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Language and style - In The Country Of Men (Hisham Matar)
Language and style - In The Country Of Men (Hisham Matar)
Language and style - In The Country Of Men (Hisham Matar)
Language and style - In The Country Of Men (Hisham Matar)
Language and style - In The Country Of Men (Hisham Matar)
Language and style - In The Country Of Men (Hisham Matar)
Language and style - In The Country Of Men (Hisham Matar)
Language and style - In The Country Of Men (Hisham Matar)
Language and style - In The Country Of Men (Hisham Matar)
Language and style - In The Country Of Men (Hisham Matar)
Language and style - In The Country Of Men (Hisham Matar)
Language and style - In The Country Of Men (Hisham Matar)
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Language and style - In The Country Of Men (Hisham Matar)

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An analysis of the language and style of Hisham Matar's 'In the Country of Men'. …

An analysis of the language and style of Hisham Matar's 'In the Country of Men'.

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  • 1. Language and Style In the Country of Men – Hisham Matar
  • 2. First person narration • Internal monologue of an only child – allows for readers to understand things that Suleiman does not
  • 3. Genre
  • 4. Names and Naming • Characters exist in relation to Suleiman • Suleiman = Emperor of the Ottoman Empire – expanded the empire – instigated social and cultural developments – enemy to the Faith who suffered defeat under the Christians.
  • 5. Poetry of language • e.g. description of Rashid being dragged to the gallows – ‘He reminded me of the way a shy woman would resist her friends’ invitation to dance, pulling her shoulders to her ears and waving her index finger nervously in front of her mouth’ (p. 186).
  • 6. setting • Lepcis Magma – symbolically a fallen civilisation
  • 7. Heat / Summer • represents Hell, as Suleiman tries to avoid Hell by practising running over the bridge to Paradise. • Its glare stupefies the people leaving only the children to jostle each other around outside. • No school allows Suleiman to have the freedom to observe adults
  • 8. Sea • Calm - just at the end of the road. • Suleiman looks to be cooled and cleansed from the dirty activities he faces day-to- day. • Tries to take Kareem into it to seek some solace from his grief but Kareem resists. • almost drowns Bahloul , exerts power and gives in to the base urges
  • 9. The Guide • symbolism of replacing the picture of Baba – loyalty to the regime and the strains on family
  • 10. Children’s Games • ‘My Land, Your Land’ – represents the political ‘games’ of the older men • squabbles and fights -a microcosm for the violence in the country.
  • 11. Words • Nasser and his Typerwriter – Subversive pamphlets • Burning of the books – Violent oppression – removal of intellectuals who might questions • Democracy Now • Moosa – poet and lover of language
  • 12. Storytelling • Scheherazade – Najwa condemns S for being ‘a coward who accepted slavery over death’ (p. 15). over time. • Suleiman and Najwa – storytellers in their own right • Ustath Rashid – scholar of history

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