Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Good presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Good presentation

98

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
98
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • {}
  • Transcript

    • 1. Example “Good Slides” for a CHI Paper Presentation Joshua B. Gross, Penn State | jgross@ist.psu.edu
    • 2. Straightforward Overview • • • • • Purpose/value statement Principles of a good slide presentation Example good slides Conclusion - good slides are a good start to a good presentation Acknowledgements
    • 3. Statement of Purpose/Value • A good presentation starts with a statement of the value of the work • Why should people care? • Why should they hear your talk? • What contribution have you made? • This information is probably in your abstract, but should be distilled for the slide
    • 4. Presenting Background Work • Don’t try to present all the background • Just one or two really crucial elements • The CHI audience is broad, so briefly describe • Examples follow • Participatory Design • The theory and practice of involving users at some or all stages of design • Semiotics • A theory of how systems of symbols (like a language) communicate ideas
    • 5. Citing Prior Work • It may be beneficial to cite prior work • It should be important and relevant • Use this style (Simon, H. A., 1975) • Often, this is used to give your audience a perspective • “Participatory design (Nardi, B. A., 1993)” is not the same as • “Participatory design (Bodker, S., 2000)”
    • 6. Visual Design • The pre-packaged Powerpoint slides are ugly. A plain background is not ugly. If you aren’t a graphic designer, don’t try to be :-) • Simple, Consistent, and Legible. • •
    • 7. Good Chart Example Frequency Follows an Inverse Log Relationship to Word Length 1 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 Word Fre que ncy 0.3 0.2 0.1 0 1 2 3 4 5 Word Length 6 7 8 9
    • 8. Presenting Data • Use simple charts/graphs, with (ideally) one main point per chart/graph • Don’t try to jam too much data in your graph • Labels x and y axis, and units • Use a title that clearly explains the idea you are trying to get across
    • 9. Alpha and Beta Teams Perform Better in the Evening, Delta and Gamma in the Morning 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 Me a n Ta s ks Comple te d Pe r Minute 4 0600 0800 1000 1200 1400 1600 1800 2000 2200 Time of Day Alpha Team Beta Team Gamma Team Delta Team
    • 10. Graphs and Charts, Part 2 • Don’t just accept defaults from Excel • Colors (including background) may need to be changed • Axis dimensions and scale can be changed • Make sure text is big enough • Move legend to where it is most useful • Make sure colors & background are visible on a projection display
    • 11. Acronyms • Acronyms are dangerous • Example: ERP • Does it mean Enterprise Resources Planner • Large-scale corporate planning software • Or does it mean Event-Related Potential • Reactions measure via electroencephalograph • Always spell out acronyms at first use • E.g. Event-Related Potential (ERP) • One safe exception - HCI!
    • 12. Slang and Colloquialisms • Avoid slang and colloquialisms if at all possible • CHI is an English-language conference • 2 billion people speak English • Lots of dialect and regionality • Make your message clear to people who speak English as a second language • Or third, or fourth…
    • 13. Future Work • You may want to talk about future work • Work you intend to do • Work you may have already done • It’s been up to six months since you submitted your paper • What direction is the work taking • What do you see as the major next hurdle or accomplishment
    • 14. Summary and Acknowledgements • Summarize your major contributions • Good slides are the basis of a good talk • Assume a broad audience at CHI • Make sure your content is readable • Stop on your summary slide - this is useful for your audience • Acknowledgements • Funding • People • Include your contact information
    • 15. Answering Questions • An advanced tip is to have a few slides ready for questions you anticipate • You won’t always have one for each question asked, and you may not use them, but they can be handy • This is a useful place to put additional/supporting data, references, etc.

    ×