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Mystery Reader's Advisory for Youth
 

Mystery Reader's Advisory for Youth

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Mystery Reader's Advisory for Youth

Mystery Reader's Advisory for Youth

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  • * Willingness to read widely to become familiar with genres both fiction and non-fiction. * Knowledge of patrons. * Understanding the appeal of books and the factors that affect that appeal. * Mastery of the readers’ advisory interview. * Help readers find books of interest to them. * Understand what readers are looking for. * Develop an appreciation of the role that “stories” play in their lives.
  • Pacing * Characters and plot quickly or slowly unveiled? *More dialogue or description? * Densely written? *Are sentences, paragraphs and chapters short or long? * Multiple plot lines, flashbacks, alternating chapters or linear plot? * Do characters act or react to events? * Is book end or open-end orie nted? * What is pattern of pacing? Characterization *Developed over time or immediately recognizable stereotypes? *Focus on single character or several intertwined? *Whose point of view? *Are characters most important element of book? *Is reader expected to identify with characters or to observe them? * Are there series characters, followed through and developed over several related novels? * Memorable and important secondary characters? Story line * Emphasizes people or situations and events? * What is author’s intention regarding story line? * Is focus more interior and psychological or exterior and action oriented? Frame * Is background detailed or minimal? *Does the frame affect the tone or atmosphere? * Is there a special background? from “Articulating a Book’s Appeal” in Joyce Saricks and Nancy Brown, Readers’ Advisory Service in the Public Library. 2nd ed. Chicago : ALA , 1997. Language Is the language appealing? Is the writing engaging? Is dialogue true to character? Setting How does time and place fit in? Is worldbuilding complete? Are historical details accurate?
  • The readers’ advisory interview uses the same welcoming behaviors as the reference interview. Approachability is the key. Use appropriate body language and make sure patrons understand you have time to talk books and reading with them. The open question varies in the readers’ advisory interview from the reference interview. In the readers’ advisory interview, you are trying to engage the patron in a conversation that elicits a broad set of information about their reading interests and habits. The two phrases you can use are: “ Tell me about a book you read that you really enjoyed.” “ Tell me the story of the last book you enjoyed.” These will elicit the information you need from the patron to appropriately suggest books that match their needs and interests. Here are some categories to watch for as you try to gauge and match their interests. * Genre: Does the patron enjoy mysteries, biographies, or romance novels? * Setting: Where is the story set? One city or around the world? Outdoors? * Time: When is the story taking place? Past, present, future? * Length: Does the patron like short stories or epic novels? * Hero: Is the main character innocent or sophisticated? One hero or many? * Plot: Does the story have a point? A definite beginning and end? * Pacing: Does the author move the story with action or dialogue? * Subject: What or who is the book ultimately about? Readers enjoy books for many reasons. Some become connected to a particular type of story or genre. Some enjoy one genre, such as mysteries, but only if they are set in a particular country, such as English mysteries. They may need a particular setting, such as mountains or small towns, or need a particular subject in the background, such as horseracing, to pique their interest. Almost all readers go through periods of change in their reading habits as they move through life. Assuming that your regular patrons only want one type of reading material year after year limits them and you in achieving their reading goals. Some of the best ways to improve your skills in readers’ advisory are to keep a record of your own reading, browse the new book shelves and best seller lists regularly, and set a goal of doing at least one readers’ advisory interview each reference shift. Hints and Tips for Readers’ Advisory * Browse with the patron – be among the books as you move along in the readers’ advisory interview to allow them time to look over new materials. * Find the common thread in their reading habits and don’t be afraid to suggest books outside their normal genre or subject if you see a connection. * SUGGEST books, don’t recommend. Recommending books means that you are endorsing them, or creating the illusion that you know a “good” book from a “bad” book. When you suggest, you are letting the patron make a choice without feeling pressure from the “expert.” * Let the patron say “No” and don’t feel like a failure when they do. When a patron doesn’t like a particular suggestion, you can gain valuable information. * Watch for easily misunderstood phrases like “good literature” or “classics.” Some readers think Stephen King is a classic writer, while others will disdain any popular author. * Use a follow up question like “Be sure to let us know how you liked the book." or "Are there any other books I can help you find." Key Behaviors * Talk books at the reference desk with other staff so patrons can feel comfortable asking for help. Patrons will hear you and respond with questions of their own. * Be prepared for a discussion and for personal questions – Remember, in these cases the patron is not your friend, but your customer. However, there is more of a social connection with reading, especially for pleasure, than with searching for information, so be prepared to have patrons ask about your reading habits. A general response like “I enjoy all types of books, that’s why I work in a library. Let’s see if we can find something for you” is usually effective. * Use displays for attracting attention (new books, genres, formats). * Be VERY careful when suggesting books in a series. Some patrons love series, and some do not. Make sure if you are suggesting the first book in a trilogy that you tell the patron about the series. Or, if you suggest a book out of order in a series, make sure the patron knows how it fits into the larger series. Some series books can be read in any order, and some need sequence in order to make sense. * Encourage patrons to select more than one book. Patrons usually need several choices once they get home to make sure they have a successful reading experience. Choosing more than one item will encourage them to experiment. The key to successful readers’ advisory services is to have a commitment to serving readers in the library. A responsive attitude and maintaining a neutral stance on the “quality” of an individual’s reading habits will encourage good readers’ advisory interviews. Be aware of popular titles and hot topics, and understand that there are many tools to help you along the way.
  • The readers’ advisory interview uses the same welcoming behaviors as the reference interview. Approachability is the key. Use appropriate body language and make sure patrons understand you have time to talk books and reading with them. The open question varies in the readers’ advisory interview from the reference interview. In the readers’ advisory interview, you are trying to engage the patron in a conversation that elicits a broad set of information about their reading interests and habits. The two phrases you can use are: “ Tell me about a book you read that you really enjoyed.” “ Tell me the story of the last book you enjoyed.” These will elicit the information you need from the patron to appropriately suggest books that match their needs and interests. Here are some categories to watch for as you try to gauge and match their interests. * Genre: Does the patron enjoy mysteries, biographies, or romance novels? * Setting: Where is the story set? One city or around the world? Outdoors? * Time: When is the story taking place? Past, present, future? * Length: Does the patron like short stories or epic novels? * Hero: Is the main character innocent or sophisticated? One hero or many? * Plot: Does the story have a point? A definite beginning and end? * Pacing: Does the author move the story with action or dialogue? * Subject: What or who is the book ultimately about? Readers enjoy books for many reasons. Some become connected to a particular type of story or genre. Some enjoy one genre, such as mysteries, but only if they are set in a particular country, such as English mysteries. They may need a particular setting, such as mountains or small towns, or need a particular subject in the background, such as horseracing, to pique their interest. Almost all readers go through periods of change in their reading habits as they move through life. Assuming that your regular patrons only want one type of reading material year after year limits them and you in achieving their reading goals. Some of the best ways to improve your skills in readers’ advisory are to keep a record of your own reading, browse the new book shelves and best seller lists regularly, and set a goal of doing at least one readers’ advisory interview each reference shift. Hints and Tips for Readers’ Advisory * Browse with the patron – be among the books as you move along in the readers’ advisory interview to allow them time to look over new materials. * Find the common thread in their reading habits and don’t be afraid to suggest books outside their normal genre or subject if you see a connection. * SUGGEST books, don’t recommend. Recommending books means that you are endorsing them, or creating the illusion that you know a “good” book from a “bad” book. When you suggest, you are letting the patron make a choice without feeling pressure from the “expert.” * Let the patron say “No” and don’t feel like a failure when they do. When a patron doesn’t like a particular suggestion, you can gain valuable information. * Watch for easily misunderstood phrases like “good literature” or “classics.” Some readers think Stephen King is a classic writer, while others will disdain any popular author. * Use a follow up question like “Be sure to let us know how you liked the book." or "Are there any other books I can help you find." Key Behaviors * Talk books at the reference desk with other staff so patrons can feel comfortable asking for help. Patrons will hear you and respond with questions of their own. * Be prepared for a discussion and for personal questions – Remember, in these cases the patron is not your friend, but your customer. However, there is more of a social connection with reading, especially for pleasure, than with searching for information, so be prepared to have patrons ask about your reading habits. A general response like “I enjoy all types of books, that’s why I work in a library. Let’s see if we can find something for you” is usually effective. * Use displays for attracting attention (new books, genres, formats). * Be VERY careful when suggesting books in a series. Some patrons love series, and some do not. Make sure if you are suggesting the first book in a trilogy that you tell the patron about the series. Or, if you suggest a book out of order in a series, make sure the patron knows how it fits into the larger series. Some series books can be read in any order, and some need sequence in order to make sense. * Encourage patrons to select more than one book. Patrons usually need several choices once they get home to make sure they have a successful reading experience. Choosing more than one item will encourage them to experiment. The key to successful readers’ advisory services is to have a commitment to serving readers in the library. A responsive attitude and maintaining a neutral stance on the “quality” of an individual’s reading habits will encourage good readers’ advisory interviews. Be aware of popular titles and hot topics, and understand that there are many tools to help you along the way.
  • A mystery is a work of fiction about a puzzling event or crime.
  • Mystery helps children develop cognitive thinking skills. They are perfect for teaching study skills for critical reading, such as cause-and-effect, logical deduction, and assessing vital information and facts. Mystery stories are rooted in trying to make sense of the world.
  • 1. Puzzles: A puzzle to solve is the heart of the mystery genre. Sometimes it’s a missing object or person, sometimes it’s a crime, and sometimes it’s a supernatural element. The conflict created by the puzzle can’t be too easy – or too difficult – to solve.   2. Special character types: The detective or sleuth is at the heart of most mysteries. They investigate a wrongdoing to a victim, and are often accompanied by a sidekick. Holmes has his Watson; Cam Jansen has ; Milo has Jazz. 3. Curiosity: Without a desire to seek the truth, a willingness to do research, and a thirst for adventure, the sleuth wouldn’t embark on his or her investigation. 4. Clues. Clues are evidence or hints, discovered or pieces together by the sleuth and his or her sidekick, to solve the mystery. 5. Red herring: a red herring is a character or clue that the author inserts to throw the reader off the trail of figuring out the mystery. A red herring leads to a dead end. 6. Setting: mystery can take place in a historical or fantasy or sci-fi setting. Many series are location based, or set in another time period. 7. Supernatural elements: Some mysteries attempt to explain the unexplained through science, or take a fantastical or horrific turn to add drama, thrills and suspense.
  • well constructed plot convincing characterization worthwhile theme appropriate style how does the author make it believable (grounded in reality 1st? careful attention to detail? character who mirrors the reader’s disbelief? appropriate language?) consistency of the storyline (logical framework and internal consistency) creative and ingenious plots Is there a universal truth underlying the metaphor? How does it compare to other books by the same author or of the same kind?
  • Benchmark Book: The House With A Clock In Its Walls – John Bellairs (gr. 4-7) Newly orphaned Lewis Barnavelt moves in with his mysterious uncle Jonathan, a mediocre, though well-intentioned, wizard. Uncle Jonathan's house was previously owned by Isaac and Selenna Izard, a sinister couple who had dedicated their lives to evil magic, and plotted to bring about the end of the world. Before dying, Isaac constructed the titular clock which he hid somewhere inside the walls of the house, where it eternally ticks, still attempting to pull the world into the magical alignment which would permit him to destroy it. Lewis’s effort to impress a new friend with magic backfires, releasing Selenna from her tomb, intent on finishing her husband's work and bringing on Doomsday. Others: Gilda Joyce, Psychic Investigator * – Jennifer Allison (gr. 5-7) After wrangling an invitation to visit San Francisco relatives, Gilda discovers just how much her dreary, tight-lipped uncle and his strange, delicate daughter need her help to uncover the terrible family secret that has a tortured ghost stalking their home. ghost of a drowned girl to wander the hallways at her private school, an unusual haunting in England, and a strange experience in the International Spy Museum in Washington, DC. Kneeknock Rise – Natalie Babbitt (gr. 4-6) From the moment young Egan arrives in Instep for the annual fair, he is entranced by the fable surrounding the misty peak of Kneeknock Rise: on stormy nights when the rain drives harsh and cold, an undiscovered creature raises its voice and moans. Nobody knows what it is—nobody has ever dared to try to find out and come back again. Before long, Egan is climbing the Rise to find an answer to the mystery. Secret of the Painted House – Marion Bauer (gr. 3-5) When Emily finds a locked playhouse in the woods, she can't resist peeking through the windows. Inside, the walls are painted to look just like the surrounding woods, right down to an identical white playhouse with blue shutters. But the playhouse is not as deserted as Emily first thought. A girl Emily's age lives on the painted walls—and she's dying for Emily to join her! She gets trapped, and she and her brother must work out a umber of puzzles to escape. Vampires Don’t Wear Polka Dots * - Debbie Dadey (gr 3-5) There are some pretty weird grown-ups living in Bailey City. But could the new third grade teacher from the Transylvania Alps really be a vampire? The sleuthing 3 rd graders have a whole series worth – over 50 titles! -- of creepy, campy supernatural mysteries to uncover, that include mummies, ghosts, dragons, and the abominable snowman. Bunnicula * - James Howe (gr 3-5) Chester the cat convinces Harold the dog that the newest addition to the family’s menagerie is a vampiric bunny in this funny mystery. The Crossroads – Chris Grabenstein (gr 5-8) Multiple hauntings abound in this story of Zack, a young man who sees the face of a man in a tree at a crossroads where numerous motorists have died. When lightning strikes the tree, the ghosts are set free. Both psychological thriller and “rip-roaring” ghost story. Sweet Miss Honeywell’s Revenge – Kathryn Reiss (gr 4-7) Zibby Thorne doesn't know what possessed her to buy an antique dollhouse--she doesn't even like dolls. But when her friends and family start having bizarre accidents clearly connected to the dollhouse, she can't ignore the menacing structure any longer. A parallel tale sheds light on the mystery. The Ink Drinker – Eric Sanvoisin (gr 3-6) A bookseller’s son solves the mystery of a vampire who drains the ink from books. The Ghost, The White House, and Me – Judith St. George (gr 3-6) Shortly after their mother takes the office of president, KayKay Granger and her sister begin to investigate their suspicion that Abraham Lincoln's ghost is haunting the White House and begin to investigate. Incorporates historical details. Marvelous Marvin and the Wolfman Mystery – Melissa Sweet (gr 3-5) Martin is sure his neighbor is a werewolf. Aided by his twin sister, Sarah, the karate expert, and a former bully/new friend, Marvin snoops for clues, stumbles upon some real crooks, and almost messes things up for the undercover detective at work on the case. The Mysterious Matter of I.M. Fine – Diane Stanley (gr 4-6) Kids all over the country are acting strangely after reading the latest books in the mega-popular Chillers series: a book about ghosts causes kids to think they see ghosts, while another about snakes causes its readers to act like snakes. Franny is convinced that I. M. Fine, author of the Chillers books, is behind it, and sets out to investigate in this humorous and suspenseful tale. A Message From The Match Girl – Janet Taylor Lisle (gr 3-6) Georgina and Poco try to help their friend Walter who is suffering from an identity crisis and receiving strange messages from his dead mother at the statue of the Little Match Girl in Andersen Park.
  • Kid Detective Benchmark Book: Room One: A Mystery or Two – Andrew Clements (gr. 4-6) Mystery upon mystery abounds in this tale of a young small-town detective who wants to save both his school and the family he discovers living in an abandoned farmhouse. Others: Cam Jansen – The Snowy Day Mystery * - David Adler (gr. 2-5) Cam Jansen, a smart curious girl with a photographic memory, stars in this series for beginning readers. In this story, three computers have been stolen from the computer lab, and the only clues are some footprints in the snow outside and a locked window. Who Stole The Wizard of Oz? – Avi (gr. 4-6) A rare edition of The Wizard of Oz goes missing from the local library. When Becky is accused of stealing it, she and her twin brother Toby set out to catch the real thief and prove her innocence. Clues cleverly hidden in four other books lead to a hidden treasure--and a gripping adventure. Half-Moon Investigations – Eion Colfer (gr. 4-6) 12-year old Fletcher, the youngest Internet certified detective in the world is retained by Ms. April Devereux to find a lock of celebrity hair that was stolen from her playhouse. During the course of the investigation, he gets attacked, accused of arson, and teams up with a boy from a criminal family. Eat Your Poison, Dear* - James Howe (gr. 4-6) No one likes school lunch. After eating the cafeteria food, kids at the middle school are dropping like flies, and Sebastian Barth suspects poison behind the epidemic. The trouble is, too many cooks have had the chance to spoil the stew. Other titles in the series involve strange happenings at the theatre, and a ghost. The Tower Treasure * - Franklin W. Dixon (gr. 4-6) In this first in the classic Hardy Boys series, brothers Frank and Joe are in the midst of trying to track down a stolen car for a friend, when they suddenly find themselves embroiled in a jewel theft at the Tower Mansion. A friend’s father is a suspect, and the boys join with their dad in the effort to bring the right man to justice. The Secret of the Old Clock* - Carolyn Keene (gr. 4-6) The first in the classic Nancy Drew mystery series, the motherless titan haired teen sleuth Nancy accidentally stumbles upon the mystery of Josiah Crowley's missing will. Nancy is intrigued by the debate over whom the estate belongs to and begins searching for Crowley's missing antique clock that contains a clue to the location or the real will. Of course, the clock gets stolen, but Nancy is on the trail. From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler – E.L. Konigsburg (gr. 4-6) Claudia and her brother James run away to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where they live undetected for a week before becoming involved in a quest to determine if the new angel sculpture on exhibit was really crafted by Michelangelo, tracking down the original owner for clues. The Mystery of the Freedom Trail * - Carole Marsh (gr. 3-6) When their schoolteacher cousin disappears in the middle of running the Boston Marathon, four kids wind their way through the perilous maze of Boston streets along the Freedom Trail to discover what happened! Other titles in the series revolve around the Alamo, the White House, Disney World; 34 locations in total. The Case of the Stinky Socks* - Lewis B. Montgomery (gr. 1-4) In the first volume in this early chapter-book mystery series, Milo reluctantly teams up with classmate Jasmyne to find her older brother’s missing lucky socks. The Case of Hermie the Missing Hamster – James Preller (gr. 2-4) When Wingnut's hamster goes missing, Jigsaw Jones and his partner, Mila, are on the case. Other adventures in the series include ghostly noises at a sleepover and a missing coin. Jacob Two-Two’s First Spy Case – Mordecai Richler (gr. 3-5) Eight-year-old Jacob Two-Two enlists the aid of his new neighbor, master spy X. Barnaby Dinglebat, when I. M. Greedyguts, the new headmaster at his school, makes the lives of the students miserable. Clever writing, magic tricks and “zippy dialogue” make for a fun read. The Absent Author * - Ron Roy (gr. 3-5) En route to an author visit, a mystery writer goes missing! The police think he just missed his plane, but Dink suspects foul play. It's up to Dink and his two best friends, Josh and Ruth Rose, to find Wallis Wallace--before it's too late!   The Case of the Missing Marquess * - Nancy Springer (gr. 4-8) When Enola Holmes, sister to the detective Sherlock Holmes, discovers her mother has disappeared, she quickly embarks on a journey to London in search of her. When she arrives, she finds herself involved in the kidnapping of a young marquess, fleeing murderous villains, and trying to elude her shrewd older brothers - all while attempting to piece together clues to her mother's strange disappearance. Sammy Keyes and the Skeleton Man* – Wendelin Van Draanen (gr. 5-8) While trick-or-treating, Sammy and her friends interrupt a mugging and burglary by a skeleton-costumed assailant and throughout the course of the novel, prove the identity of the burglar, recover the missing first editions, and reunite the estranged owners of the Bush House.
  • May 20, 2010 Discussion Suspense/Thriller Benchmark Book: Scared Stiff – Willo Davis Roberts (gr. 4-6) When their mother disappears, two brothers decide to investigate some suspicious going-on at an abandoned amusement park. Others: Murder at Midnight – Avi A magician and his boy become scapegoats when a plot to overthrow the king is discovered in this humorous mystery. The Dark Stairs* - Betsy Byars (gr. 5-7) A modern Nancy Drew born to a PI mom and a PO dad, Herculeah Jones investigates an abandoned estate and discovers a dead body. Other adventures in the series focus on murder. Assassin* – Grace Cavendish (gr. 5-7) 13 year old lady-in-waiting Grace solves mysteries that are turning the court upside down in this historical series. The Diamond of Drury Lane* – Julia Golding (gr. 4-6) An orphan living at the famous London theatre promises to safeguard the owner’s hidden diamond from a cast of 18 th century characters. Kidnapped - Book One: The Abduction* - Gordon Korman (gr. 4-6) 11 year old Meg is abducted on her way home from school. Her older brother Aiden works with the FBI to find her and deliver the ransom money. Eye of the Crow – Shane Peacock (gr. 4-7) When 13 year old misfit Sherlock Holmes investigates a sensational murder to see if he can solve it, he finds himself the accused--and in mid-nineteenth century London, they hang boys of thirteen… The 39 Clues - The Maze of Bones* – Rick Riordan (gr. 4-7) Relatives arrive from all over the world by special invitation for Grandmother Grace’s funeral, and the reading of her last will and testament, in which she issues a challenge: The first team to successfully put together 39 clues that are scattered across the world will discover the secret of Cahill power and become the richest, most important people in history – or, take one million dollars in cash right now and walk away. The View From the Cherry Tree – Willo Davis Roberts (gr. 4-6) A boy witnesses a murder from his perch in a cherry tree, but when he tells his preoccupied family, no one will believe him. Canned – Alex Shearer (gr. 4-6) In this gruesomely humorous tale, a boy who collects unlabeled cans from supermarkets discovers gross contents. Secret of the Three Treasures – Janni Lee Simner (gr. 3-6) In this melodramatic genealogical mystery, Tiernay West sets off to uncover the rumor of Revolutionary War gold buried in their Connecticut town. The Bones in the Cliff – James Stevenson (gr. 4-6) Pete and his alcoholic father are on the run, but Pete isn’t quite sure why – all he knows is he is supposed to be on the lookout for a man pursuing them who may arrive on the island ferry .
  • You-Solve-It Benchmark Book: Meg Mackintosh and the Mystery In The Locked Library – Lucinda Landon (gr. 3-5) Meg investigates the theft of a rare book from a locked library. Visual clues hidden in different places in the library challenge the reader to solve the mystery before Meg. Others: The Puzzling World of Winston Breen* – Eric Berlin (gr. 4-6) Puzzle fan Winston Breen is stumped when sister uncovers mysterious strips of wood with words and letters on them. Soon the whole family—and some friends—are caught up in the mystery and off on a scavenger hunt that just may lead to a ring worth thousands of dollars! The novel is filled with puzzles for the reader to solve. The Curse of the Ancient Mask and Other Case Files – Simon Cheshire (gr. ) The reader is the sidekick in this first collection of 3 stories in which a boy whose dad is a crime novel fan turns into a “schoolyard sleuth” in cases ranging from cursed masks, sabotaged homework and stolen jewelry. Kids’ Whodunits: Catch the Clues! – Hy Conrad (gr. 4-6) Jonah Bixby, son of a deceased detective, is taken under wing by the local police offices, where he picks up enough skills to become an amateur sleuth himself. Jonah solves a number of mysteries involving missing objects, jewel thefts and art heists, even murder. Case Closed? 40 Mini-Mysteries for You To Solve – Jurg Obrist (gr. 2-5) Short mysteries just a few paragraphs in length are augmented by visual clues. The Westing Game – Ellen Raskin (gr. 4-6) Eccentric Sam Westing has been murdered by a would be heir – whoever solves the mystery of his death inherits millions. Full of plot twists, puzzles, and a surprise ending. Encyclopedia Brown, Super Sleuth* - Donald J Sobol (gr. 2-5) Smart cookie Encyclopedia Brown and his sidekick Sally solve a number of mysteries in their neighborhood. These 2-3 page mysteries are a short read. Two-Minute Mysteries* - Donald J. Sobol (gr. 4-6) Clever mysteries are easily solvable for older readers who can read between the lines. The Mystery of Dead Man’s Curve* - Laura Williams (gr. 4-6) Jen and Zeke are on the case to discover why someone is is trying to scare away all of the guests at the Mystic Lighthouse Bed and Breakfast.
  • In this role playing exercise, break up into groups of three groups of three. Assign each group a franchise and ask them to: Identify appeal characteristics and suggest titles that might match an appeal characteristic

Mystery Reader's Advisory for Youth Mystery Reader's Advisory for Youth Presentation Transcript

  • INTRODUCTION TO MYSTERY FOR CHILDREN Funding provided through an IMLS/LSTA grant administered by the MA Board of Library Commissioners; additional funding is provided by the Friends of the Boxford Town Libraries.
  • READER’S ADVISORY RECAP
    • Finding the right book for the right person at the right time.
    • Helping readers find the best (most enjoyable!) reading that matches their needs, interests, and reading level.
    • Connecting readers and authors/writers.
    Source: Francisca Goldsmith, from Reader’s Advisory on the Web, an Infopeople Training http://infopeople.org/training/past/2004/readers_adv2004/
  • APPEAL FACTORS OF BOOKS
    • Pacing
    • Characterization
    • Storyline
    • Frame
    • Language
    • Setting
    Source: Saricks, Joyce and Nancy Brown. “Articulating a Book’s Appeal.” Readers’ Advisory Service in the Public Library. 2nd ed. Chicago : ALA , 1997. Nancy Pearl, MLA
  • REFERENCE INTERVIEW ESSENTIALS
    • Discover what the reader already knows
      • desire for a genre?
      • a mood?
      • a read-alike?
    • Clarify what’s important to this reader
      • stay with the known?
      • meet the unknown?
    • Tune your suggestions to the patron, not to your personal biases
    • Give direction to next place to go
      • shelf?
      • booklists?
      • Internet?
      • alternate library?
    Source: Francisca Goldsmith, from Reader’s Advisory on the Web, an Infopeople Training http://infopeople.org/training/past/2004/readers_adv2004/
  • REFERENCE INTERVIEW TECHNIQUES
    • Welcoming body language, tone, attitude
    • Open ended questions
    • Suggest, don’t recommend
    • Co-browse
    • Don’t judge
    • Follow up!
  • ROLE PLAY!
    • In these scenarios, you don’t need to have specific books for an answer. Just practice asking open ended questions and having a conversation about books!
    • Group 1: A student comes up to you and says, “I just finished the Sammy Keyes books! Is there another series like that I can read?”
    • Group 2: A child comes to you and says, “How can I find all of Donald J. Sobol’s books?”
    • Group 3: A student says, “I have to do a book report on a mystery book. Can you suggest something?”
  • MYSTERY GENRE OVERVIEW
    • "Often, even for reluctant readers, the short, chapter, mystery-based book is the key that turns the lock of turning children on to reading!”
    • ~Carole Marsh
  • MYSTERY MOTIFS
    • Puzzles
    • Special character types
    • Curiosity
    • Clues
    • Red herring
    • Setting
    • Supernatural elements
  • EVALUATING MYSTERY
    • Plot
    • Character
    • Theme
    • Style
    • Believability
    • Consistency
    • Creativity
  • 4 TYPES OF MYSTERY FOR YOUTH
    • Supernatural
    • Kid Detective
    • Suspense/Thriller
    • You Solve It
  • SUPERNATURAL MARCH 18, 2010
  • KID DETECTIVE APRIL 15, 2010
  • SUSPENSE/THRILLER MAY 20, 2010
  • YOU SOLVE IT JUNE 24, 2010
  • TIP: USE MEDIA AS A PROMPT
    • INSTEAD OF:
    • What authors do you like to read?
    • What are the last 3 books you read and enjoyed?
    • What did you like about them?
    • ASK:
    • What movies do you like?
    • What TV shows do you watch?
    • What games do you play?
  • TIP: TURN TO AWARDS
    • Edgar Award http://theedgars.com/
    • Newbery Award http://bit.ly/newbery
  • YOUR TURN!
    • In this exercise, break up into groups of three groups of three.
    • Each group is assigned a franchise
    • Identify appeal characteristics of the franchise, and suggest titles that might be appealing to a fan of the franchise
      • Group 1: Scooby-Do
      • Group 2: Inspector Gadget
      • Group 3: Mystery Hunters
  • QUESTIONS? CONCERNS? Beth Gallaway [email_address] http://informationgoddess.info