollment, during which thefor specific concentrations are listed in the cumulative GPA may be less than 3.40.“notes” section following each concentration’srequirements. If a student does not exercise this option, SHARP eligibility may continue provided thatSuccessful completion of a concentration the student maintains continuous full-timeis recorded on the student’s transcript upon matriculation while maintaining a cumulativegraduation. 3.40 GPA after all terms. The benefits pro- vided by SHARP are not applicable during the summer sessions, during full-time internshipacademic honoR socieTies terms, for independent studies, or for an additional culinary/pastry laboratory class.alpha Beta Kappa is a national honor Preferred scheduling and graduationsociety which recognizes superior student acceleration are not guaranteed.academic achievement, character and leader-ship. The society may also elect a limited Failure to maintain a cumulative GPA ofnumber of faculty, staff and alumni as 3.40 or better after each term will cause thehonorary members. student to become permanently ineligible for the benefits provided by SHARP. Studentspecial honors and Rewards Program Academic & Financial Services will only notify(shaRP) a student of their withdrawal from the SHARPSHARP is an honors program designed for program via his or her JWU e-mail account,qualified full-time undergraduate students in and it is the student’s responsibility to dropa day program who wish to accelerate their extra credits, if registered, to avoid incurringprogram to complete degree requirements additional charges.in less than the normally required time. Thisis accomplished by increasing the student’scourse load each term as scheduling per-mits. SHARP results in savings of time andexpenses for eligible students. Day programstudents accepted into SHARP may registerfor up to 25.0 quarter credits each term withno additional fees. Interested students mustcomplete a SHARP application, returning64
    • academic FuncTions aWaRdsAttendance at a new student orientation Johnson & Wales University recognizesprogram is mandatory for all new students. superior academic achievement andSummer Orientation is offered to all new outstanding contributions in extracurricularstudents entering Johnson & Wales in the activities by granting the following awardsfall term. At Summer Orientation, students at a private ceremony held prior tomeet with academic representatives in their commencement.chosen school or college and take academicplacement exams. Students also learn about CIRCLE OF ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE AWARDScampus resources, network with upperclass Founders’ Awardstudent leaders, familiarize themselves with This award is presented to rising sophomore,the campus and make new friends. junior or senior students in the College of Business, College of Culinary Arts or TheAn abbreviated orientation program is also Hospitality College who by their seriousoffered for all new students each term prior approach to career education and persever-to the start of classes. Activities include ance in their objectives, represent the idealsacademic orientation, social activities, and principles expressed by the founders ofdistribution of photo identification cards, Johnson & Wales University. Students mustand meetings with administration, faculty and have a minimum 3.4 cumulative GPA to beresidence hall representatives. Orientation considered for this award.also includes placement testing. Pioneer’s Awardacademic convocation is held the weekend Established to honor Audrey Gaebe, thisbefore classes begin in the fall. This aca- award is presented to rising junior or seniordemic ceremony brings together all facets of students enrolled in a concentration inthe university to celebrate and commence the School of Arts & Sciences who havethe academic year. displayed outstanding academic achievement and actively participate in the JWU community.The student Recognition ceremony is held Students must have a minimum 3.4 cumula-annually in the spring to honor students and tive GPA to be considered for this award.organizations that have displayed a high levelof performance in academic achievement or President’s Awardin service to Johnson & Wales University. This award is given to rising juniors in business, hospitality, culinary arts and technology whocommencement is held at the end of each have displayed outstanding academicacademic year. At these exercises, degree achievement, extracurricular leadership andcandidates are recognized. Participation purposefulness, cooperation, and strong collegein commencement exercises does not imply spirit. Students must have a minimum 3.4that graduation requirements are met. cumulative GPA to be considered for this award. academic Performance awards recognize graduating students in business, hospital- ity, culinary arts and technology who have achieved the highest cumulative GPA and are recommended by the faculty. alpha Beta Kappa is a national honor society that recognizes superior student academic achievement, character and leadership. 65
    • The Gene K. Burns alumni Leadership The outstanding sophomore award recog-award recognizes the student whose activi- nizes one student in each of the followingties on and off campus have best enhanced programs of study: accounting, advertising,the reputation of JWU. criminal justice, entrepreneurship, equine studies, fashion merchandising & retail mar-The recipient of the morris J.W. Gaebe keting, international business and marketing.chancellor’s award is an excellent first-year Selection for the award is based on out-student who positively influences classmates, standing academic achievement, communityexhibits leadership qualities, and has strong service and commitment to the university.speaking and writing skills. The outstanding Junior award recognizesThe Practicum Pyramid award is presented one student in each of the following programsto an upperclass student in the university’s of study: accounting, advertising, criminalexperience-based scholarship program. The justice, entrepreneurship, equine studies,recipient is a student who has utilized his fashion merchandising & retail marketing,or her knowledge and skills to assist in the international business and marketing. Selec-development of other students in the many tion for the award is based on outstandingpractical training facilities and offices of the academic achievement, community serviceuniversity. and commitment to the university.The Trustees’ awards, in memory of the The Louis d’amico scholarship award wasfaithful service to the university of trustees created by JWU trustee Louis E. D’Amico, andGov. Christopher Del Sesto and Anthony is awarded to a sophomore and/or juniorKemalian, are given to business, hospitality, majoring in accounting at the Providenceculinary arts and technology students who Campus who has demonstrated superbhave made the greatest contributions in service academic performance and made a valuableto the university. contribution to activities sponsored by the Department of Accountancy.The Wilfred n. Lavallee award is presentedto the top-ranking student in the Early COLLEGE OF CULINARy ARTSEnrollment Program. The donna Lee Food Writing endowed scholarship Honors the 20 years Donna S.Outstanding Johnson & Wales University Lee served as a renowned food editor forstudents are nominated to the national The Providence Journal with the hope ofpublications of Who’s Who among students inspiring students who share her passion forin american Junior colleges and Who’s Who food and writing.among students in american universitiesand colleges on the basis of academic The special Functions Team award rec-achievement and leadership in extracurricular ognizes the student who has improved theuniversity and community activities. university by specific actions including volun- teering for Culinary Events, community ser-COLLEGE OF BUSINESS vice activities and dedication to the SpecialThe outstanding Freshman award recognizes Functions Club.one student in each of the following programsof study: accounting, advertising, criminal The Johnsonian spirit award is presentedjustice, entrepreneurship, equine studies, to one culinary arts and one baking & pastryfashion merchandising & retail marketing, arts continuing education student who dem-international business and marketing. onstrates a genuine spirit of helping othersSelection for the award is based on out- with enthusiasm, within and outside of thestanding academic achievement, community classroom.service and commitment to the university.66
    • The apprenti cuisinier awards of excellence THE HOSPITALITy COLLEGEare presented to students who have exceptional aXT/esd honor societies awards recognizemotivation and success in a special area of sophomores and seniors in The Hospitalitydiscipline. College for their outstanding academic achievement, meritorious service, and dem-The outstanding Freshman award recognizes onstrated professionalism. AXT and ESD areone culinary arts and one baking & pastry arts national honor societies sponsored by CHRIE.student demonstrating a dedication to theirprofession through teamwork, skill building and The Leah Powers mcGarr scholarship wasparticipation within the university and in extra- established to honor the spirit and life of Dr.curricular activities in an exemplary manner. McGarr, a beloved member of The Hospitality College faculty.The outstanding Junior award recognizes onethird-year culinary arts, baking & pastry arts The Rama scholarship for the americanand culinary nutrition student exemplifying dream was established by five brothers whodedication to their profession by demonstrating immigrated to the U.S. to pursue their dreamteamwork, leadership and participation within of establishing a hospitality company. Thisthe university and in extracurricular activities. scholarship represents their desire to encour- age others to create and succeed in theirThe edmund d. Fuller Jr. award recognizes a own American dream.baking & pastry arts student who has achievedthe highest academic average, demonstrated america’s Lodging investment summitexceptional skill in the art of pastry and been scholarship honors students who are well-recommended by the faculty. rounded and have achieved a balance of aca- demics, involvement in extracurricular activi-The academic Leadership award is presented ties and possess strong personal attributes.to one graduating associate degree studentand one bachelor’s degree student from each Each year the National RestaurantCollege of Culinary Arts degree program who Association invites students from food ser-exemplify the core values of commitment, high vice education programs around the nation toacademic standing and career focus. participate in the food service industry’s pre- mier event called the salute to excellence.The Professional Pride award recognizes These students are selected as thestudents who consistently demonstrate industry’s potential leaders of tomorrow.professionalism, exceptional grooming andpride in the College of Culinary Arts uniform.The dean’s award is presented to a graduatingCollege of Culinary Arts student who, by asincere desire to obtain a career education,has exemplified his or her career by exampleand dedication. 67
    • THE SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGy The albert J. mikula award for excellencecomputer information systems departmental in academics, Leadership and service isawards are presented to students in Business presented to a sophomore, junior or seniorInformation Systems Analysis, Network student who exemplifies the ideals and prin-Engineering and Software Engineering with a ciples expressed by Albert J. Mikula, a drivingminimum GPA of 3.5 who have provided force in the development of the School ofservice to the School of Technology which Technology, by demonstrating a dedication tomay include tutoring and project assistance, academics, the university and the community.participated in technology-related professionalorganizations and clubs, presented a portfolioof work completed through the second termof the current year, and been recommendedby faculty.The outstanding Portfolio award is presentedto an engineering student who has created apresentation in his/her area of interest, includ-ing architectural, mechanical or electronicdesigns. Presentations must be in electronicformat and incorporate sound, motion and text.The engineering department achievementaward is presented to a sophomore, junior orsenior with a minimum GPA of 3.5 who hasprovided service to the university/School ofTechnology which may include involvement instudent organizations, tutoring, student men-toring and lab assistance. The student mustalso demonstrate leadership, communityservice, and be recommended by faculty.computer Graphics departmental awardsThese awards recognize students throughfaculty nomination for outstanding achieve-ment in the fields of Web design, computergraphics, new media design, digital videoand student leadership.The experiential education Recognitionaward is presented to the student or teamwho demonstrated the greatest level ofprofessionalism, reliability, responsibility andtechnical expertise in a university-sponsoredexperiential education internship, bringinghonor and prestige the School of Technology.68
    • noTice oF nondiscRiminaTion • Rhode Island State Commission for Human RightsJohnson & Wales University does not discrim- 180 Westminster Street, 3rd Floorinate unlawfully on the basis of race, religion, Providence, RI 02903-3768color, national origin, age, sex, sexual orien- 401-222-2661tation, gender identity or expression, geneticinformation, or disability, in admission to, Massachusetts:access to, treatment of, or employment in • Equal Employment Opportunity Commissionits programs and activities. John F. Kennedy Federal Building(The term “sexual orientation” shall mean 475 Government Center, Boston, MA 02203and be limited to having an orientation for 617-565-3200or being identified as having an orientationfor heterosexuality, bisexuality or homosex- • Massachusetts Commission Againstuality. This Nondiscrimination Policy shall Discrimination, One Ashburton Placenot be interpreted to prohibit Johnson & 6th Floor, Room 601, Boston, MA 02108Wales University from maintaining separate 617-994-6000facilities, sports teams, housing, university-based social fraternities and sororities, and Florida:other programs and facilities, for males • Equal Employment Opportunityand females, in accordance with the provi- Commission, One Biscayne Tower,sions of Section 16-38-1.1 of the General 2 S. Biscayne Boulevard, Suite 2700,Laws of Rhode Island, as the same may be Miami, FL 33131, 305-536-4491amended from time to time, or similar lawsapplicable in other states where the univer- • Florida Commission on Human Relations,sity conducts its operations.) 2009 Apalachee Parkway, Suite 200, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-488-7082The following person has been designatedto handle inquiries regarding the Colorado:Nondiscrimination Policy: • Equal Employment OpportunityUniversity Compliance Officer, Commission, 303 East 17th Avenue,Johnson & Wales University,One Cookson Place, Sixth Floor, Suite 410, Denver, CO 80203Providence, RI 02903, 401-598-1423. 303-866-1300Inquiries concerning the application of • Colorado Civil Rights Division,nondiscrimination policies may also be 1560 Broadway, Suite 1050, Denver, COreferred to the appropriate governmental 80202-5143, 303-894-2997agencies listed below: North Carolina:Office for Civil Rights, U.S. Department of • Equal Employment OpportunityEducation, Customer Service Team, Commission, 129 West Trade Street,400 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, DC Suite 400, Charlotte, NC 2820220202-1100, 800-421-3481. This office 1-800-669-4000may refer the matter to a regional Officefor Civil Rights. you may also visit • N.C. Human Relations Commission,http://wdcrobcolp01.ed.gov/CFAPPS/OCR/ 116 W. Jones Street, Suite 2109,contactus.cfm. Raleigh, NC 27601, 919-807-4420Rhode Island: Mailing Address:• Equal Employment Opportunity N.C. Human Relations Commission Commission 1318 Mail Service Center John F. Kennedy Federal Building Raleigh, NC 27699-1318 475 Government Center, Boston, MA 02203, 617-565-3200 69
    • Student ServicescamPus saFeTy & secuRiTy The cenTeR FoR academic suPPoRTCampus Safety & Security is responsible for The Center for Academic Support offers athe enforcement of school policies, security on variety of services to assist each student incampus, and providing public safety service for preparation for graduation and career place-the university’s students, faculty and staff. ment. The center’s goals are to support stu-Students are encouraged to take advantage of dents in their efforts to develop and maximize their talents, empower them to direct theirthe services and programs listed on our own learning, and lead them to pathways ofwebsite at www.jwu.edu/providence/safety. success. With emphasis on success, gradu- ates acquire lifelong behaviors and attitudesCampus Safety & Security officers patrol the which are recognized by employers.campus at all times and utilize an integratedelectronic access control and digital camera SERVICES OFFEREDsystem. Emergency blue-light telephones are • The Learning Center — individual, group,strategically located throughout the campus peer and professional tutoringand directly connect callers to the Campus • Coordinated study groups in residence hallsSafety & Security dispatcher on duty. Campus • Supplemental instructionSafety & Security also has the ability to issue • Workshops in stress management, timetimely alerts to the campus community if management, test-taking strategies andnecessary via an emergency notification other learning strategiesmass-messaging system. • Accommodations for students with disabili- ties with appropriate documentation asThe Campus Safety & Security Operations described below.Center is open 24 hours a day, 365 days ayear. Students who need help or have questions The Center for Academic Support complementsshould call ext. 1103 from a university phone students’ academic and technical training by sharpening their ability to position themselvesor 401-598-1103 from a non-university phone. in today’s competitive marketplace. This isHearing impaired students may call ext. 2140 accomplished with programs centered aroundfrom a university phone or 401-598-2140 personal and career success.from a non-university phone. LEARNING CENTERSIn compliance with the Higher Education Act, The Learning Center in the John Hazen WhiteJohnson & Wales University publishes an Center on the Downcity Campus offers stu-Annual Security Report and an Annual Fire dents academic assistance in business,Safety Report. The Annual Security Report hospitality, technology and arts & sciencesdiscloses information about campus security courses. Writing assistance is also provided,and statistics concerning reported crimes that including tutoring for all types of writtenoccurred on campus, on university-controlled projects, study skills remediation, and helpproperty, and on public property immediately in researching and designing papers. Tutoringadjacent to campus. The Annual Fire Safety in all first-year courses and most upper-levelReport discloses information about the cam- courses is available.pus fire safety policies and procedures andfire statistics for each residence hall. A copy The Learning Center in The Friedman Center on the Harborside Campus offers studentsof the reports may be obtained from Campus individualized and/or small group tutoring inSafety & Security. you may also visit culinary and pastry laboratory and academicwww.jwu.edu/providence/safety to view a copy classes, as well as in study skills. Writingof the most recent reports. laboratories for undergraduate students are available, including tutoring for all types ofThe university maintains a log of all fires that written projects, study skills remediation, andoccur in on-campus housing. help in researching and designing papers.70
    • Contact the Learning Center for more information: Academic Support section of the ProvidenceDowncity 401-598-1485 Campus website at www.jwu.edu or call theHarborside 401-598-1703 Center for Academic Support at 401-598-4689.TUTORIAL ASSISTANCEThe university provides tutorial assistance comPuTeR and TechnoLoGy usethrough the Center for Academic Support.Students are urged to take the initiative in All students are required to comply with theseeking out-of-class help during faculty office university’s Computer and Technologyhours as well as in the Learning Center. Use Policy, which is accessible at http://helpdesk.jwu.edu/policies.htm.In addition, peer and professional tutoring isavailable in math, accounting, writing skills, The university’s Computer and Technologymost major courses and study strategies. Use Policy prohibits students from uploading,Tutors, directed by a learning skills professional, downloading, posting, publishing, transmitting,provide individual and/or group sessions as retaining, reproducing, sharing or distributing instudent needs and resources dictate. any way information, software, movies, music, books, articles or any other material whichSTUDENTS WITH DISABILITIESJWU is dedicated to providing reasonable is protected by copyright or other proprietaryaccommodations to allow students with learn- right, without obtaining permission of theing, physical or other disabilities the opportu- owner. Violation of this policy may result innity to succeed in academic pursuits. While the termination of a student’s access to themaintaining the highest academic integrity, Internet via the university’s Internet systemthe university strives to balance scholarship and student conduct review actions up to andwith support services which will assist including dismissal from the university.students with disabilities in succeeding inthe university’s academic environment. In addition, students should be aware that unauthorized distribution of copyrighted mate-Because some programs of study at the uni- rial (e.g., songs, music and other materials),versity have technical standards and require- such as through peer-to-peer networks, mayments, applicants and students with disabili- constitute copyright infringement. Penaltiesties should contact the director of the Center for copyright infringement include civil andfor Academic Support at 401-598-4689 to criminal penalties. In general, anyone founddiscuss the availability of reasonable accom- liable for civil copyright infringement maymodations or to obtain documentation guide- be ordered to pay either actual damageslines, when appropriate. For more information or “statutory” damages affixed at not lesson technical standards, see Pages 158–159. than $750 and not more than $30,000 perAvailable reasonable accommodations for stu- work infringed. For “willful” infringement, adents with disabilities with appropriate docu-mentation include, but are not limited to court may award up to $150,000 per work Decelerated Course Load infringed. A court can, in its discretion, also Preferential Scheduling assess costs and attorneys’ fees. For details, Individualized Exams see Title 17, United States Code, Sections Note-taking Assistance 504, 505. Willful copyright infringement can Tape Recorders in Class also result in criminal penalties, including Digital Texts imprisonment of up to five years and fines Classroom Relocation of up to $250,000 per offense. For more Housing Accommodations information, please see the website of the Medically Excused Absences U.S. Copyright Office at www.copyright.gov, Support Groups Scribes especially their FAqs at www.copyright.gov/ Assistive Technology help/faq. Please refer to the Computer and Technology Use Policy for a further descrip-For further information regarding available tion of prohibited activities regarding use ofreasonable accommodations and the accom- university technology resources.modations procedure, please see the 71
    • counseLinG seRvices Course objectives are academically oriented with the aim of preparing students to functionCounseling Services provides a variety of at the university level. In addition, studentsservices to students and the university com- will be given opportunities for social andmunity. These include individual and group cultural experiences designed to assist theircounseling, crisis intervention, community cultural transition.referrals, consultation and psychoeducationalprogramming. An after-hours on-call service for Dedicated to student success, the Englishpsychological emergencies is also available Language Institute places students in theand may be accessed by contacting Campus program at their level of English proficiency.Safety & Security at 401-598-1103. eXPeRienTiaL educaTion &Students typically come to Counseling caReeR seRvicesServices to discuss problems such as rela-tionship difficulties, family issues, adjustment Experiential Education & Career Servicesconcerns, depression, anxiety, sexual identity offers a variety of internship programs andand alcohol/substance abuse issues. These career services to assist students in buildingconcerns may negatively impact students’ career skills to obtain employment and inde-quality of life, as well as their ability to suc- pendently navigate their careers.ceed academically. The center operates ona short-term treatment model and referrals Experiential Education & Career Servicesare made to the community for more components includelong-term or specialized needs. • internship opportunities available in the College of Business, The HospitalityServices are free and confidential. To sched- College, the College of Culinary Arts andule an appointment, call 401-598-1016. the School of Technology. Internship isCounseling Services has offices on both designed to provide eligible students withcampuses: practical work experience in their chosen • Downcity Campus — Wales Hall field of study while they earn academic • Harborside Campus — second floor of credit for the experience. The Friedman Center • a career capstone course for juniors and seniors that prepares them to navigate the job search process.enGLish LanGuaGe insTiTuTe • career workshops that allow students toLocated in the John Hazen White School select specific skill-building topics.of Arts & Sciences, the English Language • networking opportunities with industryInstitute provides international students with professionals through on-campus recruitingan opportunity to learn English as a Second events.Language and to earn academic credit. • career coaching resources providing personalized advising on a variety ofThe English Language Institute offers career-related topics.intensive English instruction and weekly • online job postings by employers who areenhancement activities for students preparing looking to hire students for part-time andfor admission to undergraduate and graduate full-time jobs (on and off campus) as welldegree programs. Instruction is also offered as internships. Go to http://link.jwu.edu >to those students who wish solely to improve Careers > Find a Job.their English language skills. Students are • hundreds of employers, representing theplaced in four different skill area classes: business, hospitality, culinary and technol-Oral Communications, Reading, Writing, ogy fields, that visit campus each year toand Grammar. participate in recruiting events and serve as guest lecturers and classroom speak- ers. These activities provide students with72
    • a real-world view of industry as well as The ICC is a safe and welcoming environment opportunities to connect with industry where all members of the campus community professionals and career options. are offered the opportunity to celebrate their cultures and learn about those of others. It strives to bridge cultural gaps and bring togetherheaLTh seRvices individuals of diverse backgrounds, and works to educate and develop awareness of culturalJWU maintains two Health Services offices and personal differences in all people bywhere health care is provided to students — sponsoring educational programs, events andone for the Downcity Campus at Wales Hall social activities. This includes developingand one for the Harborside Campus at the ongoing relationships with students andHarborside Recreation Center. student organizations, and promoting programs and services which impact all students andJWU’s nurses provide limited health care the Johnson & Wales community at large.services and maintain student medicalrecords. In addition, they may refer students The ICC is located in the Xavier Complex,to the university physician who is on campus Downcity Campus at 60 Broad Street in thefour mornings a week. center of the block bordered by 61 Pine Street, Claverick Street, 60 Broad StreetA school dentist is recommended to students and Foster Street. For more information,upon request. Contact Health Services for the call 401-598-4776.dentist’s name, phone number and office hours.JWU’s health services are available to inTeRnaTionaL cenTeRcommuting students as well as to residents. The International Center, which includesMEDICAL RECORDS International Student Services and StudyPrior to the first term of enrollment, the univer- Abroad Programs, is located in the Studentsity requires all new, full-time undergraduate Services Center on the Downcity Campus.students — residents and commuters alike In addition, two international student advi-— to submit proof of a complete physical exam sors from the center are located at Studentwithin the past year, including documented Academic & Financial Services in Theproof of two doses of the MMR vaccine, a Friedman Center at the Harborside Campus.tetanus-diphtheria booster within the past 10years, a negative tuberculosis test or chest international student servicesX-ray within the last six months, three doses The main focus of International Student Servicesof hepatitis B vaccine, and completion of the is to help international students adhere tochicken pox vaccine series or proof of physi- USCIS regulations, maintain their studentcian-diagnosed disease. Immunizations that status and access all the benefits permittedare strongly recommended but not required by their student visa. However, a variety ofinclude hepatitis A and meningitis. other programs and services have been created to assist students from the moment they land at the airport until the day they graduate andinTeRcuLTuRaL cenTeR beyond. International Student Services offers arrival services, orientation programs and cul-The Intercultural Center (ICC) was founded in tural programming for international students1993 to encourage efforts to respect, support and the university community. In addition,and educate people of diverse backgrounds. information sessions on employment, tax andThe center exists as an integral part of cam- other cultural adjustment issues are offeredpus life. Consistent with the mission of the regularly at both the Student Services Centeruniversity, its primary focus is to prepare all and The Friedman Center.members of the university’s diverse studentbody to live and work in a world characterizedby increasing diversity of every kind. 73
    • study abroad Programs will have an opportunity to select their roomsStudy Abroad works with all academic colleges for the next year online through a lottery sys-at all campuses to offer a portfolio of study tem during second term. Accommodations varyabroad programs to Johnson & Wales students. with each residence hall. Returning studentsProgram information and applications are are not guaranteed housing.available at www.jwu.edu/studyabroad.Providence students can pick up program Each residence hall has a resident directorinformation at the annual fall Study Abroad and graduate resident assistant. ResidentFair or at the International Center. Students assistants are assigned to each residenceattending other campuses can find program hall to assist students with the residential liv-information at Student Academic & Financial ing experience and transition to college. TheyServices. However, any interested student have been selected because of their abilityis encouraged to contact Study Abroad at to understand, mentor and assist their fellow401-598-1406 for personal study abroad resident students.counseling. All residence hall entrances are monitored 24 hours a day.neW sTudenT oRienTaTion andsuPPoRT PRoGRams OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING Generally, all freshman students are requiredJohnson & Wales University’s orientation pro- to live in university housing unless they meetgram is designed to help students become one or more of the following criteria: the stu-acquainted with college life and to facilitate dent is married or has a same sex domestica successful first-year experience. Students partner relationship that meets certain eligi-are introduced to many university administra- bility requirements; is a parent; is at least 21tors, faculty, staff and student leaders who years of age; is living at home with a relative,provide valuable information on academic parent, or guardian and commuting within astudies, student life and university policies. 50-mile radius of campus; is a transfer stu- dent; is not a U.S. citizen, a permanent resi-Social activities are also scheduled through- dent, or an eligible non-citizen able to receiveout the two-day program. Many are designed federal financial aid; or is not eligible to liveto help students meet other new students. on campus. Please contact Admissions at 401-598-1000 for further information regard-ResidenTiaL LiFe ing these exceptions. Students who have been convicted of certain felonies (or have hadJohnson & Wales University residence certain felony-type charges sustained in a juve-facilities include The Cove, Imperial, McNulty, nile proceeding), such as crimes of violence,Renaissance, Snowden and Xavier halls in serious drug offenses and sex offenses, areDowncity Providence; East, South and West not eligible to live in university housing.Halls and Harborside Village at the HarborsideCampus; and Harbor View in Cranston. Residential Life provides students with infor- mation regarding a variety of living quartersJohnson & Wales provides free shuttle bus near the campus. Rental listings are availableservice for convenient transportation between online at www.jwu.edu/providence/reslife.academic and residence facilities. Students Students interested in living off campusmay also ride the RIPTA buses for free with should visit the Residential Life website for aa valid Johnson & Wales student ID. complete listing.Transportation is also provided for athleticsprograms and social activities.Room assignments for first-year and transferstudents are made online by the student.Students currently enrolled at the university74
    • Student ActivitiesStudent Activities serves multiple functions • Caribbean Student Associationwithin the Johnson & Wales University com- • Chinese Student & Scholar Associationmunity in supporting student needs, activities • Chippers Cluband campus programs. The office provides • Christian Student Fellowshipprofessional support for Johnson & Wales • Club of Culinary Excellencestudents in their co-curricular pursuits, as well • Collegiate Honors Societyas exposure to and participation in social, cul- • Criminal Justice Associationtural, educational and recreational programs. • Dominican Student Association • Eta Sigma DeltaStudent Activities has two locations: in • Food Science Clubthe Citizens Bank Center for Student • Habitat for HumanityInvolvement at the Downcity Campus and • I-Clubin the Harborside Recreation Center at the • International Association ofHarborside Campus. Some of the Assembly Managersprograms and services include • International Fashion Society • student clubs and organizations • Investments Club • fraternities and sororities • J-Brew • concerts • Latino American Club • comedians • National Association for the • leadership workshops Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) • Halloween, Winter • National Society of Minorities in and Spring Week events Hospitality (NSMH) • Spiritual Life • National Student Organizations (NSO) • lounge area with television • Newman Club • Student Government • Nutrition Society • Emerging Leader series • Pastry Arts Club • student publications • Rotaract International • resource room guest lectures • School of Technology — Industry Career Explorers • Ski and Snowboard ClubcLuBs and oRGanizaTions • Society for the Advancement of ManagementOpportunities abound for students to become • Society for Human Resource Managementinvolved in clubs or organizations, fraternities, • Special Functions Clubsororities and social fellowships. Guidelines • Student Government Associationfor starting a new organization are outlined in • Surf Clubthe student organization handbook. The fol- • Tongue Fu — JWU Debate Grouplowing is a list of the many clubs and organi- • Travel and Tourism Clubzations that are already recognized and active • University Involvement Board (UIB)at Johnson & Wales University. (Note: Some • Women Helping Other Womenclubs may not be active at time of print.) • Accounting Association • Advertising Club • American Culinary Federation, Jr. Chapter • American Marketing Association • Anime Club • Ballroom/Latin Dance Club • Black Student Alliance • Campus Herald (student newspaper) 75
    • GReeK oRGanizaTions and sociaL indoor soccer, basketball, deck hockey, FeLLoWshiPs badminton, table tennis, roller hockey, flag football, lacrosse, volleyball, outdoor track • Alpha Sigma Tau Sorority and others. • Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity • Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. In addition, there are a number of tourna- • Groove Phi Groove Social Fellowship ments and activities, including daily aero- • Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc. bics classes; bowling; introduction to the • Lambda Upsilon Lambda Fraternity Inc. martial arts; 5-on-5 basketball; billiards • Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Inc. tournaments; 3-on-3 basketball; bad- • Phi Sigma Sigma Sorority minton; ballroom, swing and latin dance • Sigma Alpha Mu Fraternity classes; laser tag and more. Students • Sigma Delta Tau Sorority are encouraged to bring their new ideas • Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc. • Sigma Lambda Beta Fraternity and interests to Athletics, located in the • Sigma Lambda Gamma Sorority Harborside Recreation Center. • Sigma Lambda Upsilon Sorority • Sigma Pi Fraternity FiTness PRoGRams and • Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority FaciLiTies • Tau Epsilon Phi Fraternity • Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity JWU’s two fitness facilities provide an • Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc. outstanding environment for students to improve their health and well-being. The aThLeTics Downcity Fitness Center in Wales Hall on the Downcity Campus and the Harborside Athletics serves multiple functions within the Recreation Center on the Harborside community in supporting students’ needs Campus feature fitness professionals through sports. The office provides professional dedicated to providing education as well as support for the pursuit of competitive activities. assistance to help students achieve their fitness goals. In addition to free individual INTERCOLLEGIATE SPORTS fitness assessments and a customized work- JWU’s Providence Campus is a Division III out, the fitness centers contain a full cardio- member of the NCAA and is in the Great theater, Nautilus circuit, and a wide variety of Northeast Athletic Conference. The following free weights and free-weight stations. Both teams represent JWU on the intercollegiate centers are free to students with proper ID. level: Women’s men’s co-ed aThLeTic FaciLiTies and Basketball Baseball Golf scheduLinG Cross Country Basketball Sailing Soccer Cross Country harborside Recreation center: Located at Softball Ice Hockey the Harborside Campus, the center houses Tennis Soccer three full-size wood basketball and volley- Volleyball Tennis ball courts which showcase a wide variety Volleyball of intramural and recreational programs, Wrestling and hosts JWU’s NCAA Division III wrestling, men’s and women’s basketball and volley- RecReaTionaL PRoGRams ball teams. The center also boasts a state- of-the-art fitness center, an aerobics/dance JWU offers a variety of recreational and studio, a multi-purpose sport court, and intramural sports programs. The intramural locker room facilities open for use by the sports division, which grows in response to entire university community with proper ID. student interest, currently includes softball,76
    • Programs of StudyAccounting Students who maintain at least a 2.75 grade point average may have the opportunity to(College of Business) participate in internship opportunities eitherBAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree on or off campus. By participating in internship students receive hands-on experience byThe Accounting bachelor’s degree program performing accounting functions for variousprepares students for the wide range of university operations and may graduate withcareer opportunities available to accounting experience in such areas as accounts pay-professionals. Students in the program able, accounts receivable and general ledger.receive a solid foundation in accountingtheory and practice as well as in the areas Students are required to complete one 22.5of business, communications and general credit concentration or accounting option asstudies. listed below. Students are encouraged to meet with their faculty advisor before select-Graduates of the program should be able to ing a concentration so that the concentrationdemonstrate the professional competency selected best prepares the student for hisand skills necessary to analyze and record or her career goal. Students may also applybusiness transactions, prepare financial for an internship in place of one term ofstatements, and perform other functions classroom studies.required by the profession effectively usingtheir comprehension of Generally Accepted concentrAtionS forAccounting Principles (GAAP). In addition, stu- Accounting MAjorSdents should be able to demonstrate an abil- casino operationsity to use logic and critical thinking to assist ACCT3055 Casino Accounting PSYC2040 Psychological Issues of Addictionin the decision-making process as well as to and Compulsive Behaviormake recommendations to individuals and SEE2030 The Entertainment Industryorganizations relying on financial information. SEE2070 The Gaming Industry SEE3015 Managing Gaming OperationsAn important component of the program’s entrepreneurship ACCT3012 Federal Taxes IIeducational experience is the general studies ENTR1001 Introduction to Entrepreneurshipcourses taught by the John Hazen White ENTR2030 The Business PlanSchool of Arts & Sciences. Graduates are ENTR2040 Financing the Entrepreneurial Venture ENTR3010 Small Business Consultingexpected to show competencies in higherorder thinking, communications, ethics, fraud examinationglobal diversity, responsible citizenship, lead- ACCT3080 Fraud Examination: Theory and Practice CJS2050 Criminologyership and artistic responsibility. The follow- LAW3015 Criminal Procedureing literacies should also be demonstrated: LAW3025 Criminal Law LAW3090 Evidencesociocultural, quantitative, scientific andinformational. information technology ACCT4020 Accounting Technology Practice and ProcedureStudents completing the program are well ITEC3020 Information Science Ipositioned for entry-level opportunities in pub- ITEC3040 System Analysislic accounting firms and similarly challenging ITEC3050 Information Security ITEC3085 Systems Designopportunities in private, governmental andnot-for-profit organizations. Positions include international Business ACCT4050 International Accountingstaff accountants, cost accountants, tax ECON3070 Contemporary Economic Issuesaccountants and auditors. IBUS2002 International Business IBUS2040 International Culture and Protocol IBUS3050 Export Procedures and Practices 77
    • lodging operations Students wishing to satisfy the 150 Hours ofACCT3025 Hospitality Financial Management College Education requirement, now requiredHOSP1010 Front Office OperationsHOSP2020 Resort Management in many states before being allowed to takeHOSP3033 Hotel Property Operations the Uniform Certified Public AccountantsHOSP3077 Revenue Management Examination, may achieve this objective andManagement Accounting at the same time earn a master’s degreeACCT3032 Cost Accounting II by applying for acceptance to the GraduateMATH1930 Quantitative Analysis I School at the end of their junior year. OR MATH1931 Quantitative Analysis II Acceptance will be granted provided the (MATH1931 for students completing student receives the recommendation of two MATH1930 as part of their AS program) undergraduate faculty members, successfullyMGMT2030 Service and Production Operations completes an interview process, and fulfills ManagementMGMT3040 Process and Quality Management the requirements for the bachelor of scienceMGMT4001 Process Planning and Control degree.retail industryACCT3045 Internal Auditing To maximize the benefits of choosingRTL1005 Retailing electives, and because of different stateRTL3010 Merchandise BuyingRTL3020 Merchandise Mathematics requirements, students desiring to sit forRTL3030 Comparative Retail Strategies the Uniform Certified Public Accountants examination are urged to contact their facultyother oPtionS: advisor early in the program.general AccountingACCT3012 Federal Taxes IIACCT3030 Not-for-Profit AccountingACCT3032 Cost Accounting IIACCT3045 Internal AuditingACCT4050 International AccountingState Boards of Accountancy examinationrequirement*One accounting elective selected from courses inthe General Accounting option aboveANDFour courses with an EASC attribute selected fromofferings within the School of Arts & Sciences or anyother general studies course* Some states require the successful completion of at least 20 courses in liberal arts subjects prior to being allowed to take the Uniform CPA Examination. Students are urged to meet with their faculty advisor by the end of their first term of study to determine if this examination requirement applies for the state in which they plan on becoming certified.78
    • Accounting free electiveS*** Three courses selected from 1000–4999A four-year program leading to the bachelor of numbered offerings within the university, exceptscience degree ACCT1011, ACCT1012, ACCT1021, ACCT1022, ACCT3020, ACCT3023 and ACCT4012 13.5MAjor courSeS creDitS total credits 191.5ACCT1001 Principles of Accounting I and Lab 5.5ACCT1002 Principles of Accounting II and Lab 5.5 * Students choosing the Casino Accounting concentra- tion must select PSYC2001 to meet the prerequisite forACCT1005 The Accounting Field 4.5 PSYC2040 required in the concentration.ACCT2021 Intermediate Accounting I 4.5ACCT2022 Intermediate Accounting II 4.5 ** Students choosing the Fraud Examination concentra- tion must select SOC2001 to meet the prerequisite forACCT2023 Intermediate Accounting III 4.5 CJS2050 in the concentration.ACCT2030 Accounting Software I 1.5ACCT3011 Federal Taxes I 4.5 *** Students planning on becoming Certified Public Accountants in those states requiring the successfulACCT3031 Cost Accounting I 4.5 completion of at least 20 courses in liberal arts sub-ACCT3040 Auditing 4.5 jects prior to being allowed to take the Uniform CPAACCT3050 Advanced Accounting 4.5 Examination should complete courses with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within the School ofACCT3060 Accounting Information Systems 4.5 Arts & Sciences or any other general studies courseACCT3075 Financial Management 4.5 to satisfy the free electives requirement. Students areACCT3085 Accounting Software II 1.5 urged to meet with their faculty advisor by the end of their first term of study to determine the examinationACCT4060 Accounting Seminar 4.5 requirements for the state in which they plan on becom-MGMT1001 Principles of Management 4.5 ing certified.MRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5Accounting Select one concentration from noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the mathConcentr. offerings on Pages 77–78. 22.5 requirement. Students must earn a performance transcript writing assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order torelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieS graduate with a bachelor’s degree.CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0FIT1000 Information Technology for Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Visit Business Professionals I 4.5 Study Abroad for details.FIT1020 Information Technology for Business Professionals II 4.5 Free elective(s) may be satisfied by an internship. Contact EE&CS for details.LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I4.5Legal One course from the following:Elective LAW3002, LAW3010, LAW3055 4.5generAl StuDieSCSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5ENG1020 English Composition 4.5ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5MATH1020 Fundamentals of Algebra 4.5MATH2001 Statistics 4.5Science One SCI-designated course 4.5Electives Two courses with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within the School of Arts & Sciences which may be used to form an arts & sciences concentration 9.0choose two of the following: 9.0PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a Critical Thinking Approach ORPHIL3040 Ethics of Business LeadershipHistory One HIST-designated course (except HIST4030)Literature ENG1001 or one LIT-designated coursechoose two of the following: 9.0LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership StudiesPSYC2001 Introductory Psychology*SOC2001 Sociology I** 79
    • BAking & PAStry ArtS Upon graduation from the Baking & Pastry Arts associate degree program, a variety(College of Culinary Arts) of positions are attainable in hotels, clubsASSociAte in Science (A.S.) Degree and resorts, retail bakeries, restaurants and wholesale pastry shops.The associate degree program in Baking &Pastry Arts provides students with practical Graduates of this program are eligible, oreducation in baking and pastry production, may apply, for entrance into the followingwhile developing professionalism and excel- bachelor of science degree programs:lence in academic achievement. Hands-on Baking & Pastry Arts, Baking & Pastry Artstraining is paired with academic courses and Food Service Management, Culinaryresulting in a curriculum that is both dynamic Nutrition or Food Service Entrepreneurship.and directly aligned with industry needs. Certain requirements pertain to each of these bachelor’s degree programs, which are notedFirst-year Baking & Pastry Arts students in their respective program descriptions.rotate through one term of academics whichincludes Food Safety and Sanitation, andtwo terms of hands-on laboratory classes.Emphasis is placed on skills developmentand techniques of combining basic ingre-dients to produce classic pastries, basicbreads, cakes and plated desserts.The second year emphasizes advancedtechniques in classical and internationalpreparation and production of cakes, tortesand sugar work. Academic courses includeleadership studies, nutrition, communicationskills, and food and beverage cost control.BAking & PAStry internShiPDuring pastry internships, students partici-pate in actual public food service operationsin preparation for future careers. Possiblesites include university-owned or operatedpracticum educational facilities, hotels,restaurants, country clubs, resorts, casi-nos, contract food service providers andbakeries. Eligibility requirements for certainsites include a 2.75 cumulative GPA andcompletion of all prerequisite course work.Additionally, select students have the oppor-tunity to participate in international intern-ships at host company sites throughout theworld, which are chosen by the university. Inaddition to meeting specific college eligibilityrequirements, students interested in com-pleting internship in a targeted country mustmaintain a 3.25 cumulative grade point aver-age and have a minimum of one year of workexperience in a full-service bakery or similarexperience in a hotel, resort or restaurant.80
    • teAching ASSiStAnt AnD BAking & PAStry ArtSfellow ScholArShiP ProgrAM A two-year program leading to the associate in science degreeEach year, administrators in the Collegeof Culinary Arts, in conjunction with the MAjor courSeS creDitSadministration of university owned or BPA1010 Fundamental Skills andoperated practicum educational facilities, Techniques 3.0select Teaching Assistant candidates from BPA1015 Classic Pastry 3.0 BPA1020 Pies and Tarts 3.0among the top students of the graduating BPA1025 Cookies and Petits Fours 3.0class in the Culinary Arts and Baking & Pastry BPA1030 Hot and Cold Desserts 3.0Arts associate degree programs. Students BPA1035 Chocolates and Confections 3.0 BPA1040 Introduction to Cakes 3.0who are continuing their education at the BPA1045 Principles of Artisan Bread Baking 3.0university as Teaching Assistants must be BPA1050 Viennoiserie 3.0 BPA1060 How Baking Works 3.0enrolled in a day school program. Qualified BPA2010 Specialty Cakes 3.0Teaching Assistants may advance to Fellow BPA2015 Entremets and Petits Gateaux 3.0during their senior year. These opportunities BPA2020 Plated Desserts 3.0 BPA2025 Advanced Artisan Bread Baking 3.0allow students to help defray the costs BPA2030 Sugar Artistry 3.0of advanced study while developing theirsupervisory/management skills. Pastry Arts Applications* 13.5 BPA2626 Pastry Arts Internship relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieS FSM1065 Food Safety and Sanitation Management** 1.5 FSM2025 Food and Beverage Cost Control 4.5 generAl StuDieS ENG1020 English Composition 4.5 ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5 ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5 LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5 MATH1002 A Survey of College Mathematics 4.5 NUTR2001 Introduction to Nutrition 4.5 Science One SCI-designated course*** 4.5 CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0 total credits 97.0 note: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) or equivalent placement scores to enroll in MATH1002. * Students select or are assigned to one of the Pastry Arts Applications for 13.5 quarter credit hours of the program. ** Students must pass a national exam that is recognized by the Conference for Food Protection as a graduation requirement. ***Students who plan to enter the Culinary Nutrition program should select SCI1015. four-yeAr oPtionS: • Baking & Pastry Arts (Page 82) • Baking & Pastry Arts and Food Service Management (Page 84) • Culinary Nutrition (Page 100) • Food Service Entrepreneurship (Page 116) 81
    • BAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree Upon completion of the bachelor’s degree program in Baking & Pastry Arts, students willThe College of Culinary Arts has designed a be prepared to enter the food service industryfour-year curriculum that combines practical in positions such as assistant pastry chefeducation in baking and pastry production and executive pastry chef trainee.with leadership training and general studiescourses to prepare students for careers as note: All students interested in enteringexecutive pastry chefs. In the Baking & Pastry the Baking & Pastry Arts bachelor’s degreeArts bachelor of science degree program stu- program must complete and submit an appli-dents are guided in building skills to master cation to the program director. Selection istheir visions to create artisan breads, confec- based on previous academic performance,tions, sugar works, plated desserts, wedding industry experience and professionalcakes and chocolate showpieces. During recommendations. Students must have atheir junior year, students rotate through two minimum GPA of 3.0.terms of academic courses and one term ofintensive advanced laboratories. Laboratorycourses build hands-on skills in advancedbaking and pastry arts techniques.During their senior year, students experienceone term of experiential education, whichincludes internship. During pastry internships,students participate in actual public foodservice operations in preparation for futurecareers. Possible sites include university-owned or operated practicum educationalfacilities, hotels, restaurants, country clubs,resorts, casinos, artisan bakeries, confec-tionary shops and wedding cake boutiquesand are production oriented in nature withemphasis on supervisory skill development,and management and pastry skill refinement.Along with another advanced lab and aca-demics, students participate in “real world”activities which allow them to experience therole of the pastry chef in baking and pastryoperations.Qualified students have the opportunity toreplace their internship experience with asummer study abroad program experience.Student teams of 20–26 join with facultyplus international schools to study regionalspecialties and techniques in baking &pastry. Recent programs have been inSwitzerland and Italy. The program combinesclassroom and practical industry experience.82
    • BAking & PAStry ArtS * Culinary Arts associate in science degree graduates enroll- ing in the bachelor of science degree in Baking & Pastry Arts must complete all A.S. Baking & Pastry Arts laboratory courses.A four-year program leading to the bachelor ofscience degree for two-year Baking & Pastry Arts ** Students entering this program with an Associate inand culinary Arts* program graduates. Occupational Science Degree may be required to com- plete additional quarter credit hours of general education courses.first two years:Associate in Science Degree** in Baking & Pastry *** SPAN1011 is the recommended language.Arts (Page 80) or Culinary Arts (Page 96) 97.0 **** General Studies courses may be applied to Arts & Sciences concentrations (Page 153).third and fourth years: note: Students must earn a performance transcript writingMAjor courSeS creDitS assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with a bachelor’s degree.BPA3010 Advanced Decorative Breads 3.0BPA3015 Naturally Leavened Breads and Advanced Viennoiserie 3.0BPA3020 Sensory Analysis in Contemporary Desserts 3.0BPA3025 Neo-Classic Desserts 3.0BPA3030 Advanced Petits Gâteaux 3.0BPA4010 Baking and Pastry Buffet Presentation 3.0BPA4015 Tiered and Themed Decorated Cakes 3.0BPA4020 Advanced Wedding Cake Design 3.0BPA4025 Advanced Chocolates and Confections 3.0BPA4030 Advanced Sugar Artistry 3.0ADvAnceD APPlicAtionSBPA4199 Advanced Baking and Pastry Arts Internship OR 13.5 Study AbroadrelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSCAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0FSM3025 Food Science 4.5FSM3035 Supervision for Food Service Professionals 4.5FSM3040 Food Service Financial Systems 4.5generAl StuDieSLIT3015 Food in Film and Literature 4.5PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadership 4.5PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology 4.5SOC2020 Culture & Food 4.5SPAN1011 Conversational Spanish I: Specialized Vocabulary*** 4.5Electives Three courses with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within the School of Arts & Sciences which may be used towards an arts & sciences concentration. 13.5total credits 94.0four-year credit total 191.0 83
    • BAking & PAStry ArtS concentrAtionS for BAking & PAStry ArtS AnD fooDAnD fooD Service Service MAnAgeMent MAjorSMAnAgeMent • Contemporary Pastry Arts (Page 148)(College of Culinary Arts and • Sommelier (Page 149)The Hospitality College) • Any hospitality concentration listed on Pages 149–152BAchelor of Science (B.S.) DegreeThe Baking & Pastry Arts and Food ServiceManagement program combines the strengthof baking & pastry arts and management inorder to prepare students for a managementcareer in front- or back-of-the-house. Graduatesof the Baking & Pastry Arts and Food ServiceManagement program can obtain positionsin a variety of areas that include, but are notlimited to, bakeshop manager, executivepastry chef and pastry chef.The curriculum provides ample opportunity forthe food service professionals of tomorrow tobuild upon their leadership and managementabilities, baking techniques, critical thinking,personal accountability and ethical behavior,problem-solving techniques, strong financialanalysis skills and customer awareness.The Baking & Pastry Arts and Food ServiceManagement degree develops a solid baking& pastry foundation and managementphilosophy in its graduates and preparesthem for bright and rewarding careers.As a reflection of the university’s strategicplan, FOCUS 2011, which supports innovativepedagogies and technologies to enhanceactive learning, this program currently offersa limited number of courses online. Onlinecourses are equivalent in content and rigorto traditional face-to-face courses. Residen-tial day school students in the program areeligible to take online courses.This program allows students to receive aworld-class baking & pastry arts and hospitalityeducation. Its strength is that studentsreceive several senior-level capstone experi-ences in baking & pastry arts, hospitalityoperations and strategic management. 84
    • BAking & PAStry ArtS AnD fooD choose two of the following**: 9.0 MATH2001 StatisticsService MAnAgeMent PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadership+ SOC2001 Sociology IA four-year program leading to the bachelor of History One HIST-designated coursescience degree for two-year Baking & Pastry Arts (except HIST4030)program graduates Literature ENG1001 or one LIT-designated coursefirst two years:Associate in Science Degree inBaking & Pastry Arts (Page 80) 97.0 total credits 97.5–100.5third and fourth years: four-year credit total 194.5–197.5MAjor courSeS creDitS *Spanish is the recommended language.FSM3001 Food Service Management **Students may not choose the combination of MATH2001 Systems and Human Resource and SOC2001 to fulfill this requirement. Applications+ 4.5 + Course is offered both online and face-to-face.FSM4061 Advanced Food Service Operations Management 4.5 noteS: Students must earn a performance transcriptHOSP3050 Hospitality Strategic Marketing+ 4.5 writing assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order + to graduate with a bachelor’s degree.HOSP4060 Hospitality Management Seminar 4.5Culinary/ Three to five courses selected Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History,Hospitality from declared concentration Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Visit Study Abroad for details.Conc. (see previous page). Some study abroad programs offer completion of a Hospitality concentration. 13.5–15.0choose one of the following options: 13.5–15.0Culinary/ Three to five courses with an EHSP,Hospitality ECUL or EBPA attribute selectedElectives from offerings within The Hospitality College or the College of Culinary Arts OR Second Culinary or Hospitality concentration. Some study abroad programs offer completion of a Hospitality concentration. OR Study Abroad OR InternshiprelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSACCT1011 Hospitality Accounting I and Lab+ 5.5ACCT1012 Hospitality Accounting II and Lab+ 5.5ACCT3025 Hospitality Financial Management+ 4.5CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0LAW2010 Hospitality Law+ 4.5generAl StuDieSECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology+ 4.5SPAN1011 Conversational Spanish I: Specialized Vocabulary* 4.5Electives Two courses with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within the School of Arts & Sciences which may be used towards an arts & sciences concentration 9.0 85
    • BuSineSS BuSineSS ADMiniStrAtionADMiniStrAtion All students enrolled in the Business Administration program pursue the following program of study(College of Business) for one year (three terms). Students must declare a major no later than the third term of study.The Business Administration one-year pro- MAjor courSeS creDitSgram prepares students for a variety of busi-ness career options. Students enrolled in the LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5one-year program may elect to continue their MGMT1001 Principles of Management 4.5 MRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5education toward any College of Businessbachelor of science degree. It is an idealcourse of study for those students who plan relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieS ACCT1021 Business Accounting I and Lab* 5.5to pursue a bachelor’s degree but have not ACCT1022 Business Accounting II and Lab* 5.5yet chosen a business career specialization. FIT1000 Information Technology for Business Professionals I 4.5 FIT1020 Information Technology forCourses in the one-year program are carefully Business Professionals II 4.5integrated to include an overall introductionto business administration with a number of generAl StuDieScomplementary areas of study. ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5 ENG1020 English Composition 4.5 ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5Through the university’s advising system, Math One math course at theexperienced faculty are available to assist MATH1002 level or higher** 4.5students in making an educated decisionin the selection of their bachelor’s degree total credits 51.5curriculum in alignment with each student’s * Students considering Accounting as their major shouldfuture career goals. take ACCT1001 Principles of Accounting I and Lab and ACCT1002 Principles of Accounting II and Lab. ** Students considering Accounting or Financial ServicesStudents enrolled in the program must Management should elect MATH1020 or higher.elect to continue their education toward any note: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics)College of Business bachelor of science or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math requirement.degree during their third term of enrollment. 86
    • BuSineSS/inforMAtion ITEC3080 Information Management ITEC3085 Systems Design 4.5 4.5SySteMS AnAlySiS PRMG2010 Introduction to Project Management 4.5(School of Technology) relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSBAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree ACCT1021 Business Accounting I and lab 5.5 CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0The Business/Information Systems Analysis LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5 MGMT1001 Principles of Management 4.5program prepares graduates for challenges MGMT2020 Organizational Behavior 4.5in the diverse, fast-changing field of systems MGMT2030 Service and Productionanalysis, either from the business perspective Operations Management 4.5 MRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5or from the technological perspective. This MRKT3084 Customer Care Strategies 4.5curriculum provides students with the oppor- Tech. One course with an ETEC attributetunity to build upon their technical skills with Elective selected from offerings within the School of Technologyleadership skills, project management skills, (except FIT1000 or FIT1020) 4.5team-building skills and customer awareness.The Business/Information Systems Analysis eXPerientiAl eDucAtion electiveSprogram builds a solid business and techno- Courses with a TECX designation selectedlogical foundation from which the graduates of from the offerings within the School ofthis program will be prepared for challenging Technology* 9.0entry-level positions with private, governmentand nonprofit organizations. generAl StuDieS CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0The Business/Information Systems Analysis ENG1001 An Introduction to Literary Genres 4.5program has three application domain courses ENG1020 English Composition 4.5 ENG1021 Advanced Composition andthat students can use to customize their Communication 4.5programs to the specific industry they are ENG1030 Communications Skills 4.5interested in pursuing. These courses will be ENG2010 Technical Writing 4.5 LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5determined through consultation with each MATH1020 Fundamentals of Algebra 4.5student’s faculty advisor and will become MATH2001 Statistics 4.5part of their degree requirements. MATH3020 Discrete Mathematics 4.5 PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadership 4.5 PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology 4.5Seniors participate in one of these experi- PSYC2020 Industrial/Organizational Psychology 4.5ential education options: Technical project SOC2001 Sociology I 4.5team, internship or solo project. Students History One HIST-designated courseapply for the experiential education option (except HIST4030) 4.5 Science One science course from the following:they want and are placed according to their SCI2005, SCI3010, SCI3030 4.5qualifications, work availability and the bestfit for their program of study. free elective One course selected from 1000–4999 numbered offerings within the university (except FIT1000 orBuSineSS/inforMAtion FIT1020) 4.5SySteMS AnAlySiSA four-year program leading to the bachelor of APPlicAtion DoMAin courSeSscience degree Three courses selected from the various colleges through consultation with the faculty advisor 13.5MAjor courSeS creDitSCSIS1000 Problem Solving total credits 192.0 and Programming Concepts 4.5 * Students should consult with their academic advisor.CSIS1040 Fundamentals of Visual Basic Programming 4.5 noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics)CSIS2030 Database Concepts 4.5 or equivalent placement scores to enroll in MATH1020.FIT1012 Digital Technology for Business 4.5 Students must earn a performance transcript writingFIT1014 Solving Business Problems with assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to Technology 4.5 graduate with a bachelor’s degree.ITEC1000 Help Desk Concepts 4.5 Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History,ITEC1020 Introduction to Data Communications 4.5 Sociology, English and other elective requirements.ITEC3020 Information Science I 4.5 Visit Study Abroad for details.ITEC3040 Systems Analysis 4.5 Free elective(s) may be satisfied by an internship. ContactITEC3050 Information Security 4.5 EE&CS for details. 87
    • coMPuter coMPuter ProgrAMMingProgrAMMing A two-year program leading to the associate in science degree(School of Technology) MAjor courSeS creDitSASSociAte in Science (A.S.) Degree CSIS1000 Problem Solving and ProgrammingThe Computer Programming associate degree Concepts 4.5 CSIS1020 Fundamentals of C Programming 4.5program prepares students to become key CSIS1040 Fundamentals of Visual Basic 4.5contributors in the fields of computer and CSIS1050 Data Structures 4.5 CSIS2030 Database Concepts 4.5information technology in either traditional CSIS2050 Advanced Programming Concepts 4.5business and industry environments or the CSIS2060 Object-Oriented Programming in C++ 4.5fast-growing Web- and Internet-based fields. CSIS2065 Java Programming 4.5 FIT1012 Digital Technology for Business 4.5 FIT1014 Solving Business Problems withThe program maintains a double focus on Technology 4.5programming and database, which gives ITEC1020 Introduction to Data Communications 4.5students knowledge of how the two areinterrelated. In the first year, students learnthe fundamentals of computer programming relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieS Tech. Two courses with an ETEC attributeand data structures. In the advanced pro- Electives selected from offerings within thegramming courses, students study assembler School of Technology (except FIT1000 or FIT1020) 9.0language programming, object-oriented pro-gramming and the application of program-ming concepts at the systems level. In the generAl StuDieS CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0advanced database courses, they study ENG1001 An Introduction to Literary Genres 4.5database concepts and design. Courses use ENG1020 English Composition 4.5a hands-on approach that trains students in ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5computer applications used in business, ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5engineering, and Web and Internet industry. MATH1020 Fundamentals of Algebra 4.5 MATH3020 Discrete Mathematics 4.5 Science One science course from the following:Upon successful completion of the program, SCI2005, SCI3010, SCI3030 4.5students are qualified to work as program- Elective One course with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within themers or database administrators in a wide School of Arts & Sciences or anyvariety of professional settings. Students other general studies course 4.5may also choose to continue their studies inthe bachelor’s degree program in Software total credits 95.5Engineering. note: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) or equivalent placement scores to enroll in MATH1020. four-yeAr oPtion: • Software Engineering (Page 137)88
    • coMPuterizeD coMPuterizeD DrAftingDrAfting A two-year program leading to the associate in science degree(School of Technology) MAjor courSeS creDitSASSociAte in Science (A.S.) Degree CAD1000 Computer Aided Drafting I 6.0 CAD1L00 Computer Aided Drafting I Lab 1.0The goal of the two-year associate in science CAD1020 Computer Aided Drafting II 6.0degree program in Computerized Drafting is CAD1L20 Computer Aided Drafting II Lab 1.0to combine academic theory, basic drafting CAD1030 3-D Parametric Modeling 6.0 CAD1L30 3-D Parametric Modeling Lab 1.0methods, computer-aided drafting techniques CAD2000 Portfolio Development 1.5and general communications skills with the CAD2020 Mechanical CAD 4.5practical experience necessary for entry-level CAD2030 Principles of Design 4.5 CAD2040 Architectural CAD 4.5CAD drafting skills applicable to engineering CAD2059 Introduction to Computerfields that utilize mechanical, architectural or Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) 4.5 CAD2061 CAD Applications 4.5electrical applications.Upon completion of this program, students relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSmay seek immediate career opportunities FIT1012 Digital Technology for Business 4.5 Tech Two courses with an ETEC attributein state and local government public works Electives selected from offerings within theand transportation departments, or architec- School of Technology (except FIT1000 or FIT1020) 9.0tural, electronics and manufacturing indus-tries as draftspersons and/or CAD opera-tors. Students may also choose to continue generAl StuDieS CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0their studies in the Engineering Design & ENG1001 An Introduction to Literary Genres 4.5Configuration Management bachelor of ENG1020 English Composition 4.5science degree program. ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5 ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5 MATH1020 Fundamentals of Algebra 4.5 MATH1030 Precalculus 4.5 SCI1011 General Physics I and Lab 4.5 Elective One course with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within the School of Arts & Sciences or any other general studies course 4.5 total credits 95.5 note: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) or equivalent placement scores to enroll in MATH1020. four-yeAr oPtion: • Engineering Design & Configuration Management (Page 104) 89
    • counSeling PSychology To remain in the Counseling Psychology program, students must maintain a 2.75(School of Arts & Sciences) GPA in their major courses (which is theBAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree minimum requirement for internship and capstone) or have permission of theThe Counseling Psychology program prepares program director.students for careers as counselors whoassist clients in resolving personal, family, In addition, students are expected to use theeducational, mental health or work-related American Counseling Association (ACA) Codeissues. Graduates of this program may of Ethics and Standards of Practice as a guidepursue employment in the public or private for ethical behavior throughout the program.sectors working in educational settings,private agencies, hospitals, rehabilitation PleASe note: At the completion of thecenters or in non-profit organizations. bachelor’s degree program in Counseling Psychology, students may also chooseCourses have been selected to provide stu- to pursue a Master of Science degree indents with a broad foundation of knowledge Counseling Psychology.concerning human thoughts, emotions andbehaviors. The program features a significant Some positions in the profession requirenumber of psychology courses which address state licensure or certification beyond theboth the biological and psychological motiva- academic degree.tions for certain behaviors. Sociology coursesalso play a major role by exploring the Admission Standardsimpact that a person’s social environment • Preference will be given to applicants who(i.e. family, culture, religion, etc.) has had on have maintained a B average or higher inhis/her development. Knowledge gained in a college prep curriculum throughout highthese disciplines is then examined from the school.counseling psychology perspective to deter- • Submission of SAT or ACT scores ismine viable modes of intervention and treat- strongly recommended.ment, if such actions are warranted. • Students who wish to transfer into theConsistent with the Johnson & Wales Counseling Psychology program may do soUniversity experiential education philosophy, if they have met the following criteria: a BCounseling Psychology students also gain average or better in all psychology coursesvaluable practical experience while enrolled and a 2.5 cumulative GPA.in this program. For example, courseslike Principles of Group Counseling and concentrAtionS for counSelingCounseling Theories and Techniques provide PSychology MAjorSstudents with classroom exercises in which Addictions counselingthey learn about, role play and model various CSLG2110 Introduction to Family Treatment forcounseling practices. During internships Addictions Counselorsstudents will shadow counseling professionals CSLG3040 Counseling Techniques for Addictions and other Behavioral Disordersin the field and work with clients. LAW3025 Criminal LawGraduates of this program will be expected Mental health counseling CSLG2090 Foundations of Mental Healthto employ critical thinking skills and ethical Counselingprinciples essential to interacting with and PSYC3040 Introduction to Neuropsychologysuccessfully treating clients. As professional and Psychopharmacology SCI2020 Exercise Physiologycounselors, they will be prepared to conducteffective interventions by guiding clients career and School counselingthrough a series of reflective steps, enabling CSLG2100 Introduction to Career and School Counselingthem to identify and articulate their specific LAW3065 Employment Lawneeds, to investigate the potential origins of PSYC2020 Industrial/Organizational Psychologytheir issues, and to seek viable alternativesto their problems.90
    • counSeling PSychology generAl StuDieS CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0A four-year program leading to the bachelor of ENG1020 English Composition 4.5science degree ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication Skills 4.5 ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5MAjor courSeS creDitS MATH2001 Statistics 4.5 PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadership 4.5CSLG2010 Introduction to the Helping PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology 4.5 Professions 4.5 SCI2010 Nutrition 4.5CSLG2030 Counseling Theories and SCI2031 Anatomy and Physiology 4.5 Techniques 4.5 SOC2001 Sociology I 4.5CSLG2050 Introduction to Crisis Intervention 4.5 History One HIST-designated course 4.5CSLG2070 Introduction to Case Management 4.5 (except HIST4030)CSLG3010 Principles of Group Counseling 4.5 Math One math course at theCSLG3099 Internship in Counseling MATH1002 level or higher 4.5 Psychology I 1.0 Electives Three courses with an EASC attributeCSLG4099 Internship in Counseling selected from offerings within the Psychology II 13.5 School of Arts & Sciences which mayPSYC2002 Abnormal Psychology 4.5 be used to form an arts & sciencesPSYC2010 Personality 4.5 concentration 13.5PSYC2030 Developmental Psychology 4.5PSYC2040 Psychological Issues in Addiction and Compulsive Behavior 4.5 free electivePSYC3001 Social Psychology 4.5 One course selected from 1000-4999PSYC3020 Human Sexuality 4.5 offerings within the university (except FIT1000) 4.5RSCH2050 Research Methods in Applied Settings 4.5RSCH4050 Research Seminar in Counseling total credits 192.0 Psychology 4.5 *Students cannot count the same courses for credit here and toward their major concentration.Counseling Select one concentrationPsychology from offerings noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics)Concentr. on Page 90 13.5 or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math requirement. Students must earn a performance transcript writingMAjor electiveS assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with a bachelor’s degree.choose three of the following*: 13.5 Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History,CSLG2090 Foundations of Mental Health Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Visit Study Abroad for details. CounselingCSLG2100 Introduction to Career and School CounselingCSLG2110 Introduction to Family Treatment for Addictions CounselorsPSYC2020 Industrial/Organizational PsychologySOC2025 Cultural Tapestry: Perspectives in DiversitySOC2035 Sociology of AgingSOC2060 Deviant BehaviorrelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSCAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0choose five of the following:* 22.5CJS2050 CriminologyCJS2085 Juvenile JusticeENG2010 Technical WritingENG3012 Report and Proposal WritingLAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business ILAW3025 Criminal LawSOC2040 Community Leadership: An Applied SociologySOC3010 Social Issues in Contemporary America 91
    • creAtive ADvertiSing Upon completion of the Creative Advertising program graduates are expected to be able to(College of Business) • Develop strategically sound roughBAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree concepts in great quantity and quality. • Craft finished advertising in traditionalThe Creative Advertising program provides media such as print, broadcast, directstudents with a broad range of knowledge, mail, collateral, outdoor and point-of-sale.experiential learning and practical skills to • Craft finished advertising in new mediacreate advertising in the full spectrum of such as Web, viral, environmental andmedia, both traditional and new media. This other non-traditional and guerilla media.program will prepare students for the disci- • Complete a Web-based entry-level portfolioplines of copywriting and art direction both of work demonstrating their capabilitiesin advertising agencies and within in-house in the various media, skewed to eithercommunications departments in marketing- the copywriting or art direction specialty,driven private companies, as well as in or both.freelance practice.While focusing on the creative side of theadvertising field, students will also study themore strategic side of the industry, gettinga balanced marketing communicationseducation.Classroom lectures play a vital role inCreative Advertising, but it is the hands-onexperiential aspects of this program’s corecourses that provide students with practical,real-world assignments yielding the qualityand quantity of finished creative output thatconstitutes a competitive entry-level portfolio.This program utilizes the resources of JWU’sSchool of Technology to provide courses inAdobe Photoshop and InDesign as well asother graphics and new media Mac-basedprograms, both foundational and advanced.A traditional internship experience is alsooffered. This is a one-term, 4.5–13.5 creditexperience with a business partner anywherein the world. Students complete a specificbusiness-building project, which is reviewed bythe faculty advisor and the business partner.92
    • creAtive ADvertiSing generAl StuDieS CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0A four-year program leading to the bachelor of ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5science degree ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5 ENG1020 English Composition 4.5 ENG1021 Advanced Composition andMAjor courSeS creDitS Communication 4.5 ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5ADVC1010 Marketing Communications I 4.5 MATH2001 Statistics 4.5ADVC2002 Creative Craft I 4.5 Math One math course at theADVC2003 High Concept in the New Media 4.5 MATH1002 level or higher 4.5ADVC2001 Creativity in Advertising 4.5 Science One SCI-designated course 4.5ADVC3002 Creative Craft II 4.5 Electives Two courses with an EASC attributeADVC3003 Advertising Campaigns 4.5 selected from offerings within theADVC4015 IMC Seminar I 4.5 School of Arts & Sciences which mayADVC4020 Creative Advertising Lab 4.5 be used to form an arts & sciencesADVC4099 Advertising Internship* 9.0 concentration. 9.0CGRA3050 Desktop Publishing 4.5DME1020 Digital Media Perspectives 4.5 choose two of the following: 9.0MRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5 PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy:MRKT1002 Consumer Behavior 4.5 a Critical Thinking ApproachMRKT2050 Qualitative Research 4.5 ORMRKT3005 Brand Marketing 4.5 PHIL3040 Ethics of Business LeadershipMRKT4001 Strategic Marketing 4.5 History One HIST-designated courseCareer Two courses with an ECAR (except HIST4030)Electives attribute selected from offerings Literature ENG1001 or one LIT-designated within the College of Business or course the School of Technology 9.0 choose two of the following: 9.0 LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership StudiesrelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieS PSYC2001 Introductory PsychologyACCT1021 Business Accounting I and Lab 5.5 SOC2001 Sociology ICAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0DME1030 Principles of Visualization and Design 4.5 total credits 187.5FIT1000 Information Technology for *Students may take career electives or directed work Business Professionals I 4.5 experience to fulfill this requirement.FIT1020 Information Technology for Business Professionals II 4.5 noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) or equivalent placement scores to enroll in MATH1020.LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5 Students must earn a performance transcript writing assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with a bachelor’s degree.choose one of the following four options: 13.5IBUS4090 International Business Experience Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, Sociology, English and other elective requirements. OR Visit Study Abroad for details.IBUS4023 SWAP International Seminar ANDIBUS4083 SWAP International Marketing Communications ORIBUS4020 Summer Work Abroad International Seminar ANDIBUS4086 SWAP Process Mapping ORADVC4099 Advertising Internship ORConcentr. Three courses selected from declared College of Business, School of Arts & Sciences or School of Technology concentration offerings 93
    • criMinAl juStice criMinAl juStice MASter of(College of Business) Science ProgrAM JWU also offers a Master of Science DegreeBAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree in Criminal Justice that provides a unique combination of management and criminalThe goal of the Criminal Justice program is justice education. This program is relevantto graduate students who are prepared for to criminal justice students whose goal ismeaningful careers in law enforcement, the to assume management responsibilities atcourt system or corrections. Through this some point in their careers. The criminalcourse of study, students are expected to justice field requires graduates to have com-acquire the communication, logic, critical prehensive analytical skills, and the masterthinking, and ethical reasoning skills essen- of science program teaches not only thesetial for the understanding of criminal justice skills but also a broad understanding of theissues and for effective career performance. global nature of the criminal justice business.The program’s judicious mix of criminaljustice, business, technology, and arts & For more information contactsciences courses, is intended to enhance Graduate Admissionseach student’s appreciation of diversity, Ph: 1-800-DIAL-JWU ext. 1015citizenship, leadership, science and technol- or 401-598-1015ogy, qualitative and quantitative analysis, Fax: 401-598-1286and social and business culture. E-mail: gradschool@admissions.jwu.edu Web: www.jwu.edu/graduateIn keeping with the unique curriculum andvaried career opportunities available to gradu-ates of the criminal justice program, and withthe advice of the student’s faculty advisorand career coach, students are encouraged toconcentrate in one or more of the programsoffered by the School of Arts & Sciences and/or the College of Business. A student may alsopursue a collection of criminal justice electiveswhich target their interests and goals. Criminaljustice students also have the opportunity toparticipate in an internship.Selected criminal justice students may partici-pate in an internship. Students must possessa 2.75 GPA overall and a 2.75 GPA in theCriminal Justice major to take this option.The bachelor of science degree is beneficialwhen competing for a first job placement andfor career advancement. Typical career tracksfor graduates of the criminal justice programmay include policing on the local, state orfederal levels; court administration; correc-tions, probation or parole officers; privatesecurity and loss prevention managers; andsocial service providers.94
    • criMinAl juStice free electiveS Six courses selected from 1000-4999 numberedA four-year program leading to the bachelor of offerings within the university 27.0science degree total credits 184.5MAjor courSeS creDitS noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math requirement.CJS1002 Introduction to Criminal Justice 4.5CJS1070 Criminal Courts 4.5 Student must earn a performance transcript writing assess- ment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate withCJS1090 Law Enforcement 4.5 a bachelor’s degree.CJS2040 Corrections 4.5CJS2050 Criminology 4.5 Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History,CJS4030 Criminal Justice Research Methods 4.5 Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Visit Study Abroad for details.CJS4080 Criminal Justice Senior Seminar 4.5LAW3015 Criminal Procedure 4.5 Free elective(s) may be satisfied by an internship. ContactLAW3025 Criminal Law 4.5 EE&CS for details.choose option A or option B: 13.5option ASelect from the following to total 13.5 credits:CJS2085 Juvenile JusticeCJS3033 Community PolicingCJS3075 Criminal InvestigationCJS3810 Topics in National SecurityCJS3820 Cyber CrimesCJS4033 TerrorismCJS4040 CriminalisticsCJS4050 Advanced Topics in Criminal JusticeCJS4060 Advanced Topics in CriminalisticsLAW3005 Adjudication Workshop ILAW3006 Adjudication Workshop IILAW3090 Evidence ORoption BCJS4099 Criminal Justice InternshiprelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSACCT1021 Business Accounting I and Lab 5.5CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0FIT1000 Information Technology for Business Professionals I 4.5FIT1005 Introduction to Keyboarding 1.5MGMT1001 Principles of Management 4.5MGMT2001 Human Resource Management 4.5generAl StuDieSCSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5ENG1001 An Introduction to Literary Genres 4.5ENG1020 English Composition 4.5ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5HIST3001 U.S. History from Colonial Times to 1876 4.5HIST3002 U.S. History since 1877 (to the present) 4.5HIST4020 American Government 4.5LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5MATH2001 Statistics 4.5PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a Critical Thinking Approach 4.5PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadership 4.5PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology 4.5PSYC2002 Abnormal Psychology 4.5SOC2001 Sociology I 4.5Math One math course at the MATH1002 level or higher 4.5Science One SCI-designated course 4.5Sociology One sociology course at the SOC2002 level or higher 4.5 95
    • culinAry ArtS culinAry internShiP(College of Culinary Arts) During culinary internships, studentsASSociAte in Science (A.S.) Degree participate in actual public food service operations in preparation for future careers.The associate degree program in Culinary Arts Possible sites include university-owned orprovides students with practical education in operated practicum educational facilities,food production, while developing professional- hotels, restaurants, country clubs, resorts,ism and excellence in academic achievement. casinos, spas and contract food serviceStudents progress through a program of study providers. Eligibility requirements for certainthat builds proficiency in food production and sites include a 2.75 cumulative GPA andcooking, cost control, nutrition, sanitation, food completion of all prerequisite coursework.safety and food marketing. Hands-on training Additionally, select students have the oppor-is paired with traditional academic courses tunity to participate in international intern-resulting in a curriculum that is both dynamic ships at host company sites throughout theand directly aligned with industry needs. world, which are chosen by the university. In addition to meeting specific college eligi-The focus of the first-year culinary lab classes bility requirements, students interested inis development and practice of cooking completing internship in a targeted countryskills, complemented by the development of must maintain a 3.25 cumulative grade pointbaking, dining and beverage service skills, average and have a minimum of one year ofwhich includes national certification in alcohol work experience in a full-service restaurantintervention procedures. The academic areas or similar experience in a hotel or resort.include mathematics, introduction to menuplanning and cost control, English composition, Graduates of the associate degree programcommunity service, professional development in Culinary Arts have the opportunity to gainand a national food safety certification. immediate, successful employment in the food service industry, which would includeSecond-year laboratories include advanced a variety of positions in full-service restau-techniques in classical and international rants, hotels, clubs and resorts cateringcuisines, garde manger, patisserie/dessert operations, quantity food production facili-and dining room, as well as the academic ties, health spas and cruise lines.areas of leadership studies, personalizednutrition management and communication Graduates of this program are eligible, orskills. may apply, for entrance into the following bachelor of science degree programs: BakingStudents will experience one term of experi- & Pastry Arts, Culinary Arts and Food Serviceential education, which includes internships. Management, Culinary Nutrition or Food Service Entrepreneurship. Certain require- ments pertain to each of these bachelor degree programs, which are noted in their respective program descriptions.96
    • culinAry internAtionAl eXchAnge culinAry ArtS A two-year program leading to the associate inEach year, a select group of second-year science degreestudents is chosen to participate in a stu-dent international exchange program with MAjor courSeS creDitSculinary arts schools in Ireland and France. CUL1315 Stocks, Sauces and Soups 3.0For one term, JWU students attend classes CUL1325 Essentials of Dining Room 3.0in any of these countries. In exchange, stu- CUL1335 Traditional European Cuisine 3.0 CUL1345 Introduction to Baking & Pastry 3.0dents from these schools attend culinary CUL1355 New World Cuisine 3.0classes at Johnson & Wales University. CUL1365 Principles of Beverage Service* 3.0 CUL1375 Nutrition and Sensory Analysis 3.0Selected students receive full academic CUL1385 Fundamentals of Food Servicecredit for the term abroad. Production 3.0 CUL1395 Purchasing and Product Identification 3.0 CUL1405 Skills of Meatcutting 3.0 CUL2215 Garde Manger 3.0teAching ASSiStAnt AnD CUL2225 Classical French Cuisine 3.0fellow ScholArShiP ProgrAM CUL2235 Advanced Dining Room Procedures 3.0 CUL2245 International Cuisine 3.0 CUL2255 Advanced Patisserie/Desserts 3.0Each year, administrators at the Collegeof Culinary Arts, in conjunction with theadministration of university owned or culinary Arts Applications 13.5 CUL2626 Culinary Arts Internshipoperated practicum educational facilities,select Teaching Assistant candidates fromamong the top students of the graduating relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieS FSM1065 Food Safety and Sanitationclass in the Culinary Arts and Baking & Management** 1.5Pastry Arts associate degree programs. FSM2045 Introduction to Menu Planning and Cost Controls 4.5Students who are continuing their educa-tion at the university as Teaching Assistantsmust be enrolled in a day school program. generAl StuDieS CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0Qualified Teaching Assistants may advance ENG1020 English Composition 4.5to Fellow during their senior year. These ENG1021 Advanced Composition andopportunities allow students to help defray Communication 4.5 ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5the costs of advanced study while developing LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5their supervisory/management skills. MATH1002 A Survey of College Mathematics 4.5 NUTR2001 Introduction to Nutrition 4.5 Science One SCI-designated course *** 4.5 total credits 97.0 * ServSafe Alcohol Certification course required. ** Students must pass a national exam that is recognized by the Conference for Food Protection as a graduation requirement. *** Students intending to continue for a B.S. degree in Culinary Nutrition must complete SCI1015. note: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) or equivalent placement scores to enroll in MATH1002. four-yeAr oPtionS: • Baking & Pastry Arts (Page 80) • Culinary Arts and Food Service Management (see next page) • Culinary Nutrition (Page 100) • Food Service Entrepreneurship (Page 116) 97
    • culinAry ArtS AnD The program allows students to receive a world-class culinary arts and hospitalityfooD Service education. The program’s strength is thatMAnAgeMent students receive several senior-level cap-(College of Culinary Arts and stone experiences in culinary arts, hospitalityThe Hospitality College) operations and strategic management.BAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree Students may choose to focus their studies by selecting their electives in such areas asThe Culinary Arts and Food Service food and beverage, resort or dining manage-Management program combines the strength ment. The Resort Management and Casinoof culinary arts and management in order to & Gaming Operations concentrations allowprepare students for a management career in students to focus on these two rapidly grow-front- or back-of-the-house. Graduates of the ing segments of the hospitality industry. TheCulinary Arts and Food Service Management Food & Beverage Management concentrationprogram can obtain positions in a variety of allows students to focus on this vital areaareas that include, but are not limited to, of the hospitality industry. Courses are idealrestaurant manager, kitchen manager, execu- for candidates interested in working withtive chef, food and beverage director, catering beverages, non-commercial, chain, franchisesmanager, room service manager, sous chefs, or restaurant operations.beverage manager and dining room manager.The curriculum provides ample opportunity for concentrAtionS forthe food service professionals of tomorrow to culinAry ArtS AnD fooD Servicebuild upon their leadership and management MAnAgeMent MAjorSabilities, cooking techniques, critical thinking, • Baking & Pastry Arts (Page 148)personal accountability and ethical behavior, • Culinary Capstone Labs (Page 148)problem-solving techniques, strong financial • Sommelier (Page 149)analysis skills and customer awareness. The • Wellness and Sustainability (Page 149) • Any hospitality concentration listed on PagesCulinary Arts and Food Service Management 149–152degree develops a solid culinary foundationand management philosophy in its graduatesand prepares them for bright and rewardingcareers.As a reflection of the university’s strategicplan, FOCUS 2011, which supports innovativepedagogies and technologies to enhanceactive learning, this program currently offersa limited number of courses online. Onlinecourses are equivalent in content and rigorto traditional face-to-face courses. Residen-tial day school students in the program areeligible to take online courses.98
    • culinAry ArtS AnD fooD Service generAl StuDieS ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5MAnAgeMent PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology+ 4.5 SPAN1011 Conversational Spanish I:A four-year program leading to the bachelor of Specialized Vocabulary* 4.5science degree for two-year culinary Arts program Electives Two courses with an EASC attributegraduates selected from offerings within the School of Arts & Sciences whichfirst two years: may be used towards an arts &Associate in Science Degree in sciences concentration 9.0Culinary Arts (Page 96) 97.0 choose two of the following**: 9.0 MATH2001 Statistics +third and fourth years: PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadership SOC2001 Sociology IMAjor courSeS creDitS History One HIST-designated course (except HIST4030)FSM3001 Food Service Management Literature ENG1001 or one LIT-designated Systems and Human Resource course Applications+ 4.5FSM4061 Advanced Food Service Operations Management 4.5 total credits 97.5–100.5HOSP3050 Hospitality Strategic Marketing+ 4.5 +HOSP4060 Hospitality Management Seminar 4.5Culinary/ Three to five courses selectedHospitality from declared concentration four-year credit total 194.5–197.5Conc. (see previous page). Some * Spanish is the recommended language. study abroad programs offer completion of a Hospitality **Students may not choose the combination of MATH2001 and SOC2001 to fulfill this requirement. concentration. 13.5–15.0 + Course is offered both online and face-to-face.choose one of the following options: 13.5–15.0Culinary/ Three to five courses with an EHSP, noteS: Students must earn a performance transcriptHospitality ECUL or EBPA attribute selected writing assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with a bachelor’s degree.Electives from offerings within The Hospitality College or the Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, College of Culinary Arts Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Visit Study Abroad for details. OR Second Culinary or Hospitality concentration. Some study abroad programs offer completion of a Hospitality concentration. OR Study Abroad OR InternshiprelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSACCT1011 Hospitality Accounting I and Lab+ 5.5ACCT1012 Hospitality Accounting II and Lab+ 5.5ACCT3025 Hospitality Financial Management+ 4.5CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0LAW2010 Hospitality Law+ 4.5 99
    • culinAry nutrition The Providence Campus Culinary Nutrition program is accredited by the Commission on(College of Culinary Arts) Accreditation for Dietetics Education (CADE) ofBAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree the American Dietetic Association, 120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, ILThe Culinary Nutrition program is a bach- 60606-6995, 312-899-0040, ext. 5400.elor’s degree option for students who have The Providence Campus Didactic Programcompleted the associate degree program in in Dietetics (DPD) meets the standards ofeither Culinary Arts or Baking & Pastry Arts*. education set by CADE.In answer to industry and consumer demandfor more healthy-menu choices, this program note: All students interested in entering theis designed for students who want to apply Culinary Nutrition program must complete andnutrition principles and scientific knowledge submit an application to the program director.to their culinary skills. Students in their third Selection is based on previous academic per-and fourth years continue to develop sensory formance, industry experience and professionalevaluation techniques, innovative food recommendations. Students must have aproducts and nutritional diagnostic skills. minimum GPA of 3.0.The mission of the Culinary Nutrition program concentrAtionS for culinAryis to ensure that entry-level dietetic profes- nutrition MAjorSsionals possess the hands-on culinary and clinical/Dieteticsnutrition application skills to be effective food NUTR3030 Nutrition Assessment***and nutrition practitioners. NUTR4030 Medical Nutrition Therapy NUTR4630 Advanced Medical Nutrition TherapyQualified students have the opportunity to culinary food Sciencereplace their Advanced Culinary Nutrition CUL4111 Product Design and Development FSM3025 Food Science***Internship with a summer study abroad NUTR3510 Principles of Food Product Developmentprogram experience.Upon completion of the Culinary Nutritionbachelor’s degree program, students areprepared to work as personal chefs in industrytest kitchens, health care facilities, spasand restaurants where an emphasis onnutrition is fundamental.Students choosing the clinical/dieteticsconcentration can apply for a postgraduatedietetic internship program. Upon completionof this internship, graduates will qualify totake the National Dietetic Registration Exam.Dietetics is a challenging profession thatapplies the science of food and nutritionto the health and well-being of individualsand groups.100
    • culinAry nutritionA four-year program leading to the bachelor ofscience degree for two-year culinary Arts andBaking & Pastry Arts* program graduatesfirst two years:Associate in Science Degree** inCulinary Arts (Page 96) orBaking & Pastry Arts (Page 80) 97.0third and fourth years:MAjor courSeS creDitSCUL3155 Vegetarian Cuisine 3.0CUL3175 Designing Healthy Desserts 3.0CUL4155 Athletic Performance Cuisine 3.0CUL4175 Spa Cuisine 3.0NUTR3030 Nutrition Assessment*** 0–4.5NUTR3050 Life Span Nutrition 4.5Nutrition Select a concentration fromConc. offerings on Page 100*** 13.5ADvAnceD APPlicAtionSCUL4198 Advanced Culinary Nutrition Internship OR 13.5 Study AbroadrelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSCAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0FSM3025 Food Science*** 0–4.5FSM3035 Supervision for Food Service Professionals 4.5FSM3040 Food Service Financial Systems 4.5generAl StuDieSENG2010 Technical Writing 4.5MATH2001 Statistics 4.5PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadership 4.5PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology 4.5SCI2031 Anatomy and Physiology 4.5SCI2045 Introduction to General and Organic Chemistry 4.5SCI3040 Biochemistry 4.5SCI4060 Food Microbiology 4.5SCI4061 Food Microbiology Lab 2.25SOC2020 Culture and Food 4.5total credits 99.25four-year credit total 196.25* Baking & Pastry Arts students must complete the three terms of the Culinary Arts degree laboratory classes prior to entering the Culinary Nutrition bachelor of science degree program.** Students entering this program with an Associate in Occupational Science Degree may be required to complete additional quarter credit hours of general education courses.***These two courses are components of the two culinary nutrition concentrations. However, they are also part of the core culinary nutrition curriculum and are required by all Culinary Nutrition majors.note: Students must earn a performance transcriptwriting assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in orderto graduate with a bachelor’s degree. 101
    • electronicS relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieS CAD3000 Engineering Graphics and Lab 6.0engineering CAR0010 Career Capstone CSIS1020 Fundamentals of C Programming 1.0 4.5(School of Technology) CSIS2050 Advanced Programming 4.5 FIT1012 Digital Technology for Business 4.5BAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree PRMG2010 Introduction to Project Management 4.5 Tech. One technology course from the Elective following: ENGN2000 or ENGN2045 4.5The Electronics Engineering bachelor’s degreeprogram provides a broad-based foundation in eXPerientiAl eDucAtion electiveScurrent and projected growth areas of electron- Courses with a TECX designation selectedic engineering and technology. It also provides from the offerings within the School of Technology* 9.0concentrations in two areas that are directlyconsistent with the technology dynamics of generAl StuDieSthis and the coming decades: computer/digital CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0systems engineering and network hardware. ENG1001 An Introduction to Literary Genres 4.5 ENG1020 English Composition 4.5 ENG1021 Advanced Composition andCourse sequences for these concentrations Communication 4.5are as follows: ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5 LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5 MATH1040 Calculus I 4.5computer/Digital Systems engineering MATH1041 Calculus II 4.5ENGN2060 Advanced Microprocessors and Lab MATH2042 Calculus III 4.5ENGN3080 Computer Architecture MATH2043 Ordinary Differential Equations 4.5ENGN4040 VLSI Design and Layout PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a CriticalENGN4045 VLSI Design and Integration Thinking ApproachENGN4070 Hardware Organization and Design OR 4.5 PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadershipnetwork hardware PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology 4.5CAD2050 Computer-Aided Network Design SCI1021 General Chemistry 4.5ENGN2070 Signal Transmission SCI1022 General Chemistry Lab 2.25ITEC1020 Introduction to Data Communications SCI2011 Physics I and Lab 4.5ITEC2080 Network Devices SCI2012 Physics II and Lab 4.5ITEC3030 Advanced Networking with TCP/IP SOC2001 Sociology I 4.5 History One HIST-designated course (except HIST4030) 4.5Graduates of the Electronics Engineeringbachelor’s degree program are qualified four-year credit total 193.25to work in electronics companies as test * Students should consult with their academic advisor.engineers, design engineers and advancedtechnical support. noteS: Students must have MATH1030 (Precalculus) or equivalent to enroll in MATH1040. Students must earn a performance transcript writing assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in orderelectronicS engineering to graduate with a bachelor’s degree.A four-year program leading to the bachelor of Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, Sociology and English requirements. Visit Study Abroad forscience degree details.MAjor courSeS creDitSENGN1000 Digital Electronics I 4.5ENGN1010 Introduction to Circuit Theory and Lab 6.0ENGN1030 Solid State I: Devices and Lab 6.0ENGN1040 Digital Electronics II 4.5ENGN2020 Transform Methods for Engineering 4.5ENGN2030 Electronic Communications and Lab 4.5ENGN2040 Solid State II: Electronic Circuits and Lab 6.0ENGN2055 Introduction to Microprocessors 4.5ENGN3030 Instrumentation and Process Control 6.0ENGN3050 Logic Design 4.5ENGN4030 Digital Signal Processing 4.5AreA concentrAtionFive-course sequence (see above) 24.0102
    • electronicS engineeringA four-year program leading to the bachelor ofscience degree for two-year robotic engineeringtechnology program graduatesfirst two years:Associate in Science Degree in RoboticEngineering Technology (Page 134) 98.5MAjor courSeS creDitSENGN1040 Digital Electronics II 4.5ENGN2020 Transform Methods for Engineering 4.5ENGN2030 Electronic Communications and Lab 4.5ENGN2040 Solid State II: Electronic Circuits and Lab 6.0ENGN3030 Instrumentation and Process Control 6.0ENGN3050 Logic Design 4.5ENGN4030 Digital Signal Processing 4.5relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSCAD3000 Engineering Graphics and Lab 6.0CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0CSIS2050 Advanced Programming 4.5PRMG2010 Introduction to Project Management 4.5eXPerientiAl eDucAtion electiveSCourses with a TECX designation selectedfrom the offerings within the School ofTechnology* 9.0generAl StuDieSLEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5MATH1040 Calculus I 4.5MATH1041 Calculus II 4.5MATH2042 Calculus III 4.5MATH2043 Ordinary Differential Equations 4.5PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a Critical Thinking Approach OR 4.5PHIL3040 Ethics of Business LeadershipPSYC2001 Introductory Psychology 4.5SCI1021 General Chemistry 4.5SCI1022 General Chemistry Lab 2.25SCI2012 Physics II and Lab 4.5SOC2001 Sociology I 4.5History One HIST-designated course (except HIST4030) 4.5total credits 111.25four-year credit total 209.75* Students should consult with their academic advisor.noteS: Students must have MATH1030 (Precalculus)or equivalent to enroll in MATH1040.Students must earn a performance transcript writingassessment of “validated” or “mastered” in orderto graduate with a bachelor’s degree.Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History,Sociology and English requirements. Visit Study Abroadfor details. 103
    • engineering DeSign ENGN4000 Standards/Codes and Ergonomics ENGN4005 Quality Control/Professional 4.5& configurAtion Practice ENGN4010 Configuration Management 4.5 4.5MAnAgeMent ITEC3070 Systems Modeling and Simulation 4.5(School of Technology) relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSBAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0 ENGN3090 Systems Performance and Measurement 4.5The Engineering Design & Configuration PRMG2010 Introduction to Project Management 4.5Management bachelor’s degree program Tech. One course with an ETEC attributecomplements the two-year Computerized Elective selected from offerings within theDrafting associate degree. School of Technology (except FIT1000 or FIT1020) 4.5Students build upon their associate degreein Computerized Drafting and integrate CAD eXPerientiAl eDucAtion electiveSsoftware and drafting standards to develop Courses with a TECX designation selected from the offerings within the School ofengineering design concepts and configura- Technology* 9.0tion management methods and techniques.The Engineering Design & Configuration generAl StuDieS LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5Management program is comprised of the MATH2001 Statistics 4.5development of design skills, conventions and PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a Criticalstandards, and the management of design Thinking Approachdocumentation for products and projects. The OR 4.5 PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadershiporganization and design of products parallels SOC2001 Sociology I 4.5the organization and development of projects. History One HIST-designated courseSome topics in this program are quality con- (except HIST4030) 4.5 Science One science course from the following:trol/professional practice, design and project SCI1012, SCI3010, SCI3030 4.5development, materials and process engi- Electives Two courses with an EASC attributeneering, standards/codes and ergonomics, selected from offerings within theconfiguration management and an introduction School of Arts & Sciences which may be used to form an arts & sciencesto CAD/CAM. Each course is developed for concentration 9.0hands-on experience and case studies to pre-pare the student for professional placement. total credits 97.0Graduates can expect to be part of designand project teams in a product manufacturing four-year credit total 192.5field or in areas of project development and * Students should consult with their academic advisor.management with start-up companies, and note: Students must earn a performance transcriptestablished organizations. writing assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with a bachelor’s degree.engineering DeSign Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, Sociology and English requirements. Visit Study Abroad for& configurAtion MAnAgeMent details.A four-year program leading to the bachelor ofscience degree for two-year computerized Draftingprogram graduatesfirst two years:Associate in Science Degree inComputerized Drafting (Page 89) 95.5third and fourth years:MAjor courSeS creDitSCAD3070 Introduction to CAD/CAM and Lab 6.0ENGN3000 Materials and Process Engineering 4.5ENGN3020 Design II and Project Development 4.5ENGN3085 Principles of Systems Engineering 4.5104
    • entrePreneurShiP Entrepreneurship students participate in a hands-on learning experience at the(College of Business and the Larry Friedman Larry Friedman International Center forInternational Center for Entrepreneurship) Entrepreneurship during their senior year.BAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree Students have the option of putting into operation the business plan they have beenAs Entrepreneurship majors in the working on throughout their time at the uni-Larry Friedman International Center for versity and starting their business prior toEntrepreneurship, students have opportunities graduation. They may also choose to work forto solve the kinds of problems that they would a small business as “intrapreneurs” (corpo-face in starting their own businesses, without rate entrepreneurs) as change and innovationthe costly risks involved in the trial and error proponents in order to identify and prepareprocess. Through classroom discussions, to capitalize on emerging business opportuni-case studies, guest speakers, internships ties. To facilitate this, the center providesand opportunities to study abroad, students an office, available year round, with state-of-are guided by successful entrepreneurs as the-art technology and access to faculty andthey learn how to avoid the classic errors in Rhode Island Small Business Developmentstarting and operating a business. Center professionals.The Larry Friedman International Center for An important component of the program’sEntrepreneurship offers students the resources educational experience is the general stud-necessary to bring their business ideas to ies courses taught by the John Hazen Whitereality — technological, administrative and School of Arts & Sciences. Graduates areprofessional assistance. Through various expected to show competencies in higherprograms supported by the Small Business order thinking, communications, ethics,Development Center (SBDC), students have global diversity, responsible citizenship, lead-the opportunity to interact with real-world ership and artistic responsibility. The follow-business clients, SBDC consultants, ing literacies should also be demonstrated:students and instructors. sociocultural, quantitative, scientific and informational.Graduates with a bachelor of science degreein Entrepreneurship are better prepared to Graduates of the program willboth operate their own business and act as a • demonstrate oral and written communica-proponent of intrapreneurship within existing tion competencies in the development oforganizations. An integrated mix of custom a viable business planentrepreneurial courses, traditional manage- • apply logic and critical thinking to the basicment and marketing classes, and extensive qualitative and quantitative analysis ofexperiential (hands-on) opportunities (both small business development andinside and outside of required classes) pre- sustainabilitypares students for their careers as business • identify the various types of capitalstarters and/or corporate intrapreneurs in funding sources for start-up and existingan extensive variety of industries. Typically businessesstudents enter in these varied career pathsas junior managers-in-training for moreresponsible management positions. 105
    • entrePreneurShiP Electives Two courses with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within theA four-year program leading to the bachelor of School of Arts & Sciences which mayscience degree be used to form an arts & sciences concentration 9.0MAjor courSeS creDitS choose two of the following: 9.0 PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a CriticalACCT1021 Business Accounting I and Lab 5.5 Thinking ApproachACCT1022 Business Accounting II and Lab 5.5 ORACCT3023 Managerial Accounting PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadership OR 4.5 History One HIST-designated courseACCT4012 Taxes and Business Decisions (except HIST4030)ENTR1001 Introduction to Entrepreneurship 4.5 Literature ENG1001 or one LIT-designatedENTR2030 The Business Plan 4.5 courseENTR2040 Financing the Entrepreneurial choose two of the following: 9.0 Venture 4.5 LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership StudiesENTR3010 Small Business Consulting 4.5 PSYC2001 Introductory PsychologyENTR3025 Business Expansion Strategies SOC2001 Sociology I and Tactics 4.5ENTR3030 Marketing Research for Entrepreneurs 4.5ENTR4010 Managing Change and Innovation 4.5 total credits 193.0ENTR4020 Global Entrepreneurship 4.5 * Required courses cannot be used to fulfill a concentration.MGMT1001 Principles of Management 4.5MGMT2020 Organizational Behavior 4.5 noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics)MGMT2030 Service and Production or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math require- ment. Operations Management 4.5MGMT3030 Managerial Technology 4.5 Students must earn a performance transcript writingMGMT4020 Strategic Management 4.5 assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with a bachelor’s degree.MRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5MRKT1011 Principles of Professional Selling 4.5 Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History,Concentr. Any approved concentration Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Visit Study Abroad for details. selected from offerings within the university* 13.5relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSCAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0FIT1000 Information Technology for Business Professionals I 4.5FIT1020 Information Technology for Business Professionals II 4.5LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5LAW3002 The Legal Environment of Business II 4.5choose one of the following: 13.5 ENTR4099 Entrepreneurship Internship OR IBUS4090 International Business Experience OR Choose three electives from any 3000 or 4000 level courses from the College of Business, The Hospitality College or the School of TechnologygenerAl StuDieSCSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5ENG1020 English Composition 4.5ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5MATH2001 Statistics 4.5Math One math course at the MATH1002 level or higher 4.5Science One SCI-designated course 4.5106
    • equine BuSineSS Business concentrations emphasize the con- nection between the equine industry and theMAnAgeMent business world. Students may tailor their(College of Business) degree through the selection of numerous concentrations in the College of Business,BAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree School of Technology, The Hospitality College or the School of Arts & Sciences. SomeThe Equine Business Management bachelor’s popular concentrations include marketingdegree program combines equine academic communications; sports management; sales,courses and hands-on equine labs with meeting and event management; entre-business and general studies courses. preneurship; professional selling; desktopThe program prepares students for areas of publishing; career writing and internationalthe industry demanding managerial skills, a business.knowledge of business practice and equineexperience. Equine students participate in hands-on educational activities at the Center forSpecialized science-based equine classes Equine Studies in Rehoboth, Mass. Studentsdevelop the understanding of the functioning gain experience in all aspects of horseof the horse with study in anatomy, lame- management including health and dentalness, physiology, sports therapy, genetics, maintenance, nutrition, facilities manage-nutrition, diseases and reproduction. Further ment, equipment usage, trailering, lunging,classes develop the ability to evaluate hors- ground driving, vaccination and anthelmintices for sport, develop a farm management programs.plan and manage horse shows. Throughthese equine academic courses graduates Many students select to participate in theare expected to demonstrate competencies internship program which allows them toin formulating rations, designing a herd work in the equine industry at approvedhealth program, selecting sport horses, establishments. Students interested in theand developing an equine business plan. breeding industry have participated in the Kentucky Equine Management InternshipAn important component of the program’s program at selected breeding farms in theeducational experience is the general stud- Lexington, Ky., area. Students that select toies courses taught by the John Hazen White participate in the internship option often tran-School of Arts & Sciences. Graduates are sition from school to work in one easy stepexpected to show competencies in higher when their internship site hires them uponorder thinking, communications, ethics, completion of their degree.global diversity, responsible citizenship, lead-ership and artistic responsibility. The follow- A sampling of the positions that studentsing literacies should also be demonstrated: have filled upon graduation include farmsociocultural, quantitative, scientific and manager, equine advertising account man-informational. ager, sales representative, insurance agent, horse show personnel, horse/breed asso-Both equine degree programs offer three ciation publicist and veterinary assistant.specialized Equine Management labs which Students may also participate in a summeremphasize the hands-on aspects of horse term in England to complete their arts andmanagement including daily care, presenta- sciences electives.tion of the horse in hand, first aid, lunging,long lining and other applied skills. As anoutcome of the lab classes, graduates havethe skills needed to obtain a position inthe farm management sector of the horseindustry. 107
    • eXtrAcurriculAr ActivitieS the fAcilityJohnson & Wales’ equine programs offer a The home of Johnson & Wales’ Equine Studiesvariety of extracurricular activities for students, programs, the Johnson & Wales Equine Center,including student dressage shows, schooling is located in Rehoboth, Massachusetts, ashows, seminars and clinics. short drive from Providence. The 30-acre farm is located in the Massachusetts countryside,The university hosts seminars and career adjacent to the Rehoboth State Forest. Thenights with nationally recognized speakers farm includes a 170’ x 70’ mirrored indoorfrom the equine industry. A well-established riding hall with Pos-A-Trac footing, attachedclinic program rounds out students’ educa- 32-stall barn, pastures, and turnout paddocks.tional experiences through participation and It also features a round-pen used in theobservation of various teaching and training training course and for schooling horses.techniques. Clinicians such as Sybille Crafts, Rounding out the facility are three showMark Weissbecker, Sarah Geikie, Shannon quality outdoor arenas: a 225’ x 100’ multi-Dueck and Greg Prince have participated in purpose jumping ring, a 220’ x 80’ dressagethis program. ring and a 70’ x 135’ warm-up ring.Equestrian Education Systems has worked The Johnson & Wales Center for Equinewith Johnson & Wales University to offer the Studies is equipped with a pine-paneledEckart Meyner’s BALIMO training symposiums observation room housing state-of-the-artand instructor workshop at the university. communication technologies that allow clini-The BALIMO exercise and teaching program cians to address students and spectatorsare utilized in the riding classes offered at during mounted lessons. Classroom space,the university. administrative offices and a conference area with kitchen facilities make this a comfortableJohnson & Wales University participates meeting area. Heated tack rooms, laundryin equine sports through two distinct com- facilities, wash stall and storage add to thepetitive teams: Intercollegiate Horse Show additional ease and efficiency of the facility.Association (IHSA) and IntercollegiateDressage Association (IDA). The IHSA team The horses for school use are all selectedcompetes in the hunter-seat equitation team for their training and temperament. Severalthroughout New England and hosts a show different breeds are represented, includingannually at the Center for Equine Studies. Dutch Warmblood, Hanoverian, Swedish Warmblood, Holsteiner, Thoroughbred,The university is a charter member of the Trakehner, Quarter Horse and Morgan. ManyIntercollegiate Dressage Association, of the horses have successful show recordshosts two competitions yearly and travels which include competition experience at theregionally to compete. The university is presi- F.E.I. level of dressage, on the hunter/jumperdent college for Northeast Region A. The uni- circuit, and in eventing.versity’s dressage team has won numerousregional and national awards and has beenrepresented at every national championshipby team members.The university participates in events throughseveral combined tests held at the EquineCenter. Students have the opportunity tobroaden their knowledge through selectedfield trips, the highlight of which is the annualupstate New York breeding farms trip. TheEquine Club provides students with socialand recreational equine opportunities.108
    • equine BuSineSS MAnAgeMent choose two of the following: 9.0 PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a CriticalA four-year program leading to the bachelor of Thinking Approachscience degree OR PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadership History One HIST-designated courseMAjor courSeS creDitS (except HIST4030) Literature ENG1001 or one LIT-designatedEQN1001 Introduction to Equine Studies 4.5 courseEQN1010 Equine Physiology and Sports Therapy 4.5 choose two of the following: 9.0EQN1020 Equine Anatomy and Lameness 4.5 LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership StudiesEQN1071 Equine Management Lab I 3.0 PSYC2001 Introductory PsychologyEQN1072 Equine Management Lab II 3.0 SOC2001 Sociology IEQN2000 Equine Diseases 4.5EQN2010 Equine Nutrition 4.5EQN2073 Equine Management Lab III 1.5 free electiveSEQN3010 Equine Reproduction and Genetics 4.5 choose one of the following: 18.0–-19.5EQN3040 Sport Horse Evaluation and Judging 4.5 Four courses selected from 1000–4999EQN4050 Horse Farm Management 4.5 numbered offerings within the universityEQN3030 Horse Show Management OR OR 4.5 Equine Internship and one free electiveBusiness One course with an ECARElective attribute selected from offerings total credits 187.0–-188.5 within the College of Business noteS: Students must earn a performance transcript writing assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with a bachelor’s degree.relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSACCT1021 Business Accounting I and Lab 5.5 Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History,ACCT1022 Business Accounting II and Lab 5.5 Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Visit Study Abroad for details.ADVC1010 Marketing Communications I 4.5CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0FIT1000 Information Technology for Business Professionals I 4.5FIT1020 Information Technology for Business Professionals II 4.5LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5MGMT1001 Principles of Management OR 4.5ENTR1001 Introduction to EntrepreneurshipMRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5MRKT1011 Principles of Professional Selling 4.5Concentr. A concentration selected from offerings within the College of Business, The Hospitality College, the School of Technology or Career Writing Concentration 13.5generAl StuDieSCSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5ENG1020 English Composition 4.5ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communications 4.5ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5MATH2001 Statistics 4.5Math One math course at the MATH1002 level or higher 4.5Science One SCI-designated course 4.5Electives Two courses with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within the School of Arts & Sciences which may be used to form an arts & sciences concentration 9.0 109
    • equine BuSineSS inStructor/trAiner concentrAtionMAnAgeMent/riDing(College of Business) Students may choose to specialize throughBAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree an Instructor/Trainer concentration featuring two methods of riding instruction classes, aDesigned for the student who desires a training course, a movement training classcareer in teaching, training and/or farm man- and three additional advanced riding classes.agement, the Equine Business Management/ Upon completion of the instructor trainingRiding degree program combines riding program students receive American Red Crossinstruction, specialized academic equine First Aid and CPR certification and may becomecourses and equine labs with business and licensed to teach riding through examinationgeneral studies courses. by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Students wishing to gain the Instructor/Equine Business Management/Riding students Trainer concentration on their transcript mustparticipate in nine riding classes focusing on complete the performance transcript skilldressage and jumping. Each course is individ- certifying first-level dressage competency.ually tailored to the students’ competenciesso that maximum advancement is obtained Admission to the Equine Business Manage-by each student. A unique feature of the ment/Riding degree requires prior riding ex-riding program is the use of Eckart Meyner’s perience, a DVD showing riding competencieswarm-up routine and exercises to unblock the and a telephone interview with the equinerider and achieve harmony with the horse. admissions representative. Admission to thisStudent riding outcomes are measured through program is limited and early application isperformance transcript and certificate programs recommended.which validate the rider’s progress at fourlevels of dressage and four levels of jumping.Equine students participate in hands-oneducational activities at the Equine StudiesCenter in Rehoboth, Mass. Students gainexperience in all aspects of horse manage-ment including health and dental mainte-nance, nutrition, facilities management,equipment usage, trailering, lunging, grounddriving, vaccination and anthelmintic programs.Qualified students may elect to participate inan Equine Study Abroad. Recently studentshave studied at the German Riding School inWarendorf and the Muenster Riding School inMuenster, Germany.For more information on academics,concentrations, extracurricular activities andthe facility, see the program description forEquine Business Management on Page 107.110
    • equine BuSineSS MAnAgeMent/ generAl StuDieS CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0riDing ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5 ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5A four-year program leading to the bachelor of sci- ENG1020 English Composition 4.5ence degree ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communications 4.5MAjor courSeS creDitS ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5 MATH2001 Statistics 4.5EQN1001 Introduction to Equine Studies 4.5 Math One math course at theEQN1010 Equine Physiology and MATH1002 level or higher 4.5 Sports Therapy 4.5 Science One SCI-designated course 4.5EQN1020 Equine Anatomy and Lameness 4.5 Electives Two courses with an EASCEQN1061 Principles of Riding I 1.5 attribute selected from offeringsEQN1062 Principles of Riding II 1.5 within the School of Arts &EQN1063 Principles of Riding III 1.5 Sciences which may be used toEQN1071 Equine Management Lab I 3.0 form an arts & sciencesEQN1072 Equine Management Lab II 3.0 concentration 9.0EQN2000 Equine Diseases 4.5EQN2010 Equine Nutrition 4.5 choose two of the following: 9.0EQN2061 Principles of Riding IV 1.5 PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a CriticalEQN2062 Principles of Riding V 1.5 Thinking ApproachEQN2063 Principles of Riding VI 1.5 OREQN2073 Equine Management Lab III 1.5 PHIL3040 Ethics of Business LeadershipEQN3000 Foundations of Riding Theory 4.5 History One HIST-designated courseEQN3010 Equine Reproduction and Genetics 4.5 (except HIST4030)EQN3040 Sport Horse Evaluation and Judging 4.5 Literature ENG1001 or one LIT-designatedEQN3061 Dressage and Jumping I 1.5 courseEQN3062 Dressage and Jumping II 1.5 choose two of the following: 9.0EQN3063 Dressage and Jumping III 1.5 LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership StudiesEQN4050 Horse Farm Management 4.5 PSYC2001 Introductory Psychologyinstructor/trainer concentration* SOC2001 Sociology ISelect 13.5 credits from following list:EQN3001 Methods of Riding Instruction I 4.5 total credits 187.0–188.5EQN3002 Methods of Riding Instruction II 4.5EQN3064 Movement Training for the Rider 2.0 * Student must earn a performance transcript First LevelEQN3070 Horse Training 4.5 Dressage assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to receive this concentration on their transcript.EQN4061 Advanced Riding and Training I 1.5EQN4062 Advanced Riding and Training II 1.5 noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics)EQN4063 Advanced Riding and Training III 1.5 or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math require- OR ment.EQN3030 Horse Show Management AND Students must earn a performance transcript writing 2 business/equine electives 13.5 assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to OR graduate with a bachelor’s degree.Concentr. Business/Hospitality/Technology Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, or Career Writing Concentration 13.5 Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Visit Study Abroad for details.relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSACCT1021 Business Accounting I and Lab 5.5ACCT1022 Business Accounting II and Lab 5.5ADVC1010 Marketing Communications I 4.5CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0ENTR1001 Introduction to Entrepreneurship OR 4.5MGMT1001 Principles of ManagementFIT1000 Information Technology for Business Professionals I 4.5LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5MRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5EQN4089 Equine International Experience OREQN4099 Equine Internship 13.5-15.0 ORFree Three courses selected fromElectives 1000–4999 numbered offerings within the university 111
    • fAShion An important component of the program’s educational experience is the general stud-MerchAnDiSing & ies courses taught by the John Hazen WhiteretAil MArketing School of Arts & Sciences. Graduates are(College of Business) expected to show competencies in higher order thinking, communications, ethics,BAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree global diversity, responsible citizenship, lead- ership and artistic responsibility. The follow-The Fashion Merchandising & Retail ing literacies should also be demonstrated:Marketing degree prepares students for sociocultural, quantitative, scientific andmiddle-management or executive trainee informational.opportunities within the retail or retail supportindustries. concentrAtionS for fAShionUpon completion of the program, graduates MerchAnDiSing & retAilare expected to demonstrate MArketing MAjorS• the ability to perform the necessary • Advertising (Page 145) procedures required for retail operations • Business-to-Business Selling (Page 145) • e-Commerce (Page 146)• knowledge of global fashion markets, • Fashion Communications (Page 146) designer contributions to the industry and • Fashion Product Development (Page 146) manufacturing categories of fashion goods• knowledge of marketing principles as applied to fashion goods• the ability to identify, analyze and forecast future retail trendsSpecific skills developed include retail mer-chandising, management, buying, promotion,advertising and stock control. Students havethe opportunity to master these skills whileparticipating in a term-long internship, heldat a wide variety of host sites. During thisinternship, students have the opportunityto apply their learning in multiple phases ofretail store operations firsthand, such assales, merchandise presentation, catalogoperations, inventory control, receiving andmarking, and buyer’s clerical duties.Upon graduation, students may be employedby retail organizations in positions that utilizethese skills. Students possess the combina-tion of academic theory and practical experi-ence necessary for entry-level positions inretail management, merchandise buying,visual merchandising, distribution, productdevelopment and sales.Students should use their electives tocreate a meaningful, customized career con-centration. The university’s faculty advisingsystem will facilitate these selections.112
    • fAShion MerchAnDiSing generAl StuDieS CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0& retAil MArketing ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5 ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5A four-year program leading to the bachelor of ENG1020 English Composition 4.5science degree ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5MAjor courSeS creDitS ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5 MATH2001 Statistics 4.5MGMT1001 Principles of Management 4.5 Math One math course at theMRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5 MATH1002 level or higher 4.5MRKT1002 Consumer Behavior 4.5 Science One SCI-designated course 4.5RTL1005 Retailing 4.5 Electives Two courses with an EASC attributeRTL1010 Textiles 4.5 selected from offerings within theRTL1020 The Business of Fashion 4.5 School of Arts & Sciences whichRTL2010 Apparel Quality Analysis 4.5 may be used to form an arts &RTL2063 Retail Industry Seminar 4.5 sciences concentration 9.0RTL2095 Retail Lab 4.5 choose two of the following: 9.0RTL3010 Merchandise Buying 4.5 PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a CriticalRTL3020 Merchandise Mathematics 4.5 Thinking ApproachRTL3030 Comparative Retail Strategies 4.5 ORRTL3055 Global Influences on Fashion History 4.5 PHIL3040 Ethics of Business LeadershipRTL4010 Retail Executive Decision Making 4.5 History One HIST-designated courseRTL4099 Retailing Internship* 9.0 (except HIST4030)choose two of the following: 9.0 Literature ENG1001 or one LIT-designatedRTL1050 Visual Merchandising courseRTL2050 Fashion Promotion choose two of the following: 9.0RTL3060 Fashion Forecasting LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership StudiesRTL3070 Textile Design for the Apparel and PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology Home Furnishings Industry SOC2001 Sociology IMRKT1011 Professional SellingMRKT3005 Brand MarketingMRKT3020 Product Development total credits 188.5 *Students may take career electives or directed work experience to fulfill this requirement.relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieS noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics)ACCT1021 Business Accounting I and Lab 5.5 or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math require-ACCT1022 Business Accounting II and Lab 5.5 ment.CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0 Students must earn a performance transcript writing assess-FIT1000 Information Technology for ment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with Business Professionals I 4.5 a bachelor’s degree.FIT1020 Information Technology for Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, Business Professionals II 4.5 Sociology, English and other elective requirements.LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5 Visit Study Abroad for details.choose one of the following legal electives: 4.5LAW3002 The Legal Environment of Business IILAW3010 Business Law for Accountantschoose one of the following four options: 13.5IBUS4090 International Business Experience ORIBUS4191 Fashion Merchandising and Retail Management in an international Context ORIBUS4020 Summer Work Abroad International Seminar ANDIBUS4082 SWAP Operations Management and Process Improvement ORIBUS4020 Summer Work Abroad International Seminar ANDIBUS4086 SWAP Process Mapping ORRTL4099 Retailing Internship ORConcentr. Three courses selected from declared College of Business, School of Arts & Sciences or School of Technology concentration offerings 113
    • finAnce fiSv-related electives Any FISV Course(College of Business) ACCT2010 Personal Budgeting and Planning ACCT3011 Federal Taxes IBAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree ACCT3031 Cost Accounting I ACCT3032 Cost Accounting II MRKT1011 Principles of Professional SellingThe Finance degree program prepares studentsfor careers in corporate finance and/or thefinancial services industry. concentrAtionS for finAnce MAjorSThe finance curriculum is designed to meetthe needs of some of the most prestigious general financial Services FISV3005 International Financeindustry certifications. As finance majors, FISV3010 Credit Managementstudents gain exposure to a broad range of FISV3015 Fundamentals of Financial Planningfinancial practices with studies focusing on FISV4010 Bank Management FISV4020 Risk Management and Insuranceareas leading to positions in investment anal- FISV4030 Real Estateysis, corporate finance, risk management and Analystfinancial planning. Students choose a concen- ACCT3031 Cost Accounting Itration that helps them meet their career goal FISV3005 International Financefrom the options listed to the right. Students FISV3080 Financial Statement Analysis FISV4040 Futures and Optionsare encouraged to meet with their faculty FISV4050 Portfolio Management and Analysisadvisor before selecting a concentration to FISV4060 Fixed Income Analysisfacilitate choosing a concentration that best Planningmatches the student’s career goals. ACCT3011 Federal Taxes I FISV3015 Fundamentals of Financial Planning FISV4015 Fundamentals of Estate PlanningGraduates are expected to demonstrate an FISV4020 Risk Management and Insuranceability to use logic, critical thinking and ana- FISV4050 Portfolio Management and Analysislytical skills to assist in the decision making FISV4070 Series 7process as well as to make recommenda- operationstions to individuals and organizations using ACCT3031 Cost Accounting Ifinancial information. ACCT3032 Cost Accounting II MGMT2030 Service and Production Operations ManagementAn important component of the program’s MGMT2040 Purchasing and Supply Chain Managementeducational experience is the general studies MGMT3030 Managerial Technologycourses taught by the John Hazen White MGMT3040 Process and Quality ManagementSchool of Arts & Sciences. Graduates are ORexpected to show competencies in higher MGMT4001 Process Planning and Controlorder thinking, ethics, global diversity, MGMT4020 Strategic Management MGMT4050 Operations Management Strategyresponsible citizenship and leadership.The following literacies should also bedemonstrated: sociocultural, quantitative,scientific and informational.Students who maintain a grade point averageof at least 2.75 may also have the opportunityto participate in a Finance Internship to gainexperiential education by completing a workexperience in their area of interest. Additionaloptions are also available for foreign travelthrough the study abroad program.114
    • finAnce note: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math requirement.A four-year program leading to the bachelor of Students must earn a performance transcript writing assess-science degree ment of “vallidated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with a bachelor’s degree. Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History,MAjor courSeS creDitS Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Visit Study Abroad for details.FISV2010 Finance 4.5FISV3001 Investments 4.5FISV3020 Introduction to Financial Institutions 4.5FISV3040 Money and Capital Markets 4.5FISV4025 Corporate Finance 4.5MGMT1001 Principles of Management 4.5Finance Choose a finance concentrationConc. from the listed options 27.0–36.0choose one of the following: 13.5Finance Three FISV-related electivesElectives selected from list on previous page ORIBUS4090 International Business Experience ORFISV4099 Finance InternshiprelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSACCT1001 Principles of Accounting I and Lab 5.5ACCT1002 Principles of Accounting II and Lab 5.5ACCT2021 Intermediate Accounting I 4.5ACCT2022 Intermediate Accounting II 4.5ACCT2023 Intermediate Accounting III 4.5CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0FIT1000 Information Technology for Business Professionals I 4.5FIT1020 Information Technology for Business Professionals II 4.5LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5MRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5generAl StuDieSCSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5ENG1020 English Composition 4.5ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5MATH1020 Fundamentals of Algebra 4.5MATH1930 Quantitative Analysis 4.5MATH2001 Statistics 4.5PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a Critical Thinking Approach 4.5PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadership 4.5PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology 4.5SOC2001 Sociology I 4.5Science One SCI-designated course 4.5History One HIST-designated course (except HIST4030) OR 4.5Literature ENG1001 or one LIT-designated courseElectives Two courses with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within the School of Arts & Sciences which may be used to form an arts & sciences concentration 9.0total credits 188.5–197.5 115
    • fooD Service An important component of the program’s educational experience is the general stud-entrePreneurShiP ies courses taught by the John Hazen White(College of Business) School of Arts & Sciences. Graduates are expected to show competencies in higherBAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree order thinking, communications, ethics, global diversity, responsible citizenship, lead-The Food Service Entrepreneurship bachelor’s ership and artistic responsibility. The follow-degree program provides Baking & Pastry Arts ing literacies should also be demonstrated:or Culinary Arts associate degree program sociocultural, quantitative, scientific andgraduates with the business skills necessary informational.to open their own businesses and/or workin a management capacity at a food-related Graduates of the program willsmall business. • demonstrate oral and written communica-Graduates receive training from an integrated tion competencies in the development ofmix of custom entrepreneurial courses and a viable business plantraditional management, accounting, finance • apply logic and critical thinking to the basicand marketing classes to build the necessary qualitative and quantitative analysis ofbusiness knowledge base to capitalize on small business development andtheir culinary/baking and pastry skills in their sustainabilitycareer pursuits. Opportunities also exist for • identify the various types of capitalstudents to study abroad. The university’s funding sources for start-up and existingfaculty advising system helps guide and facili- businessestate student choices.The Larry Friedman International Center forEntrepreneurship offers students most of theresources necessary to bring their businessideas to reality with technological, administra-tive and professional assistance. Throughvarious programs supported by the R.I. SmallBusiness Development Center (SBDC), theseofferings include interaction between real-world business clients, the SBDC director,students and instructors.Graduates are better prepared to bothoperate their own business and act as aproponent of intrapreneurship within existingorganizations. An integrated mix of customentrepreneurial courses, traditional manage-ment and marketing classes, and extensiveexperiential (hands-on) opportunities (bothinside and outside of required classes) pre-pares students for their careers as businessstarters and/or corporate intrapreneurs inan extensive variety of industries. Typicallystudents enter in these varied career pathsas junior managers-in-training for moreresponsible management positions.116
    • fooD Service entrePreneurShiP noteS: Students must earn a performance transcript writing assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with a bachelor’s degree.A four-year program leading to the Bachelorof Science Degree for two-year Baking & Pastry Arts Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, Sociology, English and other elective requirements.or culinary Arts program graduates Visit Study Abroad for details.first two years:Associate in Science Degree inBaking & Pastry Arts (Page 80) orCulinary Arts (Page 96) 97.0third and fourth years:MAjor courSeS creDitSACCT1021 Business Accounting I and Lab 5.5ACCT1022 Business Accounting II and Lab 5.5ACCT3023 Managerial Accounting OR 4.5ACCT4012 Taxes and Business DecisionsENTR1001 Introduction to Entrepreneurship 4.5ENTR2030 The Business Plan 4.5ENTR2040 Financing the Entrepreneurial Venture 4.5ENTR3025 Business Expansion Strategies and Tactics 4.5ENTR4010 Managing Change and Innovation 4.5MGMT1001 Principles of Management 4.5MRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSCAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0FIT1000 Information Technology for Business Professionals I 4.5FIT1020 Information Technology for Business Professionals II 4.5LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5generAl StuDieSECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5MATH2001 Statistics 4.5Electives Two courses with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within the School of Arts & Sciences which may be used to form an arts & sciences concentration 9.0choose two of the following: 9.0PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a Critical Thinking Approach ORPHIL3040 Ethics of Business LeadershipHistory One HIST-designated course (except HIST4030)Literature ENG1001 or one LIT-designated coursechoose one of the following: 4.5PSYC2001 Introductory PsychologySOC2001 Sociology Itotal credits 97.5four-year credit total 194.5 117
    • grAPhic DeSign & organizational identity kits, video, animation and websites. Students work in project teamsDigitAl MeDiA supervised by faculty and senior students.(School of Technology) Digital Media Team I & II provides advancedBAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree experiential education to senior-level students. In these courses, students are assigned aThe Graphic Design & Digital Media bachelor’s variety of project work from a range ofdegree program combines visual design clients affiliated with the Feinstein Centerfoundation courses, hands-on experience for Technology & Design, other university pro-and specialized concentrations to prepare grams and select external partners. Projectsstudents for careers in professional graphic involve individual and team work to providedesign and digital media. solutions in all digital media platforms. Students conceive, plan, create and deliverStudents in this degree program prepare for digital media products, as well as providea wide range of career opportunities in the team leadership to undergraduates.creative industries where graphic design andtechnology intersect. Sample job titles in this Other opportunities such as study abroad,rapidly changing professional market include national competitions, school exhibitions,digital media designer, interactive graphic independent/team projects and internshipsdesigner, digital artist, Web designer and are also available to qualified students anddeveloper, information architect, print and complement the college experience.digital publisher.The academic and experiential focus of this concentrAtionS for grAPhicprogram prepares students to solve various DeSign & DigitAl MeDiA MAjorSdigital communication problems using visualdesign and digital tools. Learning is hands-on Digital Media Animation Choose three of the following:and performance-based using current digital DME3110 Multimedia Programmingsoftware and hardware in university labs DME3120 Character Animation DME3130 Computer Animationand studios. Students prepare many graphic DME3140 Integrated Motion Graphicsdesign and digital media pieces to include inthe sophomore portfolio class, which serves Digital Media Print DME3210 Print Productionas a springboard to advanced concentrations. DME3220 Intermediate PrintIn addition to concentration study, junior and DME3230 Advanced Printsenior year is highlighted with real-world expe- Digital videorience in the Feinstein Center for Technology DME3140 Integrated Motion Graphics& Design for Non-Profit Organizations. DME3300 Introduction to Digital Video DME3310 Intermediate Digital VideoThrough advanced coursework and experien-tial education, students develop competitive web Applications Developmentskills in project management by creating, CSIS2030 Database Concepts CSIS3030 Server Side Programming Imanaging and presenting graphic design and CSIS3040 Server Side Programming IIdigital media projects. web technologies DME3110 Multimedia ProgrammingIn Design Solutions Team I & II junior-level CSIS3030 Server Side Programming Istudents apply their knowledge to real-world DME3115 Emerging Web Technologiesproblems through experiential education.Working from the Feinstein Center forTechnology & Design on campus, studentsprovide digital media solutions for non-profitorganizations. Students hone their designskills by creating, editing and presentingcollateral that includes pamphlets, posters,118
    • grAPhic DeSign & DigitAl MeDiA free electiveS Two courses selected from 1000-4999A four-year program leading to the bachelor of offerings within the university (except FIT1000) 9.0science degree total credits 186.5–191.0MAjor courSeS creDitS * Students should consult with their academic advisor.DME1000 Foundation Drawing & Digital Tools 4.5 noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics)DME1020 Digital Media Perspectives 4.5 or equivalent placement scores to enroll in MATH1020.DME1030 Principles of Visualization and Design 4.5 Students must earn a performance transcript writing assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in orderDME1040 Introduction to Client-Side to graduate with a bachelor’s degree. Development 4.5DME1050 Imaging for Digital Media 4.5 Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, Sociology, English and other elective requirements.DME1060 Advanced Client-Side Development 4.5 Visit Study Abroad for details.DME2000 Typography and Spatial Design 4.5DME2020 Introduction to Motion Graphics 4.5DME2030 Print Design 4.5DME2040 Portfolio Assessment 4.5DME2050 Interactive Architecture and Content Design 4.5DME4050 Senior Portfolio Assessment 4.5CSIS2025 Introduction to Server-Side Technologies 4.5FIT1012 Digital Technology for Business 4.5Tech. Select one concentration fromConcentr. offerings on Page 118. 13.5relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSCAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5LAW3080 Cyberlaw 4.5MRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5PRMG2010 Introduction to Project Management 4.5eXPerientiAl eDucAtion electiveSDME3010 Digital Media Design Solutions Team I 4.5DME3020 Digital Media Design Solutions Team II 4.5Courses with a TECX designation selectedfrom the offerings within the School ofTechnology* 9.0–13.5generAl StuDieSART2010 Introduction to Film 4.5CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0ENG1020 English Composition 4.5ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5HUM3050 Science & Civilization: Progress and Problems 4.5HUM3070 Visual Literacy and the Sociology of Perception 4.5MATH1020 Fundamentals of Algebra 4.5MATH3020 Discrete Mathematics 4.5PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology 4.5SOC2010 Sociology of Digital Environments 4.5History One HIST-designated course (except HIST4030) 4.5Science One science course from the following: SCI2005, SCI3010, SCI3030 4.5Electives Two courses with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within the School of Arts & Sciences which may be used to form an arts & sciences concentration, or any other general studies courses 9.0 119
    • hotel & loDging concentrAtionS for hotel & loDging MAnAgeMent MAjorSMAnAgeMent(The International Hotel School) At least one three-course Hospitality College concentration is required for graduation.BAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree This program allows students to select concentrations that can lead to careerThe Hotel & Lodging Management bach- growth within lodging companies or toelor’s degree program focuses on current enhance their initial and subsequent careerbest practices for operational, strategic and opportunities. Students may elect to usestaff management in lodging properties and their hospitality and free elective credits forcompanies. Lodging is defined as activities a second concentration, an internship or arelated to commercial, overnight accommoda- summer abroad program.tions of all types, including hotels, resortsand smaller lodging properties (e.g., boutique While all Hospitality College concentrationshotels, country inns, B&Bs, etc.). are available to students in this degree (see Pages 149–152), the following concen-The degree prepares graduates for employ- trations are recommended: Resort Manage-ment in operational management or profes- ment; International Hospitality Operationssional staff positions within commercial lodg- (summer program only); Entrepreneurship;ing companies, as well as positioning them Casino & Gaming Operations or Food andto move up to higher-level positions such as Beverage Management.general manager and various corporate staffpositions. Possible career tracks might relateto front office management, housekeeping,food and beverage management and affiliatedactivities such as concierge, spa manage-ment, property sales and marketing, conven-tion services, meeting and event planning,resort activities, revenue management, control-ler, development, regional management, etc.Graduates are expected to be able to utilizetheir technical and management skills, aswell as apply critical thinking skills, ethicalstandards and problem-solving techniqueswithin a lodging organization.Hotel & Lodging Management studentscomplete a required experience at an inde-pendent, university-owned hotel, the Johnson& Wales Inn, or at a university-owned-and-operated corporate franchise, the RadissonAirport Hotel. These facilities, which are opento the public, provide an opportunity to gainpractical experience in lodging and foodservice operations through a rotation amongseveral departments. Students may alsofulfill this requirement by being assignedto an internship at local, non-JWU affiliatedhotels. This is done at the discretion of theinternship coordinator.120
    • hotel & loDging MAnAgeMent Math One math course at the MATH1002 level or higher 4.5A four-year program leading to the bachelor of Science One SCI-designated course 4.5science degree Electives Two courses with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within the School of Arts & Sciences which mayMAjor courSeS creDitS be used to form an arts & sciences concentration, or any other generalFSM1065 Food Safety and Sanitation studies courses 9.0 Management* 1.5FSM2085 Hotel Food and Beverage Operations 4.5FSM2095 Hotel Food and Beverage Controls 4.5 free elective**FSM4060 Hospitality Operations Management 9.0 One course selected from 1002–-4999 numberedHOSP1001 The Hospitality Field 4.5 offerings within the university (except ACCT1005,HOSP1008 Customer/Guest Service CJS1002, MGMT2001). It is important to save Management 4.5 this elective if you plan to participate in aHOSP1010 Front Office Operations 4.5 Hospitality study abroad program. 4.5HOSP2030 Hospitality Human Resources and Diversity Leadership 4.5 total credits 190.0HOSP2011 Hospitality Sales and Meeting Management 4.5 * Students must pass a national exam that is recognized by the Conference for Food Protection as a graduationHOSP2099 Hotel Internship 13.5 requirement.HOSP3033 Hospitality Property Operations 4.5 ** Elective courses allow students to enhance theirHOSP3077 Revenue Management 4.5 education by earning a second concentration or byHOSP3050 Hospitality Strategic Marketing 4.5 participating in an internship or study abroad program.HOSP4060 Hospitality Management Seminar 4.5 Students use two Hospitality Electives and one Free Elective toward this option.Hospitality Three courses selected fromConcentr. declared concentration. Some noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) study abroad programs offer or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math require- ment. completion of a Hospitality concentration. 13.5 Students must earn a performance transcript writing assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in orderchoose one of the following: 9.0 to graduate with a bachelor’s degree.Hospitality Two courses with an EHSP attributeElectives selected from offerings within Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, Sociology, English and other elective requirements. The Hospitality College** Visit Study Abroad for details. OR Second Hospitality concentration (with use of one free elective). Some study abroad programs offer completion of a Hospitality concentration. OR Study Abroad (with use of one free elective) OR Second InternshiprelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSACCT1011 Hospitality Accounting I and Lab 5.5ACCT1012 Hospitality Accounting II and Lab 5.5ACCT3025 Hospitality Financial Management 4.5CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0LAW2010 Hospitality Law 4.5generAl StuDieSCSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5ENG1001 An Introduction to Literary Genres 4.5ENG1020 English Composition 4.5ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5MATH2001 Statistics 4.5PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology 4.5SPAN1011 Conversational Spanish I: Specialized Vocabulary 4.5History One HIST-designated course (except HIST4030) 4.5 121
    • internAtionAlBuSineSS(College of Business)BAchelor of Science (B.S.) DegreeStudents enrolling in the InternationalBusiness program will become businessfluent in a new, global business language andculture. Global business languages includeEnglish, French, German, Spanish or anotheruniversity-approved language. This languagerequirement pertains to all internationalbusiness students, regardless of their currentlanguage expertise.The first two years of this program introducestudents to the world of international busi-ness, complemented by general educationand specific language study. The final twoyears offer more advanced business courseswith an international experience emphasis.An important component of the program’seducational experience is the general stud-ies courses taught by the John Hazen WhiteSchool of Arts & Sciences. Graduates areexpected to show competencies in higherorder thinking, ethics, responsible citizen-ship and leadership. The following literaciesshould also be demonstrated: sociocultural,quantitative, scientific and informational.The graduate of the four-year InternationalBusiness program is trained to assumeentry-level management positions with firmsoperating in the global environment.Students should use their electives to createa meaningful, customized career concentra-tion. The university’s faculty advising systemwill facilitate these selections.122
    • internAtionAl BuSineSS choose two of the following: 9.0 LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership StudiesA four-year program leading to the bachelor of PSYC2001 Introductory Psychologyscience degree SOC2001 Sociology IMAjor courSeS creDitS total credits 184.0ACCT3023 Managerial Accounting 4.5 * Students meeting eligibility criteria may elect a SummerIBUS2002 International Business 4.5 Study Abroad, Business Internship or Summer WorkIBUS2040 International Culture and Protocol 4.5 Abroad program (SWAP). Otherwise, students must take a concentration (13.5 total credits) selected from the CollegeIBUS4090 International Business Experience* 13.5 of Business.MGMT1001 Principles of Management 4.5MGMT2001 Human Resources Management 4.5 ** Students may choose from French, German, Spanish or other university-approved language.MGMT3030 Managerial Technology 4.5MGMT4020 Strategic Management 4.5 *** Required courses cannot be used to fulfill a concentration.MGMT4030 Senior Management Seminar 4.5 noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) orMRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5 equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math requirement.Language Language I and II** 9.0Concentr. Any approved concentration Students must earn a performance transcript writing assess- ment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with selected from offerings within a bachelor’s degree. the university*** 13.5 Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History,choose one of the following two options: 13.5 Sociology, English and other elective requirements.ECON2010 Economic Geography Visit Study Abroad for details.IBUS2030 Foreign Area StudiesIBUS3050 Export Procedures and Practices ORHUM3020 Language and Cultural ImmersionrelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSACCT1021 Business Accounting I and Lab 5.5ACCT1022 Business Accounting II and Lab 5.5CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0FIT1000 Information Technology for Business Professionals I 4.5FIT1020 Information Technology for Business Professionals II 4.5LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5LAW3055 International Business Law 4.5generAl StuDieSCSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5ENG1020 English Composition 4.5ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5MATH2001 Statistics 4.5Math One math course at the MATH1002 level or higher 4.5Science One SCI-designated course 4.5Electives Two courses with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within the School of Arts & Sciences which may be used to form an arts & sciences concentration 9.0choose two of the following: 9.0PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a Critical Thinking Approach ORPHIL3040 Ethics of Business LeadershipHistory One HIST-designated course (except HIST4030)Literature ENG1001 or one LIT-designated course 123
    • internAtionAl hotel & concentrAtionS for internAtionAl hotel &touriSM MAnAgeMent touriSM MAnAgeMent MAjorS(The International Hotel School) While a concentration is not required forBAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree this degree, it is possible to use hospital- ity electives to obtain a concentration.The International Hotel & Tourism Management Concentrations help students focus theirbachelor of science degree provides students studies and develop stronger careerwith the opportunity to experience the broad credentials. While all Hospitality Collegenature of the hospitality and tourism industries concentrations are available to studentson a global scale. Students prepare to enter in this degree (see Pages 149–-152), theinternational hospitality corporations as well as following concentrations are recommended:tourism planning and marketing organizations Rooms Division Management; Resortas entry-level managers or staff professionals. Management; International Hospitalty Operations (summer program only); Sales,Students spend one term abroad integrating Meeting & Event Management; Tourtheir previous studies with new experiences Management; Casino & Gaming Operations orand knowledge about different countries and Food & Beverage Management. Also, a Worldcultures. The program exposes them to the prin- Languages concentration is possible throughciples and practices of international hospitality the School of Arts & Sciences.management, marketing, strategic planning,tourism, and financial and operational manage-ment for both lodging and food and beveragemanagement. Three terms of study of anotherlanguage are required for the degree.The required study abroad and the languagerequirement provide students with a uniqueglobal perspective, as well as a competitiveadvantage when seeking employment with inter-national hospitality organizations. By participat-ing in a summer abroad, international internshipor international exchange program a studentmay have a second international experience.Graduates are expected to be able to utilizetheir technical and management skills, as wellas apply critical thinking skills, ethical standardsand problem-solving techniques within a globalbusiness environment.Applications are accepted during a student’sfreshman year through the International HotelSchool. Preference is given to students whoachieve a 3.20 GPA or higher during their fresh-man year. Selection is based upon academicperformance, community and university service,industry experience, a personal interview, andprofessional and professorial recommenda-tions. Once in the program, students mustmaintain a minimum GPA of 2.85. ContactThe Hospitality College for more details.124
    • internAtionAl hotel generAl StuDieS CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0& touriSM MAnAgeMent ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5 ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5A four-year program leading to the bachelor of ENG1001 An Introduction to Literary Genres 4.5science degree ENG1020 English Composition 4.5 ENG1021 Advanced Compositionfirst year: and Communication 4.5Enrollment in a Hospitality College program ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5 LEAD2001 Foundations in Leadership Studies 4.5Second, third and fourth years: MATH2001 Statistics 4.5 PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology 4.5MAjor courSeS creDitS SOC2001 Sociology IHOSP1001 The Hospitality Field1 4.5 OR 4.5FSM1065 Food Safety and Sanitation SOC2020 Culture and Food Management* 1.5FSM2085 Hotel Food and Beverage Operations2 4.5 History One HIST-designated courseFSM2095 Hotel Food and Beverage Controls3 4.5 (except HIST4030) 4.5FSM4060 Hospitality Operations Language Language I** 4.5 Management4 9.0 Language Language II** 4.5HOSP1008 Customer/Guest Services Language Language III** 4.5 Management 4.5 Math One math course at theHOSP1010 Front Office Operations 4.5 MATH1002 level or higher 4.5HOSP2011 Hospitality Sales and Meeting Science One SCI-designated course 4.5 Management5 4.5HOSP2030 Hospitality Human Resource and Diversity Leadership 4.5 total credits 190.0HOSP2099 Hotel Internship * Students must pass a national exam that is recognized by the Conference for Food Protection as a graduation OR 13.5 requirement.TRVL2099 Travel-Tourism & Hospitality Internship6 ** Students must satisfy three levels of the same language or may substitute three general studies electives if profi- ciency in a second language is demonstrated orHOSP3050 Hospitality Strategic Marketing# 4.5 documented.HOSP4060 Hospitality Management Seminar 4.5 # Courses are taught during the study abroad.IHTV3010 International Hospitality Management# 4.5 1 Students transferring from Restaurant Food & BeverageTRVL2801 World Geography for Tourism Management substitute FSM1001. Students transferring from Sports/Entertainment/Event Management substitute and Hospitality7 4.5 SEE1001.TRVL3010 Dynamics of Tourism 4.5 2 Students transferring from Restaurant Food & BeverageTRVL3030 International Policies of Tourism# 4.5 Management substitute two of the following: CUL1315, CUL1335, CUL1355.choose one of the following: 13.5 3 FSM2080 may be substituted for this course if schedulingHospitality Three courses with an EHSP limitations exist.Electives attribute selected from offerings 4 Students transferring from Restaurant, Food & Beverage within The Hospitality College Management substitute CUL1385, CUL1395, FSM4061. OR 5 Students transferring from Sports/Entertainment/Event Hospitality concentration (Some Management may substitute SEE2020 for this course if the course has been completed. study abroad programs offer 6 Students may substitute TRVL2099 with permission of completion of a Hospitality program advisor and the Center for International Travel/ concentration.) Tourism, depending upon availability. Students are required to complete a hotel rotation as part of TRVL2099. OR 7 Students transferring from Travel-Tourism & Hospitality Study Abroad Management substitute TRVL1011. OR 8 Students transferring from Sports/Entertainment/Event Internship Management may substitute ACCT1021 if the course has been completed. 9 Students transferring from Sports/Entertainment/Event Management may substitute ACCT1022 for this course ifrelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieS the course has been completed.ACCT1011 Hospitality Accounting I and Lab8 5.5 noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) orACCT1012 Hospitality Accounting II and Lab9 5.5 equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math requirement.ACCT3025 Hospitality Financial Management 4.5CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0 Students must earn a performance transcript writing assess- ment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate withLAW2010 Hospitality Law 4.5 a bachelor’s degree. Students transferring into this degree from programs other than Hotel & Lodging Management may have unused credits and thereby exceed the 190 credit total shown above. Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Visit Study Abroad for details. 125
    • MAnAgeMent(College of Business)BAchelor of Science (B.S.) DegreeThe goal of the four-year Managementprogram is to prepare graduates for careersin a variety of entry-level managerial positionsin a wide range of firms. Students are expect-ed to acquire the communication, criticalthinking and ethical reasoning skills essentialfor today’s managers. The program’s mix ofcourse work provides students with a broadunderstanding of the issues facing thebusiness world.An important component of the program’seducational experience is the general stud-ies courses taught by the John Hazen WhiteSchool of Arts & Sciences. Graduates areexpected to show competencies in higherorder thinking, ethics, global diversity,responsible citizenship and leadership.The following literacies should also bedemonstrated: sociocultural, quantitative,scientific and informational.Students who maintain a GPA of at least2.75 may have the opportunity to participatein an internship and gain experiential educa-tion in their area of interest. Options are alsoavailable for foreign travel through the studyabroad program.Regardless of what industry the studentchooses to enter, an understanding of keybusiness principles is critical to a success-ful career, whether it is vying for a first jobplacement or success later in life. A studentmay focus on studies leading to managementpositions in production operations, humanresources, financial services and otherservice industries.Students will choose one concentration fromthe university’s offerings. The university’sfaculty advising system will facilitate theseselections.126
    • MAnAgeMent choose two of the following: 9.0 PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a CriticalA four-year program leading to the bachelor of Thinking Approachscience degree OR PHIL3040 Ethics of Business LeadershipMAjor courSeS creDitS History One HIST-designated course (except HIST4030) Literature ENG1001 or one LIT-designatedACCT3023 Managerial Accounting 4.5 courseFISV2010 Finance 4.5MGMT1001 Principles of Management 4.5 choose two of the following: 9.0MGMT2001 Human Resources Management 4.5 LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership StudiesMGMT2020 Organizational Behavior 4.5 PSYC2001 Introductory PsychologyMGMT2030 Service and Production SOC2001 Sociology I Operations Management 4.5MGMT3030 Managerial Technology 4.5 total credits 184.0MGMT3040 Process and Quality Management 4.5 * Students meeting eligibility criteria may elect achoose one of the following: 13.5 Management Internship, Summer Study Abroad or SWAP (Students Working Abroad Program) to satisfy require-MGMT3060 Human Resources Training and ments. Otherwise, students must take three additional Development AND career electives from the College of Business or SchoolMGMT4001 Process Planning and Control AND of Technology.MGMT4070 Human Resources Management ** Required courses cannot be used to fulfill a concentration. Strategy OR noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math require-IBUS4090 International Business Experience ment.MGMT4020 Strategic Management 4.5 Students must earn a performance transcript writing assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in orderMGMT4030 Senior Management Seminar 4.5 to graduate with a bachelor’s degree.MGMT4099 Management Internship* 13.5MRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5 Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, Sociology, English and other elective requirements.Concentr. Any approved concentration Visit Study Abroad for details. selected from offerings within the university** 13.5relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSACCT1021 Business Accounting I and Lab 5.5ACCT1022 Business Accounting II and Lab 5.5CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0FIT1000 Information Technology for Business Professionals I 4.5FIT1020 Information Technology for Business Professionals II 4.5LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5LAW3002 The Legal Environment of Business II 4.5generAl StuDieSCSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5ENG1020 English Composition 4.5ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5MATH2001 Statistics 4.5Math One course at the MATH1002 level or higher 4.5Science One SCI-designated course 4.5Electives Two courses with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within the School of Arts & Sciences which may be used to form an arts & sciences concentration 9.0 127
    • MAnAgeMent (AccelerAteD) noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math require- ment.A two-year program leading to the bachelor ofscience degree for graduates of non-management Students must earn a performance transcript writing assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in orderand/or business-related associate degree programs. to graduate with a bachelor’s degree. Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History,first two years: Sociology, English and other elective requirements.Associate degree or equivalent. Students must Visit Study Abroad for details.meet program’s prerequisiterequirements listed below. 90.0 PrerequiSiteS ENG1001 An Introduction to Literary Genresthird and fourth years: ENG1020 English CompositionMAjor courSeS creDitS ENG1030 Communication Skills FIT1000 Information Technology forACCT1021 Business Accounting I & Lab 5.5 Business Professionals IACCT1022 Business Accounting II & Lab 5.5 Math One Math course, MATH1002ACCT3023 Managerial Accounting 4.5 level or higherFISV2010 Finance 4.5 Science One Science courseMGMT1001 Principles of Management 4.5 Social One Sociology, Psychology orMGMT2001 Human Resources Management 4.5 Science Political Science courseMGMT2030 Service and Production Operations Management 4.5MGMT3030 Managerial Technology 4.5MGMT4020 Strategic Management 4.5MGMT4030 Senior Management Seminar 4.5MRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5choose one of the following: 9.0MGMT3040 Process and Quality Management ANDMGMT4050 Operations Management Strategy ORMGMT3060 Human Resources Training and Development ANDMGMT4070 Human Resources Management StrategyrelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSCAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0FIT1020 Information Technology for Business Professionals II 4.5LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5generAl StuDieSECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5MATH2001 Statistics 4.5History One HIST-designated course (except HIST4030)Elective One course with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within the School of Arts & Sciences or any other general studies course 4.5total credits 103.0four-year credit total 193.0128
    • MArketing Upon graduation, students may be employed by retail, consumer goods, industrial or(College of Business) advertising companies in positions thatBAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree utilize these skills. Typical areas of interest include entry-level positions in sales, marketThe Marketing bachelor’s degree progarm research, market analysis, product develop-provides students with a broad range of ment or brand management.knowledge and practical skills related to thefundamentals of marketing including product, Students should use their career electivespricing, promotion, distribution and customer and free electives to create a meaningful,relationship management. customized career concentration. The univer- sity’s faculty advising system will facilitateUpon completion of the program, graduates these selections.are expected to demonstrate the ability to• develop, implement, analyze, interpret, and An important component of the program’s make recommendations based on second- educational experience is the general studies ary and primary research data using qualita- courses taught by the John Hazen White tive and quantitative methods School of Arts & Sciences. Graduates are• analyze consumer decision-making and expected to show competencies in higher behavior order thinking, communications, ethics, global diversity, responsible citizenship,• prepare and conduct a professional sales leadership and artistic responsibility. The presentation following literacies should also be demon-• develop e-commerce, international and strated: sociocultural, quantitative, scientific strategic marketing plans and informational.Specific skills developed include managingmarket research projects, developing Web- concentrAtionS forbased marketing programs, developing and MArketing MAjorSexecuting brand strategies, and developing • Fashion Product Development (Page 146)and managing comprehensive marketing • Marketing Communications (Page 147)plans. Students have the opportunity to honethese skills while participating in a term-longinternship, held at a wide variety of hostsites. This is a one-term, 4.5–13.5 creditexperience with a business partner anywherein the world. Students complete a specificbusiness-building project, which is reviewed bythe faculty advisor and the business partner.A traditional internship experience is alsooffered. This is a one-term, 13.5 creditexperience with a business partner anywherein the world. Students complete a specific,business-building project, which is reviewed bythe faculty advisor and the business partner. 129
    • MArketing Math One math course at the MATH1002 level or higher 4.5A four-year program leading to the bachelor of Science One SCI-designated course 4.5science degree Electives Two courses with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within the School of Arts & SciencesMAjor courSeS creDitS which may be used to form an arts & sciences concentration 9.0ADVC1010 Marketing Communications I 4.5ADVC1011 Marketing Communications II 4.5 choose two of the following: 9.0FISV2010 Finance 4.5 PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a CriticalMRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5 Thinking ApproachMRKT1002 Consumer Behavior 4.5 ORMRKT1011 Principles of Professional Selling 4.5 PHIL3040 Ethics of Business LeadershipMRKT2020 Business-to-Business Marketing 4.5 History One HIST-designated courseMRKT2050 Qualitative Research 4.5 (except HIST4030)MRKT3005 Brand Marketing 4.5 Literature ENG1001 or one LIT-designatedMRKT3011 Direct Marketing 4.5 courseMRKT3045 Social Media and Internet choose two of the following: 9.0 Marketing 4.5 LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership StudiesMRKT3055 Quantitative Research 4.5 PSYC2001 Introductory PsychologyMRKT4001 Strategic Marketing 4.5 SOC2001 Sociology IMRKT4030 International Marketing 4.5MRKT4099 Marketing Internship* 9.0 total credits 193.0Career Three courses with an ECAR attributeElectives selected from offerings within the *Students may take career electives or directed work College of Business experience to fulfill this requirement. OR 13.5 noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics)Markteting Select one concentration from or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math require-Concentr. offerings on Page 129 ment. Students must earn a performance transcript writing assess- ment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with arelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieS bachelor’s degree.ACCT1021 Business Accounting I and Lab 5.5 Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History,ACCT1022 Business Accounting II and Lab 5.5 Sociology, English and other elective requirements.CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0 Visit Study Abroad for details.FIT1000 Information Technology for Business Professionals I 4.5FIT1020 Information Technology for Business Professionals II 4.5LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5MGMT1001 Principles of Management 4.5choose one of the following four options: 13.5IBUS4090 International Business Experience ORIBUS4023 SWAP International Seminar ANDIBUS4083 SWAP International Marketing Communications ORIBUS4020 Summer Work Abroad International Seminar ANDIBUS4086 SWAP Process Mapping ORMRKT4099 Marketing Internship ORConcentr. Three courses selected from declared College of Business, School of Arts & Sciences or School of Technology concentration offeringsgenerAl StuDieSCSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5ENG1020 English Composition 4.5ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5MATH2001 Statistics 4.5130
    • network engineering ITEC3060 Network Management and Administration 4.5(School of Technology) ITEC3075 Network Security 4.5BAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieS CAD2050 Computer-Aided Network Design 6.0The Network Engineering bachelor’s degree CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0program gives students an in-depth skill base FIT1012 Digital Technology for Business 4.5 FIT1014 Solving Business Problems within the networking tools and problem-solving Technology 4.5practices they need to become professionals ITEC3010 Server Configuration andin the fast-growing field of network technology. Implementation 4.5Using current networking software and hard- ITEC3040 Systems Analysis 4.5 ITEC3070 System Modeling and Simulation 4.5ware tools, students develop communications LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5skills that prepare them to become highly LAW3080 Cyberlaw 4.5functional members of project teams consist- MGMT2020 Organizational Behavior 4.5 PRMG2010 Introduction to Project Management 4.5ing of design, technological and businessprofessionals. eXPerientiAl eDucAtion electiveS Courses with a TECX designation selectedSpecially designed laboratories give students from the offerings within the School ofan enriched hands-on environment in which to Technology* 9.0hone their design and problem-solving skills,become familiar with equipment and methods generAl StuDieScommon in industry, and develop competency CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0in the use of a range of current networking ENG1001 An Introduction to Literary Genres 4.5software tools. ENG1020 English Composition 4.5 ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5Seniors participate in one of these experi- ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5ential education options: technical project LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5 MATH1020 Fundamentals of Algebra 4.5team, internship or solo project. Students MATH2001 Statistics 4.5apply for the experiential education option MATH3020 Discrete Mathematics 4.5they want and are placed according to their PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a Criticalqualifications, work availability and the best Thinking Approach OR 4.5fit for their program of study. PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadership PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology 4.5Successful graduates of the program in SOC2001 Sociology I 4.5 History One HIST-designated courseNetwork Engineering should be prepared (except HIST4030) 4.5to sit for network certification exams, and Science One science course from the following:will be ready to embark upon careers SCI2005, SCI3010, SCI3030 4.5 Elective One course with an EASC attributein information technology and business selected from offerings within theas network administrators, managers, School of Arts & Sciences which maydesigners or assistant engineers. be used to form an arts & sciences concentration, or any other general studies courses 4.5network engineering free electiveSA four-year program leading to the bachelor of Three courses selected from 1000–4999science degree numbered offerings within the university (except FIT1000 or FIT1020) 13.5MAjor courSeS creDitS four-year credit total 188.0CSIS1000 Problem Solving and Programming Concepts 4.5 * Students should consult with their academic advisor.CSIS1020 Fundamentals of C Programming 4.5CSIS1050 Data Structures 4.5 noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) or equivalent placement scores to enroll inCSIS2045 Introduction to Operating Systems 4.5 MATH1020.ENGN2070 Signal Transmission 4.5ITEC1020 Introduction to Data Communications 4.5 Students must earn a performance transcriptITEC2080 Network Devices 4.5 writing assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with a bachelor’s degree.ITEC2085 Distributed Systems with TCP/IP 4.5ITEC3030 Advanced Networking with TCP/IP 4.5 Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History,ITEC3050 Information Security 4.5 Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Visit Study Abroad for details. 131
    • reStAurAnt, fooD &BeverAge MAnAgeMent(Center for Food and Beverage Management)BAchelor of Science (B.S.) DegreeThe Restaurant, Food & BeverageManagement bachelor’s degree program pro-vides a unique combination of culinary skillsand hospitality management. The focus ison current restaurant and food service man-agement industry topics. The program alsodevelops proficiency in the area of beveragemanagement. Other areas of study includecritical thinking, financial analysis, leader-ship and customer awareness in order toprepare students for a management careerin the food service industry. According to theNational Restaurant Association, the foodand beverage industry is the largest U.S.employer besides the government.This program includes a unique hands-onrotational internship experience at aJohnson & Wales-owned facility, or at oneof our partner properties.Graduates are expected to be able to utilizetheir technical and management skills as wellas apply critical thinking skills, ethical stan-dards and problem-solving techniques withina food service operation. Graduates will alsoidentify and communicate long-range visionand strategy for a food service company.Value-added certifications within the degreeinclude an industry-recognized responsiblealcohol service certification, the nationalsanitation certification (a graduation require-ment), recognized by the Conference forFood Protection, and the International Schoolof Mixology Bartending Certificate.132
    • reStAurAnt, fooD & BeverAge generAl StuDieS CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0MAnAgeMent ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5 ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5A four-year program leading to the bachelor of ENG1001 An Introduction to Literary Genres 4.5science degree ENG1020 English Composition 4.5 ENG1021 Advanced CompositionMAjor courSeS creDitS and Communication 4.5 ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5FSM1001 Introduction to the LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5 Food Service Field 4.5 PSYC2001 Introductory PsychologyFSM1065 Food Safety and Sanitation OR 4.5 Management* 1.5 SOC2001 Sociology IFSM2055 Beverage Appreciation 4.5 SPAN1011 Conversational Spanish I:FSM2080 Food Service Operations 4.5 Specialized Vocabulary 4.5FSM2099 Food Service Management History One HIST-designated course Internship 13.5 (except HIST4030) 4.5 Math One math course at theFSM3020 Dining Service Management 4.5 MATH1002 level or higher 4.5FSM4061 Advanced Food Service Operations Science One SCI-designated course 4.5 Management 4.5 Electives Two courses with an EASC attributeFSM4880 Beverage Operations Management 4.5 selected from offerings within theCUL1315 Stocks, Sauces and Soups 3.0 School of Arts & Sciences which mayCUL1335 Traditional European Cuisine 3.0 be used to form an arts & sciencesCUL1355 New World Cuisine 3.0 concentration, or any other generalCUL1385 Fundamentals of Food Service studies courses 9.0 Production 3.0CUL1395 Purchasing and Product Identification 3.0 free elective**CUL4045 Spirits and Mixology Management 4.5 One course selected from 1002–4999 numberedHOSP1008 Customer/Guest Service offerings within the university (except ACCT1005, Management 4.5 CJS1002, MGMT2001). It is important to saveHOSP2011 Hospitality Sales and Meeting this elective if you plan to participate in a Management 4.5 Hospitality study abroad program. 4.5HOSP2030 Hospitality Human Resource and Diversity Leadership 4.5HOSP3050 Hospitality Strategic Marketing 4.5 total credits 196.0HOSP4060 Hospitality Management Seminar 4.5 * Students must pass a national exam that is recognizedHospitality Three courses selected from by the Conference for Food Protection as a graduationConcentr. declared concentration. Some requirement. study abroad programs offer ** Elective courses allow students to enhance their completion of a Hospitality education by earning a second concentration or by concentration. 13.5 participating in an internship or study abroad program. Students use two Hospitality Electives and one Freechoose one of the following: 9.0 Elective toward this option.Hospitality Two courses with an EHSP attributeElectives selected from offerings within noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math requirement. The Hospitality College** OR Students must earn a performance transcript writing Second Hospitality concentration assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with a bachelor’s degree. (with use of one free elective). Some study abroad programs offer Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, completion of a Hospitality Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Visit Study Abroad for details. concentration. OR Study Abroad (with use of one free elective) OR Second InternshiprelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSACCT1011 Hospitality Accounting I and Lab 5.5ACCT1012 Hospitality Accounting II and Lab 5.5ACCT3025 Hospitality Financial Management 4.5CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0LAW2010 Hospitality Law 4.5 133
    • roBotic engineering roBotic engineering technologytechnology A two-year program leading to the associate in science degree(School of Technology) MAjor courSeS creDitSASSociAte in Science (A.S.) Degree CSIS1020 Fundamentals of C Programming 4.5This two-year associate degree program ENGN1000 Digital Electronics I 4.5 ENGN1010 Intro to Circuit Theory and Lab 6.0provides comprehensive education in the ENGN1030 Solid State I: Devices and Lab 6.0area of robotics and automation. The ENGN2000 Robotics 4.5 ENGN2045 Computer Vision 4.5program will include courses in math, ENGN2055 Introduction to Microprocessors 4.5science and engineering to provide a solid ENGN2060 Advanced Microprocessors and Lab 4.5background in this technical area. Courses ENGN2061 Mechatronics 4.5 ENGN2062 Artificial Intelligence 4.5will cover material in mechatronics and ENGN2063 Advanced Robotics 4.5microprocessor-based robotic projects, FIT1012 Digital Technology for Business 4.5including microprocessor interfacing forvarious sensors, speech synthesis, relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieScommunication and real-time programming. Tech. One course with an ETEC attribute Elective selected from offerings within the School of TechnologyStudents graduating from this program will (except FIT1000 or FIT1020) 4.5be prepared for a wide range of positions inthe areas of robotics, automation and real- generAl StuDieStime applications. Graduating students can vary CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0work as maintenance and troubleshooting tech- ENG1001 Introduction to Literary Genres 4.5 ENG1020 English Composition 4.5nicians or find employment in robotic hardware ENG1021 Advanced Compositiondesign and automation as well as software and Communication 4.5development for real-time applications. ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5 MATH1020 Fundamentals of Algebra 4.5 MATH1030 Precalculus 4.5Upon graduating from this program, students SCI1011 General Physics I and Lab 4.5may choose to continue their studies towards Elective One course with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within thea B.S. in Electronics Engineering. School of Arts & Sciences or any other general studies course 4.5 total credits 98.5 note: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) or equivalent placement scores to enroll in MATH1020. four-yeAr oPtionS: • Electronics Engineering (Page 103)134
    • Security MAnAgeMent Graduates are expected to demonstrate an ability to use logic, critical thinking and ana-(College of Business) lytical skills to assist in the decision makingBAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree process as well as to make recommenda- tions to individuals and organizations usingThe Security Management bachelor’s degree financial information.program is designed to provide graduateswith strong management and security man- An important component of the program’sagement foundations as well as advanced educational experience is the general studiesstudies in this rapidly growing field. Security courses taught by the John Hazen Whiteis one of the fastest-growing industries School of Arts & Sciences. Graduates areworldwide, with a strong demand for inves- expected to show competencies in highertigators in areas including computer and order thinking, ethics, global diversity,financial information security, as well as responsible citizenship and leadership.managers and directors of security at major The following literacies should also becorporations and organizations. The demand demonstrated: sociocultural, quantitative,for heightened security in many industries is scientific and informational.driven by activities that disrupt normal opera-tions including fraud, information theft, com- Students are required to complete a 13.5puter hacking, workplace violence, terrorism credit internship as part of the program.and economic crime.This program teaches business operationsand security management, as well as provid-ing an understanding of financial data andnetworked environments. Students will learnabout the latest trends, issues, and con-cerns within the field while completingcourse work in security, computer science,electronics, business management, law,accounting, personnel and informationmanagement.Security management is a private industry-focused field that supplements public agencyprotection. Security managers work with staffand technology to protect assets, personneland property from outside threats. Theyalso work with local, state and federal lawenforcement.Graduates of this program can expect to findemployment in the private sector, as well asin government agencies, particularly at thefederal level. 135
    • Security MAnAgeMent choose two of the following: 9.0 PHIL3020 Logic: Critical ThinkingA four year program leading to the bachelor of ORscience degree PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadership History One HIST-designated courseMAjor courSeS (except HIST4030) Literature ENG1001 or one LIT-designated courseACCT3023 Managerial Accounting 4.5 choose two of the following: 9.0ACCT3080 Fraud Examination: LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies Theory and Practice 4.5 PSYC2001 Introductory PsychologyMGMT1001 Principles of Management 4.5 SOC2001 Sociology IMGMT2001 Human Resources Management 4.5MGMT2020 Organizational Behavior 4.5 total credits 193.0MGMT3030 Managerial Technology 4.5MGMT3040 Process and Quality Management 4.5 noteS: Students must earn a performance transcript writingMGMT3070 Contemporary Management 4.5 assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with a bachelor’s degree.SMGT2001 Security Management 4.5SMGT3001 Emergency Planning and Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, Business Continuity 4.5 Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Visit Study Abroad for details.SMGT4010 Risk Analysis and Loss Prevention 4.5SMGT4020 Security Management Senior Seminar 4.5SMGT4099 Security Management Internship 13.5relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSCAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0ACCT1001 Principles of Accounting I and Lab 5.5ACCT1002 Principles of Accounting II and Lab 5.5ACCT2021 Intermediate Accounting I 4.5ACCT2022 Intermediate Accounting II 4.5FIT1000 Information Technology for Business Professionals I 4.5FIT1020 Information Technology for Business Professionals II 4.5FISV3040 Money and Capital Markets 4.5ITEC1020 Introduction to Data Communications 4.5ITEC2080 Network Devices 4.5ITEC3050 Information Security 4.5ITEC3075 Network Security 4.5LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5LAW3002 The Legal Environment of Business II 4.5generAl StuDieSCSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5ENG1020 English Composition 4.5ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5MATH2001 Statistics 4.5Math One course at the MATH1002 level or higher 4.5Science One SCI-designated course 4.5Electives Two courses with an EASC attribute selected from offerings within the School of Arts & Sciences which may be used to form an arts & sciences concentration 9.0136
    • SoftwAre SoftwAre engineeringengineering A four year program leading to the bachelor of science degree for two-year computer Programming(School of Technology) graduatesBAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree first two years: Associate in Science Degree inThe Software Engineering program prepares Computer Programming (Page 88) 95.5graduates for the challenges in the diverse, MAjor courSeSfast-paced and rapidly evolving field of solu-tion development. This curriculum provides ENGN4010 Configuration Management 4.5 ITEC2080 Network Devices 4.5the student with the opportunity to build ITEC2085 Distributed Systems with TCP/IP 4.5upon their technical skills with leadership ITEC3040 Systems Analysis 4.5abilities, project management skills, team ITEC3050 Information Security 4.5 PRMG2010 Introduction to Project Management 4.5building skills and customer awareness.The Software Engineering program develops relAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieS CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0a solid philosophy based on technology as a LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business 4.5tool for business solutions and prepares LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5students for rewarding careers in any industry MGMT2020 Organizational Behavior 4.5 MRKT3084 Customer Care Strategies 4.5as the provider of business solutions.Graduates of this program will be preparedto work in private, public or governmental eXPerientiAl eDucAtion electiveS Courses with a TECX designation selectedorganizations from within various industries from the offerings within the School ofsuch as retail, hospitality, finance or technology. Technology* 9.0The Software Engineering program has generAl StuDieSthree courses that students can use to ENG2010 Technical Writing 4.5tailor their program to the specific industry PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadership 4.5 PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology 4.5they wish to pursue. These courses will be PSYC2020 Industrial/Organizational Psychology 4.5determined through discussion with the History One HIST-designated course (except HIST4030) 4.5students’ faculty advisor and recorded on Electives Two courses with an EASC attributetheir degree requirements. selected from offerings within the School of Arts & Sciences which may be used to form an arts & sciencesSeniors participate in one of these experi- concentration, or any other generalential education options: technical project studies courses 9.0team, internship or solo project. Studentsapply for the experiential education option APPlicAtion DoMAin courSeSthey want and are placed according to their Three courses selected from the various collegesqualifications, work availability and the best through consultation with the faculty advisor 13.5fit for their program of study. total credits 100.0 four-year credit total 195.5 * Students should consult with their academic advisor. noteS: Students must earn a performance transcript writing assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to graduate with a bachelor’s degree. Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Visit Study Abroad for details. 137
    • SPortS/ The program culminates in an exciting, term- long, off-site internship under the direction ofentertAinMent/ an industry professional that allows studentsevent MAnAgeMent to apply the skills they’ve learned and(Center for Sports, Entertainment prepares them to launch their careers. Theand Event Management) experience enables students to gain valuable work experience in the areas of sales/BAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree marketing, facility operations and financial management. The internship focuses on theThe Sports/Entertainment/Event Management ability to identify, document and successfullybachelor’s degree program prepares students communicate personal and professionalto manage many areas of major sports facili- short- and long-term vision and strategies forties and resorts, as well as organize national a successful career in sport, entertainment orand international events like the World Cup, event management. Graduates have workedthe Grammy Awards or the Olympics. Course for professional sports teams, entertainmentwork enables graduates to apply the primary venues, resorts and conference centers.tools and fundamental understanding of thebasic areas of sport, entertainment or eventdevelopment, planning and management.In this four-year program the curriculumincludes core courses in event management,facilities management, media relations,ancillary services management, and enter-tainment management.Students tailor their degrees toward theirchosen careers by complementing the corecurriculum with such electives as professionalsports management, sports and entertainmentmarketing, special event protocol, concert andevent production, fundraising and philanthropy,wedding and other ceremonies, and athleticcoaching administration. This enables them todemonstrate personal discipline, profession-alism, accountability, and ethical behavior ina sport, entertainment or event managementenvironment.Students further specialize by choosing ahospitality concentration. This experienceallows them to use analytical thinking skillsto create, develop, plan, manage, operateand evaluate the critical elements of asuccessful sport, entertainment or eventorganization.138
    • SPortS/entertAinMent/ generAl StuDieS CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0event MAnAgeMent ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5 ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5A four-year program leading to the bachelor of ENG1001 An Introduction to Literary Genres 4.5science degree ENG1020 English Composition 4.5 ENG1021 Advanced CompositionMAjor courSeS creDitS and Communication 4.5 ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5HOSP1008 Customer/Guest Service LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5 Management 4.5 MATH2001 Statistics 4.5HOSP2030 Hospitality Human Resource PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology 4.5 and Diversity Leadership 4.5 SOC2001 Sociology I 4.5HOSP3050 Hospitality Strategic Marketing 4.5 History One HIST-designated courseHOSP3850 Negotiations and Agreements 4.5 (except HIST4030) 4.5SEE1001 Introduction to Sports/ Math One math course at the MATH1002 Entertainment/Event level or higher 4.5 Management 4.5 Science One SCI-designated course 4.5SEE2010 Facilities Operations 4.5 Electives Two courses with an EASC attributeSEE2020 Event Management 4.5 selected from offerings within theSEE2030 The Entertainment Industry 4.5 School of Arts & Sciences which maySEE3008 Sports/Entertainment/Event be used to form an arts & sciences Management Ancillary Services concentration, or any other general and Revenues 4.5 studies courses 9.0SEE3010 Ticket Sales and Operations 4.5SEE3045 Media Relations 4.5SEE4060 Sports/Entertainment/Event Management Seminar 4.5 free elective*SEE4099 Sports/Entertainment/Event One course selected from 1002–4999 numbered Management Internship 13.5 offerings within the university (except ACCT1005,choose two of the following: 9.0 CJS1002, MGMT2001). It is important to save thisHOSP3020 Trade Show/Exposition Management elective if you plan to participate in a HospitalitySEE3020 Professional Sports Management study abroad program. 4.5SEE3030 Athletic Coaching and AdministrationSEE3041 Special Event ProtocolSEE3042 Weddings & Ceremonies total credits 193.0SEE3060 Concert and Event Production * Elective courses allow students to enhance theirSEE4050 Public Assembly Facility Management education by earning a second concentration or by participating in an internship or in a study abroadHospitality Three courses selected from program. Students use two Hospitality Electives andConcentr. declared concentration. Some one Free Elective toward this option. study abroad programs offer noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) completion of a Hospitality or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math require- concentration. 13.5 ment.choose one of the following: 9.0 Students must earn a performance transcript writingHospitality Two courses with an EHSP attribute assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in orderElectives selected from offerings within to graduate with a bachelor’s degree. The Hospitality College* Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, OR Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Second Hospitality concentration Visit Study Abroad for details. (with use of one free elective). Some study abroad programs offer completion of a Hospitality concentration. OR Study Abroad (with use of one free elective) OR Second InternshiprelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSACCT1021 Business Accounting I and Lab 5.5ACCT1022 Business Accounting II and Lab 5.5ACCT3020 Managerial Finance 4.5CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0LAW2010 Hospitality Law 4.5 139
    • StrAtegic Typical areas of interest include entry-level positions in account management, accountADvertiSing planning, media planning/buying, media(College of Business) sales and creative services.BAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree Students should use their career electives and free electives to create a meaningful,The Strategic Advertising bachelor’s degree customized career concentration. The univer-program provides students with a wide range sity’s faculty advising system will facilitateof knowledge and practical skills related to these selections.the development and execution of integratedmarketing communication plans, which An important component of this program’sembrace the promotional elements of adver- educational experience is the general stud-tising, public relations, direct marketing, ies courses taught by the John Hazen Whitesales promotion, interactive marketing and School of Arts & Sciences. Graduates arepersonal selling. expected to show competencies in higher order thinking, communications, ethics,Upon completion of the program, graduates global diversity, responsible citizenship,are expected to demonstrate the ability to leadership and artistic responsibility.• develop integrated marketing The following literacies should also be communication strategies demonstrated: sociocultural, quantitative,• create integrated marketing scientific and informational. communications messages• analyze, interpret and make recommendations based on primary concentrAtionS for and secondary research data StrAtegic ADvertiSing MAjorS • Business Communication (Page 145)Specific skills developed include the plan- • Fashion Product Development (Page 146)ning and buying of media, writing publicityand cause-related material, managing marketresearch projects, developing Web-basedand viral advertising programs, producingconcepts for print and broadcast advertise-ments, and writing creative strategy state-ments. Students have the opportunity tohone these skills while participating in aterm-long internship, held at a wide varietyof host sites. This is a one-term, 4.5–13.5credit experience with a business partneranywhere in the world. Students completea specific business-building project, whichis reviewed by the faculty advisor and thebusiness partner.Upon graduation, students may be employedby media organizations, advertising agencies,or marketing communications companies inpositions that utilize these skills.140
    • StrAtegic ADvertiSing generAl StuDieS CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0A four-year program leading to the bachelor of ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5science degree ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5 ENG1020 English Composition 4.5 ENG1021 Advanced CompositionMAjor courSeS creDitS and Communication 4.5 ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5ADVC1010 Marketing Communications I 4.5 MATH2001 Statistics 4.5ADVC1011 Marketing Communications II 4.5 Math One math course at theADVC1021 Public Relations Concepts 4.5 MATH1002 level or higher 4.5ADVC2001 Creativity in Advertising 4.5 Science One SCI-designated course 4.5ADVC2025 Public Relations Cases and Plans 4.5ADVC3003 Advertising Campaigns 4.5 Electives Two courses with an EASC attributeADVC4015 IMC Seminar I 4.5 selected from offerings within theADVC4016 IMC Seminar II 4.5 School of Arts & Sciences which mayCGRA3050 Desktop Publishing 4.5 be used to form an arts & sciencesMRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5 concentration 9.0MRKT1002 Consumer Behavior 4.5 choose two of the following: 9.0MRKT2050 Qualitative Research 4.5 PHIL3020 Crisis and Controversy: a CriticalMRKT3005 Brand Marketing 4.5 Thinking ApproachMRKT3055 Quantitative Research 4.5 ORMRKT4001 Strategic Marketing 4.5 PHIL3040 Ethics of Business LeadershipMRKT4099 Marketing Internship* 9.0 History One HIST-designated courseCareer Two courses with an ECAR attribute (except HIST4030)Electives selected from offerings within the Literature ENG1001 or one LIT-designated College of Business or School of course Technology 9.0 choose two of the following: 9.0 LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies PSYC2001 Introductory PsychologyrelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieS SOC2001 Sociology IACCT1021 Business Accounting I and Lab 5.5ACCT1022 Business Accounting II and Lab 5.5CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0 total credits 188.5FIT1000 Information Technology for *Students may take career electives or directed work Business Professionals I 4.5 experience to fulfill this requirement.FIT1020 Information Technology for Business Professionals II 4.5 noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics)LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5 or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math require- ment.choose one of the following four options: 13.5 Students must earn a performance transcript writing assess-IBUS4090 International Business Experience ment of “validated” or “mastered” in order to OR graduate with a bachelor’s degree.IBUS4023 SWAP International Seminar AND Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History,IBUS4083 SWAP International Marketing Sociology, English and other elective requirements. Visit Study Abroad for details. Communications ORIBUS4020 Summer Work Abroad International Seminar ANDIBUS4086 SWAP Process Mapping ORMRKT4099 Marketing Internship ORConcentr. Three courses selected from declared College of Business, School of Arts & Sciences or School of Technology concentration offerings 141
    • trAvel-touriSM Graduates of the program will be employed in all industry segments due to its more& hoSPitAlity generalized curriculum, but the emphasisMAnAgeMent on travel/tourism will provide specific career options in destination marketing organiza-(Center for International Travel tions such as CVBs and tourism offices,and Tourism Studies) resorts, tour operators, travel industry sup-BAchelor of Science (B.S.) Degree pliers such as airlines, cruise lines or ground transportation, and various internationalThe Travel-Tourism & Hospitality operators. Students can further customizeManagement bachelor’s degree program their degree by selecting a concentrationprovides a broad-based option for students option specific to their area(s) of interest.incorporating the hotel, travel/tourism andfood segments of the hospitality industrywith special focus given to travel/tourism.This bachelor’s degree program places anemphasis on tourism as the glue that holdsthe industry together — especially in courseofferings and the term-long experiential learn-ing program. Students participate in varioushospitality and tourism site rotations, suchas the T.F. Green Airport Information Center,AAA Travel Services, the Rhode Island StateHouse Tour Guide Program and ColletteVacations, an internationally known travelwholesaler.The highlight of the program is theFamiliarization (FAM) Tour, a class projectto a domestic or international destination.Students are required to research, budget,plan, promote and implement the tasks of atour escort and tour guide. The program isalso enhanced by mini-FAM tours and avisiting guest speaker series.Graduates are expected to be able to utilizetheir technical and management skills as wellas apply critical thinking skills, ethical stan-dards and problem-solving techniques withina tourism setting. Graduates will also identifyand communicate long-term vision and strat-egy within a tourism business environment.142
    • trAvel-touriSM generAl StuDieS CSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0& hoSPitAlity MAnAgeMent ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5 ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5A four-year program leading to the bachelor of ENG1001 An Introduction to Literary Genres 4.5science degree ENG1020 English Composition 4.5 ENG1021 Advanced CompositionMAjor courSeS creDitS and Communication 4.5 ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5TRVL1010 Destination Geography I 4.5 LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5TRVL1011 Destination Geography II 4.5 PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology 4.5TRVL2099 Travel-Tourism & Hospitality SOC2001 Sociology I 4.5 Internship 13.5 SPAN1011 Conversational Spanish I:TRVL3010 Dynamics of Tourism 4.5 Specialized Vocabulary 4.5TRVL3030 International Policies of Tourism 4.5 History One HIST-designated courseTRVL4011 Destination Management (except HIST4030) 4.5 Organization 4.5 Math One math course at theHOSP1001 The Hospitality Field 4.5 MATH1002 level or higher 4.5HOSP1008 Customer/Guest Service Science One SCI-designated course 4.5 Management 4.5 Electives Two courses with an EASC attributeHOSP1080 Technology in the selected from offerings within the Tourism/Hospitality Industry 4.5 School of Arts & Sciences which mayHOSP2011 Hospitality Sales and Meeting be used to form an arts & sciences Management 4.5 concentration, or any other generalHOSP2030 Hospitality Human Resources studies courses 9.0 and Diversity Leadership 4.5HOSP3050 Hospitality Strategic Marketing 4.5HOSP3850 Negotiations and Agreements 4.5 free elective**HOSP4060 Hospitality Management Seminar 4.5 One course selected from 1002–4999 numberedFSM1065 Food Safety and Sanitation offerings within the university (except ACCT1005, Management* 1.5 CJS1002, MGMT2001). It is important to save thisFSM2065 Essentials of International Food elective if you plan to participate in a Hospitality and Beverage 4.5 study abroad program. 4.5Hospitality Three courses selected fromConcentr. declared concentration. Some study abroad programs offer total credits 194.5 completion of a Hospitality * Students must pass a national exam that is recognized concentration. 13.5 by the Conference for Food Protection as a graduationchoose one of the following: 9.0 requirement.Hospitality Two courses with an EHSP attribute ** Elective courses allow students to enhance theirElectives selected from offerings within education by earning a second concentration or by The Hospitality College** participating in an internship or study abroad program. Students use two Hospitality Electives and one OR Free Elective toward this option. Second Hospitality concentration (with use of one free elective). noteS: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math require- Some study abroad programs offer ment. completion of a Hospitality concentration. Students must earn a performance transcript writing assessment of “validated” or “mastered” in order OR to graduate with a bachelor’s degree. Study Abroad (with use of one free elective) Study Abroad programs may satisfy a variety of History, Sociology, English and other elective requirements. OR Visit Study Abroad for details. Second InternshiprelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieSACCT1011 Hospitality Accounting I and Lab 5.5ACCT1012 Hospitality Accounting II and Lab 5.5ACCT3025 Hospitality Financial Management 4.5CAR0010 Career Capstone 1.0LAW2010 Hospitality Law 4.5 143
    • unDeclAreD MAjor elective FIT1020 Information Technology for Business Professionals II***Because some students may be unsure of OR 4.5 HOSP2030 Hospitality Human Resourcetheir major when they enroll at Johnson & and Diversity Leadership****Wales, the Undeclared option allows themthe opportunity to pursue a basic business total credits 93.0and general studies program and, in the * Students entering The Hospitality College must takesophomore year, choose a major from a ACCT1012 as their second Accounting course. Students in the College of Business must take ACCT1002.number of business and hospitality programs. ** Students considering Accounting or Financial ServicesStudents who begin their studies in the Management should elect MATH1020 or higher.Undeclared program earn a bachelor of *** For students entering the College of Businessscience degree at the end of four years **** For students entering The Hospitality Collegeof study. note: Students must have MATH0001 (Basic Mathematics) or equivalent placement scores to enroll in the math require- ment.unDeclAreDAll students enrolled in the Undeclared program four-yeAr oPtionS:pursue the following program of study for the firsttwo years. Students must declare a major no later • Accounting (Page 77)than the fifth term (sophomore year) of study. • Criminal Justice (Page 94) • Entrepreneurship (Page 105) • Fashion Merchandising & Retail MarketingrelAteD ProfeSSionAl StuDieS creDitS (Page 112)ACCT1001 Principles of Accounting I and Lab 5.5 • Finance (Page 114) • Hotel & Lodging Management (Page 120)ACCT1002 Principles of Accounting II and Lab* • Management (Page 126) OR 5.5 • Marketing (Page 129)ACCT1012 Hospitality Accounting II and Lab* • Restaurant, Food & Beverage Management (Page 132)FIT1000 Information Technology for • Sports/Entertainment/Event Management Business Professionals I 4.5 (Page 138)LAW2001 The Legal Environment of Business I 4.5 • Strategic Advertising (Page 140)HOSP1008 Customer/Guest Service • Travel-Tourism & Hospitality Management Management 4.5 (Page 142)MGHI1000 Introduction to Management and the Hospitality Industry 4.5MRKT1001 Principles of Marketing 4.5generAl StuDieSCSL1001 Community Service-Learning 1.0ECON1001 Macroeconomics 4.5ECON2002 Microeconomics 4.5ENG1001 An Introduction to Literary Genres 4.5ENG1020 English Composition 4.5ENG1021 Advanced Composition and Communication 4.5ENG1030 Communication Skills 4.5LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies 4.5MATH2001 Statistics 4.5PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology OR 4.5SOC2001 Sociology IHistory One HIST-designated course (except HIST4030) 4.5Math One math course at the MATH1002 level or higher** 4.5Science One SCI-designated course 4.5144
    • concentrAtionS BeverAge Service MAnAgeMent Choose three courses from the following depending on degree and concentration selection.Students may choose to focus their elec-tives in any of the following concentrations. courSeS creDitSBeyond the enrichment a concentration CUL3020 Foundations of Wine and Spirits 4.5provides, students’ transcripts will reflect CUL3091 Oenology 4.5commitment to a particular area which may CUL3092 Brewing Arts 4.5 CUL3093 Coffee, Tea, and Non-alcoholicbe impressive to prospective employers. Beverage Specialist 4.5 CUL4045 Spirits and Mixology Management 4.5Declaring your concentration FSM2055 Beverage Appreciation* 4.5 FSM4070 The Business of Alcohol Distribution,Each student should consult with his/her Retail and Sales 4.5faculty advisor in order to determine which FSM4880 Beverage Operations Management** 4.5concentration(s) will best further the stu-dent’s career goals. Students then need to total credits 13.5formally declare their concentration(s) by * Required for students who are not in the Restaurant, Food & Beverage Management or Culinary Arts program.completing a concentration form in Student ** Required for students who are not in the Restaurant,Academic & Financial Services. A student Food & Beverage Management program.may declare up to a maximum of threeconcentrations per degree program. BuSineSS coMMunicAtion courSeS creDitScollege of BuSineSS ENG2010 Technical Writing 4.5 ENG2030 Introduction to Newswriting 4.5Courses already required in a student’s indi- SEE3045 Media Relations 4.5vidual program cannot be selected to fulfill aCOB concentration requirement. Students are total credits 13.5responsible for completing all prerequisitesnecessary for courses listed in a concentra-tion in order to complete the concentration. BuSineSS-to-BuSineSS Selling courSeS creDitSADvertiSing MRKT1011 Principles of Professional Selling 4.5courSeS creDitS MRKT2012 Sales Management 4.5 MRKT2020 Business-to-Business Marketing 4.5ADVC1010 Marketing Communications I 4.5ADVC1011 Marketing Communications II 4.5ADVC2001 Creativity in Advertising 4.5 total credits 13.5total credits 13.5 creAtive ADvertiSing courSeS creDitS ADVC2002 Creative Craft I 4.5 ADVC2003 High Concept in New Media 4.5 ADVC3002 Creative Craft II 4.5 total credits 13.5 145
    • e-coMMerce fAShion ProDuct DeveloPMent Choose any three of the following courses.courSeS creDitS courSeS creDitSCGRA2020 Website Design Concepts 4.5CGRA2030 Multimedia Applications I 4.5 MRKT3005 Brand Marketing 4.5MRKT3045 Social Media and Internet MRKT3020 Product Development 4.5 Marketing 4.5 RTL1020 The Business of Fashion 4.5 RTL3060 Fashion Forecasting OR 4.5total credits 13.5 RTL3070 Textile Design for the Apparel and Home Furnishings IndustryentrePreneurShiP total credits 13.5Choose any three of the following courses.courSeS creDitS finAnceECON3030 Managerial Economics 4.5 Choose any combination of the following courses toENTR1001 Introduction to Entrepreneurship 4.5 total 13.5 credits.ENTR2030 The Business Plan 4.5ENTR2040 Financing the Entrepreneurial courSeS creDitS Venture 4.5ENTR3025 Business Expansion Strategies FISV3005 International Finance 4.5 and Tactics 4.5 FISV3010 Credit Management 4.5ENTR4010 Managing Change and Innovation 4.5 FISV3015 Fundamentals of Financial Planning 4.5ENTR4020 Global Entrepreneurship 4.5 FISV3020 Financial Institutions 4.5FISV4030 Real Estate 4.5 FISV4010 Bank Management 4.5PRMG2010 Introduction to Project Management 4.5 FISV4020 Risk Management and Insurance 4.5PRMG3010 Advanced Project Management 4.5 FISV4030 Real Estate 4.5 FISV4070 Series 7 Securities 9.0total credits 13.5 total credits 13.5fAShionChoose any three of the following courses. gloBAl Sourcing Choose any three of the following courses.courSeS creDitS courSeS creDitSRTL1010 Textiles 4.5RTL1020 The Business of Fashion 4.5 IBUS2040 International Culture and Protocol 4.5RTL1050 Visual Merchandising 4.5 MRKT3020 Product Development 4.5RTL2010 Apparel Quality Analysis 4.5 IBUS3050 Export Procedures and PracticesRTL2050 Fashion Promotion 4.5 OR 4.5RTL3060 Fashion Forecasting 4.5 MRKT4030 International Marketing 4.5RTL3070 Textile Design for the Apparel and Home Furnishings Industry 4.5 total credits 13.5total credits 13.5note: Fashion Merchandising & Retail Marketing majors arenot eligible for this concentration. huMAn reSourceS MAnAgeMent Choose any three of the following courses. courSeS creDitSfAShion coMMunicAtionS ECON3030 Managerial Economics 4.5 MGMT2001 Human Resources Management 4.5courSeS creDitS MGMT3050 Compensation and Benefits Management 4.5ENG2010 Technical Writing 4.5 MGMT3060 Human Resources TrainingENG2030 Introduction to Newswriting 4.5 and Development 4.5RTL2050 Fashion Promotion 4.5 MGMT3070 Contemporary Management 4.5 MGMT4070 Human Resources Managementtotal credits 13.5 Strategy 4.5 total credits 13.5146
    • internAtionAl BuSineSS MArketing MAnAgeMentChoose any three of the following courses. Choose any three of the following courses.courSeS creDitS courSeS creDitSECON3030 Managerial Economics 4.5 MRKT1002 Consumer Behavior 4.5IBUS2002 International Business 4.5 MRKT2020 Business-to-Business Marketing 4.5IBUS2030 Foreign Area Studies 4.5 MRKT2050 Qualitative Research 4.5IBUS2040 International Culture and Protocol 4.5 MRKT3005 Brand Marketing 4.5IBUS3050 Export Procedures and Practices 4.5 MRKT4030 International Marketing 4.5total credits 13.5 total credits 13.5inveStMentS MArketing reSeArchChoose any combination of the following courses to Choose any three of the following courses.total 13.5 credits. courSeS creDitScourSeS creDitS ENTR2030 The Business Plan 4.5FISV3001 Investments 4.5 MRKT2050 Qualitative Research 4.5FISV3015 Fundamentals of Financial Planning 4.5 MRKT3005 Brand Marketing 4.5FISV4030 Real Estate 4.5 MRKT3055 Quantitative Research 4.5FISV4070 Series 7 Securities 9.0FISV4050 Portfolio Management and Analysis 4.5 total credits 13.5total credits 13.5 oPerAtionS MAnAgeMent Choose any three of the following courses.MAnAgeMentChoose any three of the following courses. courSeS creDitScourSeS creDitS ECON3030 Managerial Economics 4.5 IBUS3050 Export Procedures and Practices 4.5ECON3030 Managerial Economics 4.5 MGMT2030 Service and Production OperationsFISV3020 Introduction to Financial Institutions 4.5 Management 4.5MGMT2001 Human Resource Management 4.5 MGMT2040 Purchasing and Supply ChainMGMT2020 Organizational Behavior 4.5 Management 4.5MGMT3030 Managerial Technology 4.5 MGMT3040 Process and Quality Management 4.5MGMT3060 Human Resource Training 4.5 MGMT4001 Process Planning and Control 4.5MGMT4001 Process Planning and Control 4.5 MGMT4050 Operations Management Strategy 4.5PRMG2010 Introduction to Project Management 4.5 PRMG2010 Introduction to Project Management 4.5PRMG3010 Advanced Project Management 4.5 PRMG3010 Advanced Project Management 4.5total credits 13.5 total credits 13.5MArketing coMMunicAtionS retAilcourSeS creDitS courSeS creDitSADVC1021 Public Relations Concepts 4.5 RTL1005 Retailing 4.5ADVC2001 Creativity in Advertising 4.5 Choose two of the following:ADVC3003 Ad Campaigns 4.5 RTL2063 Retail Industry Seminar 4.5 RTL3010 Merchandise Buying 4.5total credits 13.5 RTL3030 Comparative Retail Strategies 4.5 total credits 13.5 note: Fashion Merchandising & Retail Marketing majors are not eligible for this concentration. 147
    • retention MArketing BeverAge Service MAnAgeMent Choose three courses from the following dependingcourSeS creDitS on degree and concentration selection.MRKT3084 Customer Care Strategies 4.5 courSeS creDitSMRKT3085 Customer Relationship Management 4.5PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadership 4.5 CUL3020 Foundations of Wine and Spirits 4.5 CUL3091 Oenology 4.5 CUL3092 Brewing Arts 4.5total credits 13.5 CUL3093 Coffee, Tea, and Non-alcoholic Beverage Specialist 4.5 CUL4045 Spirits and Mixology Management 4.5 FSM2055 Beverage Appreciation* 4.5SPortS AnD entertAinMent FSM4070 The Business of Alcohol Distribution, Retail and Sales 4.5MArketing FSM4880 Beverage Operations Management** 4.5courSeS creDitS total credits 13.5SEE2020 Event Management 4.5 * Required for students who are not in the Restaurant,SEE4020 Sports and Entertainment Marketing 4.5 Food & Beverage Management or Culinary Arts program.Choose one of the following: ** Required for students who are not in the Restaurant,HOSP3020 Trade Show/Exposition Management 4.5 Food & Beverage Management program.SEE2030 The Entertainment Industry 4.5total credits 13.5 conteMPorAry PAStry ArtS* courSeS creDitScollege of culinAry ArtS BPA3340 Wedding Cake Design 3.0 BPA3350 Artisan Breads 3.0BAking & PAStry ArtS* BPA3360 Chocolate Artistry 3.0 CUL3095 Designing ContemporarycourSeS creDitS Plated Desserts 3.0 CUL3165 Light and Healthy Desserts 3.0BPA1035 Chocolates and Confections 3.0BPA1045 Principles of Artisan Bread Baking 3.0BPA3300 Frozen Desserts 3.0 total credits 15.0BPA3330 Buffet Showpiece Design 3.0 * For students in the Baking & Pastry Arts and Food ServiceCUL3095 Designing Contemporary Management. Plated Desserts 3.0 note: Lab courses for culinary concentrations may only be taken by students who are enrolled in the concentration.total credits 15.0* For students in the Culinary Arts and Food Service Management Program. culinAry cAPStone lABS*note: Lab courses for culinary concentrations may only betaken by students who are enrolled in the concentration. courSeS creDitS CUL3055 American Cuisine Today 3.0 CUL3075 A la Carte Cuisine: Europe 3.0 CUL4010 Advanced Buffet and Special Function Operations 3.0 CUL4065 Foods of Asia and the Orient 3.0 CUL4085 Dining Room Supervision 3.0 total credits 15.0 * For students in the Culinary Arts and Food Service Management program. note: Lab courses for culinary concentrations may only be taken by students who are enrolled in the concentration.148
    • SoMMelier the hoSPitAlity collegecourSeS creDitS As a condition of baccalaureate graduation,Choose one of the following: 4.5 all students (except for International HotelCUL3020 Foundations of Wine and Spirits & Tourism Management majors) enrolled inCUL3091 Oenology Hospitality College degrees must completeChoose one of the following: 4.5CUL4020 New World Wine and Spirits a concentration during their junior andCUL4030 Classic Old World Wine and Spirits senior years.Choose one of the following: 4.5CUL4045 Spirits and Mixology Managment When completing a concentration inCUL4185 Sommelier CapstoneFSM4070 The Business of Alcohol Distribution, The Hospitality College, students may not use Retail and Sales required core courses (or their equivalent) from within their chosen major. Additionally,total credits 13.5 students may not apply the same course to different Hospitality College concentrations.wellneSS AnD SuStAinABility* Hospitality majors have three concentration electives and two hospitality electives (withcourSeS creDitS the exception of International Hotel & TourismCUL3165 Light and Healthy Desserts 3.0 Management students). Transfer studentsCUL3200 Plant-based Cuisine 3.0 who transfer in three or more hospitalityCUL3250 Sustainability in the Culinary Kitchen 4.5 elective courses are not required to use theirCUL3300 Conscious Cuisine 3.0 remaining electives toward a concentration.total credits 13.5* For students in the Culinary Arts and Food Service ADventure, SPort AnD Management program. nAture BASeD touriSMnote: Lab courses for culinary concentrations may only betaken by students who are enrolled in the concentration. courSeS creDitS TRVL3040 Adventure, Sport and Nature Based Tourism 4.5 Choose two of the following: CGRA3050 Desktop Publishing 4.5 HOSP3065 Hospitality Security and Risk Management 4.5 SEE2015 Leadership in Recreation/Leisure Settings 4.5 SEE2040 Outdoor Recreation Planning 4.5 SEE3045 Media Relations 4.5 TRVL2040 Travel Sales Management 4.5 TRVL3020 Ecotourism 4.5 TRVL3801 Winter Resort & Adventure Management 4.5 TRVL4011 Destination Management Organization 4.5 total credits 13.5 149
    • BeverAge Service MAnAgeMent entertAinMent MAnAgeMentChoose three courses from the following dependingon degree and concentration selection. courSeS creDitScourSeS creDitS SEE2030 The Entertainment Industry 4.5 Choose two of the following:CUL3020 Foundations of Wine and Spirits 4.5 ART2010 Introduction to Film 4.5CUL3091 Oenology 4.5 ART2030 Music Appreciation 4.5CUL3092 Brewing Arts 4.5 SEE2020 Event Management 4.5CUL3093 Coffee, Tea, and Non-alcoholic SEE2070 The Gaming Industry 4.5 Beverage Specialist 4.5 SEE3060 Concert and Event Production 4.5CUL4045 Spirits and Mixology Management 4.5 SEE3150 Television and Movie ProductionFSM2055 Beverage Appreciation* 4.5 Management 4.5FSM4070 The Business of Alcohol Distribution, SEE4020 Sports and Entertainment Marketing 4.5 Retail and Sales 4.5FSM4880 Beverage Operations Management** 4.5 total credits 13.5total credits 13.5* Required for students who are not in the Restaurant, Food & Beverage Management or Culinary Arts program. entrePreneurShiP** Required for students who are not in the Restaurant, Food & Beverage Management program. courSeS creDitS ENTR2030 The Business Plan 4.5 Choose two of the following:cASino AnD gAMing oPerAtionS ENTR2040 Financing the Entrepreneurial Venture 4.5 ENTR4010 Managing Change and Innovation 4.5courSeS creDitS FISV4030 Real Estate 4.5 HOSP3055 Franchising Opportunities 4.5PSYC2040 Psychological Issues of Addiction HOSP4011 Hospitality Management Consulting 4.5 and Compulsive Behavior 4.5 HOSP4012 Developing and Managing a SmallSEE2070 The Gaming Industry 4.5 Hospitality Lodging Property 4.5Choose one of the following: SEE3120 Fitness and Wellness CenterACCT3055 Casino Accounting 4.5 Management 4.5HOSP3065 Hospitality Security and Risk Management 4.5 total credits 13.5SEE3015 Managing Gaming Operations 4.5total credits 13.5 fooD AnD BeverAge MAnAgeMent Choose any three of the following courses.cruiSe line MAnAgeMent courSeS creDitScourSeS creDitS CUL4045 Spirits and Mixology Management 4.5 FSM2055 Beverage Appreciation 4.5TRVL3080 Dynamics of the Cruise Industry* 4.5 FSM2065 Essentials of International FoodTRVL3081 Cruise Operations** 4.5 and Beverage 4.5TRVL3082 Cruise Marketing and Sales** 4.5 FSM3012 Advanced Menu Analysis 4.5 FSM3020 Dining Services Management 4.5 FSM3030 Facilities Design and Analysis 4.5total credits 13.5 FSM4040 On-site Food Service 4.5 HOSP3060 Private Club Management 4.5* Students must register for TRVL3080 at the Providence Campus during the fall term.** Students must register for TRVL3081 and TRVL3082 at total credits 13.5 the North Miami Campus during the winter term.150
    • golf MAnAgeMent on-Site fooD Service MAnAgeMentcourSeS creDitS courSeS creDitSHOSP3060 Private Club Management 4.5 FSM4040 On-site Food Service 4.5SEE3080 Golf Operations Management* 4.5 Choose two of the following:SEE3095 Tournament Operations* 4.5 FSM2010 Medical Food Service 4.5 FSM3012 Advanced Menu Analysis 4.5 FSM3020 Dining Service Management 4.5total credits 13.5 HOSP3040 Managing Quality Services 4.5* Students must register for SEE3080 and SEE3095 at the MRKT3005 Brand Marketing 4.5 North Miami Campus during the spring term. SCI2010 Nutrition 4.5 total credits 13.5internAtionAl hoSPitAlityoPerAtionS MAnAgeMent reSort MAnAgeMentcourSeS creDitS courSeS creDitSChoose one of the following:HOSP2050 International Tour and Hotel HOSP2020 Resort Management 4.5 Operations* 9.0 Choose two of the following:SEE3055 International Special Event FISV4030 Real Estate 4.5 Management* 9.0 HOSP1010 Front Office Operations 4.5Choose one of the following: HOSP2011 Hospitality SalesHOSP4020 Cultural Diversity Management 4.5 and Meeting Management 4.5IBUS2030 Foreign Area Studies 4.5 HOSP3045 Managing Vacation OwnershipIBUS2040 International Culture and Protocol 4.5 (Timeshare) Resorts 4.5IHTV3010 International Hospitality HOSP3065 Hospitality Security and Management 4.5 Risk Management 4.5TRVL3010 Dynamics of Tourism 4.5 HOSP3810 Spa Management 4.5TRVL3030 International Policies of Tourism 4.5 HOSP4012 Developing and Managing a Small Hospitality Lodging Property 4.5 SEE2040 Outdoor Recreation Planning 4.5total credits 13.5 SEE3120 Fitness and Wellness Center Management 4.5* HOSP2050 and SEE3055 are only offered during summer study abroad program. Students must apply and be accepted TRVL3010 Dynamics of Tourism 4.5 to this program. TRVL3020 Ecotourism 4.5 TRVL3801 Winter Resort and Adventure Management 4.5Meeting & event MAnAgeMent total credits 13.5Choose any three of the following courses.courSeS creDitS rooMS DiviSion MAnAgeMentFSM2065 Essentials of International Food Choose any three of the following courses. and Beverage 4.5HOSP2011 Hotel Sales and Meeting courSeS creDitS Management 4.5HOSP3020 Tradeshow/Exposition HOSP1010 Front Office Operations Management 4.5 OR 4.5HOSP3850 Negotiations and Agreements HOSP1080 Technology in the Tourism/SEE2020 Event Management 4.5 Hospitality Industry* 4.5SEE2030 The Entertainment Industry 4.5SEE3041 Special Event Protocol 4.5 HOSP3033 Hotel Property Operations* 4.5SEE3042 Weddings & Ceremonies 4.5 HOSP3040 Managing Quality Services 4.5SEE3060 Concert and Event Production 4.5 HOSP3065 Hospitality Security and RiskSEE3065 Fundamentals of Fundraising Management 4.5 and Philanthropy 4.5 HOSP3077 Revenue Management 4.5 HOSP4012 Developing and Managing a Small Hospitality Lodging Property 4.5total credits 13.5 total credits 13.5 *This option is NOT available to students pursuing the Hotel & Lodging Management, International Hotel & Tourism Management or Travel-Tourism & Hospitality Management degree programs. 151
    • SAleS & MArketing MAnAgeMent SPortS MAnAgeMent Choose any three of the following courses.courSeS creDitS courSeS creDitSHOSP4015 Advanced Hospitality Sales Seminar 4.5 LIT3040 Sports in Film and Literature 4.5Choose two of the following: SEE2015 Leadership inHOSP2011 Hospitality Sales and Meeting Recreation/Leisure Settings 4.5 Management 4.5 SEE3020 Professional Sports Management 4.5HOSP3077 Revenue Management 4.5 SEE3030 Athletic Coaching and Administration 4.5MRKT3005 Brand Marketing 4.5 SEE4020 Sports and Entertainment Marketing 4.5MRKT3011 Direct Marketing 4.5MRKT3045 Social Media and Internet Marketing 4.5MRKT4030 International Marketing 4.5 total credits 13.5SEE3045 Media Relations 4.5SEE4020 Sports & Entertainment Marketing 4.5TRVL 4011 Destination Management Organization 4.5 tour MAnAgeMent oPerAtionS courSeS creDitStotal credits 13.5 TRVL2030 Tour Management 4.5 Choose two of the following: HOSP2020 Resort Management 4.5SoMMelier HOSP3850 Negotiations and Agreements 4.5 SEE2070 The Gaming Industry 4.5courSeS creDitS SEE3045 Media Relations 4.5 TRVL3020 Ecotourism 4.5Choose one of the following: 4.5 TRVL3030 International Policies of Tourism 4.5CUL3020 Foundations of Wine and SpiritsCUL3091 Oenology total credits 13.5Choose one of the following: 4.5CUL4020 New World Wine and SpiritsCUL4030 Classic Old World Wine and SpiritsChoose one of the following: 4.5 trAvel AgentCUL4045 Spirits and Mixology ManagmentCUL4185 Sommelier Capstone courSeS creDitSFSM4070 The Business of Alcohol Distribution, Retail and Sales TRVL2030 Tour Management 4.5 TRVL2810 Aviation and Airline Industry Management 4.5total credits 13.5 TRVL3040 Adventure, Sport and Nature Based Tourism 4.5 total credits 13.5SPortS AnD entertAinMentfAcility MAnAgeMent note: Only students majoring in Travel-Tourism & Hospitality Management are eligible for this concentration.courSeS creDitSSEE4050 Public Assembly Facility trAvel Agent Management 4.5Choose two of the following: courSeS creDitSFSM4040 On-site Food Service 4.5HOSP3065 Hospitality Security and TRVL1035 Travel Information Systems 4.5 Risk Management 4.5 Choose one of the following:HOSP3850 Negotiations and Agreements 4.5 TRVL1011 Destination Geography II 4.5HOSP4011 Hospitality Management Consulting 4.5 TRVL2801 World Geography for Tourism andLAW3092 Sports, Entertainment and Event Hospitality 4.5 Management Law 4.5 Choose one of the following:SEE3060 Concert and Event Production 4.5 HOSP2011 Hospitality Sales and MeetingSEE3120 Fitness and Wellness Center Management 4.5 Management 4.5 TRVL2030 Tour Management 4.5SEE4020 Sports and Entertainment Marketing 4.5 TRVL2810 Aviation and Airline Industry Management 4.5total credits 13.5 TRVL3040 Adventure, Sport and Nature Based Tourism 4.5 total credits 13.5 note: Students majoring in Travel-Tourism & Hospitality 152 Management are not eligible for this concentration.
    • School of ArtS & ScienceS cAreer writingAPPlieD MAtheMAticS courSeS creDitChoose any three of the following courses(only one may be a required course in your major). ENG2030 Introduction to Newswriting 4.5 Choose two of the following:courSeS creDitS ADVC1021 Public Relations Concepts 4.5 CGRA3050 Desktop Publishing 4.5MATH1002 A Survey of College Mathematics 4.5 ENG2010 Technical Writing 4.5MATH1020 Fundamentals of Algebra 4.5 ENG3016 Advanced Business Communication 4.5MATH1030 Precalculus 4.5 ENG3030 Introduction to Food Writing 4.5MATH1040 Calculus I 4.5 ENG3050 Introduction to Travel Writing 4.5MATH1041 Calculus II 4.5MATH1930 Quantitative Analysis I 4.5 total credits 13.5MATH1931 Quantitative Analysis II 4.5MATH2001 Statistics 4.5MATH2005 Special Topics in Mathematics 4.5MATH2042 Calculus III 4.5MATH2043 Ordinary Differential Equations 4.5 econoMicSMATH3020 Discrete Mathematics 4.5 Choose any three of the following courses. courSeS creDitStotal credits 13.5note: Students majoring in Electronics Engineering are not ECON2010 Economic Geography 4.5eligible for this concentration. ECON3030 Managerial Economics 4.5 ECON3070 Contemporary Economic Issues 4.5 FISV3005 International Banking and Finance 4.5ArtS total credits 13.5Choose any three of the following courses.courSeS creDit environMentAl ScienceART2010 Introduction to Film 4.5ART2020 Introduction to Art 4.5 courSeS creDitSART2030 Music Appreciation 4.5RTL3055 Global Influences on Fashion SCI3010 Environmental Science 4.5 History 4.5 SCI3030 Introduction to Ecology 4.5 Choose one of the following:total credits 13.5 SCI1021 General Chemistry 4.5 AND SCI1022 General Chemistry Lab 2.25 SCI2040 Marine Biology 4.5BiologicAl Science SCI3020 Sustainability Policy and Planning 4.5Choose any three of the following courses. SCI3070 Food Sustainability 4.5 SCI3080 The Business of Sustainability 4.5courSeS creDit TRVL3020 Ecotourism 4.5SCI2005 Introduction to Botany 4.5 total credits 13.5–15.75SCI2020 Exercise Physiology 4.5SCI2031 Anatomy and Physiology 4.5SCI2040 Marine Biology 4.5SCI2045 Introduction to General and Organic Chemistry 4.5SCI3040 Biochemistry 4.5SCI4060 Food Microbiology 4.5 ANDSCI4061 Food Microbiology Lab 2.25total credits 13.5–15.75 153
    • gloBAl PerSPectiveS interDiSciPlinAry StuDieSChoose 13.5 credits from the following courses. Choose any three of the following courses.courSeS creDitS courSeS creDitSFREN1003 Conversational French III 4.5 ENG1901 20th Century Literature:FREN1902 French II Honors 4.5 A Multi-Disciplinary Approach 4.5GER1003 Conversational German III 4.5 HUM3070 Visual Literacy and the SociologyIBUS2002 International Business 4.5 of Perception* 4.5IBUS2030 Foreign Area Studies 4.5 LEAD3010 Leadership Through FilmIBUS2040 International Culture and Protocol 4.5 and Literature 4.5IHTV3010 International Hospitality LIT3015 Food in Film and Literature 4.5 Management 4.5 REL2001 Comparative Study of World Religions:LIT2030 African-American Literature 4.5 An Interdisciplinary Approach 4.5LIT4030 Multi-Ethnic Literature 4.5 SCI3050 Science and Civilization:REL2001 Comparative Study of World Religions: Progress and Problems** 4.5 An Interdisciplinary Approach 4.5 SOC2020 Culture and Food 4.5SOC2020 Culture and Food 4.5SPAN1003 Conversational Spanish III 4.5SPAN1902 Spanish II Honors 4.5 total credits 13.5TRVL3030 International Policies of Tourism 4.5 * Students may also register under SOC3070. They’re the same interdisciplinary course.total credits 13.5 ** Students may also register under SOC3050 or HUM3050. They’re all the same interdisciplinary course.note: A special feature of this concentration is the possibilityfor students to fulfill some course requirements overseasduring the summer. Summer campuses will change yearly,as will course offerings. The international component pro-vides students the opportunity to use what they‘ve learned leADerShiP StuDieSand add yet another impressive component to their résumés.International Business majors are not eligible for the GlobalPerspectives concentration. courSeS creDitS LEAD2001 Foundations of Leadership Studies OR 4.5hiStory LEAD2901 Honors Foundations ofChoose any three of the following courses. Leadership Studies Choose two of the following:courSeS creDitS FSM3035 Supervision for Food Service Professionals* 4.5HIST2001 World History to 1500 4.5 HIST4030 R.I. State Internship Program 4.5HIST2002 World History Since 1500 4.5 LEAD2010 Special Topics in Leadership 4.5HIST3001 U.S. History from Colonial Times LEAD2920 Intercampus Course on Philanthropy I 4.5 to 1876 4.5 LEAD2921 Intercampus Course on Philanthropy II 4.5HIST3002 U.S. History Since 1877 LEAD3010 Leadership Through Film (to the Present) 4.5 and Literature 4.5HIST3010 Modern History 4.5 LEAD3020 Creative Leadership 4.5HIST3020 A Multicultural History of America 4.5 PHIL3040 Ethics of Business Leadership 4.5HIST4010 Contemporary American History: SEE2015 Leadership in Recreation/ the U.S. in a Global Age 4.5 Leisure Settings 4.5HIST4020 American Government 4.5 SOC2040 Community Leadership: An Applied Sociology 4.5total credits 13.5 total credits 13.5 * FSM3035 is only available to bachelor’s degree candidates within the College of Culinary Arts. 154
    • legAl iSSueS PhySicAl ScienceThis concentration is designed to enrich the legalunderstanding of students for whom law will not be courSeS creDitSthe primary activity or profession. Students hoping SCI1011 General Physics I and Lab 4.5to apply to law school are strongly urged to avoid SCI1012 General Physics II and Lab 4.5this concentration, and instead select a concentra- SCI1021 General Chemistry 4.5tion in Applied Mathematics, History, Literature, SCI1022 General Chemistry Lab 2.25Physical Science and/or Political Science. total credits 15.75Choose any three of the following courses.courSeS creDitS PoliticAl ScienceCJS3820 Cyber Crimes 4.5LAW3002 The Legal Environment of Business II 4.5 courSeS creDitSLAW3010 Business Law for Accountants* 4.5LAW3015 Criminal Procedure 4.5 PSCI3001 Introduction to Political Science* 4.5LAW3025 Criminal Law 4.5LAW3055 International Business Law 4.5 Choose two of the following:LAW3065 Employment Law 4.5 HIST4020 American Government 4.5LAW3080 Cyberlaw 4.5 HIST4030 R.I. State Gov’t Internship Program 4.5LAW3090 Evidence 4.5 PSCI3005 Contemporary Political Ideologies 4.5LAW3092 Sports and Entertainment PSCI3010 Introduction to World Politics 4.5 Management Law 4.5LAW4020 The Law of Contracts and Sales* 4.5 total credits 13.5 * It is strongly recommended that PSCI3001 be taken first.total credits 13.5* Students may not take both LAW3010 and LAW4020 to complete this concentration, nor may a student who has taken LAW3010 to fulfill a major requirement take LAW4020 to fulfill this concentration. PSychologynote: Criminal Justice majors are not eligible for the LegalIssues Concentration. courSeS creDitS PSYC2001 Introductory Psychology ORliterAture PSYC2901 Honors Introductory Psychology 4.5Choose any three of the following courses. Choose two of the following: PSYC2002 Abnormal Psychology 4.5 PSYC2010 Personality 4.5courSeS creDitS PSYC2020 Industrial/Organizational Psychology 4.5 PSYC2030 Developmental Psychology 4.5ENG1001 An Introduction to Literary Genres 4.5 PSYC2040 Psychological Issues of AddictionLIT2030 African-American Literature 4.5 and Compulsive Behavior 4.5LIT2040 American Literature I 4.5 PSYC3001 Social Psychology 4.5LIT2050 American Literature II 4.5LIT3001 Studies in Drama 4.5LIT3015 Food in Film and Literature 4.5 total credits 13.5LIT3020 Studies in the Short Story 4.5LIT3030 Studies in Poetry 4.5LIT3040 Sports in Film and Literature 4.5LIT4010 Science Fiction 4.5LIT4030 Multi-Ethnic Literature 4.5LIT4040 Shakespeare 4.5total credits 13.5 155
    • Sociology DAtABASe MAnAgeMentcourSeS creDitS courSeS creDitSSOC2001 Sociology I CSIS1040 Fundamentals of Visual Basic 4.5 OR 4.5 CSIS2030 Database Concepts 4.5SOC2901 Honors Sociology I CSIS2080 Database Design 4.5Choose two of the following:HUM3070 Visual Literacy and the Sociology total credits 13.5 of Perception OR 4.5SOC3070 Visual Literacy and the Sociology of Perception DeSktoP PuBliShingSOC2002 Sociology II 4.5SOC2020 Culture and Food 4.5SOC2025 Cultural Tapestry: Perspectives courSeS creDitS in Diversity 4.5SOC2035 Sociology of Aging 4.5 CGRA2030 Multimedia Applications I 4.5SOC2040 Community Leadership: CGRA3040 Information Architecture and An Applied Sociology 4.5 Content Planning 4.5SOC2050 Cultures of Africa 4.5 CGRA3050 Desktop Publishing 4.5SOC2060 Deviant Behavior 4.5SOC3010 Social Issues in total credits 13.5 Contemporary America 4.5total credits 13.5 gAMe DeveloPMent courSeS creDitSworlD lAnguAgeSComplete three language courses CSIS2055 Introduction to Game Development 4.5 CSIS3050 2D Game Development with C# 4.5(13.5 credits) in one of these options.* CSIS3060 Game Engine Design 4.5oPtion 1Complete three levels of a single language. total credits 13.5Example: FREN1001, FREN1002 and FREN1003 (orSPAN or GER)oPtion 2 Print MeDiAComplete two levels of one language andone level of a second language. courSeS creDitSExample: FREN1001 and FREN1002 (or 1002 and DME1030 Principles of Visualization & Design 4.51003 depending on placement), plus SPAN 1001 DME1050 Imaging for Digital Media 4.5(or 1002/1003 per placement) DME2030 Print Design 4.5* Students with previous foreign language study must take the placement exam to determine placement at the total credits 13.5 appropriate level.School of technology Project MAnAgeMentcoMPuterizeD DrAfting courSeS creDitS PRMG2010 Introduction to Project Management 4.5courSeS creDitS PRMG3010 Advanced Project Management 4.5 PRMG4010 Project Management ApplicationCAD1000 Computer Aided Drafting I 6.0 and Experiential 4.5CAD1L00 Computer Aided Drafting I Lab 1.0CAD1020 Computer Aided Drafting II 6.0CAD1L20 Computer Aided Drafting II Lab 1.0 total credits 13.5CAD1030 3-D Parametric Modeling 6.0CAD1L30 3-D Parametric Modeling Lab 1.0total credits 21.0 156
    • MinorS technicAl coMMunicAtion Having strong communication skills is essentialThe John Hazen White School of Arts & for success in many fields of business andSciences offers two minors (22.5 credits) industry. Whether making decisions, analyzingthat enhance and strengthen the qualifica- performance, designing user-friendly systems ortions of graduates moving into business: managing a project, effective communication of business and technical details is needed. ThisEnvironmental Sustainability and Technical minor focuses on building written and oral com-Communications.* These are intended munication, use of new media, collaboration andto give students opportunities to develop problem solving skills as part of career education.expertise in an area that complements theirmajor. Real-world applications are embedded courSeS creDitSin both minors. ENG2010 Technical Writing 4.5 ENG3010 Technical Editing 4.5environMentAl SuStAinABility Choose three of the following: ENG3012 Report and Proposal Writing 4.5This minor prepares students to understand ENG3014 Instruction and Manual Writing 4.5 ENG3016 Advanced Business Communication 4.5the scientific, public policy and economic DME1000 Foundation Drawing andchallenges of current environmental problems Digital Tools 4.5such as global climate change and renewable PRMG2010 Introduction to Project Managementenergy. Faced with balancing social, economic OR 4.5and environmental concerns, industry and com- PRMG3010 Advanced Project Managementmunity leaders are exploring sustainable busi-ness practices. Through course work and field total credits 22.5research, students develop the knowledge andskills needed to address sustainability issuesand to navigate the emerging green economy. * The only minors offered are those listed in the catalog. Students cannot elect to create their own minors.courSeS creDitSSCI3010 Environmental Science 4.5SCI3020 Sustainability Policy and Planning 4.5SCI3070 Food Sustainability 4.5SCI3080 The Business of Sustainability 4.5SCI3090 Research Seminar in Sustainability 4.5total credits 22.5 157
    • Technical StandardsCollege of Culinary arts the hospitality CollegeTo participate in any program in the College sports/entertainment/event Managementof Culinary Arts, each student, with or without To participate in these programs, eachreasonable accommodations, must be able student, with or without reasonableto safely and effectively accommodations, must be able to safely• communicate in person with co-workers and effectively and guests • communicate with fellow workers and• attend and participate in laboratory customers in person, by telephone and production classes of up to six hours and by radio in length • input data into and retrieve data from• lift and transport food and other culinary a computer product, equipment, small wares and • lift, transport, and use program-related utensils equipment and apparatus, including,• lift and transport trays with hot and cold where applicable, sporting, gaming, and plated foods, small wares, and other recreational equipment, or convention items, and serve and clear tables where services apparatus such as furniture, guests are seated displays and drapage• pour and serve liquids and beverages, including hot liquids travel-tourism & hospitality Management• use knives and other commercial cooking To participate in this program, each student, utensils with or without reasonable accommodations,• operate commercial cooking and food must be able to safely and effectively service equipment • communicate with fellow workers and• maneuver in professional or commercial customers in person, by telephone kitchens, dining rooms and related facilities and by radio• test and evaluate the taste, appearance, • input data into and retrieve data from texture and aroma of food and beverage a computer products • travel by standard commercial carriers,• use commercial cleaning and sanitizing including airlines equipment and materials • handle luggage, ground transportation and hotel accommodations, and access tourThe foregoing technical standards are sites with available on-site accommodationsessential to all programs of instruction inthe College of Culinary Arts and also reflectindustry requirements and standards. all other hospitality programs To participate in these programs, each stu- dent, with or without reasonable accommoda- tions, must be able to safely and effectively • communicate with fellow workers, guests and customers in person and by telephone • attend and participate in both day and night shift (including third shift) classes • input data into and retrieve data from a computer158
    • • lift, transport and set up moveable hotel College of business/ furniture, serving equipment and cleaning equine prograMs equipment, and safely and effectively operate or use such items in the To participate in these programs, each preparation, utilization and maintenance student, with or without reasonable of hotel or institutional facilities accommodations, must be able to safely• attend and participate in laboratory and (including the safety of the horse, where food production classes of up to six hours applicable) and effectively in length• lift and transport food and other culinary equine business Management (non-riding) product, equipment, small wares and • remain alert at all times while handling a utensils horse• lift and transport trays with hot and cold • lead and control a horse for turnout into plated foods, small wares and other a paddock items, and serve and clear tables where • operate horse management equipment guests are seated such as tractors and wheelbarrows• pour and serve liquids and beverages, • lift, handle and transport tack, feed bags, including hot liquids hay bales and equipment for feeding and• use knives and other commercial cooking watering horses utensils • groom horses, including bathing, brushing• operate commercial cooking and food and picking out hooves service equipment • clean equine equipment, stalls and aisles• maneuver in professional or commercial kitchens, dining rooms and related facilities equine studies and equine business• test and evaluate the taste, appearance, Management/riding texture and aroma of food and beverage • mount a 15.2 hand horse products • control a moving horse as a rider• perform commercial or institutional house- • maintain balance and remain alert at all keeping tasks (such as bedmaking) and times while riding or handling a horse use commercial cleaning and sanitizing • wear an ASTM/SEI-certified riding helmet equipment and materials and standard flat-soled riding boots with at least a 3/4” heelThe foregoing technical standards are • lead and control a horse for turnout intoessential to the programs of instruction in a paddockThe Hospitality College and also reflect • operate horse management equipmentindustry requirements and standards. such as tractors and wheelbarrows • lift, handle and transport tack, feed bags, hay bales and equipment for feeding and watering horses • groom horses, including bathing, brushing and picking out hooves • clean equine equipment, stalls and aisles The foregoing technical standards are essential to the programs of instruction in Equine Business Management, Equine Studies, and Equine Business Management/ Riding and also reflect industry requirements and standards. 159
    • Course Numbering SystemAlphabetic AlphabeticCode Discipline Code Discipline (continued)alan shawn feinstein graduate school/ school of technologyschool of education CAD Computerized DraftingCOMM Communication CGRA Computer GraphicsEDUC Education CSIS Computer ScienceEVNT Event Leadership DME Digital Media ENGN EngineeringGRAD Graduate Studies FIT Foundations in TechnologySPED Special Education ITEC Information Technology PRMG Project ManagementCareer Development TECX Technology Experiential EducationCAR Career Management otherCollege of business ABRD Academic International ProgramsACCT* Accounting PHYS Physical EducationADVC Advertising CommunicationsCJS* Criminal Justice Numeric ValuesENTR EntrepreneurshipEQN Equine 0001–0999 Non-credit and/or institutionalFISV* Financial Services Management credit coursesIBUS* International Business 1000–1999 Introductory coursesMGHI Management and the Hospitality Industry 2000–3999 Intermediate courses 4000–4999 Advanced coursesMGMT* Management 5000–6999 Graduate coursesMRKT* Marketing 7000–9999 Doctoral coursesRTL RetailSMGT Security Management First DigitCollege of Culinary arts 1 Freshman level 4 Senior levelBPA Baking & Pastry Arts 2 Sophomore level 5–6 Graduate levelCUL Culinary Arts 3 Junior level 7–9 Doctoral levelFSM Food Service ManagementNUTR Culinary Nutrition Miscellaneousthe hospitality College GS Denotes a general studies course outside ofFSM Food Service Management the School of Arts & SciencesHOSP* Hospitality Management HO Denotes an honors-option courseIHTV International Hotel and Tourism HY Denotes a hybrid format course OL Denotes an online courseMGHI Management and the Hospitality Industry PT Denotes a course in which performanceSEE Sports/Entertainment/Event transcript skills are measured Management SL Denotes a possible service learning moduleTRVL Travel/Tourism WI Denotes a writing-intensive courseschool of arts & sciences Definitions of Elective AttributesARA ArabicART Art Elective courses, as designated by each program,CSL Community Service Learning allow students to personalize their program of studyCSLG Counseling by selecting courses that will strengthen and sup-ECON* Economics port their individual or career aspirations. EligibleENG English elective course offerings are defined by attributeESL English Language Institute type and are identified by appropriate colleges orFREN French schools. Special note: Individual program require- ments will detail any exceptions when specificGER German courses may not satisfy an elective requirement.HIST HistoryHUM Humanities When selecting an elective, students must registerLAW* Law the appropriate type of elective and are responsibleLEAD Leadership Studies for satisfying any prerequisites or restrictions thatLIT* Literature may be present on the elective course offering.MATH* Mathematics Furthermore, the elective may not be a requiredPHIL Philosophy course in the student’s program of study.PSCI Political SciencePSYC Psychology type of elective attribute typeREL Religion accounting EACCRSCH* Research arts & sciences EASCRUS Russian baking/pastry EBPASCI Science career elective ECAR criminal justice ECJSSOC Sociology culinary ECULSPAN Spanish elective (“free” elective) any 1000-level or higher course except those noted equine EEQN*these codes also exist in the graduate school financial services EFIN graduate EGRD hospitality EHSP international business EIBU160 technology ETEC
    • Course DescriptionsExperiential Education payroll, systems and controls, accounting principles and preparation of the statement of cash flows and statement of cost of goods manufactured. Prerequisite:& Career Services ACCT1001 or ACCT1011 or ACCT1021. Quarter Credit Hours 5.5Career ManageMent aCCt1005 the aCCounting fielD This introductory course provides an overview of theCar0010 Career Capstone accounting field including its history and evolution.This career management course focuses on preparing Emphasis is placed on national and internationaland empowering students to make effective career regulatory groups, government agencies, accountingchoices, identify and pursue internships, secure organizations and professional certifications. Legal andemployment, and navigate lifelong career direction. ethical requirements are presented. The componentsStudents learn ways to enhance and customize their of an annual report, accounting information systemsjob search materials and to market themselves effec- and business organizational structures of for-profit andtively to employers. Various job search strategies, not-for-profit organizations are discussed.networking and interview techniques are reinforced. Quarter Credit Hours 4.5Other topics include personal financial management andgraduate school. Prerequisite: Junior status. (PT) (OL) aCCt1011 hospitality aCCounting i anD labQuarter Credit Hours 1.0 This course is designed to combine the concepts of accounting theory and practice with the specialized requirements of the hospitality industry. The courseDirected Work introduces the nature and purpose of accounting, the double-entry system, hospitality accounting docu- ments and special journals, inventories, adjustingExperience entries, financial statements and the closing process. Students learn the accounting cycle for proprietorship and corporate forms of business. (OL)DireCteD Work experienCe Quarter Credit Hours 5.5DWe3999 DireCteD Work experienCe aCCt1012 hospitality aCCounting ii anD labThe Directed Work Experience offers students an This course is based on the Uniform System of Accountsexperiential learning opportunity for the application of as approved by the American Hotel & Lodging Association.acquired skills and knowledge in a supervised, unpaid, Comprehensive coverage is given to revenue and expenseproject-oriented setting. The focus of these experiences accounting, the periodic inventory method, preparationrevolves around a specific industry-based or a functional of departmental and corporate financial statementsarea-based project under the supervision of a faculty for a hotel, ratio analysis, accounting for intangiblemember. assets, and selective topics in property and equipmentPrerequisites: accounting and hospitality payroll. Prerequisite:College of Business: cumulative 2.75 GPA; faculty ACCT1001 or ACCT1011 or ACCT1021. (OL)recommendation Quarter Credit Hours 5.5The Hospitality College: approval of department chairand dean aCCt1021 business aCCounting i anD labSchool of Technology: cumulative 2.75 GPA; approval The purpose of this course is to provide the studentof department chair and dean with an understanding of the processing of financialQuarter Credit Hours 1.5, 4.5, 9.0, 13.5 data with an emphasis on concepts rather than procedures. Accounting is presented with a focus in its business context, integrating ratios and financial statements to enhance the understanding of how theCollege of Business information is used as a tool for decision making in the business world. Quarter Credit Hours 5.5aCCounting aCCt1022 business aCCounting ii anD labaCCt1001 prinCiples of aCCounting i anD lab The purpose of this course is to provide the studentAccounting I is designed to acquaint students with with an understanding of accounting for assets, liabili-the nature and purpose of accounting. Students are ties and equity necessary in running a business andintroduced to the accounting cycle, where they identify, evaluating its operating results and financial condi-record and summarize accounting data, including the tion employing various analytical methods and ratios.preparation of financial statements. Also included in Prerequisite: ACCT1001 or ACCT1011 or ACCT1021.the course is accounting systems design as it per- Quarter Credit Hours 5.5tains to cash, accounts receivables and inventories.Corequisite: FIT1020. (HO) aCCt2010 personal buDgeting anD planningQuarter Credit Hours 5.5 This course focuses on personal financial planning for a variety of life situations. Topics include moneyaCCt1002 prinCiples of aCCounting ii anD lab management strategies, consumer credit, insuringStudents are exposed to basic accounting procedures your resources, and personal purchasing decisions.in the areas of fixed assets, partnerships, corporations, Topics are discussed with real-world applications. Quarter Credit Hours 4.5 161
    • aCCt2021 interMeDiate aCCounting i aCCt3020 Managerial finanCeThis course provides an introduction to financial The procedures and practices that successful man-accounting basic theory, practice and developmental agers use to prepare financial plans and forecasts,framework. Students are exposed to certain assets manage their finances, and evaluate their financial per-such as cash, accounts receivable and inventories. formance are examined in this course. Topics includeAttention is given to their valuation and impact on budgeting, cash flows, and financial statement analy-periodic net income and financial position. sis. This course is not available to accounting majors.Prerequisite: ACCT1002. (PT) Prerequisites: ACCT1002 or ACCT1022, FIT1020 orQuarter Credit Hours 4.5 FIT1014 or SEE3008, junior status. Quarter Credit Hours 4.5aCCt2022 interMeDiate aCCounting iiThis course is a continuation of Intermediate aCCt3023 Managerial aCCountingAccounting I. Students are exposed to the remaining Designed for business students, this course focusesasset groups including non-current operating assets on the informational needs of internal users of finan-and long-term investments. Coverage also includes the cial information such as company officers, companyentire spectrum of liabilities and stockholders equity. executives, human resource managers, marketingPrerequisite: ACCT2021. (WI) managers, program directors and production operationQuarter Credit Hours 4.5 managers. Emphasis is placed on acquiring and ana- lyzing the financial and nonfinancial information that isaCCt2023 interMeDiate aCCounting iii needed by these users to plan, direct and control theThis course serves as a continuation of Intermediate business. This course is not available to accountingAccounting II. Special topics are studied such as majors. Prerequisites: MGMT1001 and ACCT1002 oraccounting for earnings per share, income taxes, ACCT1022, junior status.leases, pensions and the statement of cash flows. Quarter Credit Hours 4.5Prerequisite: ACCT2022. (HO) (PT)Quarter Credit Hours 4.5 aCCt3025 hospitality finanCial ManageMent This course presents how accounting information isaCCt2030 aCCounting softWare i used by management to analyze and measure theIn this interactive course students become expe- efficiency and profitability of a hospitality business.rienced with a commercial accounting software The course emphasizes the managerial uses ofpackage. The course is conducted in a laboratory accounting data in decision making, preparation ofsetting. The software program is selected based budgets and variance analysis, relevant cost analysis,on local market demand and designed for small to regression analysis and cost-volume-profit relationships.medium-sized businesses. Setup, maintenance, and Prerequisite: ACCT1002 or ACCT1012, junior status.the entire accounting cycle are completed using the (OL)software. Corequisite: ACCT2023, sophomore status. Quarter Credit Hours 4.5Quarter Credit Hours 1.5 aCCt3030 not-for-profit aCCountingaCCt2191 aCCounting internship i This course introduces students to the accountingThis internship offers students part-time hands-on procedures of local and state governments. It alsoexperience in basic bookkeeping at a university prop- introduces students to the accounting standards oferty or an approved off-campus organization. Students organizations that exist and operate for purposeshave an opportunity to gain real-world experience in other than to provide goods and services at a profit.analyzing, journalizing and posting transactions; prepar- The Single Audit Act (OMB Circular A-133), govern-ing various reconciliations and schedules; and general ment auditing standards (the “yellow book”) and theoffice skills and procedures. This course can be used preparation of federal form 990 are also studied.for partial fulfillment of a free elective requirement if Prerequisite: ACCT2023.Accounting Internship II and Accounting Internship III Quarter Credit Hours 4.5are also completed. Prerequisite: Permission ofdepartment chair. aCCt3031 Cost aCCounting iQuarter Credit Hours: 1.5 This course provides an introduction to accounting in a manufacturing business. Costing procedures coveredaCCt3011 feDeral taxes i include activity based costing, job order cost, processA study is made of federal tax laws and treasury cost, joint cost, standard cost and variance analysis.regulations and their application to the income of indi- Prerequisite: ACCT1002 or ACCT1012 or ACCT1022.viduals. Practice is given in the preparation of the tax (PT)returns, supplemental forms, and schedules required Quarter Credit Hours 4.5to be filed by individuals. Prerequisite: ACCT1002 orACCT1012 or ACCT1022. (PT) aCCt3032 Cost aCCounting iiQuarter Credit Hours 4.5 This course focuses on a study of more advanced problems encountered in a manufacturing business.aCCt3012 feDeral taxes ii Topics covered include the use of a standard costThis course involves the study of federal tax laws system, variance analysis, absorption versus directpertaining to partnerships and corporations. Topics costing, break-even analysis and material and laborinclude the preparation of tax returns involving special related problems. Prerequisite: ACCT3031.problems, such as those associated with corporate Quarter Credit Hours 4.5reorganizations, personal holding companies and netoperating losses. Prerequisite: ACCT3011. aCCt3040 auDitingQuarter Credit Hours 4.5 This course is designed to acquaint the student with methods of verification, analysis and interpretation of generally accepted auditing procedures. The mechanics of planning and implementing an audit and the prepa- ration of reports are studied. Prerequisite: ACCT2023. Quarter Credit Hours 4.5162
    • aCCt3045 internal auDiting aCCt3191 aCCounting internship iiThe internal audit function of the modern organization This internship provides students who completedis the subject of this course, with a concentration ACCT2191 with an accounting experience that requireson the nature of operational auditing, its objectives, more responsibility. It offers the student a part-timeprocedures and standards. Attention is given to the hands-on experience in entry-level accounting functionsanalysis of the various administrative and account- at a university property or an approved off-campusing controls on which management depends for effi- organization which can be different than the organiza-ciency and effectiveness of operations. Prerequisite: tion where ACCT2191 was completed. The studentACCT3040.Quarter Credit Hours 4.5 has an opportunity to gain real-world experience in analyzing, journalizing and posting transactions; pre-aCCt3050 aDVanCeD aCCounting paring various reconciliations and schedules; creatingAdvanced Accounting is designed to provide the reports for internal and external usage; and generalstudent with a sound foundation in partnership office skills and procedures. This course can beaccounting and consolidated financial statements. used for partial fulfillment of a free elective require-Prerequisite: ACCT2023. (HO) (PT) ment if Accounting Internship III is also completed.Quarter Credit Hours 4.5 Prerequisites: ACCT2191, permission of department chair.aCCt3055 Casino aCCounting Quarter Credit Hours 1.5This course instructs students on the characteristicsof casino accounting by providing a history of the aCCt3192 aCCounting internship iiigaming industry. This history describes the evolution This internship provides students who completedof the systems of internal control used in casino ACCT3191 with an accounting experience that requiresoperations, and illustrates the accounting methods more responsibility and analytical tasks. It offers theused to comply with state and federal regulations student a part-time hands-on experience in entry-levelaccording to generally accepted accounting principles accounting functions at a university property or anand the AICPA Guide to the Casino and Gaming approved off campus organization which can be dif-Industry. Prerequisite: ACCT1002 or ACCT1012 or ferent than the organization where ACCT3191 wasACCT1022. completed. The student has an opportunity to gainQuarter Credit Hours 4.5 real-world experience in analyzing, journalizing and posting transactions; preparing various reconciliationsaCCt3060 aCCounting inforMation systeMs and schedules; creating reports for internal and exter-This course explores the various aspects of information nal usage; and general office skills and procedures.technology that accountants should have familiarity with This course can be used for partial fulfillment of ain business organizations. The topics discussed include free elective requirement if Accounting Internshipthe current computer hardware and software used in I and Accounting Internship II are also completed.business, risks and controls in accounting information Prerequisites: ACCT3191, permission of departmentsystems, the systems development life cycle, and busi- chair.ness processes enhanced by technology. Prerequisite: Quarter Credit Hours 1.5ACCT3040.Quarter Credit Hours 4.5 aCCt4012 taxes anD business DeCisions The income tax issues that must be considered byaCCt3075 finanCial ManageMent managers prior to making business decisions areFinancial management is designed to acquaint the examined in this course. Topics include tax aspects ofstudent with the basic tools required to perform financial selecting a type of business entity; acquisition, use,analysis and planning, working capital management and disposal of fixed assets; investments, capitaland capital budgeting in a business environment. gains and losses, nontaxable transactions, payrollPrerequisite: ACCT1002 or ACCT1022. (PT) taxes, and income tax planning. This course is anQuarter Credit Hours 4.5 elective for non-accounting majors only. Prerequisite: ACCT1002 or ACCT1012 or ACCT1022.aCCt3080 frauD exaMination: theory anD Quarter Credit Hours 4.5praCtiCeThe accounting and legal concepts along with the aCCt4020 aCCounting teChnology praCtiCeprocedures that are necessary to accomplish fraud anD proCeDuredetection, fraud investigation, and fraud prevention Using the content specification outline of the Certifiedduties are studied in this course. Students learn Information Technology Professional (CITP)® designa-how to analyze allegations of fraud and how to utilize tion developed by the American Institute of Certifiedaccounting and investigative skills during a fraud Public Accountants (AICPA), this course examines theinvestigation. The development of computerized various areas of technology related services providedapplications is used to assist in case analysis. Expert by accountants in public accounting and private indus-witness testimony is also discussed along with a try. Topics include information technology strategicreview of the variety of ways of communicating findings. planning; information systems management; systemsPrerequisites: ACCT1002 or ACCT1022, FIT1020. architecture, business applications and e-business;Quarter Credit Hours 4.5 security, privacy and contingency planning; system development, acquisition and project management;aCCt3085 aCCounting softWare ii systems auditing and internal control; and databasesIn this interactive course students become experi- and database management. Prerequisite: ACCT3060.enced with a commercial accounting software pack- Quarter Credit Hours 4.5age. The course is conducted in a laboratory setting.The software program is selected based on localmarket demand and designed for medium to large-sized businesses. Setup, maintenance, and the entireaccounting cycle are completed using the software.Corequisite: ACCT3075, sophomore status.Quarter Credit Hours 1.5 163
    • aCCt4050 international aCCounting product liability, marketing communications, issueAccounting for and reporting upon the financial aspects management, crisis control, media relations, corporateof a multinational corporation are addressed in this affairs and image building. Topics include research,course. Topics include foreign currency transactions, planning, communication and evaluation. Particularforeign currency translation (FASB 52), and account- emphasis is placed on writing press releases.ing policies and practices of countries other than the Prerequisite: ADVC1011. (PT)United States. Prerequisite: ACCT2023. Quarter Credit Hours 4.5Quarter Credit Hours 4.5 aDVC2001 CreatiVity in aDVertisingaCCt4060 aCCounting seMinar This course is designed to teach the student toThis course is delivered in a semi