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NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development
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NEFLIN: Childrens Collection Development

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  • Lists selection tools, includes weeding guidelines, and has goals within each collection
  • If you think that kids play games instead of reading, you haven’t looked at a video game lately. There is a lot of reading within the game itself. Environmental print is part of the background to many video games, in the form of signage, ads, labels and more. Chat between the players, game instructions, and information must be read on the screen for successful play. At a glance, player chat in MMOGs might look like gibberish: “WTS, Mageweave cloth, 15g” translates to “I want to sell 10 stacks of Mage Weave cloth for 15 gold pieces.” In fact, it is a whole new language, created and understood only by the residents of the space. Gamers have a whole language all their own.
  • If you think that kids play games instead of reading, you haven’t looked at a video game lately. There is a lot of reading within the game itself. Environmental print is part of the background to many video games, in the form of signage, ads, labels and more. Chat between the players, game instructions, and information must be read on the screen for successful play. At a glance, player chat in MMOGs might look like gibberish: “WTS, Mageweave cloth, 15g” translates to “I want to sell 10 stacks of Mage Weave cloth for 15 gold pieces.” In fact, it is a whole new language, created and understood only by the residents of the space. Gamers have a whole language all their own.
  • If you think that kids play games instead of reading, you haven’t looked at a video game lately. There is a lot of reading within the game itself. Environmental print is part of the background to many video games, in the form of signage, ads, labels and more. Chat between the players, game instructions, and information must be read on the screen for successful play. At a glance, player chat in MMOGs might look like gibberish: “WTS, Mageweave cloth, 15g” translates to “I want to sell 10 stacks of Mage Weave cloth for 15 gold pieces.” In fact, it is a whole new language, created and understood only by the residents of the space. Gamers have a whole language all their own.
  • REVIEWING GRAPHIC NOVELS The term "graphic novel" was coined by Will Eisner in who used it define book length stories told in comic panel format. They are unique combinations of text and artwork and like picture books, the elements should be judged for how the words and pictures work together to tell the story. The white space between the panels is meant to convey the passage of time, allowing the reader to imagine what happens in the gap, and in some ways, according to artist Scott McCloud, direct the pace of the action. In addition to considerations for TEXT covered earlier in the course (such as plot, character, setting, literary devices), consider these further questions for evaluation: Is the writing style appropriate for intended audience in terms of reading level, word choice, sentence or non-traditional text structure, clarity, length, and interpretation? Is the subject matter, concepts, and vocabulary relevant to students' ages, developmental levels, and abilities? Is the narrative true to it's genre such as fantasy, short story, etc? In addition to considerations for ILLUSTRATION and DESIGN covered earlier in the course (such as medium, style, tone), consider these further questions for evaluation: Is the cover attractive and appealing, with a clear indication of the topic/theme of the graphic novel? Are the art and text interdependent and aesthetically pleasing? Does the artist effectively use color and shading and convey mood and tone? Are the art and text appropriate and relevant to graphic format and content? Does the artist use a variety and appropriate symbolic art, such as text bubbles and graphical representations of sound effects and emotions Are the images appropriately sized and easy to see? Is white space (panels and gutters) used skillfully for effective transitions? With graphic novels, you may also want to address: What are the potential uses for the graphic novel? How does this book relate to similar titles, or the writer/artist's body of work as a whole? Is the graphic novel reasonably priced in comparison to similar books?
  • REVIEWING AUDIOBOOKS Audiobooks are the recordings of the text of a book, produced on cassette, CD or in digital format. Audioboks encompass every genre, including nonfiction. Audiobooks may be unabridged (complete) or abridged (edited or censored for length or content). They may be narrated by a single voice actor, or a full cast. In addition to literary merit (good storytelling, complete worldbuilding, strong character development), narration, sound quality, and background music and sound effects should also be considered for evaluation of audiobooks. NARRATION is the act, or process, of delivering a story. For audiobooks, narration goes beyond simply reading the text aloud. Questions for evaluation: Does the reader (or readers) have good voice quality, diction, and timing? Is the reader (or readers) believable and convincing? Does the reader (or readers) distinguish between characters by changing pitch, tone, and inflection? Are accents or dialects used and if so, are they handled authentically and consistently? Are all words, including proper nouns, locales, foreign terms, character names, and others pronounced correctly and consistently? Does the reader (or readers) avoid condescending vocal mannerisms and style and is the reading believable and convincing? Is the performance dynamic and does it reflect the expressive nature of the text? SOUND QUALITY is about the degree of good/bad of the audio output of the material. Questions for evaluation: Is the sound sharp and clear with no obvious humming, distortion, or electronic interference? Does the sound quality remain consistent throughout the recording? BACKGROUND MUSIC & SOUND EFFECTS are audio added to enhance the performance, make the story come alive, or serve are transitions. Questions for evaluation: If music and sound effects are used, do they enhance the text and support the vocal performance? Does the music represent the emotional and structural content of the text? With audiobooks novels, you may also want to address: What are the potential uses for the audiobook? How does this audiobook relate to similar titles, or the writer/artist's body of work as a whole? Is the audiobook reasonably priced in comparison to similar audiobooks? Is the audiobook delivered in sturdy quality packaging to withstand library use? If the audiobook is in a physical format, is there a replacement plan for lost or damaged cassettes or CDs?
  • Color : Pigments used to shade an illustration, in varying hues and shades. Questions for evaluation: What colors are used? How do the colors convey a mood, setting or theme? Composition : The arrangement of individual objects in a scene to form a harmonious whole. Questions for evaluation: Is the scene busy? Sparse? Static? Dynamic? How does the composition reflect story, character, theme, setting? Depth : The distance from the top downward, from the surface inward, or from front to back. Questions for evaluation: does the illustration have a flat look or a layered look? How does the artist use 3-D space? Design : In a picture book, design sets the tone for everything. It's the combination of art text and layout that bring the work together. Questions for evaluation: What is the style, size, and color of type? What type of paper is used? How large is the book? How are the type and illustrations are to be displayed on the pages available? Font : Typestyle that the book is set in. Questions for evaluation: Is it readable? Well-sized? Uniform? Fitting to the theme? Layout : The combination of text and image. Questions for evaluation: How does the layout drive the story? Is placement consistent or varied? Medium : tools used to create the illustrations, i.e. watercolors, computer animated, photography, charcoal, pastel, crayon, pencils, oils, gouache, ink, woodcuts, stencil, collage, embroidery, etc. Questions for evaluation: what medium, or combination of mediums, are employed? How proficient is the artist? How does the choice work for the theme, tone, plot? Moving parts : Architectural elements of a book. Questions for evaluation: Does the book have tabs, flaps, pop-ups, wheels to spin, holes to poke at? Are moving parts sturdy, or delicate? Paper : Wood or fiber material that the book is printed on. Questions for evaluation: Are the pages thick? Flimsy? Smooth? Glossy? Opaque? Marbled? What do the end papers look like? How do the cover and endpapers tie the book together? Perspective : The art of picturing objects as to show them as they appear to the eye with reference to relative distance or depth. Point of view : Vantage point from which the illustration is drawn. Questions for evaluation: Is the viewpoint static or varied throughout? Proportion : Comparative relation between parts to a whole. Questions for evaluation: are elements proportional? How do angles, shadows, sizing act to create the desired effect? Size : The dimensions of the images, and the proportion of the page they take up/amount of storytelling they do. Questions for evaluation: Do the illustrations grow? Shrink? Take over the page? How do they pictures relate to the amount of text? Style : The way the illustrations evoke a period or way of illustrating, from a historical or personal perspective, i.e. caricature, painterly, graphical, impressionist, pointillism. Questions for evaluation: Do the illustrations emulate a particular artist, period or style? Technique : Way of applying the medium. Texture : Structural quality of a work of art. Questions for evaluation: How is texture added to the illustration? Through style, medium, technique? Typography : the variety of fonts used in the book. Questions for evaluation: Does the type will fit the feeling of the story? Is the type set to a text width and leading that make for good readability? Does the type complement the artwork?
  • PLOT is the events that take place to tell the story. Plot drives storytelling and requires a beginning, middle and end. All elements of the story should work together to further the plot to it's resolution. Questions for evaluation: how believable is the plot? if it's unlikely, how does the author make it convincing? Are there subplots? how does the subplot work to move the main story along? STRUCTURE is the architecture of the story, and describes how the story is put together for effective telling. Questions for evaluation: Is there a format to the story? How is it organized? What devices does the author/illustrator use? NARRATIVE is the telling of the story. Questions for evaluation: How does the sequence of events unfold? Whose point of view is the story from? What is the central conflict? How well does it maintain the tension and get resolved? CHARACTERIZATION is the process of developing traits of the people in the book, presented by means of description, or through their actions, speech, or thoughts. Questions for evaluation: Does the book realistically, accurately and honestly portray the culture? How are details of appearance, action, thought, and dialogue revealed to develop the characters? Are they realistic? dynamic? consistent? How well are supporting characters developed, and what is the author's purpose in including them? Does the book contain groups that cross lines religious affiliations or sexual orientations? Is racial/cultural/ethnic/religious/gender stereotyping avoided? VOICE is the tone of the narrative. Additionally, voice can be applied to each unique character. Questions for evaluation: Is the voice authentic? Consistent? Do you believe the thoughts and actions are age-appropriate? AUTHORITY is about the credentials of the author, and does sometimes come into play in evaluating fiction writing. Questions for evaluation: Who is the author? Look for biographical information. Check the acknowledgments. What about the author's background makes him or her an authority on the theme, characters, setting? SETTING is the time and location where the events of the plot take place. In some stories, setting becomes a secondary character. Questions for evaluation: What is the setting? How does the choice of setting work to further the plot? Are details realistic, accurate (historical fic) or convincing (scifi/fantasy). THEME is the central idea of the story. Questions for evaluation: What is the story about? What is the overall idea? How do the plot, setting, and characterizations reveal the theme? Does the book foster awareness, understanding or appreciation for people who at first glance may seem different from the reader? WRITING STYLE is the way the author tells to the story to bring it to life. Questions for evaluation: Is the writing distinctive? Unique? Is the approach creative or original? Is there writing clear, flowery, complex? How are the underlying themes presented? LITERARY DEVICES are elements introduced by the author to enhance the storytelling. They include alliteration, metaphor, simile, flashback, foreshadowing, onomatopoeia, irony, etc. many of these terms are defined in the course glossary. Questions for evaluation: What literary devices does the author employ? How (well) are they used? ILLUSTRATIONS are drawings or graphics that enhance the narrative by depicting a scene from the story. Questions for evaluation: what is the medium and style of the illustrations? Are characters and events shown as described? How do the pictures enhance the story? COVER ART refers to the image and graphics on the book's jacket. It is primarily a marketing tool. Questions for evaluation: How does the cover illustration market the title to its audience? Does it convey the story within the pages? Does it authentically illustrate the characters or setting? What is the appeal factor of the cove r?
  • SCOPE Scope refers to the parameters of the subject, and speaks to the author's ambition to cover a topic, as well as the intended audience's grasp on the subject. Questions for evaluation: What is the scope of the book? Is it for the beginner with no background in the subject? ORGANIZATION In information books, it is particularly vital that there is a logical sequence to the content, and that the information is easy to access. Questions for evaluation: Is the information presented in some kind of order? Do concepts build on one another? Is there a table of contents? Is there an index? AUTHORITY The credentials of the author may indicate whether s/he is an expert on the subject. Look for biographical information, and check the acknowledgments - this is where non-experts will give thanks to the experts consulted. Questions for evaluation: What is the author's background? Who does the author cite? who does the author thank? ACCURACY Information books must contain correct, factual material that is verifiable. While use of fiction techniques (narrative, dialogue, etc) maybe used, invented details and fictional content should be avoided. Questions for evaluation: Is the information accurate and up-to-date? Is anything fabricated? Are facts sensationalized? Are scientific processes clearly and precisely presented? DOCUMENTATION Because information must be verifiable, it's important for authors to cite their sources. It's also beneficial for students to see works cited in the books they read. Undocumented information may be erroneous information. Questions for evaluation: Is there a bibliography of sources (indicating primary or secondary)? Are the sources up-to-date? Are popular or scholarly sources used? Are there lists of further reading? Are photos credited? ILLUSTRATIONS Illustrations provide information by supporting or extending the text, and may include drawings, diagrams, maps, charts, and/or photographs. Questions for discussion: What type of graphic enhancements does the book contain? How do images relate to the text? Are they merely decorative? Or do they enhance and add? Are they up to date? Clear? Accurate? Free from bias or stereotype? DESIGN Design clarifies the sequence of ideas and shows how the parts are related. Questions for evaluation: Is the appropriate size type used? Are different styles and sizes used? Why? For what purpose? How are the illustrations placed? How much white space is on the page? WRITING STYLE Style brings the subject to life. Voice is often missing from informational books. Look for creativity, vivid writing, active writing, and enthusiam. Questions for evaluation: Is there precision? Clarity? Was the approach creative or original? How are the underlying principles presented? What is the tone? Is it appropriate for the subject matter? Does the author fictionalize or anthropomorphize? BIAS Even in informational book, preferences can sneak in. Good information books maintain an objective point of view. Questions for evaluation: Are the materials free of religious and political bias? Is the presentation of controversial issues balanced and sensitive? Does there seem to be a distinct point of the view of the author or organization publishing the book? EQUITY Equity is a form of equal representation, where gender, capability and ethnic background are represented equally and without stereotypes in text and image? Questions for evaluation: Are images composed of diverse people? Is the material relevant in a wide number of geographic locations and to a wide spectrum of students from diverse backgrounds? Are suggested activities or experiments accessible to all students? VALUE Consider what makes it this book worth it's purchase price. Questions for evaluation: It is high quality? Does it have wide appeal? How does it compare with similar titles?How might this book be used? ALSC's Sibert Medal for Informational Books is awarded annually to the author(s) and illustrator(s) of the most distinguished informational book published in English during the preceding year. Reviewing the Sibert Medal terms and criteria may be helpful as you begin to look at informational books more critically. The next reading, from School Library Journal , looks at the Sibert award in more depth. YALSA's Excellence in Nonfiction for the best nonfiction book published for young adults (ages 12-18) during a November 1 – October 31 publishing year, available in English in the United States. Reviewing the Excellent in Nonfiction Policies & Procedures may also be helpful as you begin to look at information books more critically.
  • SCOPE Scope refers to the parameters of the subject, and speaks to the author's ambition to cover a topic, as well as the intended audience's grasp on the subject. Questions for evaluation: What is the scope of the book? Is it for the beginner with no background in the subject? ORGANIZATION In information books, it is particularly vital that there is a logical sequence to the content, and that the information is easy to access. Questions for evaluation: Is the information presented in some kind of order? Do concepts build on one another? Is there a table of contents? Is there an index? AUTHORITY The credentials of the author may indicate whether s/he is an expert on the subject. Look for biographical information, and check the acknowledgments - this is where non-experts will give thanks to the experts consulted. Questions for evaluation: What is the author's background? Who does the author cite? who does the author thank? ACCURACY Information books must contain correct, factual material that is verifiable. While use of fiction techniques (narrative, dialogue, etc) maybe used, invented details and fictional content should be avoided. Questions for evaluation: Is the information accurate and up-to-date? Is anything fabricated? Are facts sensationalized? Are scientific processes clearly and precisely presented? DOCUMENTATION Because information must be verifiable, it's important for authors to cite their sources. It's also beneficial for students to see works cited in the books they read. Undocumented information may be erroneous information. Questions for evaluation: Is there a bibliography of sources (indicating primary or secondary)? Are the sources up-to-date? Are popular or scholarly sources used? Are there lists of further reading? Are photos credited? ILLUSTRATIONS Illustrations provide information by supporting or extending the text, and may include drawings, diagrams, maps, charts, and/or photographs. Questions for discussion: What type of graphic enhancements does the book contain? How do images relate to the text? Are they merely decorative? Or do they enhance and add? Are they up to date? Clear? Accurate? Free from bias or stereotype? DESIGN Design clarifies the sequence of ideas and shows how the parts are related. Questions for evaluation: Is the appropriate size type used? Are different styles and sizes used? Why? For what purpose? How are the illustrations placed? How much white space is on the page? WRITING STYLE Style brings the subject to life. Voice is often missing from informational books. Look for creativity, vivid writing, active writing, and enthusiam. Questions for evaluation: Is there precision? Clarity? Was the approach creative or original? How are the underlying principles presented? What is the tone? Is it appropriate for the subject matter? Does the author fictionalize or anthropomorphize? BIAS Even in informational book, preferences can sneak in. Good information books maintain an objective point of view. Questions for evaluation: Are the materials free of religious and political bias? Is the presentation of controversial issues balanced and sensitive? Does there seem to be a distinct point of the view of the author or organization publishing the book? EQUITY Equity is a form of equal representation, where gender, capability and ethnic background are represented equally and without stereotypes in text and image? Questions for evaluation: Are images composed of diverse people? Is the material relevant in a wide number of geographic locations and to a wide spectrum of students from diverse backgrounds? Are suggested activities or experiments accessible to all students? VALUE Consider what makes it this book worth it's purchase price. Questions for evaluation: It is high quality? Does it have wide appeal? How does it compare with similar titles?How might this book be used? ALSC's Sibert Medal for Informational Books is awarded annually to the author(s) and illustrator(s) of the most distinguished informational book published in English during the preceding year. Reviewing the Sibert Medal terms and criteria may be helpful as you begin to look at informational books more critically. The next reading, from School Library Journal , looks at the Sibert award in more depth. YALSA's Excellence in Nonfiction for the best nonfiction book published for young adults (ages 12-18) during a November 1 – October 31 publishing year, available in English in the United States. Reviewing the Excellent in Nonfiction Policies & Procedures may also be helpful as you begin to look at information books more critically.
  • The library's selected service responses and resultant goals • The needs and demands of the library's community of users • The availability of more suitable material • The ability of the budget to provide funds to purchase more satisfactory items • The relationship of a particular item to others on that subject • Cooperative agreements with other libraries and the ability for patrons to use other libraries in the area • The degree to which the library serves as an archive or local history center • The possible future usefulness of a particular item • The availability of more current information on the Internet • The ability of the library to borrow the item through interlibrary loan
  • Copyright date Last checkout
  • MUSTIE in the title of this page means items should be discarded when they are M isleading, U gly, S uperseded by newer editions or better books, T rivial, I rrelevent to patron interests, easily obtained E lsewhere through interlibrary loan. Date—when was the item published? When was it added to the collection? • Author—is the author still read or likely to be read in the future? Is the book a lesser work? • Publisher—was the book self-published or published by an ‘instant’ press that may not have taken care in editing and printing? • Physical condition—are there any factors that make the item unattractive? • Additional copies—are more copies available that may be in better condition? • Other books on the same subject in the collection—if this book is discarded, what else is available? CREW: A Weeding Manual for Modern Libraries. http://www.tsl.state.tx.us/ld/pubs/crew Texas State Library and Archives Commission Page 18 of 93 • Expense of replacement—can the item be replaced? Was this an expensive item that might benefit from rebinding or refurbishing rather than replacement? • Shelf-time—how long has the item sat on the shelf without circulating? • Relevance of the subject to the community—is the material of interest to anyone in the community? For juvenile and young adult materials, also consider: • Format—paperbacks are preferred by many young adults; board books get a lot of wear in tiny hands. • Reading level—is the level too high or too easy for young patrons who would be interested in the item? • Current interest in the subject matter—are young people interested in the subject? Is the treatment of the subject engaging? • Visual appeal—are the illustrations in color? Are photographs clear? Is the layout of the book open (white space) and inviting? • Jacket art (contemporary vs. outmoded)—does the book look like something your great-grandmother read? • Use in school curricula—are books available for the grade level
  • Transcript

    • 1. COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT FOR CHILDREN Presented by Beth Gallaway for NEFLIN January 13, 2011
    • 2. OBJECTIVES <ul><li>Discuss key questions to ask in creating a collection development policy for children; </li></ul><ul><li>Share online and print selection materials and resources for children’s collections; </li></ul><ul><li>Identify criteria for selecting fiction and non-fiction for children; </li></ul><ul><li>Review CREW (Continuous Review Evaluation Weeding)/MUSTIE (Misleading, Ugly, Superceded, Trivial, Irrelevant, Elsewhere) methods for weeding the children’s collection. </li></ul>
    • 3. COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT POLICIES
    • 4. QUESTIONS TO ASK <ul><li>Who is the collection for? </li></ul><ul><li>What formats will you collect? </li></ul><ul><li>What genres will you collect? </li></ul><ul><li>What is your selection criteria? </li></ul><ul><li>What resources will you use to select? </li></ul><ul><li>Where will you purchase from? </li></ul><ul><li>Is there a donation policy? </li></ul><ul><li>How will the collection be organized? </li></ul><ul><li>Where will the collection be stored? </li></ul><ul><li>Are there security measures that need to be addressed? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the procedure for materials challenge? </li></ul>
    • 5. SAMPLE POLICIES http://www.mhl.org/about/policies/cd/formats/children.htm
    • 6. POLICY 2007 Standards for Public Library Service to Children in Massachusetts. http://www.masslib.org/yss/ServicesToChildrenFinal2007.pdf
    • 7. SAMPLES www.townofarlington.org/DocumentView.aspx?DID=263 http://www.crooklib.org/AboutUs/LibraryInformation/CollectionDevelopmentPolicy/tabid/1042/Default.aspx
    • 8. COLLECTIONS <ul><li>Multimedia </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Fiction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Nonfiction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Magazines </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Graphic Novels </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Audio </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Video </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Games </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Electronic Resources </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Portability </li></ul><ul><ul><li>MP3 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Playaway </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Digital </li></ul></ul>
    • 9. 10 TRICKS FOR GETTING CHILDREN TO UTILIZE THE COLLECTION <ul><li>Ask youth what they want to read/consume. </li></ul><ul><li>Celebrate literacy initiatives. </li></ul><ul><li>Relate materials to programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Display, display, display. </li></ul><ul><li>Purchase a variety of genres. </li></ul><ul><li>Purchase a variety of formats. </li></ul><ul><li>Any reading = good reading. </li></ul><ul><li>Make it easy to get library cards. </li></ul><ul><li>Make reading its own reward. </li></ul><ul><li>  Use non-book formats to pique interest. </li></ul>
    • 10. WHAT COUNTS AS READING? Multimedia Collections, Peabody Institute Library, Danvers MA
    • 11. AUDIOBOOKS = LITERACY <ul><li>Reading comprehension is increased </li></ul><ul><li>Listening becomes a family/group activity </li></ul><ul><li>Listening while reading along meets multiple intelligences </li></ul>
    • 12. GAMING = LITERACY <ul><li>Environmental print </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Signage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Labels </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Maps </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Reading about the game </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Instructions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Walkthroughs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Writing about the game </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Forums </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Websites </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Chat: “WTS, Mageweave cloth, 15g” </li></ul>
    • 13. READING ONLINE = LITERACY <ul><li>Email </li></ul><ul><li>Chat </li></ul><ul><li>Webpages </li></ul><ul><li>Fan Fiction </li></ul><ul><li>Forums </li></ul><ul><li>Tagging </li></ul><ul><li>Blogging </li></ul><ul><li>Online Classes </li></ul>
    • 14. DISPLAY, DISPLAY, DISPLAY Goodnow Library Sudbury MA
    • 15. SELECTION RESOURCES
    • 16. SELECTION RESOURCES IN PRINT <ul><li>Horn Book </li></ul><ul><li>School Library Journal </li></ul><ul><li>Booklist </li></ul><ul><li>Kirkus </li></ul><ul><li>Publisher’s Weekly </li></ul><ul><li>NYT </li></ul><ul><li>Other? </li></ul>
    • 17. ALSC AWARDS <ul><li>Randolph Caldecott </li></ul><ul><li>John Newbery </li></ul><ul><li>Robert F. Sibert </li></ul><ul><li>Coretta Scott King </li></ul><ul><li>Pura Belpre </li></ul><ul><li>Mildred L. Batchhelder </li></ul><ul><li>Schneider Family </li></ul><ul><li>Laura Ingalls Wilder </li></ul><ul><li>Theodore Geisel </li></ul><ul><li>Odyssey Award </li></ul>
    • 18. ALSC CHILDREN’S NOTABLES LISTS <ul><li>Great Interactive Software </li></ul><ul><li>Books </li></ul><ul><li>Recordings </li></ul><ul><li>Videos </li></ul>
    • 19. ASSESSING MATERIALS
    • 20. ASSESSING GRAPHIC NOVELS <ul><li>Art </li></ul><ul><li>Text </li></ul><ul><li>Design </li></ul>
    • 21. ASSESSING AUDIO <ul><li>Narration </li></ul><ul><li>Sound Quality </li></ul><ul><li>Background Music & Sound Effects </li></ul><ul><li>Packaging </li></ul>
    • 22. ASSESSING ILLUSTRATION <ul><li>Medium </li></ul><ul><li>Style </li></ul><ul><li>Technique </li></ul><ul><li>Composition </li></ul><ul><li>Texture </li></ul><ul><li>Font </li></ul><ul><li>Design </li></ul><ul><li>Perspective </li></ul><ul><li>Point of view </li></ul><ul><li>Color </li></ul><ul><li>Tone </li></ul><ul><li> </li></ul>
    • 23. ASSESSING FICTION
    • 24. ASSESSING NONFICTION
    • 25. ASSESSING GAMES
    • 26. BUDGET
    • 27. SAMPLE PERCENTAGES <ul><li>50% new </li></ul><ul><li>25% retro </li></ul><ul><li>25% replacement </li></ul><ul><li>33% new </li></ul><ul><li>33% retro </li></ul><ul><li>33% replacement </li></ul><ul><li>30% media </li></ul><ul><li>40% fiction </li></ul><ul><li>30% nonfiction </li></ul><ul><li>50% hardcover </li></ul><ul><li>25% pbk </li></ul><ul><li>25% media </li></ul>
    • 28. COLLECTION DEVELOPMENT ON A SHOESTRING <ul><li>Review </li></ul><ul><li>ARCs </li></ul><ul><li>Grants </li></ul><ul><li>Collective purchasing </li></ul><ul><li>Book Coops </li></ul><ul><li>Remainders </li></ul><ul><li>Amazon Wish List </li></ul>
    • 29. WEEDING
    • 30. CREW
    • 31. WHY WEED? <ul><li>Space </li></ul><ul><li>Time </li></ul><ul><li>Appealing </li></ul><ul><li>Enhances reputation </li></ul><ul><li>Keep up with collection needs </li></ul><ul><li>Constant feedback </li></ul>
    • 32. QUESTIONS TO CONSIDER <ul><li>Library mission & goals </li></ul><ul><li>Needs/demands of patrons </li></ul><ul><li>Availability of (other) materials </li></ul><ul><li>Budget </li></ul><ul><li>Potential us </li></ul><ul><li>Content </li></ul><ul><li>Appearance </li></ul><ul><li>Usage </li></ul>
    • 33. FORMULA
    • 34. WEEDING: MUSTIE
    • 35. THANK YOU! <ul><li>Slides: infogdss.wordpress.com </li></ul><ul><li>Links: delicious.com/informationgoddess29/colldev </li></ul><ul><li>Contact: informationgoddess29@gmail.com </li></ul>

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