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Records Conversion & Redaction With Food Final Print

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Document Conversion Services

Document Conversion Services

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Records Conversion & Redaction With Food Final Print Records Conversion & Redaction With Food Final Print Presentation Transcript

  • Records Conversion & Redaction Services November 28, 2006 2006 Hart InterCivic, Inc. 
  • Agenda
    • Meeting Objectives
    • Conversion Services
    • Redaction Services
    • Q&A
    2006 Hart InterCivic, Inc. 
  • Meeting Objectives
    • Provide description of areas of conversion services
    • Define each service with explanation of source document materials
    • Discuss Pricing Model for each service
    • Highlight Cost Drivers for each service
    • Map Sales Process
    • Calculating ROI
    • Review Partners
    • Identify Resources
  • Conversion Services Placeholder Beginning of Nation’s history until 1905 (all paper) 1905 1930 1980 2006 Photostats Acetate Microfilm Polyester Film Document Imaging Systems
  • Conversion Services
      • What is Document Conversion?
      • Who is our Target Market?
      • Why is this needed by Government Offices?
      • What does Hart have to offer?
  • Technical Overview Document Conversion
    • Document Prep
    • Scanning
    • Image Treatment or Image clean-up
    • Indexing
    • Image File Output
    • Image/Index import into EDMS (Electronic Document Management System)
  • Conversion Services Government records are our target! County Clerk Tax Assessor Collector Municipal Courts District Clerk Sheriff’s Office
  • Government Records What prompts the government to request conversion?
    • Internet/Intranet Access
    • File Sharing
    • Storage
    • Labor
    • Revenue
    • Source Document Deterioration
    • Dual Database Dependency
    • Disaster Recovery
    • *These items are listed in a likely order of priority
  • Government Records
    • What does Hart have to offer?
      • Conversion
        • Paper
        • Microfilm
      • Film Creation
        • New microfilm creation
      • Redaction
        • Identifying and covering sensitive/private information from public records
      • Microfilm Library Management
        • Identify and Remediate critical problems
        • Storage
      • Restoration/Recreation
        • Books, Binders, Maps and Plats
  • Conversion Services Menu
  • Microfilm Conversion Records Preservation & Conservation Microfilm Library Management Indexing Microfilm Production Paper Document Conversion Conversion Services
  • Paper Document Conversion
  • Paper Document Conversion
    • What is Paper Document Conversion?
    • Paper Document Conversion is the process of converting paper records (land records, Photostats, Maps, Plats, Court Dockets etc….) into digital images.
    • What problems does it solve?
    • Information Protection
    • Reduce Operational Costs
    • Hardware Capital Expense
    • Rapid Retrieval
    • Concurrent Access
    • Image Enhancement
    • Flexible Indexing
    • File Sharing
    • Security
    • Disaster Recovery
  • Paper to Digital Image Source Document Type (Cost Driver)
    • Documents sizes vary
    • Over-sized documents
    • Brittle pages
    • Faded text
    • Taped pages
    • Torn pages
    • Loose Maps
    • Loose Plats
    Map Cabinets Hanging Maps Cabinets
    • Court Records stored in “Shucks”,
    • very difficult prep
    • Varying paper weights and sizes
    • Court records (Municipal, District etc), Police and Sheriff’s Department
    Loose Paper Records in files and cabinets
    • Dismantling / re-assembly of sewn books can only be done by LBS
    • Documents sizes vary, over-sized
    • Photostats
    • Brittle pages
    • Faded text
    • Taped pages
    • Torn pages
    • Maps/Plats
    • Land Records
    • Index Books
    • Road Books
    • Lien Books and other District and County Records
    Sewn/Glued Books
    • Document sizes vary
    • Over-sized documents
    • Brittle pages
    • Faded text
    • Taped pages
    • Photostats
    • Torn pages
    • Land Records
    • Index Books
    • Maps/Plats
    • Lien Books and other County and District Records
    Mechanical Binders Image Issues (Cost Drivers) Document Types Description
  • Paper to Digital Image Special Document Type (Cost Driver) The legacy of Sanborn maps: "Stated simply, the Sanborn maps survive as a guide to American urbanization that is unrivaled by other cartography and, for that matter, by few documentary resources of any kind." They are a highly useful resource for historical research, planning, preservation, genealogical research, sociological studies and research of urban geography. Kim Keister - Author Originally created for assessing fire insurance liability in urbanized areas in the United States. The maps include detailed information regarding town and building information in approximately 12,000 U.S. towns and cities from 1867 to 1970.
      • Originals are over-sized documents – 21” wide
      • Sanborn are all color maps and must be scanned in color
      • May be stored in Mechanical Binders or Books
      • May be encased in Mylar or other type archival envelope
    • 21” x 25”
    • Color
    • Loose
    • map File Cabinets
    • Bound in Books
    • Binders
    Sanborn Maps Image Issues (Cost Drivers) Attributes Description
  • Paper to Digital Image Special Document Type (Cost Driver)
      • Negative Image – commonly requested to reverse image (polarity reversal) during scanning process to deliver a positive image final product
      • Originals are over-sized documents – Many are 14” wide which will call for a Wide Format scanner for processing.
      • Seals that are barely legible
      • Text bleed-through
      • Faint and illegible signatures
      • Poor resolution of plat maps contained on the Photostat book pages
      • Certification strips that are reversed polarity from the Photostat pages
      • Documentary Stamps
      • Oil and Gas mineral leases with 4 to 6 point text
    Many older land records are photostat images bound in both sewn binders and mechanical binders. These can be Deed and Mortgage records, Lien Books, Road Books, Index Books and other. Photostats Image Issues (Cost Drivers) Attributes Description
  • Paper to Digital Image Special Document Type (Cost Driver) Extra Border Certificate Stamps Seals Signatures
  • Paper to Digital Image Special Document Type (Cost Driver) Bleed Through
  • Paper to Digital Image Digital Scanners
    • Scan up to 100,000 images per 8 hour shift
    • Bitonal, grayscale and 24 bit color
    • CCD Element
    • 200, 240, 300, 400, 600 dpi
    • Image output – Color = JPEG
    • Image output – Bitonal = Group IV TIFF
    Max scan size is 12” x 30” ADF Scanner
    • Scan 12” per second in bitonal
    • Scan 3” per second in color
    • 400, 600 dpi
    Max scan width is 54” Wide Format Scanner
    • Desktop
    • Bitonal, grayscale and 24 bit color
    • CCD Element
    • 200, 240, 300, 400, 600 dpi
    • Image output – Color = JPEG
    • Image output – Bitonal = Group IV TIFF
    Max scan area is 12” x 18” Flat Bed Scanner
    • Motorized book cradle with glass platen to flatten books and documents
    • Auto book page separation
    • Curvature removing software
    • 3 seconds per scan
    • Image output – Color = JPEG
    • Image output – Bitonal = Group IV TIFF
    Max scan area is 23.39” X 33.11”. Color and grayscale at 200, 400 and 600 dpi Face-Up Book Scanner
    • Image
    • Attributes
    • Scan Specifications
    • Description
  • Paper to Digital Image Process Step 1: Source Documents Step 2: Convert to Digital Step 3: Index Images Step 4: Data Load Paper Documents Potential Redaction Services Here
  • Paper to Digital Image Process Step 1: Source Documents Step 2: Convert to Digital Step 3: Index Images Step 4: Data Load Paper source documents are converted to digital images using industry leading technology. Potential Redaction Services Here
  • Paper to Digital Image Process Step 1: Source Documents Step 2: Convert to Digital Step 3: Index Images Step 4: Data Load Images are manually indexed by data entry personnel (abstracting). Potential Redaction Services Here
  • Paper to Digital Image Process Step 1: Source Documents Step 2: Convert to Digital Step 3: Index Images Step 4: Data Load Images & Indexes are ready for loading into the select recording system or document management system e.g. Hart’s A2. Potential Redaction Services Here
  • Microfilm Conversion
  • Microfilm Conversion
    • What is Microfilm Conversion?
    • Microfilm Conversion is the process of converting 16mm, 35mm, Aperture Cards or Microfiche to digital format.
    • What problems does it solve?
    • Information Protection
    • Reduce Operational Costs
    • Hardware Capital Expense
    • Rapid Retrieval
    • Concurrent Access
    • Image Enhancement
    • Flexible Indexing
    • File Sharing
    • Security
    • Disaster Recovery
  • Microfilm Conversion Types of Microfilm Open Reel Roll Film 16mm 100 ft 215 ft 35mm 100 ft Acetate Polyester M-Style Cartridge ANSI Cartridge 3M Cartridge 16mm Aperture Cards 35mm Hollerith Code Microfiche Jacketed Fiche COM Fiche
  • Microfilm Conversion
    • Archive Master
    • 1 st Generation
    • Direct from camera
    • Negative Copy
    • Archive Storage –
    • No copies after Print Master
    • Print Master
    • 2 nd Generation
    • Closest to resolution of
    • Master Copy
    • Negative Copy
    • Loss of resolution with
    • Each generation
    • Used to make all copies
    • Floor/Service Copies
    • 3 rd Generation
    • Positive Copies
    Use Archive or Print Master for Conversion projects
  • Microfilm Conversion Microfilm Film Bases (Cost Driver)
    • Acetate
    • Used almost exclusively from the 1930’s to the mid 1980’s
    • Will naturally degrade over time
    • Deterioration accelerated when not properly stored
    • Polyester
    • Only film base currently recommended for preservation microfilming
    • Black-and-white polyester film has a life expectancy of 500+ years (LE 500) under proper storage conditions.
    To determine Acetate – Hold a wound roll of film up to the light and examine the side of the roll. If it is opaque (light does not pass through), the film is likely acetate. Unwind several inches of film. Acetate film tends to curl . Also, If you are still indecisive on the nature of the film, try to tear a small section of the film. If it tears easily, then it is acetate.
  • Microfilm Conversion Open Reel or Roll Film
    • Same as 16mm open reel
    Same as 16mm open reel Cartridge protects the roll of film from dust and scratching. Allows the microfilm to be used in sophisticated automatic loading readers and reader/printers ANSI / M-Style Cartridge
    • Acetate
    • Age
    • Film Base Quality
    • Film Image Quality
    • Photostat Images
    • Negative Images
    • Cropping
    • Two book pages on one frame of film
    • Splices
    100’ – Hold up to 1,000 images Typically used for filming drawings, maps and plans Common in Land Records 35mm Open Reel
    • Acetate
    • Film Base Quality
    • Image Base Quality
    • Photostats Images
    • Negative Images
    • Splices
    - 100’ will hold up to 2500 8 ½” x 11” images @ 24x reduction - 215’ will hold up to 5000 8 ½” x 11” images @ 24x reduction 16mm Open Reel Issues (Cost Drivers) Attributes Description
  • Microfilm Conversion Aperture Cards and Microfiche
    • Film Base Quality
    • Image Quality
    • Special Image Clean-Up
    • Card Integrity/Quality
    Film insert is 35mm film cut from a roll of microfilm. A card with a rectangular hole or holes specifically designed to hold a frame or frames of microfilm. Often used to store frequently accessed large format documents such as building plans, plats or maps Aperture Cards
    • Film Base Quality
    • Varying Formats
    • Image Quality
    • Special Image Clean-Up
    • Fiche Sheet Integrity/Quality
    16mm or 35mm film strips that are sleeved in polyester jackets containing three to eight sleeves. Jacketed Fiche
    • Film Base Quality
    • Image Quality
    • Fiche Sheet Integrity
    Computer Output Microfilm . Microfilm produced directly from a computer file to microfilm. COM produces high quality microfilm, often in microfiche format. Precisely positioned and have consistent quality 7 rows of 14 images on a sheet of film about 4 by 6 inches COM Fiche Issues (Cost Drivers) Attributes Description
  • Microfilm to Digital Image Digital Scanners
    • 125 ppm @ 24x reduction
    • Bitonal - grayscale
    • CCD Element
    • 16mm
    • 35mm
    • COM Fiche
    • Jacketed Fiche
    Microfiche Scanner
    • Reduction Ratios 37x,36x,30x,24x,21.2x,16x,15x,10.5x,7.5x
    • Automatic Card Feeding
    • 100 Card Hopper
    • 1 card every 7 seconds
    • Rejected Card Bin
    • TIFF – JPEG Output
    • 35mm cards
    • Hollerith Code
    Aperture Card Scanner
    • 4, 8 and 12 bit grayscale scanning
    • Rotation, smart cropping, framing
    • Contrast Enhancement
    • Image Density Compensation
    • Over 400 ppm
    • TIFF – JPEG Output
    • 16mm
    • 35mm
    • Microfiche
    • Aperture Cards
    Film Scanner Image Attributes Scan Specifications Description
  • Microfilm to Digital Image
    • Two pages – one film frame
    • Most common with 35mm
    • Software will capture each page separately
    • Final product will be two digital images
    Special Document Type (Cost Driver)
  • Microfilm to Digital Image Special Document Type (Cost Driver) Extra Border Certificate Stamps Seals Signatures
  • Microfilm to Digital Image Special Document Type (Cost Driver) Bleed Through
  • Microfilm to Digital Image Image Cropping (Cost Driver)
    • Raw Microfilm Scan
  • Microfilm to Digital Image Image Cropping (Cost Driver)
    • Typical Crop
  • Microfilm to Digital Image Image Cropping (Cost Driver)
    • Excess Border Removal
  • Microfilm to Digital Image Image Cropping (Cost Driver)
    • 150k File Size
    • Excessive Border
  • Microfilm to Digital Image Image Cropping (Cost Driver)
    • Excess Border Removed
    • Original 150k File Size
    • 27k- 82% Reduced File Size
    150k x 10,000,000 images = 1.40 terabytes 27k x 10,000,000 images = 0.251 terabytes
  • Microfilm Conversion Process Step 1: Source Documents Step 2: Convert to Digital Step 3: Index Images Step 4: Data Load Microfilm Potential Redaction Services Here
  • Microfilm Conversion Process Step 1: Source Documents Step 2: Convert to Digital Step 3: Index Images Step 4: Data Load Film source images are converted to digital images using industry leading technology. Potential Redaction Services Here
  • Microfilm Conversion Process Step 1: Source Documents Step 2: Convert to Digital Step 3: Index Images Step 4: Data Load Images are manually indexed by data entry personnel (abstracting). Potential Redaction Services Here
  • Microfilm Conversion Process Step 1: Source Documents Step 2: Convert to Digital Step 3: Index Images Step 4: Data Load Images & Indexes are ready for loading into the select recording system or document management system e.g. Hart’s A2. Potential Redaction Services Here
  • Microfilm Production
  • Microfilm Production
    • What is Hart InterCivic’s Microfilm Production Service?
    • Creating film images from paper records
    • Creating film images from digital images
    • What problems does Microfilm Production solve?
    • Stable Archiving
    • Disaster Recovery
    • Storage
    • Information Dissemination
    • Security/Integrity
  • Microfilm Production from Paper Microfilm Cameras
    • Holds source document steady for fuming
    • Camera head moves up and down for focus
    • Dual light source to avoid shading in body of filmed images
    • Accommodates paper sizes up to A3 (11.7 x 16.5)
    • Outputs 16mm film – 100’/215’
    • 35mm 100’
    Planetary Camera Filmer
        • .
      • A rotary camera films documents while they are being transported through the device. The device frequently uses a rotating, circular drum as the transport mechanism, hence the name. The film is also in motion during filming; optics ensure that the image of the document is stationary relative to the film. The camera size limits the width of documents to be filmed, but it can accept very long documents.
    • Accommodates paper sizes 11 ½ wide by 16” long
    • Produces 16mm film
    • 100’ or 215’
    Rotary Camera Filmer Image Attributes Scan Specifications Description
  • Microfilm Production from Digital Image Archive Writer
    • Input data via CD/DVD
    • Input data via USB, Ethernet
    • Accepts Single Page and Multi Page TIFF images - Very popular and common image format.
    • Accepts Group III and IV TIFF and JBIG compressions formats
    • Accepts 100-600 dpi images
    • Accepts mixed image sizes: checks, letter
    • Output in 16mm microfilm
    • 100’ and 215’
    • Up to “D” Size scanned images
    Archive Writer Image Attributes Specifications Description
  • Microfilm Production Open Reel or Roll Film
    • Rotary
    • Planetary
    Same as 16mm open reel Cartridge protects the roll of film from dust and scratching. Allows the microfilm to be used in sophisticated automatic loading readers and reader/printers ANSI / M-Style Cartridge
    • Planetary
    100’ – Hold up to 1,000 images Typically used for filming drawings, maps and plans Common in Land Records 35mm Open Reel
    • Rotary
    • Planetary
    - 100’ will hold up to 2500 8 ½” x 11” images @ 24x reduction - 215’ will hold up to 5000 8 ½” x 11” images @ 24x reduction 16mm Open Reel Camera Source Attributes Description
  • Digital Image to Microfilm Process Step 1: Existing & Created TIFF Images Step 2: Film Writing Step 4: Film Storage Step 3: Film Processing The counties pre-existing TIFF images are delivered via FTP or DVD, CD media to film writer.
  • Digital Image to Microfilm Process Step 1: Existing & Created TIFF Images Step 2: Film Writing Step 4: Film Storage Step 3: Film Processing Paper source documents are scanned to create TIFF images.
  • Digital Image to Microfilm Process Step 1: Existing & Created TIFF Images Step 2: Film Writing Step 4: Film Storage Step 3: Film Processing TIFF images conversion is compliant with all legally mandated archival procedures using the Kodak Archive Writer.
  • Digital Image to Microfilm Process Step 1: Existing & Created TIFF Images Step 2: Film Writing Step 4: Film Storage Step 3: Film Processing Certified Kodak Microfilm Lab meets or exceeds all ANSI Standards set for microfilm production and archiving.
  • Digital Image to Microfilm Process Step 1: Existing & Created TIFF Images Step 2: Film Writing Step 4: Film Storage Step 3: Film Processing Microfilm is managed in a Texas Library & ANSI compliant, secure, storage vault.
  • Indexing Indexing (Cost Driver)
    • Indexing is, in essence, the electronic equivalent of the paper-based retrieval protocol. For example, County Land Records, Deed Books, are commonly retrieved via the grantor, grantee, book number, page number, instrument number, part of the Legal Description, or some combination of all.
    • Electronic Records Management Systems (ERMS) use a similar protocol for retrieving images. However, instead of the index information being located on the bind of a physical book, a page, file cabinet or typed into an index book, the information is entered electronically into a database file of some nature and associated with a specific image or set of images within an image database/file.
    • Field Indexing
      • Alpha/Numeric data associated with a specific image
      • Keystroke used to retrieve a specific keystroke/image or set of images within an ERMS.
    • Key Field
      • Linking newly scanned images to existing index records
      • Used to import new images into a legacy index database
  • List Pricing - Indexing
    • Example
    • Deed Records
      • 11,000,000 total images
      • Average 6 pages per record
      • Estimated total of 1,833,333 records
      • Index request
        • Grantor = average 15 keystrokes
        • Grantee = average 15 keystrokes
        • Document Type = average 9 keystrokes
        • Book = average 3 keystrokes
        • Page = average 3 keystrokes
        • Legal Description = average 15 keystrokes
    Avg. = 15 keystrokes Legal Description $439,999.92 or $0 .24 per record 109,999,980 keystrokes @ .0040 per keystroke @ 1,833,333 Avg. = 60 keystrokes per record Total Estimated keystrokes per record Avg. = 3 keystrokes Page Avg. = 3 keystrokes Book Avg. = 9 keystrokes Document Type Avg. = 15 keystrokes Grantee Avg. = 15 keystrokes Grantor
  • Microfilm Library Management
  • Microfilm Library Management
    • What is Microfilm Library Management?
    • Receive and Inventory a complete microfilm library
    • Review every roll, fiche or aperture card in microfilm library
    • Identify all problems and issues with the microfilm
    • Provide a comprehensive report on the condition of the library
    • Providing the services to resolve all problems and issues.
    • What problems does it solve?
    • Accurate Assessment
    • Film Stabilization
    • Reproduction Costs
    • Digital Conversion Preparedness
  • Microfilm Library Management
    • Management
    • Full Inventory
    • Quality Review
      • Film Base (Acetate – Polyester)
      • Vinegar Syndrome
      • Redox
      • Resolution
      • Chemical Residue
      • Spliced Film
    • Confirm Integrity of Library
      • Look for empty boxes or cases
      • Confirm the correct roll of film is in the box or case
      • Confirm storage boxes are non-acidic and lignin free
    • Stored in ANSI compliant environment*
    • On-line inventory access
    • Suggest, execute and deliver film library solutions
    • Storage
    • No online inventory access
    • Not microfilm trained staff
    • Not reviewed
    • Stored in boxes
    • Stored on shelf
    • Stored in office desk
    • Stored in data “storage” facility
    • Stored in Salt Mines
    • Stored in Caves
    vs.
  • Microfilm Library Management ANSI/AIIM Compliant Vault Storage
    • Class 125-3 hour and Class 150-4 hour fire-ratings.
    • 3M’s NOVEC 1230TM fire suppression system inside the vault.
    • Climate and humidity controlled.
      • Constant 68 degrees
      • 35% Humidity
    • High-density, slotted Gemtrac storage system to prevent light and dust from degrading your media.
    • 24-hour video surveillance.
    • Class 125 vault door assembly:
      • Combination lock on outer door;
      • Lone-key access on inner door.
    • Barcode tracking
    • Online Inventory Access
  • Microfilm Library Management
    • Our Laboratory staff is Kodak Certified and adhere to all ANSI/AIIM microfilm standards
    • Film is inspected under the densitometer to assure the background density is correct.
    • Film is viewed under a microscope to calculate resolution and check for other imperfections
    • Film is also viewed over a light box for image clarity review, splices and image sequence accuracy
    Microfilm Density Specs Maximum variation within any frame should be .015 Dmin-less than 0.15 Service Copy .09 1.25 Print Master Dmin-not higher than 0.10 Master Negative Minimum Density Dmin Maximum Density Dmax Generation
  • Microfilm Library Management Process 1. Film Inventory 2. Secure Transport 3. Inventory Reconciliation 4. Film Review 5. Microfilm Library Report 6. Services 7. Secure Storage All Film is inventoried and prepared for shipping Shipping done by Hart Certified Transport or FedEx “White Glove Service” Upon receipt, film is reconciled against onsite inventory Film is inspected in Kodak Certified Lab under strict ANSI/AIIM Compliant conditions by trained and experienced Microfilm personnel Comprehensive Microfilm Library Report is compiled and presented to Sales / S Specialist for delivery to client Conservation Program – Remedial services performed in Kodak Certified Lab Upon completion of remediation services, film will be stored in ANSI/AIIM compliant vault facility
  • Microfilm Library Management Film Inspection Report
    • Valuable “Tool” for long term considerations
    • Sales/Solution Specialist to review with government official
    • Conservation Program for microfilm
  • Preservation
  • Preservation
    • What is Hart InterCivic’s Preservation Service?
    • Hart InterCivic provides services to restore and recreate government records found in books, binders and on Maps and Plats.
    • What problems does Preservation Services solve?
    • Records Deterioration
    • Information Loss
    • Storage
    • Daily Use of Original Documents
    • Digitization Preparedness
  • Preservation
    • Common work to be done on county records includes
      • De-acidify pages
      • Filing areas of Paper Loss
      • Mend torn pages
      • Surface clean
      • Tape Removal
      • Mold and Insect Treatment
      • Removal and Replacement of Backings
      • Removal of Old Repairs
      • Stain Reduction
      • Rebinding in New County Recorder Bindings
      • Encapsulate in Mylar Archival Sleeves
      • Creating Compact Book Copies
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