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Who/Why/How YA?
Who/Why/How YA?
Who/Why/How YA?
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Who/Why/How YA?

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    • 1. Who YA? Why YA? How YA? Presented by Beth Gallaway Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
    • 2. Contact
      • Beth Gallaway
      • 603-247-3196
      • [email_address]
      • http://informationgoddess.info
      • Slides: Slideshare http://www.slideshare.net/informationgoddess29
      • Links: Delicious http://www.delicious.com/informationgoddess29/serls
    • 3. Objectives
      • Identify characteristics of the young adult demographic
      • Define why service to young adults is not just important but essential
      • Discover best practices in serving young adults
      • Draft a plan for a new service or program with teen appeal

    • 4. Teen Brain Development
      • Risk Takers
      • Consequences
      • Impulse
    • 5. Who YA?
      • Ages 12-18
      • 33 million youth
      • 11% of the population
    • 6. Millennials
      • Born with a chip?
      • Trophy kids
      • Direct
      • Smarter
      • Healthier
      • More liberal
      • More conservative
      • Well-balanced
    • 7. Millennials & Media
      • 97% play video games
      • 90% own a home computer
      • 85% spend at least an hour a day online
      • 75% have a TV in their room
      • 57% are content creators
      • 55% have a cell phone
    • 8. Gamers
      • 97% of teens play games online
      • 32% of households own a handheld gaming device
    • 9. Gamer Generation
      • Social
      • Competitive
      • Wired
      • Self-aware
      • Always On
      • Heroic
      • Multi-taskers
      • Global
      • Collaborative
      • Risk Takers
      Beck, John and Mitchell Wade. Got Game: How the Gamer Generation is Reshaping Business Forever . Harvard Business School Press, 2004.
    • 10. Platform Agnostic
    • 11. Micromedia Consumers
      • Ringtones
      • iTunes
      • Podcasts
      • Runescape
      • Twitter
      • YouTube
    • 12. Who YA Resources
      • Census http://www.census.gov
      • Millennial Generation http://www.millennialgeneration.org/
      • Pew Internet & American Life Project http://www.pewinternet.org
    • 13. Why YA?
      • Your mission statement doesn’t say “except for teens.”
      • YA Services generate lots of bang for your buck.
      • There are standards for public library service to young adults to be met
      • To fulfill library roles: lifelong learning, community center, etc.
    • 14. Why YA?
      • YALSA advocates youth services/youth participation.
      • There may not be any other place in the community for them.
      • Teens give back.
      • To foster a love of reading.
      • To build developmental assets.
      • It’s fun!
    • 15. Why YA?
      • “ They will grow up to be taxpayers
      • and library supporters.”
    • 16. Why YA?
      • Teens matter RIGHT NOW, as teens!
    • 17. Convincing your Colleagues
      • Stand on the shoulders of YALSA – use the frameworks
      • If there are not statewide standards, form a committee to write them!
      • Tell your story
        • Keep statistics
        • Get testimonials
    • 18. Convincing your Colleagues
      • Demonstrate that you are the teen expert
      • Finding allies
      • Get involved in the community
      • Get involved in the profession
      • Develop a strategic plan for YA service
    • 19. Why YA Resources
      • Census http://www.census.gov
      • Millennial Generation http://www.millennialgeneration.org/
      • Pew Internet & American Life Project http://www.pewinternet.org
    • 20. How YA
      • Services
      • Spaces
      • Collections
      • Programs
    • 21. Provide Excellent Customer Service
      • Create raving fans of the Library!
      • Say yes
      • Be consistent
      • Model behavoir
      • Listen
      • Evaluate
    • 22. Provide Excellent Reference Service
      • Do a reference interview
      • Be a strategy guide
      • Work with the schools
      • Read the newspaper
      • Evaluate
    • 23. Becoming a Strategy Guide
      • Don’t be a level boss
      • Show, don’t tell
      • Make it interactive
      • Get them started with a free-for-all
      • Ask for a demo of expertise
      • Be open-minded
    • 24. Provide Excellent Reader’s Advisory Service
      • INSTEAD OF:
      • What authors do you like to read?
      • What are the last 3 books you read and enjoyed?
      • What did you like about them?
      • ASK:
      • What movies do you like?
      • What TV shows do you watch?
      • What games do you play?
    • 25. If You Like City of Heroes
    • 26. Teen Spaces Trends
      • Teen input
      • Flexible space
      • Portable furniture
      • Café tables
      • iMacs
      • Video rockers
      • “ Teen”
      • Display shelving
      • Multimedia
      • Homework centers
    • 27. Peabody Institute Library Danvers, MA http://www.flickr.com/photos/informationgoddess29/sets/72157604161429738/
    • 28. Seekonk Public Library Seekonk, MA http://www.flickr.com/photos/informationgoddess29/sets/72157605215189280/
    • 29. Teen’Scape, LAPL Los Angelel, CA http://www.flickr.com/photos/informationgoddess29/sets/72157594561431396/
    • 30. LAPL TEEN’SCAPE LOS ANGELES, CA http://www.flickr.com/photos/informationgoddess29/sets/72157594561431396/
    • 31. Ocean County Library System Tom’s River, NJ http://www.flickr.com/photos/informationgoddess29/sets/72157600301119059/
    • 32. OCEAN COUNTY LIBRARY SYSTEM TOM’S RIVER, NJ http://www.flickr.com/photos/informationgoddess29/sets/72157600301119059/
    • 33. Farmington Public Library Farmington, CT http://www.flickr.com/photos/informationgoddess29/sets/72157604050215319/
    • 34. Farmington Public Library Farmington, CT http://www.flickr.com/photos/informationgoddess29/sets/72157604050215319/
    • 35. Collections
      • Multimedia
        • Fiction
        • Nonfiction
        • Magazines
        • Graphic Novels
        • Audio
        • Video
        • Games
      • Portability
        • MP3s
        • Playaways
    • 36. What Counts As Reading?
      • Books (fiction, nonfiction, short stories) ‏
      • Graphic Novels
      • Magazines
      • Anime Subtitles
      • CD Booklets
      • Poetry & Song/Rap Lyrics
      • Email, Chat, Websites
      • Videogaming
      • Back of the Cereal Box
      • Environmental Print
      • Reading Aloud/Being Read To/Audiobooks
    • 37. Audiobooks = literacy
      • Reading comprehension is increased
      • Listening becomes a family/group activity
      • Listening while reading along meets multiple intelligences
    • 38. Gaming = literacy
      • Environmental print
        • Signage
        • Labels
        • Maps
      • Reading about the game
        • Instructions
        • Walkthroughs
      • Writing about the game
        • Forums
        • Websites
      • Chat: “WTS, Mageweave cloth, 15g”
    • 39. Reading Online = Literacy
      • Email
      • Chat
      • Webpages
      • Fan Fiction
      • Forums
      • Tagging
      • Blogging
      • Online Classes
    • 40. BEST BOOKS, NANTUCKET ATHENEUM NANTUCKET, MA
    • 41. PRINT & NONPRINT, PEABODY INSTITUTE LIBRARY DANVERS, MA http://www.flickr.com/photos/informationgoddess29/sets/72157604161429738/
    • 42. MAGAZINES, FARMINGTON PUBLIC LIBRARY FARMINGTON, CT
    • 43. PLAYAWAYS, EVANSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY EVANSTON, IL http://eplteen.wordpress.com/tag/playaways/
    • 44. MP3S, SOUTH HUNTINGTON PUBLIC LIBRARY SOUTH HUNTINGTON, NY http://www.shpl.info/catalog_ipodmusic.asp
    • 45. Collections
      • Core Collections & YALSA Booklists
      • Collection Development on a Budget
        • Review books!
        • http://www.hiplibrariansbookblog.blog-city.com
      • 1o Tips for Getting Teens to Read
    • 46. 10 Tips for Getting Teens to Read
      • 1. Ask teens what they want to read.
      • 2. Celebrate Teen Read Week
      • 3. Develop programs that center around books, and find a way to incorporate books into programming
      • 4. Display, display, display
      • 5. Purchase a variety of genres. 
      • 6. Purchase a variety of formats, including Hi-Lo books 
      • 7. Any reading is good reading
      • 8. Make it easy for teens to get library cards
      • 9. Make reading the reward
      • 10. Use non-book formats to pique teen’s interests
    • 47. Program Planning
      • Scheduling
      • Audience
      • Budget
      • Funding
      • Approval
      • PR
      • Event
      • Evaluation
    • 48. Scheduling
      • DAY: ______ DATE: ____/____/____
      • START TIME: __:__ END TIME: __:__
        • Date checked on library calendar
        • Date checked on school calendar
        • Date checked on community calendar
      • LOCATION FOR PROGRAM: _________________________________
    • 49. Audience
      • TARGET AUDIENCE: ☐ Children ☐ YA ☐ Adult ☐ All
      •  
      • EXPECTED ATTENDANCE: ☐ Children ☐ YA ☐ Adult ☐ All
    • 50. Budget
      • Speaker’s cost (fee, travel, meals, other)
      • Supplies and equipment (materials purchases, rentals, other)
      • Staff time (programmer hours x wage, PR department hours x wage)
      • Public relations (fliers, poster, bookmarks, press releases, mail outs, postage)
      • Other costs (display books, refreshments, follow-up mailings, miscellaneous)
    • 51. Funding
      • Budget line- general revenue
      • Grant funds
      • Friends of the Library
      • Corporate sponsorship
      • Outside donations
      • Other:
    • 52. Program Approved
      • Preliminary planning should be approved at this point before proceeding any further.
      • Approved by supervisor
      • Approved by director
      • Off desk planning time approved
    • 53. PR
      • All library staff informed
      • Program information posted to library website
      • Fliers distributed to schools, community groups, businesses and other libraries
      • Media releases to local newspapers, school newspapers, radio, TV, library newsletter, blog, etc.
      • Visits to schools planned and approved
      • Book displays
      • Email or direct mailings to YAs, school and community liaisons
    • 54. Event
      • Room set-up
      • Equipment and supplies
      • Refreshments
      • Speaker’s introduction
      • Speaker’s check
      • Fliers for next program
      • Room clean up
      • Other:
    • 55. Evaluation
      • Attendance count
      • Informal evaluations
      • Formal evaluations
      • Anecdotal evidence
    • 56. What is Social Software? ajax.phpmagazine.net/2006/02/great_collection_of_web_20_log.html
    • 57. Social Software Assumptions
      • Everything is meant to be shared (“public” is the default) ‏
      • Everything is meant to be critiqued (commenting “ON” is the default) ‏
      • Everything is meant to be remixed (Creative Commons licensing is the default) ‏
    • 58. How do you feel about Social Networking sites? “ Libraries cannot afford to ignore the social networking potential to attract new, younger and more technologically interested customers.” "It's where the patrons are so we need to be visible to them-marketing, information and building community online. Not all patrons have to walk through the door. We can make connections with and serve online those patrons who, for whatever reason, won't be physically in the library." “ At this time we feel the drawbacks outweigh the benefits" “ not sure--need more info"
    • 59. Why are Social Networks so popular?
      • It’s all about ME!
      • Customizable
      • Music-heavy
      • Social
      • Meets Developmental Assets
    • 60. P E A C E F I R E http://www.peacefire.org
    • 61. What is Web 2.0?
      • Web as platform (Face Your Manga)
      • Collective intelligence (Sims OnStage)
      • Data driven (Online Summer Reading)
      • Everything is in beta (meebo)
      • Simple programming (Facebook)
      • Cross platform (Twitter)
      • Rich user experience
    • 62. Web As Platform: Face Your Manga
      • Create a digital representation of yourself
      • Use in a variety of applications
      Face Your Manga http://www.faceyourmanga.com
    • 63. Face Your Manga: Uses
      • Contest: create a personal
      • Contest: create a celebrity, author, character…
      • Internet safety session
      Face Your Manga http://www.faceyourmanga.com
    • 64. Face Your Manga Face Your Manga http://www.faceyourmanga.com
    • 65. Collective Intelligence: Sims OnStage
      • Record something: a song, a poem, a story
      • Create a slideshow to accompany your creation, with still photos or video or machinima
      • Post for contests, rating, review
      Sims OnStage http://thesimsonstage.ea.com/
    • 66. Library Relevant Uses for Sims OnStage
      • Online Contest
      • Poetry Slam
      • Joke Contest
      • Machinima Contest
      • Karaoke Contest
      • Book Review!
      Sims OnStage http://thesimsonstage.ea.com/
    • 67. Data Driven: Online Summer Reading
      • Online registration
      • Online book logs
      • Online book reviewing/rating
      MA 2008 Statewide Summer Reading Program: Wild Reads http://www.readsinMA.org
    • 68. Online Summer Reading screenshot MA 2008 Statewide Summer Reading Program: Wild Reads http://www.readsinMA.org
    • 69. Everything’s in Beta: Meebo
      • Meebo
      • http://www.meebo.com
    • 70. Meebo Me!
      • Instant Messager Aggregator
      • Cross platform
      • Icons
      • Chat Rooms
    • 71. Virtual Author Visits: Public Library
      • BeththeLibrarian : What did it take to publish the book? (That's from Brandy & Alex)
      • MBLundgren : Another good question. It took me 2 years to write it, then 6 months to find an agent, then a few days to find an editor, then months of revisions. A Loooooonnnggg process.
                       
    • 72. Virtual Author Visits: Regional Library System
      • AIM chat with MT Anderson
      • Skype Chat
      • with Ned Vizzini
      • http://www.metrowestce.org/Materials/cemeettheauthor06.html
      • audio:
      • http://ia331321.us.archive.org/1/items/BethGallaway_NedVizziniskypewithned/nedvizzini110606.mp3
    • 73. Cheshire Public Library
      • CPL Podcast
      • http://www.cheshirelib.org/teens/cplpodcast.htm
    • 74. GabCast
      • Free podcasting by phone
      • http://www.gabcast.com/
    • 75. Light Programming Facebook
      • Status Updates
      • IM
      • Email
      • Networking
      • Affinity Groups
      • Applications
      “ Facebook gives people the power to share and makes the world more open and connected.” Schmelling, Sarah. “Hamlet.” The Bard of Avon on Facebook. http://www.angelfire.com/art2/antwerplettuce/hamlet.html
    • 76. Hennepin County Library
      • HCLIB
      • http://www.facebook.com/pages/Minnetonka-MN/Hennepin-County-Library/7223112325
    • 77. Thunder Bay YAC
      • Thunder Bay Youth Advisory Council
      • http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=2317537625
    • 78. Rich User Experience Library 2.0 Night Brewster Ladies Library (MA)
    • 79. YouTube Contest Denver Public Library (CO) http://teens.denverlibrary.org/media/youtube.html
    • 80. Handheld Program
      • Cell phone clinic
      • PSP Gamefest
      • Nintendo DS Gamefest
    • 81. Wii Sports
      • Low physical impact
      • Intergenerational
        • Senior Bowling League
        • Parent/Child Golf Tournament
        • Wii Olympics
    • 82. Guitar Hero Tournament
        • Winners continue, others do free play
        • Prizes from Red Octane
    • 83. Free Play
      • North Hunterdon High School (NJ)
        • Student-run game night in the cafeteria
    • 84. RuneScape Club Glendale, AZ
    • 85. “ I LOVED DDR”
      • “ Awesome cuz everyone gets along with each other, there’s no waiting in line or nething. Plus guitar hero is wicked rad”
      “ I liked this because there’s too few of the DDR community around. This is a good opportunity to meet people with like interests.”
    • 86. Game Design
      • Ben 10 Alien Force Game Creator
        • http://gamecreator.cartoonnetwork.com/
    • 87. Carousel Brainstorming
        • Break into 4 groups
        • Come up with a program idea
        • Come up with a justification
        • Come up with a marketing plan
        • Come up with a measure of success
    • 88. Next Steps
      • Add a new service
      • Train your coworkers in customer service to teens
      • Develop a new area of the collection
      • Plan a new program
    • 89. Set a SMART Goal
      • S pecific
      • M easurable
      • A chievable
      • R ealistic
      • T imely
    • 90. Contact
      • Beth Gallaway
      • 603-247-3196
      • [email_address]
      • http://informationgoddess.info
      • Slides: Slideshare http://www.slideshare.net/informationgoddess29
      • Links: http://www.delicious.com/informationgoddess29/pittsburgh

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