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  • 1. Gaming and the New Literacy Beth Gallaway informationgoddess29@gmail.com Canadian Library Association Conference May 2007
  • 2. What is a Game? GAME: activity engaged in for diversion or amusement; synonym: see FUN VIDEO GAME: an electronic game played by means of images on a video screen and often emphasizing fast action Merriam-Webster Online. http://www.m-w.com
  • 3. Ways to Play Video Games • At an Arcade • On a PC or Mac • On a Plug ‘n’ Play Device • On a Mobile Device • On a Handheld Device • On a Console
  • 4. Console Gaming Devices 9.77 million 7.36 million 3.32 million http://www.vgcharts.org
  • 5. Handheld Gaming Devices 21.24 million 42.70 million http://www.vgcharts.org
  • 6. Why Games at the Library? Games … • Are the medium of choice for the millennial generation • Are educational and recreational • Meet developmental needs of teens • Reinforce new literacies
  • 7. Does This Sound Like Any Gamers You Know? • Social • Heroic • Competitive • Multi-taskers • Wired • Global • Self-aware • Collaborative • Always On • Risk Takers Beck, John and Mitchell Wade. Got Game: How the Gamer Generation is Reshaping Business Forever. Harvard Business School Press, 2004.
  • 8. Learning Principles in Games* • Risk –taking in a “safe” environment • Rewards practice • Use of affinity groups • Probing cycles • Situated meaning • Self-knowledge • Identity formation *** Gee, James Paul. What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy. Palgrave McMillan, 2003
  • 9. Gaming Meets Developmental Needs of Young Adolescents Positive social interaction with adults & peers • Structure and clear limits • Physical activity • Creative expression • Competence and achievement • Meaningful participation in families, school, • communities • Opportunities for self-definition NMSA. NMSA Research Summaries. Young Adolescents Developmental Needs (1996) http://www.nmsa.org/Research/ResearchSummaries/Summary5/tabid/257/Default.aspx
  • 10. How much money did computer & video game sales gross in 2005?* $7 Billion * Entertainment Software Association. Top 10 Facts. http://www.theesa.com/facts/top_10_facts.php
  • 11. What is the average age of the gamer?* 33 * Entertainment Software Association. Top 10 Facts. http://www.theesa.com/facts/top_10_facts.php 28 December 2006
  • 12. What percentage of teens report playing games online**? 81 % ** Pew Internet & American Life Project. Teens and Technology, July 2005.
  • 13. What percentage of games sold in 2005 were rated M for Mature? 15% * Entertainment Software Association. Top 10 Facts. http://www.theesa.com/facts/top_10_facts.php
  • 14. Ratings The Entertainment Software Ratings Board (ESRB) is a self-regulating body established by the Entertainment Software Association (ESA). ESRB applies and enforces game ratings, advertising and online privacy principles. http://www.esrb.org
  • 15. Gaming = literacy • Environmental print – signage – labels – maps • Reading about the game – instructions – walkthroughs • Writing about the game – forums – websites • Chat: – “WTS, Mageweave cloth, 15g”
  • 16. “Leet” & 4 // 3 I2 5 GAMERS
  • 17. Gaming Reinforces New Literacies • Exposing knowledge • Employing information • Expressing ideas compellingly • Ethics on the Internet Warlick, David. ”The New Literacies.” TechLearning. Mar-Apr2005 http://www.techlearning.com/story/showArticle.php?articleID=47102021
  • 18. 1. Exposing Knowledge • Find information • Understand and explain found information regardless of its format • Evaluate information • Organize information
  • 19. 2. Employing Information • Computation • Measurement • Analysis • Application
  • 20. 3. Expressing Ideas Compellingly • Mechanics matter • Creativity & efficiency highly rated • Text, images, audio, and video are used to express ideas in many digital formats
  • 21. Ways Gamers Express Ideas Compellingly • Fan Fiction • Machinima • Web Comics • Fan Forums • Clan Websites
  • 22. Ethics on the Internet • Modding – recreating game content • FanFic – writing stories about characters created/owner by someone else • Machina – films/videos created through recording video game play
  • 23. Reader’s Advisory to Gamers INSTEAD OF: • What authors do you like to read? • What are the last 3 books you read and enjoyed? • What did you like about them? ASK: • What movies do you like? • What TV shows do you watch? • What games do you play?
  • 24. Reader’s Advisory to Gamers −>
  • 25. Roleplaying/MMORPG Games • Games: – Everquest – Runescape – World of Warcraft – Dark Age of Camelot – Ultima • Characteristics – epic fantasy setting – good vs. evil theme • Suggest?
  • 26. Historical Sim Games • Games: – Civilization – Caesar – Age of Empires – Oregon Trail – America’s Army • Characteristics – Simulation elements – Historical setting – Alternative history possibility • Suggest?
  • 27. Sports Games • Games: – Madden Football – NBA Street – Need for Speed – Tiger Woods – Golf • Characteristics – Sports theme – Competition • Suggest?
  • 28. Strategy & Puzzle Games • Games: – Myst – Tetris – Bejeweled – Where in the World is Carmen San Diego? • Characteristics: – Problem to solve – Logic, math, reasoning • Suggest?
  • 29. First Person Shooters (FPS) • Games: – Doom – Quake – Halo • Characteristics – Warfare – Strategy – Violent • Suggest?
  • 30. Simulations • Games: – The Sims – The Urbz • Characteristics: – Character driven • Suggest?
  • 31. Japanese/Manga tie-in • Games: – Katamari Damacy – Final Fantasy – Dragonball Z – Pokemon • Characteristics – Anime style – Japanese culture • Suggest?
  • 32. Superhero Games • Games: – Spider-Man – Fantastic Four – City of Heros • Characteristics – Heroes/villains setting – Good vs. evil theme – Film tie-ins • Suggest?
  • 33. Don’t Forget Print Resources for Gamers 1. Magazines 2. Strategy guides 3. Nonfiction about gaming 4. Fiction with gaming as a plot or subplot
  • 34. Video Game Culture • Watch Red Vs. Blue • Read Penny Acade • Read PvP • Set a Google Alert • Subscribe to a gaming podcast or blog • Skim gaming magazines • Pay attention to gaming around you in public spaces • Try some games yourself!
  • 35. More Ways to Immerse! • Join the LibGaming Google Group – Email discussion for gaming in libraries • Game On! Video Games in Libraries blog – Blog about gaming news of interest to libraries • Join YALSA and the Teen Gaming Interest Group – YALSA interest group dedicated to gaming • Celebrate Teen Tech Week – Annual celebration of teens + technology in libraries, March 2008
  • 36. Game Policy Questions • Who is the collection for? • What formats will you collect? • What genres will you collect? • What is your selection criteria? • What resources will you use to select? • Where will you purchase from? • Is there a donation policy? • How will the collection be classified/cataloged? • Where will the collection be stored? • How will it be displayed? • What security measures need to be taken? • What is the procedure for materials challenge?
  • 37. Best Practices: Collections in US • Helen McGraw branch of the Irondequoit (NY) Public Library • Games Rated E, E10+ and T • PS2 and PC games • 14 day circ • $.25/day late fee • game cost+$5/replacement fee • Genres: compilations, sports, racing games, platformers, unique and quirky titles
  • 38. Evaluating Games Plot + Setting + Character + Graphics + Soundtrack + Modification/Customization + Uniqueness ________________ Replayability
  • 39. What Makes a Successful Gaming Program? 1. Do your homework 2. Provide variety 3. Open up to the community 4. Spread the word 5. Play
  • 40. Program Tips • Choose games appropriate to age group • Choose multiplayer games • Choose games with short rounds • Offer two to three games in conjunction with board or tabletop games
  • 41. Free Play vs. Tournaments • Both are structured • Both may include other activities • Emphasis is on fun • Free play = more casual, self- competitive • Tournament = more rules, competitive tone and prizes for winners
  • 42. Model Gaming Programs • Santa Monica Public Library, CA Counterstrike LAN party – After hours program – 50 teens lined up around the block to play • After School Zone, Benicia Public Library, CA – Hanging out, snacks and playing games encourages – Kids and teens who have gotten parental consent can play Halo 2 and Ghost Recon on the XBox 360; – Mario Kart and Super Smash Bros. Melee are popular on Gamecube
  • 43. Model Gaming Programs: US • Ann Arbor District Library (MI) Mario Kart, Super Smash Bros, & DDR – Tournaments for all ages – Regular programs – Online community • North Hunterdon High School (NJ) – Student-run game night in the cafeteria
  • 44. “Ddr+gutiart hero= fun” “Awesome cuz everyone gets along with each other, there’s no waiting in line or nething. Plus guitar hero is a wicked rad game.” “I loved DDR” “I liked this because there’s too few of the DDR community around. This is a good opportunity to meet people with like interests.”
  • 45. Think Like A Gamer! Develop a BETA PROJECT
  • 46. Questions & Handouts • Beth Gallaway • informationgoddess29 @gmail.com • 603.247.3196 • http://information goddess29.com