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Review of available evidence regarding the impact of ICT in education at different levels. Presented at École Centrale Paris with the support of Programme Action Marie Curie, FMSH.

Review of available evidence regarding the impact of ICT in education at different levels. Presented at École Centrale Paris with the support of Programme Action Marie Curie, FMSH.

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    The impact of ICT in education The impact of ICT in education Presentation Transcript

    • The Impact of ICT in education. A Commented Summary of Available Evidence (2002-2012) ImmaTubella and Ingrid Noguera Collège d'Études Mondiales/École Centrale Paris, June 2013
    • Our hypothesis is that it exists a lot of evidence about technological equipment but very few about the consequences of the use of technology in education. Transformation is the center of our interest. Objective Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References How Millenials are and what they expect? ICT has had impact at the workplace? How is the context? ICT has had impact in HE? How to implement e-learning effectively? How will be the education of the future?
    • Methodology Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Method Desk-based research Years 2002-2012 Source Reports: all education levels and from all around the world Institutions: Pew Internet, New Media Consortium, BECTA, IEA, Fundación Telefónica, JISC, European Schoolnet, Eurydice, European Commission, Institute for Prospective, OECD and Sloan Consortium Quantity Selected: 179 Discarded: 90 Deeply reviewed: 89
    • Context What are we talking about? How people is equipped in the Information society? + mobile Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References
    • + - Desktop + Laptop Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References
    • + Internet + Broadband Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References
    • + Devices + e-book & tablets - iPod & game consoles Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References
    • USA Europe Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References What are they doing online?
    • USA Europe Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References What are they doing online? + social, audiovisual, news - blogging (young) Young people intensive use
    • Millenials Born after 1980, and known as Net Generation, IM Generation, Gamer Generation, Digital Natives , Digital residents or Homo Zappiens ➡Confident, self-expressive, liberal, optimistic and open to change ➡Less religious ➡Late entry into careers and first jobs ➡Optimistic about their own economic futures ➡Place parenthood and marriage far above career and financial success ➡Get along well with their parents ➡Respect their elders ➡Strong sense of identity ➡Autonomy and independence in their learning styles Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References ➡Always connected ➡Steeped in digital technology and social media ➡Embrace multiple modes of self-expression ➡Adept with computers, creative with technology and highly skilled at multitasking ➡Immediate communication (instant messenger, cellular conversations or text messaging) ➡Spending more time using home digital media (computer, games, the Internet) rather than watching TV Social characteristics Technological characteristics Pew Research Center (2010), Pedró (2006) Who are we talking about?
    • Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which are the competences to function in a digital environment?
    • information Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which are the competences to function in a digital environment?
    • information collaboration Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which are the competences to function in a digital environment?
    • information communication collaboration Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which are the competences to function in a digital environment?
    • information creation communication collaboration Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which are the competences to function in a digital environment?
    • information ethics creation communication collaboration Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which are the competences to function in a digital environment?
    • information ethics creation communication collaboration solve & assess Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which are the competences to function in a digital environment?
    • information ethics creation communication collaboration solve & assess technics Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which are the competences to function in a digital environment?
    • How students work? Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References
    • What they expect now? How students work? Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References
    • What they expect now? ➡The kind of ICT devices and services available at educational institutions, ➡The frequency of their use, ➡The range of possible activities, ➡The opportunities for collaborative work and networking, ➡The communication skills involved (including a reinterpretation of written language), ➡The degree of learning personalization, ➡The standards of digital quality, in terms of interactivity and use of multimedia resources. Source: Pedró (2006) How students work? Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References
    • What they expect now? ➡The kind of ICT devices and services available at educational institutions, ➡The frequency of their use, ➡The range of possible activities, ➡The opportunities for collaborative work and networking, ➡The communication skills involved (including a reinterpretation of written language), ➡The degree of learning personalization, ➡The standards of digital quality, in terms of interactivity and use of multimedia resources. Source: Pedró (2006) How students work? intensive use of technologies different activities multimedia & interactive resources collaborative & social personalization skills working patterns Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References
    • (+) ➡E-learning is growing. ➡Feel that e-learning has positive effect on the quality of teaching and learning. ➡ICT is changing the learning experience of students regarding time, space and access to information. (-) ➡More studies in USA than in Europe. ➡Face-to-face remains central, e-learning is supplementary. ➡E-learning has not revolutionized learning and teaching because ICT still being used as operational tools. ➡More focus on technologies instead of knowledge access and building. ➡ICT has more impact on administrative service than on teaching and learning. ➡Resistance among the faculty members is still one of the key barriers. ➡E-learning don’t make programmes less costly (high cost of software development, face-to-face tutorial support, and infrastructure costs). ➡State or national governments play a significant role in the strategic direction and funding of e-learning. ➡The priority now is to find a way to mainstream e-learning and maximize its impact in the classroom. OECD (2005) Which use and acceptance of e- learning in OECD countries? Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References ICT impact in higher education
    • Which use and acceptance of e-learning in Europe? Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References (+) ➡Use of ICT for learning is most widespread in tertiary education. ➡Informal and nonformal e-learning activities could be dramatically increasing. ➡Countries that are well advanced in e-learning also have well developed broader education, research and innovation policies. ➡ICT implementation in education changes the role of teachers and students, promote the improvement of teaching methods and the motivation of students, and fosters the internationalization of higher education through virtual mobility. ➡Some online programs are being offered online implementing collaborative, problem-based and project-based learning methods. (-) ➡Few adults and students have participated in e-learning courses. ➡The skilled people in using computers, but not in using Internet, are not interested in participating in online courses. ➡50% of people prefer guided learning than autodidactic one. ➡From those who have taken an online course, more 50% are satisfied with online learning and most of them prefer to participate in online courses than in face-to-face courses. ➡Face-to-face teaching remains central, e-learning as supplementary tool. ➡E-learning has not really revolutionized learning and teaching, is being more used for administrative purposes. ➡ICT is used to support existing (traditional) teaching structures. ➡Little reliable and comparative data available on the diffusion of e-learning. ➡The digital generation is making use of weblogs, social networking sites, podcasting, and other bottom-up ICT tools outside the formal learning environments. Future ➡Trends: to obtain and create knowledge at the right time, in the right place, in the right way, on the right device and available for everyone. ➡The prominent tools are adapted to learning styles. ➡Future skills: ICT and social competence, critical thinking, knowledge sharing and cooperation techniques. ➡Learning with mobile game technologies can make learning more pleasant and more effective ➡Empowering teachers and trainers is fundamental. Punie et al. (2006), European Commission (2008)
    • (+) ➡Students use their devices at university and are satisfied with the level of Internet access and ICT support. ➡Use standard packages for learning assignments, ➡Use the web to find information in a sophisticated way, ➡Use different tools to communicate with peers and tutors (e-mail, chat, Skype, etc.), ➡Use technologies to meet their own personal needs. ➡Students see clearly the usefulness of some technologies to learn (i.e. WebCT, online administration, course specific information online, emailing tutors) ➡50% students like to look for new technologies to help their learning and most of them access to online materials weekly. (-) ➡Students do not understand the use of social technology in education and react negatively if teacher promote it. ➡Students do not see how wikis and collaborative learning help them to learn. ➡They consider being more digital literate than their teachers and prefer that teachers do not use technologies than they used it in a wrong way. ➡They can feel uncomfortable when teachers relate to them in non-hierarchical structure or less formal methods. ICT implementation is not systematic and is bottom up (from staff). ➡ICT is more used for administrative purposes. ➡Face-to-face interaction is still seen as the best form of teaching. Conole et al. (2006), Ipsos MORI (2008),The Committee of Inquiry into the Changing Learner Experience (2009). Which use of ICT in UK? Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References
    • (+) ➡The number of students enrolled in online courses is growing (increased by over 570,000 to a new total of 6.7 million). ➡Most of college presidents state that their institutions offer online courses. ➡30% college graduates have taken a class online. ➡50% college presidents predict that 10 years from now most of their students will take classes online. ➡50% college graduated state that they have used a laptop, smartphone or tablet computer in class sometimes. ➡30% of people consider online courses as valuable as face-to-face, while 50% of college presidents consider it equally valuable. ➡Academic leaders consider that learning outcomes of students in online learning are the same or superior to those in face-to-face. ➡Academic leaders are progressively including online learning to their long-term strategies although they believe that teaching online takes more faculty time. (-) ➡Barriers for academic leaders to adopt online learning: online students’ discipline, lower retention rates, and lack of acceptance of online degrees. Taylor et al. (2011),Allen & Seaman(2013) Which use and acceptance of e-learning in USA? . Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References
    • ➡Students in online conditions perform better, especially, if they are guided, offering them media to control their interactions and prompting reflection. ➡Blended learning is better than face-to-face learning if include a variation in terms of curriculum materials and instructional approach. Means et al. (2010) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References ➡Technology has had and will have significant impact on higher education ➡Online learning is gaining a firm foothold in universities around the world ➡University respondents view technology as having a largely positive impact on their campuses Glenn (2008). International Has technology had impact on HE in the world? Is e-learning better than face-to-face?
    • Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which are the emerging technologies in HE?
    • Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Technologies are becoming more ubiquitous, social, personal, open and based on cloud computing. Also game-based learning, augmented reality and semantic applications are having a great impact. However, the main emerging technology for learning seems to be the mobile phone. Which are the emerging technologies in HE?
    • Knight, S. (2004) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which tools for what approaches? Collaborate and discuss through mobiles (real time)
    • •Learners become co-producers in the learning process •Flexibility, user friendliness (for both teachers and learners) and different “digital” learning styles •Learning becomes a social process •Assure that everyone is able to acquire the necessary digital competences for participation in society. •Experience-based learning via immersive virtual worlds •Experimental learning via computer-generated simulations •Cognitive support for people with special needs •Podcasting, blogging, social proximity and synchronous learning •Learning Content Management Systems (LMCS) Punie & Cabrera (2005) Technological Pedagogical Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References How to innovate with ICT?
    • •Learners become co-producers in the learning process •Flexibility, user friendliness (for both teachers and learners) and different “digital” learning styles •Learning becomes a social process •Assure that everyone is able to acquire the necessary digital competences for participation in society. •Experience-based learning via immersive virtual worlds •Experimental learning via computer-generated simulations •Cognitive support for people with special needs •Podcasting, blogging, social proximity and synchronous learning •Learning Content Management Systems (LMCS) Punie & Cabrera (2005) Technological Pedagogical Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References How to innovate with ICT?
    • •Learners become co-producers in the learning process •Flexibility, user friendliness (for both teachers and learners) and different “digital” learning styles •Learning becomes a social process •Assure that everyone is able to acquire the necessary digital competences for participation in society. •Experience-based learning via immersive virtual worlds •Experimental learning via computer-generated simulations •Cognitive support for people with special needs •Podcasting, blogging, social proximity and synchronous learning •Learning Content Management Systems (LMCS) Punie & Cabrera (2005) Technological Pedagogical Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References How to innovate with ICT?
    • •Learners become co-producers in the learning process •Flexibility, user friendliness (for both teachers and learners) and different “digital” learning styles •Learning becomes a social process •Assure that everyone is able to acquire the necessary digital competences for participation in society. •Experience-based learning via immersive virtual worlds •Experimental learning via computer-generated simulations •Cognitive support for people with special needs •Podcasting, blogging, social proximity and synchronous learning •Learning Content Management Systems (LMCS) Punie & Cabrera (2005) Technological Pedagogical Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References How to innovate with ICT?
    • •Learners become co-producers in the learning process •Flexibility, user friendliness (for both teachers and learners) and different “digital” learning styles •Learning becomes a social process •Assure that everyone is able to acquire the necessary digital competences for participation in society. •Experience-based learning via immersive virtual worlds •Experimental learning via computer-generated simulations •Cognitive support for people with special needs •Podcasting, blogging, social proximity and synchronous learning •Learning Content Management Systems (LMCS) Punie & Cabrera (2005) Technological Pedagogical Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References How to innovate with ICT?
    • •Learners become co-producers in the learning process •Flexibility, user friendliness (for both teachers and learners) and different “digital” learning styles •Learning becomes a social process •Assure that everyone is able to acquire the necessary digital competences for participation in society. •Experience-based learning via immersive virtual worlds •Experimental learning via computer-generated simulations •Cognitive support for people with special needs •Podcasting, blogging, social proximity and synchronous learning •Learning Content Management Systems (LMCS) Punie & Cabrera (2005) Technological Pedagogical Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References How to innovate with ICT?
    • ➡Pedagogical innovations: - Promote collaboration and networking - Responding better to the changed cognitive processes and learning patterns - Facilitating and improving teaching methods that put the learner at the centre of the learning process - Recognizing the diversity of users and contribute to the personalization of educational experiences - Promoting independent, autonomous and self-directed learners - Increasing motivation, participation and the development of new cultural forms of expressions - Promoting reflection and meta-cognition, enabling learners to take care of their own learning processes - Facilitating inclusion and lifelong learning ➡Factors influencing learning 2.0 take-up: - The availability and accessibility of social computing tools by teachers and learners - The functionalities of the tools employed, their suitability for the chosen task and the learners' familiarity with and acceptance of these tools; - The students’ attitudes towards the respective social computing tools and the extent to which they are able to appropriate them for their personal needs; - The participants’ background of knowledge and skills, the group structure, and the form of interaction and communication among peers; - The ‘scaffolding’ (technological and pedagogical guidance and support); - A structured approach is critical for the success of Learning 2.0. - The role of the teacher remains vital for the success of the learning activities Redecker (2009) How to innovate with 2.0 tools? Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References
    • ➡Same criteria than effective practice in learning: engage learners in the learning process, encourage independent learning skills,develop learners’ skills and knowledge and motivate further learning. ➡Must have: right resources, right mode (or blend of modes) of delivery, right context, right learners and right level of support. ! How to use e-learning effectively? Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Knight (2004) Model of learning activity design
    • ➡Same criteria than effective practice in learning: engage learners in the learning process, encourage independent learning skills,develop learners’ skills and knowledge and motivate further learning. ➡Must have: right resources, right mode (or blend of modes) of delivery, right context, right learners and right level of support. ! How to use e-learning effectively? Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Knight (2004) Model of learning activity design
    • ➡Same criteria than effective practice in learning: engage learners in the learning process, encourage independent learning skills,develop learners’ skills and knowledge and motivate further learning. ➡Must have: right resources, right mode (or blend of modes) of delivery, right context, right learners and right level of support. ! How to use e-learning effectively? Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Knight (2004) Model of learning activity design
    • ➡Same criteria than effective practice in learning: engage learners in the learning process, encourage independent learning skills,develop learners’ skills and knowledge and motivate further learning. ➡Must have: right resources, right mode (or blend of modes) of delivery, right context, right learners and right level of support. ! How to use e-learning effectively? Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Knight (2004) Model of learning activity design
    • ➡Same criteria than effective practice in learning: engage learners in the learning process, encourage independent learning skills,develop learners’ skills and knowledge and motivate further learning. ➡Must have: right resources, right mode (or blend of modes) of delivery, right context, right learners and right level of support. ! How to use e-learning effectively? Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Knight (2004) Model of learning activity design
    • ➡Same criteria than effective practice in learning: engage learners in the learning process, encourage independent learning skills,develop learners’ skills and knowledge and motivate further learning. ➡Must have: right resources, right mode (or blend of modes) of delivery, right context, right learners and right level of support. ! How to use e-learning effectively? Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Knight (2004) Model of learning activity design
    • ! Knight (2004) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References How e-learning take advantage of established practice?
    • ! ! Knight (2004) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References How e-learning take advantage of established practice?
    • ! ! !Knight (2004) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References How e-learning take advantage of established practice?
    • ! ! !Knight (2004) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References How e-learning take advantage of established practice? Visualization (mind-mapping)
    • Problem ➡How to transform the transition from education to work due to the increased labour market dynamics, and job competition. Solution ➡Anticipation and closer collaboration between education and industry, and individual flexibility and self-responsibility should be improved. ➡ICT uses: Networks fostering dialogue and collaboration between education and industry, context-aware simulation, virtual reality and interactive games, autodidactic training courses, and online learning communities. ➡Trend towards short-term, targeted and flexible learning modules, to taping the tacit knowledge of a team and supporting intergenerational learning, and towards mechanisms to validate and recognize informally acquired skills. ➡By 2025, 31.5% of all jobs will need tertiary-level qualifications. ➡The number of people aged 60 or above will increase to 25% of the population by 2013 and to 30% by 2027, while the overall working population will diminish. ➡Knowledge based economy and a demographical problem, thus, we have to give to students an adequate education in their field of study, and also to arm them with the skills and knowledge required to perform effectively at the workplace. Redecker et al. (2011) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References ICT impact at the workplace What is the context? What is the problem and how to solve it?
    • Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References ➡Many large organizations are now using web applications to support their business development by enabling informal learning and knowledge sharing. ➡Small and Medium enterprises (99% of enterprises in Europe) have not followed this pattern of ICT use. ➡Yet e-learning could help them organize training with reduced costs and less time off work. European Commission (2008) ➡Employers expect technology skilled graduates when joining their organizations, 30% of private sector respondents say that they assume some on-the-job training for new employees. ➡40% of all survey respondents believe that current graduates are able to compete successfully in today’s global marketplace. ➡The challenge faced by educational institutions and companies is to work together in renewing curricula and methodologies and definitely increase lifelong learning strategies and efforts. ➡Making lifelong learning a reality and tapping into the tacit knowledge of senior workers, enterprises will have increased responsibility for providing training, and formalizing lifelong learning. Redecker at al. (2011) What do employers think? What are companies doing?
    • ➡Entering the labour market: gap between formally acquired skills and competences and labour market needs will. Thus, a dialogue between education and training institutions and industry to adapt curricula is necessary. ➡Re-entering the labour market: many people will enter job fields without possessing relevant formal qualifications.Thus, informally acquired skills and non-professional experiences will have to be recognized. Formal qualifications will remain important but practical skills training will become more important to prepare people for a entering into a new job field. ➡Re-skilling later in life: all European citizens will have to accept that their expertise could become obsolete and that they might have to rethink their professional lives and careers. However, the increased flexibility of industry and labour market, will offer a set of opportunities for re-skilling and changing professional profiles. ➡Career development and professional relationships: professional relationships will change: hierarchies, relation among generations, and training needs will be openly and collaboratively addressed. Competences will become a more important criterion for promotion than seniority (Redecker et al., 2010:5). Redecker et al. (2010) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which are the future training strategies?
    • Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Methodology Technologies Personalization (targeted and flexible) People will have to assume responsibility for their qualifications and take initiative in developing their professional careers and industry will have to be more involved in training and encouraging workers to participate in lifelong learning. Effectively and efficiently (re) qualify people for jobs of their choosing, addressing their training needs and offering learning strategies tailored to their level of competence, their future job requirements, their time constraints, and their learning styles and objectives. Collaboration (peer learning) Professional relationships will promote open knowledge exchange. ICT-based peer learning networks and communities will become an important tool for lifelong learning. Providing environments that scaffold, document, and archive the learning process and convert knowledge exchange into an accessible learning resource available anywhere and anytime. Informalization (recognition of skills) Informal acquired skills will have to be formally recognized. Accreditation mechanisms are needed to make individuals’ learning portfolios relevant and valuable for their career development. Central policy issue: setting up the rules and institutions that allow for the practical exercise of ownership over a personal record of competence or accumulated knowledge. T e c h n o l o g i e s w i l l s u p p o r t informalization during the process of accreditation of informal skills. Which are the new methodologies in continuing professional development?
    • Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which are the approaches of learning at the workplace? (work-based learning) Drysdale (2012)
    • ➡Improved access to up-to-date institution and course information. ➡Faster response to initial enquiries and streamlined online application processes. ➡Access to institutional services from mobile devices, from any location. ➡Easier engagement with employers in curriculum design and delivery. ➡Responsive programmes that meet learners’ and employers’ needs. ➡Learner choice in the timing and location of study. ➡Flexible ways of delivering the curriculum and assessment and providing learner support. ➡Opportunities to extend higher education to new markets by distance and online learning. ➡Increased opportunities for learners to demonstrate a range of achievements and prior attainment. ➡Efficient assignment-handling processes. ➡Rapid and timely feedback that prompts reflection. ➡Improved data collection and transfer across processes. ➡Online integrated points of access to institutional services for practitioners, learners and employers. ➡Tools: e-portfolios, blogs, wikis, podcasting, social networking, web conferencing, online assessment tools and virtual learning environments (VLEs). Drysdale (2012) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Benefits of technology in HE for lifelong learning
    • ➡Improved access to up-to-date institution and course information. ➡Faster response to initial enquiries and streamlined online application processes. ➡Access to institutional services from mobile devices, from any location. ➡Easier engagement with employers in curriculum design and delivery. ➡Responsive programmes that meet learners’ and employers’ needs. ➡Learner choice in the timing and location of study. ➡Flexible ways of delivering the curriculum and assessment and providing learner support. ➡Opportunities to extend higher education to new markets by distance and online learning. ➡Increased opportunities for learners to demonstrate a range of achievements and prior attainment. ➡Efficient assignment-handling processes. ➡Rapid and timely feedback that prompts reflection. ➡Improved data collection and transfer across processes. ➡Online integrated points of access to institutional services for practitioners, learners and employers. ➡Tools: e-portfolios, blogs, wikis, podcasting, social networking, web conferencing, online assessment tools and virtual learning environments (VLEs). Drysdale (2012) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Benefits of technology in HE for lifelong learning !
    • ➡Self-learning, horizontal structures, collectivity, a de- centered pedagogy, networked learning, open source education, learning as connectivity and interactivity, lifelong learning, learning institutions as mobilizing network, and flexible scalability and simulation. ➡Participatory learning as a key element related to interaction to co- create with myriad people who are strangers and who can remain anonymous. With participatory learning, the play between technology, composer, and audience is no longer passive and the modes of authority break down. Future education Davidson & Goldberg 2010 Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References ➡Collaborative in nature; ➡Social networks arise around common (learning) interests and aims and facilitate the learning process by providing social and cognitive guidance and support. ➡The learner plays a central role in the learning process as an active author, co- creator, evaluator and critical commentator, but always evaluated by his or her peers. ➡Education has to respond to the new working styles emphasizing certain skills and attitudes: creativity, collaboration, critical capacity and communication. ➡Tools: social networking services; syndication and notification technologies; blogs; wikis; tagging, social bookmarking and folksonomies; media-sharing services, podcasts and vodcasts; virtual worlds and immersive environments; and online office applications. Redecker (2009) Which are the principles to rethink future learning institutions? What means to learn in the digital era?
    • ➡Trend towards: - Self-generated personalization - Widespread do-it-yourself attitude - Breakdown of the professional/amateur distinction - Emergence of Web 2.0 technologies that give rise to social networking, collaborative content creation and democratized innovation. - marginalization of institutionalized learning. - open learning will be at the core of what everyone does all the time, everywhere. ➡Future vision of learning called “learning spaces” that have eight attributes: - connecting and social spaces, - personal digital spaces, - trusted spaces, - pleasant and emotional spaces, - learning spaces (allow to differentiate between learning moments and other moments), - creative/flexible spaces, - open and reflexive spaces, - certified spaces, - knowledge management systems. Miller, Shapiro, & Hilding-Hamann (2008) Which learning spaces for a 21st Century Learning-intensive Society? Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References
    • ➡will be focused on competences, ➡based on the needs of individuals, ➡more active and connected to real life, ➡technologies will be an integral part of learning, ➡teachers will become lifelong learners, ➡education needs to change to respond to the needs of economy and society, ➡it is needed more knowledge regarding the impact of ICT in education, ➡teachers have to be encouraged to change education, ➡organizational change is required, ➡policies should be better linked with developing practices. ➡Future of education with ICT support: - to learn more (using technologies to be more efficient in introducing new methodological approaches), - to learn better (using technologies to personalize learning) - to learn in a different way (using technologies to facilitate the acquisition of 21 century skills). ➡To this aim it is necessary a modernization of educational institutions (organizationally and pedagogically), policies to improve and promote an efficient use of technologies in education, and to evaluate the impact of ICT. eTwinning Project.Ala-Mutka et al. (2010) Pedró (2011) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References How will be the future of learning in 10-20 years? (teachers’ views) How ICT will support the education of the future?
    • ➡Staff should take profit of students’ practical skills with ICT. ➡Students should have access to appropriate technology and promote the development of their technical skills. ➡Information literacies should be a priority area (identify, search, locate, retrieve, critically evaluate information, and organize and use it effectively). ➡Web awareness should be a priority area. ➡Staff should have support to reflect on research into learning (teaching and assessment methods) to become proficient users of an appropriate range of technologies and skilled practitioners of e-pedagogy. ➡New ways of tutor/student relationship might be developed based on the Web 2.0 (skills and attitudes). ➡Funding for investment in physical infrastructure and research at the national level to enabling and embedding the flexible use of technology and supporting the research and development programs. CLEX (2009 -UK) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References ➡Open and inclusive policies enhancing ICT integration in education, ➡Digital competences acquisition by all, ➡Allow more learner-centred approaches, ➡Adapt teacher education and training to embrace more open and flexible learning environments, ➡Holistic approaches in research, ICT cluster (2010) How to integrate 2.0 tools in HE? How to integrate ICT in education?
    • Allen & Seaman (2013) Sharples et al. (2012) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which tools will we use?
    • Allen & Seaman (2013) Sharples et al. (2012) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which tools will we use? In general, the future of education seems to be in technologies more adapted to users, more visual, collaborative and ubiquitous.
    • Allen & Seaman (2013) Sharples et al. (2012) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which tools will we use? In general, the future of education seems to be in technologies more adapted to users, more visual, collaborative and ubiquitous. MOOCs are the future?
    • ➡In North America MOOCs have never been cited as an emerging technology (Horizon Reports) ➡Just in Australia seem to be present in the future of education in the horizon 2016-2017. ➡The data about the implementation of MOOCs in US in higher education give us a clear view about the low integration of MOOCs (only 2.6% of higher education institutions currently have a MOOC). Allen & Seaman (2013) Sharples et al. (2012) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which tools will we use? In general, the future of education seems to be in technologies more adapted to users, more visual, collaborative and ubiquitous. MOOCs are the future?
    • ➡In North America MOOCs have never been cited as an emerging technology (Horizon Reports) ➡Just in Australia seem to be present in the future of education in the horizon 2016-2017. ➡The data about the implementation of MOOCs in US in higher education give us a clear view about the low integration of MOOCs (only 2.6% of higher education institutions currently have a MOOC). ➡In UK, MOOCs are seen as a good technology to increase the enrollment of students and as a place to experiment with new pedagogies. ➡However, the way of introduce and supports these MOOCs can damage the reputation of the institutions, reducing the students recruitment, and frustrate students. ➡The accreditation remains as a main issue in implementing MOOCs. Allen & Seaman (2013) Sharples et al. (2012) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Which tools will we use? In general, the future of education seems to be in technologies more adapted to users, more visual, collaborative and ubiquitous. MOOCs are the future?
    • Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References + Devices (mobile, tablets, laptops) + Internet (broadband) + Social + Multimedial How is the context? How Millenials are and what they expect? Are: + connected, communicative, technological, social, multitasking, visual, autonomous Expect: + technologies, different activities, multimedia, interactive resources, collaboration, personalization, more skills and working patterns
    • Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References (+) ➡Significant impact ➡Students are using their devices in class ➡E-learning is seen as supplementary tool but positive ➡Students in online conditions perform better ➡Changes roles ➡Increase motivation ➡Internationalize (-) ➡No revolutionized teaching and learning ➡More focused on technology than knowledge ➡E-learning is not less costly ➡Support existing traditional teaching methods ➡Bottom-up (teachers) ICT has had impact in HE? How to implement e-learning effectively? ➡ Engage & motivate learners ➡ Promote independent learning ➡ Develop learners skills & knowledge ➡ Appropriated resources (materials & tools), approaches, context and support ➡ Learner is the center ➡ Flexible ➡ Learning as social process
    • Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References ➡ Need: prepare student to workplace, dialogue education & enterprises, accredit informal skills, lifelong learning and change professional relationships ➡ Methodologies: personalization, collaboration, informalization ➡ How technologies help: access, administration, adapt needs, time and location, feedback ICT has had impact at the workplace? How will be the education of the future? ➡ Open, social, collaborative, ubiquitous, personalized, participatory, lifelong, flexible, multimodal, pleasant, de-centered, learner-centered. ➡ Recommendations: take profit students ICT skills, access, support teachers, new ways relation tutors/students, flexible use of technologies, open policies, real life. ➡ To learn more (ICT: efficiency), to learn better (ICT: personalize), to learn in a different way (ICT: 21 century skills)
    • Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References ➡Education needs to change to respond to the needs of the economy and knowledge society ➡Teachers need to be encouraged to use ICT more effectively (to change) ➡Organizational change is required to allow and encourage innovation in education ➡Policies (and research) should be better linked with developing practices ➡ICT are creating and impacting change in learning, but more knowledge is needed ➡Research and studies need to look for holistic, international and qualitative approaches to analyze the effective use of ICT and its impact on learning processes and outcomes. It is about transformation and about important cultural changes in the students. It is about transformation of the whole educational system. It is not about using ICT to do the same. It is about the change of structures, curricula and methodologies with ICT support. It is about the new learning culture to change libraries, classrooms, study plans and accreditation systems. Concluding remarks
    • − The ICDE World Conference on Open and Distance Education. Organized by: ICDE - World Innovation Summit for Education. Organized by: WISE - The eLearning Africa. Organized by: The Republic of Namibia − The Networked Learning Conference. Organized by: Open University of the Netherlands, Lancaster University, Aalborg University i Open University UK − International Conference on Mobile, Hybrid, and On-line Learning . Organized by: IARIA − EDEN Conference. Organized by: (European Distance Education Network) − Media & Learning Conference. Organized by: Flemish Ministry of Education and the European Commission Directorate-General for Education and Culture − International Conference of Education, Research and Innovation. Organized by:International Association of Technology, Education and Development − Worldviews Conference on Media and Higher Education. Organized by: University of Toronto − International Conference on Internet Studies. Organized by: ATISR academic − EDULEARN International Conference on Education and New Learning Technologies. Organized by:International Association of Technology, Education and Development − International Conference on Information Society. Organized by: i-society and IEEE − IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies. Organized by: ICALT − European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning: Towards Ubiquitous Learning. Organized by: cooperation among different universities − European Conference on e-Learning. Organized by: ACI (Academic Conferences International) − Annual Conference on Distance Teaching & Learning. Organized by: Distance Education Professional Development (DEPD) − Annual Emerging Technologies for Online Learning International Symposium. Organized by: Sloan Consortium − Annual TCC Worldwide Online Conference. Organized by: TCC − ED-MEDIA. World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications. Organized by: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). − International Technology, Education and Development Conference. Organized by:International Association of Technology, Education and Development − International Conference on E-Learning in the Workplace. Organized by: International E-Learning Association (IELA) − EDUCAUSE Annual Conference. Organized by: EDUCAUSE − Society for Information, Technology and Teacher Education International Conference. Organized by: SITE − Annual Sloan Consortium International Conference on Online Learning. Organized by: Sloan Consortium − International Conference on Technology Supported Learning & Training (ONLINE EDUCA BERLIN). Organized by: Federal Ministry of Education and Research − Mobile Learning. Organized by: IADIS Conferences Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References
    • Journals Computers & Education Journal of Computer Assisted Learning Australasian Journal of Educational Technology British Journal of Educational Technology (BJET) ETD&R - Educational Technology Research and Development Interactive Learning Environments Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology Learning Media & Technology International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning (iJET) Journal of Technology, Learning and Assessment Educational research review Research in Learning and Technology International Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning EDUCAUSE Review online International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning International Journal on E-Learning E-Learning and Digital Media Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References
    • Experts Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Academics Michael Graham Moore (Professor of education at University of Wisconsin-Madison-USA). Research interest:Transactional distance between teacher and students, independent learning, learner autonomy in higher education,. Yong Zhao (Professor at the College of Education, Michigan State University-USA). Research interest: effectiveness of distance education, diffusion and evolution of technology in educational contexts, second language acquisition, and globalization and education. More information: http://zhaolearning.com/ Terry Anderson (Professor in Distance Education.Athabasca University-Canada). Research interest: social software use in distance education. Insung Jung (Professor of Education, Media and Society at the International Christian University (ICU) inTokyo, Japan). Research interest: Quality assurance in distance education Stella Porto (University of Maryland University College-USA). Research interest: Leadership, management, administration, delivery and development of distance education programs, with extensive experience in e-learning systems and methodologies. Tian Belawati (ICDE President and former President at UniversitasTerbukas, Indonesia). Rector of UT interested in open distance learning. Som Naidu  (Charles Sturt University,Australia). Research interest: learning environments and architectures, Instructional Management Systems. Martha Stone Wiske (Harvard University, USA).Research interest: Integration of new technologies and the incorporation of learner-centered teaching for understanding into educational settings, including schools, universities, and other settings. Richard Noss (London Knowledge Lab, UK). Co-director of the London Knowledge Lab, co-founder of Kaleidoscope, and director of the UK'sTechnology Enhanced Learning   Vijay Kumar (Senior Associate Dean and Director, Office of Education Innovation andTechnology MIT-USA). Research interest: sustainable technology-enabled educational innovation. Sonia Livingstone (London School of Economics and Political Science). Research interest: young people and the internet in social, domestic and educational contexts. Guy Haug (Expert Advisor, Higher Education Europe, Brussels, Belgium). Research interest: quality assurance/accreditation, higher education, Bologna process. Martin Carnoy (Professor Graduate School of Education-Stanford-USA). Research interest: Economics of education. Francesc Pedró (Senior analyst at the OECD Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI)-France). Research interest: New Millenium learners, ICT integration in education. Morten Flate Poulsen (Professor of Online Education at the Norwegian School of Information and Director of Development at NKI Distance Education in Norway). Research interest: online education, LMS, computer-mediated communication, cooperative online education. More information: http://revica.europace.org/Morten.html Albert Sangrà (Director eLearn Center Open university of Catalonia). Research interest: the use of ICT in education and training and quality in e-learning Begoña Gros (Professor University of Barcelona) Research interest: the use of ICT to improve learning with special attention in ICT in higher education, learning design and the use of digital games.
    • Experts Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts ReferencesObjective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Consultants Frank Mayadas:(Co-Chair Sloan Foundation-USA) Research interest: e-learning impact in higher education, forms of on-line learning, industry and educational programs, quality in online education. More information: http://www.acm.org/globalizationreport/biographies.htm#m21 Bruce Chaloux: (Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer, Sloan Consortium-USA) Research interest: e-learning transformation of higher education, policy barriers in distance learning, adult access to e-learning,quality, authorization. More information: http://www.magnapubs.com/bio/297/ Tony Bates: (President and CEO ofTony Bates Associates Ltd-Canada ) Research interest: Specialized in consultancy and training in the planning and management of e-learning and distance education. Betty Collis (Collis & Moonen,The Netherlands) Research interest:Application of technology for strategy, learning and change in educational institutions and corporate training. Indy Johar (Co-founder | Executive Director & Strategic Counsel, HUB Westminster-UK) Research interest: design needs to meets policy and a new economics. Diana Oblinger (President and CEO of EDUCAUSE-USA) Research interest:: advance higher education through the use of information technology, next Generation Learning Challenges. Marco Antonio R. Días (Consultor de la Universidad de las Naciones Unidas, Ex-director de la División de Educación superior de la UNESCO) Research interest: Higher educatio, knowledge society.   Fabrice Henard (UNESCO, analyst at the OECD, for the programme Institutional Management for Higher Education (IMHE)-France) Research interest: Strategy consultant - education, skills and quality policies; evaluation, capacity building and expertise. More information: http://learningavenue.fr/.  Asha Kanwar (President & Chief Executive Officer of the Commonwealth of Learning (COL)-Vancouver, Canada). Consultant in open and distance learni UNESCO's Regional Office for Education in Africa (BREDA) in Dakar, Senegal.
    • Cases ➡Effective practices of online education in USA (Sloan) ➡Effective practices in the digital age (UK) ➡Effective practice with e-learning (UK, different education levels) ➡Good Practices for Learning 2.0 (Europe) ➡Innovative Practice with e-Learning, mobile and wireless technologies (UK) ➡Lifelong learning in digital age and workplace (UK) ➡Learning 2.0 innovations (Europe) Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References
    • References Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Ala-Mutka, K.; Redecker, C.; Punie,Y.; Ferrari, A.; Cachia, R. & Centeno, C. (2010). The future of learning: European teachers’ visions report on a foresight consultation at the 2010 eTwinning conference, Seville 5-7 February 2010. JRCTechnical Notes. Retrieved from http://ftp.jrc.es/EURdoc/JRC59775_TN.pdf Allen, I. E., & Seaman, J. (2013). Changing course:Ten years of tracking online education in the United States. Newburyport, MA. Retrieved from www.sloanconsortium.org Committee of Inquiry into the Changing Learner Experience (CLEX) (2009). Higher Education in a Web 2.0 World. http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/publications/ heweb20rptv1.pdf Conole, G., De Laat, M., Dillon, T., & Darby, J. (2006). JISC LXP: Student experiences of technologies, Final report of the JISC-funded LXP project, Southampton: University of Southampton, available online at www.jisc.ac.uk/elp_learneroutcomes.html Davidson, C & Goldberg, D. (2010) The Future of Thinking: Learning Institutions in a Digital Age Chicago:The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation http://mitpress.mit.edu/ sites/default/files/titles/free_download/9780262513593_Future_of_Learning.pdf Drysdale, R . (2012). Learning in a Digital Age Extending higher education opportunities for lifelong learning. UK : HEFCE, JISC. http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/publications/ programme/2012/JISCLearninginaDigitalAge.pdf Durall, E., Gros, B., Maina, M., Johnson, L. & Adams Becker, S. (2012). Technology Outlook: Iberoamerican Tertiary Education 2012-2017. Austin, Texas: The New Media Consortium. http://openaccess.uoc.edu/webapps/o2/bitstream/10609/17021/6/horizon_iberoamerica_2012_ESP.pdf European Commission (2006). Special Eurobarometer 249: E-communications Household Survey. Brussels: European Commission http://ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/archives/ebs/ ebs_249_en.pdf European Commission (2007). Special Eurobarometer 274: E-communications Household Survey. Brussels: European Commission http://ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/archives/ebs/ ebs_274_en.pdf European Commission (2008). Special Eurobarometer 293: E-communications Household Survey. Brussels: European Commission http://ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/archives/ebs/ ebs_293_full_en.pdf European Commission (2008). Commission Staff Working Document.The use of ICT to support innovation and lifelong learning for all - A report on progress. SEC(2008) 2629 final http://ec.europa.eu/education/lifelong-learning-programme/doc/sec2629.pdf European Commission (2010). Special Eurobarometer 335: E-communications Household Survey. Brussels: European Commission http://ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/archives/ebs/ ebs_335_en.pdf European Commission (2011). Special Eurobarometer 362: E-communications Household Survey. Brussels: European Commission http://ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/archives/ebs/ ebs_362_en.pdf European Commission (2012). Special Eurobarometer 381: E-communications Household Survey. Brussels: European Commission http://ec.europa.eu/public_opinion/archives/ebs/ ebs_381_en.pdf
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    • References Objective Methodology Context Millenials ICT impact education ICT impact workplace Future education Conclusions Conferences Journals Experts Cases References Miller, R., Shapiro, H. & Hilding-Hamann, K.E. (2008). School’s over : Learning spaces in Europe in 2020 : An imaging exercise on the future of learning. In Punie,Y. , Ala-Mutka, K. & Redecker, C. (Eds.), JCR scientific and technical reports (pp. 1-80). Luxembourg : Office for Official Publications of the European Communities. ftp://ftp.jrc.es/pub/EURdoc/JRC47412.pdf OECD (2005). Are Students Ready for A Technology-Rich World? What PISA Studies Tell Us Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). OECD. http://www.oecd.org/education/ school/programmeforinternationalstudentassessmentpisa/35995145.pdf Pedro, F. (2006), ’The New Millenium Learners: Challenging ourViews on ICT and Learning’ , France: OECD.Accessed at http://www.oecd.org/edu/nml/ Pedró, F. (2011).Tecnología y escuela: lo que funciona y por qué. Fundación Santillana. http://www.fundacionsantillana.com/upload/ficheros/noticias/201111/documento_bsico.pdf Pew Research Center (2010). MILLENNIALS. A Portrait of Generation Next http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2010/10/millennials-confident-connected-open-to-change.pdf Punie ,Y. & Cabrera , M. (2005).The Future of ICT and Learning in the Knowledge Society -Report on a Joint DG JRC - DG EAC Workshop held in Seville, 20 - 21 October 2005. Seville: European Commission Directorate - General Joint Research Centre. Punie,Y., Zinnbauer, D., & Cabrera, M. (2006). A review of the Impact of ICT on Learning. Working paper prepared for DG EAC. Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS), JRC, European Commission. http://ipts.jrc.ec.europa.eu/publications/pub.cfm?id=1746 Redecker, C (2009). Review of Learning 2.0 Practices: Study on the Impact of Web 2.0 Innovations on Education and Training in Europe, JRC Scientific and Technical Report, EUR 23664 EN, ftp://ftp.jrc.es/pub/EURdoc/JRC49108.pdf Redecker, C.,Ala-Mutka, K. & Punie,Y. (2010). Learning 2.0 -The Impact of Social Media on Learning in Europe. Seville: IPTS. http://ftp.jrc.es/EURdoc/JRC56958.pdf Redecker, C., Leis, M., Leendertse, M., Punie,Y., Gijsbers , G., Kirschner, P., Stoyanov, S. & Hoogveld, B. (2011).The Future of Learning: Preparing for Change Seville Spain: Institute for Prospective Technological Studies, JRC, European Commission. http://ftp.jrc.es/EURdoc/JRC66836.pdf Sharples, M., McAndrew, P., Weller, M., Ferguson, R., Fitzgerald, E., Hirst,T., Mor,Y., Gaved, M. and Whitelock, D. (2012). Innovating Pedagogy 2012: Open University Innovation Report 1. Milton Keynes:The Open University. Smith, A., Rainie, L. & Zickuhr, K. (2011). College students and technology. Pew Internet Research Group. http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2011/College-students-and-technology/ Report.aspx Taylor,P., Parker, K. , Lenhart,A. & Patten., E. (2011).The Digital Revolution and Higher Education.Washington DC: Pew Research Center.Available at: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/files/2011/08/online-learning.pdf Zickuhr K. (2010). Generations 2010. Pew Internet & American Life Survey 2009-2010 http://www.pewinternet.org/~/media/Files/Reports/2010/PIP_Generations_and_Tech10_final.pdf Zickhur, K. (2011) Generations and their gadgets. Pew Internet & American Life Survey 2010. http://www.libraryworks.com/bynumbers/pip_generations_and_gadgets.pdf Zickhur, K. & Smith, A. (2012). Digital differences. Pew Internet & American Life Project, Pew Research Center. http://pewinternet.org/~/media//Files/Reports/2012/ PIP_Digital_differences_041312.pdf