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"Don't Come to Class Naked": Immersion, Engagement and Ethos for Freshman Composition Writers Using SecondLife
 

"Don't Come to Class Naked": Immersion, Engagement and Ethos for Freshman Composition Writers Using SecondLife

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CCCC presentation 3/23/07

CCCC presentation 3/23/07

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"Don't Come to Class Naked": Immersion, Engagement and Ethos for Freshman Composition Writers Using SecondLife "Don't Come to Class Naked": Immersion, Engagement and Ethos for Freshman Composition Writers Using SecondLife Presentation Transcript

  • “ Don’ t Come to Class Naked” Immersion, Engagement and Ethos for Freshman Composition Writers Using SecondLife Sarah “Intellagirl” Robbins – Ball State University CCCC 2007
  • What is Second Life © ?
    • M ulti
    • U ser
    • V irtual
    • E nvironment
  • Chat Instant Messaging Inventory Friends List MiniMap Motion Controls Camera Controls Building Tools Chat Window Media Controls Appearance
  • History of ENG104 in SL
    • Funded by The Center for
    • Media Design at Ball State
    • 18 Students (300 applied )
  • Example assignments
    • Rhetorical analyses of immersive spaces
    • Analyses of avatars as rhetorical constructions
    • Interviews with SL residents about avatars, social interaction, life in digital spaces
    • Spatial communication
    • Visual communication methods
    • Visual representations of arguments made in written assignments
  • Why Second Life Works for Comp
    • Authentic Writing Environment
    • Primary Research
    • Visual Rhetorical Environment
    • Active Learning
  • Authentic Writing Environment
      • Writing for an attentive audience
      • Vygotsky’s scaffolding:
        • helps when students need it
        • allows them to work freely when they can accomplish the tasks by themselves
        • Fading scaffolding
  • Primary Research
    • Community Research Hands-on Experience
  • Visual Rhetorical Environment
      • Everything in SL is intentional
      • Bolter- Writing Space Text (semiotic) is subordinate to graphics (visual). This changes our traditional cultural orientation to alphabetic writing-desire for the natural sign (like emotions) (icons)
      • Kress- Visual rhetoric: studies visuals as rational expressions of cultural meaning
  • Active Learning
    • Presnky “they [today’s “game generation”] want to be to be treated as “creators and doers” rather than “receptacles to be filled with content.” (Prensky, 76)
  • The Value of Play
    • “ Play at being a critic. Deconstruct the game in order to play with it. Instead of accepting the rules, challenge and modify them. Without the freedom to critique and reconstruct, there is no truly free game; we are addicts and nothing more”
    • Virilio and Sans quoted in Rouzie
  • Brian Sutton –Smith’s Play categories
        • Mind or subjective play: daydream, metaphors
        • Solitary play: hobbies
        • Playful behaviors: playing tricks
        • Informal social play: parties and social gatherings
        • Vicarious audience play: films, theatre
        • Performance play: “playing” someone or an object
        • Celebrations and festivals: holidays and carnivals
        • Contests and games: gambling, sports
        • Risky or deep play: dangerous, risk taking play
  • 1. Mind or subjective play: daydream, metaphors
  • 2. Solitary play: hobbies
  • 3. Playful behaviors: playing tricks
  • 4. Informal social play: parties and social gatherings
  • 5. Vicarious audience play: films, theatre
  • 6. Performance play: “playing” someone or an object
  • 7. Celebrations and festivals: holidays and carnivals
  • 8. Contests and games: gambling, sports
  • 9. Risky or deep play: dangerous or risk-taking play
      • Gregory Bateson: play parodies, not reality, but an idea or image of reality held by the players (Rouzie)
  • What is an Avatar?
  • Anatomy of an avatar: Developing Identities, exploring digital ethos
      • Selfe and Selfe (1994)
      • Interfaces express a set of dominant identities and relations within a given social context.
      • A limited set of options for self-representation, expression, and interaction, shapes the kinds of identity and modes of communication that are possible.
      • Reid “Virtual Worlds: Culture and Imagination”: MUD players are self-made identities
      • Turkle Life on Screen: online identity is more flexible than real identity
  • Play + Avatars= Immersion and Engagement
    • Better bonds between students
    • Increased connection between faculty and students
    • Greater understanding of learning outside of constructed experiences
    • Authenticity and exigency in learning situations
    • Increased student output