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Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)
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Humanidades digitales por Ryan Shaw (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Estados Unidos)

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Ryan Shaw is an assistant professor in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 2010 he received his Ph.D. from the University of …

Ryan Shaw is an assistant professor in the School of Information and Library Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 2010 he received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley School of Information, where he wrote a dissertation on how events and periods function as concepts for organizing historical knowledge. He is also the author of the LODE (Linking Open Descriptions of Events) ontology, recently adopted by the UK Archives Hub for their Linked Data effort. In 2012 he received a three-year Early Career Development grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services to invent new tools for applying computational text processing techniques to organize large collections of civil rights histories. He is also a co-PI of the Editors' Notes project , a Mellon Foundation-funded effort to develop open, collaborative notebooks for humanists, and the PeriodO project, an NEH-funded gazetteer of scholarly assertions about the extents of historical, art-historical, and archaeological periods. In the past he has been involved in a number of digital humanities projects through his work with the Electronic Cultural Atlas Initiative. In a previous life, he worked as a software engineer in Tokyo, Japan.

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  • 1. Editors’ Notes Managing Working Research Notes Ryan Shaw School of Information and Library Science University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2. What are “working research notes”?! Current tools for organizing editorial research! The Editors’ Notes system! Initial experiments with using Linked Data! Current efforts and where we’re going! Parting thoughts on Library Linked Data
  • 3. ➡ What are “working research notes”?! Current tools for organizing editorial research! The Editors’ Notes system! Initial experiments with using Linked Data! Current efforts and where we’re going! Parting thoughts on Library Linked Data
  • 4. Our goal is to provide a “medium by which much valuable information may become a sort of common property among those who can appreciate and use it” Thoms, William J. 1849. “Notes and Queries.” http://nq.oxfordjournals.org/content/s1-I/1/1.full.pdf+html
  • 5. Documentary editing Editors prepare collections of documents: letters, articles, diaries, essays, etc. ! Printed volumes provide context for better understanding subjects’ experiences and general milieu through footnotes, images, chronologies, articles
  • 6. Documentary editing: workflow 1. Gather documents! 2. Contextualize select items! 3. Publish final product! 4. Repeat as funding allows
  • 7. Example: ! Emma Goldman Papers
  • 8. Patrick— ! Lenin: Had any of his family members beside his brother, been imprisoned? ! What was the book he had written on ‘political economy’ that was used in Russian Universities? ! New York (Evening?) Post, September 1918 editorial on IWW verdict for the huge IWW trial in Chicago.
  • 9. Sources consulted, notes taken based on findings Notes stored in a Word document? Yellow notebook? Email? Negative conclusion reached to question, (but few will ever see this)
  • 10. Working notes … are relevant to source documents, but are not necessarily tied to any specific document (as annotations are)! … may or may not become a formal finished product! … critical to the functioning of scholarly projects at any scale
  • 11. What are “working research notes”?! ➡ Current tools for organizing editorial research! The Editors’ Notes system! Initial experiments with using Linked Data! Current efforts and where we’re going! Parting thoughts on Library Linked Data
  • 12. Problems Published volumes & necessary work are expensive! Lack of space for all footnotes! Much of research done is either glossed over in footnotes or not included at all! Fact checking! Falsification or dead ends! Tangential biographical details! Preservation & legacy
  • 13. What are “working research notes”?! Current tools for organizing editorial research! ➡ The Editors’ Notes system! Initial experiments with using Linked Data! Current efforts and where we’re going! Parting thoughts on Library Linked Data
  • 14. http://editorsnotes.org/
  • 15. Notes Description Status Assigned users Sections Citation with optional notes Stored as HTML Revision history
  • 16. Documents Zotero for document metadata High quality, zoomable scans Transcripts in HTML with interface to annotate passages of text
  • 17. Topics Primary method of indexing items Classified by type Interface for clustering and merging
  • 18. Design principles Minimal amount of “friction” for researchers! Flexibility for different work habits! Consistency in data models! Existing technology wherever possible! Adherence to web standards
  • 19. Open source https://github.com/editorsnotes HTTP API built on Django web framework! PostgreSQL database! Haystack for full-text searching! Zotero for document description! Google Refine for duplicate detection! Mozilla Persona for ID management
  • 20. What has changed for researchers? Free text Structured blocks Implicit people, places, events Explicit linkable entities Filing cabinets Open access
  • 21. Benefits Connections linking topics are freed from the minds of editors & researchers and indexed for anyone to see! Standardized records of work can easily be revisited from within a project or from outside! New way of seeing the outer edges of humanities research! Evidence of intense, often messy, scholarship behind concise, clean footnotes
  • 22. What are “working research notes”?! Current tools for organizing editorial research! The Editors’ Notes system! ➡ Initial experiments with using Linked Data! Current efforts and where we’re going! Parting thoughts on Library Linked Data
  • 23. http://metadata.berkeley.edu/emma/
  • 24. topic names statements (triples) candidate URIs
  • 25. Lessons learned Possible to automatically harvest relevant linked data from libraries and other institutions! Editorial control over the harvested data needs to be better integrated into the note-taking process! Did not adequately demonstrate the benefits of structured data ! Do not simply aggregate and edit linked data— need to usefully exploit it to researchers’ benefit.
  • 26. What are “working research notes”?! Current tools for organizing editorial research! The Editors’ Notes system! Initial experiments with using Linked Data! ➡ Current efforts and where we’re going! Parting thoughts on Library Linked Data
  • 27. In-process reconciliation Editors create topics to label and index their notes; later reconciled to external identifiers in a separate batch process. Old Editors fluidly create, link to, and reconcile topics within the note-taking process. New
  • 28. JSON document store JSON-LD storage API Existing Editors’ Notes API server-side client-side Backbone.js (client-side JavaScript app framework) Indexed Database API
  • 29. Motivating structured data use enabled storing and editing of structured data, but provided no incentive for editors to do this Old storing and editing structured data immediately enables sorting and filtering and creating simple visualizations New
  • 30. Sorting & filtering
  • 31. Sorting & filtering Filter and sort notes not only using the dates of the cited documents (as they currently can), but also using:! locations and birth and death dates of the people referenced in the notes! locations and dates of existence of the organizations referenced! locations and dates of the events referenced
  • 32. JSON document store JSON-LD storage API Existing Editors’ Notes API server-side client-side D3.js (data-driven visualization) Backbone.js (client-side JavaScript app framework) Indexed Database API
  • 33. Visualizing notes A note on Dhanvanthi Rama Rau & the Fourth International Conference on Planned Parenthood can become viewable as: ! a map of specific locations in Stockholm and Bombay! a timeline of dates associated with the conference! a network of relationships among people and organizations.
  • 34. Expected benefits Working notes become repurposable! Working notes become more discoverable! Shift of focus from one-shot product to continuous data curation process
  • 35. What are “working research notes”?! Current tools for organizing editorial research! The Editors’ Notes system! Initial experiments with using Linked Data! Current efforts and where we’re going! ➡ Parting thoughts on Library Linked Data
  • 36. Bibliographic metadata Currently we rely on Zotero for bibliographic metadata! Professional cataloging ⇒ HTML pages ⇒ web scraping ⇒ manual editing! This is madness: libraries (and archives) should be the premier source of high-quality, easy to use bibliographic metadata
  • 37. New user task: reuse obtain find identify select explore FRBR contextualize justify FRAD FRSAD
  • 38. Thank You We are grateful for funding from:! The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation! Coleman Fung! ! Ryan Shaw ryanshaw@unc.edu! Project information http://ecai.org/mellon2010/! Project site http://editorsnotes.org/! Source code https://github.com/editorsnotes

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