Tom Worsnop - Summer Foundation - Young People in Nursing Homes & the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

567 views
408 views

Published on

Tom Worsnop delivered the presentation at the 2014 Younger People with very High & Complex Care Needs Conference.

The 4th Annual Younger People with very High & Complex Care Needs Conference focused on topics such as report on Summer Foundation’s preliminary findings from NDIS Launch sites in Barwon & the Hunter Valley, identify policy & practice opportunities & barriers for YPINH that arise from the NDIS.

For more information about the event, please visit: http://www.informa.com.au/youngerpeopleconference14

Published in: Health & Medicine
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
567
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Tom Worsnop - Summer Foundation - Young People in Nursing Homes & the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

  1. 1. Young People in Nursing Homes & the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) Some of the story so far …
  2. 2. 2 Presentation by Tom Worsnop Executive Manager at Summer Foundation Contact: tom.worsnop@summerfoundation.org.au About the Summer Foundation Established in 2006, the mission of the Summer Foundation is to resolve the need for young people with disability to live in nursing homes. The Summer Foundation focuses on research, creating a movement, and developing integrated housing and support models.
  3. 3. Today’s key points: 1  Challenges facing isolated young people in the aged care system 2  Preliminary findings from NDIS Launch sites in Barwon and the Hunter ValleyTitle four 3  Policy and practice opportunities and barriers for YPINH that arise from the NDIS 3
  4. 4. Some key current challenges for YPINH: •  It depends where you live, what response you are now getting •  Differential experience between states – differing starting points •  Appropriate choice of housing – a long term investment 4
  5. 5. AIHW latest YPINH stats – July 2013 ! 5   Permanent  Residents   New  admissions  July  2012  –  June  2013   Under  50   years 50  –  59   years Under  60   years Total  under   65 Under  50   years 50  –  59   years Under  60   years Total   under  65 Australia 605 2430 3035 6209 292 1050 1342 2692 Victoria 139 609 748 1540 74 271 345 684 Barwon 10 51 61 127 4 24 28 58 NSW 233 917 1150 2211 111 379 490 965 Hunter 29 82 111 196 13 38 51 89 ACT 2 30 32 66 nil 13 13 23
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. A few Summer Foundation Ambassadors: 7
  8. 8. 8
  9. 9. 9 Summer Foundation Research
  10. 10. 10 Summer Foundation Housing Demonstration Projects
  11. 11. Housing and Support Challenges! •  ‘a combination of circumstances has led to the systemic, but unintended, domination of the group home model in Australian social and disability housing provision’ •  ‘…… despite a widely accepted and endorsed recognition that people with all forms of disability have a right to the accommodation of their choice’ •  ‘……. key actions made by the Australian Disability and Housing sectors to translate housing choice policy into practice have been largely ineffective in generating change for people with higher care and support needs’ Wright, Muenchberger and Whitty, Griffith University, 2014 11
  12. 12. YPIRAC Young People In Residential Aged Care 2006 - 2011 COAG agreement •  Developments from the YPIRAC initiative – some still ongoing, 50- only, three pronged goals: •  Key finding: difficulty in maintaining specialist knowledge and approach 12
  13. 13. 1.  To provide alternative supports: provide better living options where available and the person wants to examine options 2.  To enhance disability supports within RAC: promote more age-appropriate responses 3.  To minimise future admissions to RAC: provide alternative responses for those at risk of RAC placement 13 YPIRAC Goals
  14. 14. YPIRAC: What have we learnt and what is there still to achieve? Demographic projections in June 2012 : •  128 people under 65 in RAC in the Hunter NDIS launch site, it is estimated that this will rise to 145 people by June 2016. •  81 people under 65 in RAC in the Barwon NDIS launch site, it is estimated that this will rise to 96 people by June 2016. •  70-75 people under 65 in RAC in the ACT, it is estimated that this will rise to 74-79 people by June 2016 14
  15. 15. NDIS trial sites (2013-2016), as per August 2013
  16. 16. So now … ‘NDIS Connections’ projects Hunter
 •  Started March 2014 •  Project Coordinator Natalie Butler •  Based in Newcastle, •  Currently 2 LGA’s Barwon •  Started May 2014 •  Project Coordinator: Joanna Stewart •  Operating in mobile office at present. •  All Barwon LGA’s 16 ACT Still to begin, with the NDIS trial due to commence in July 2014
  17. 17. Background! •  Prior to NDIS our reseach evidence and our case work experience: case finding for eligible YP should be done early in the piece •  We need to collect baseline data so that we can measure what difference we are making, and so that we can measure outcomes •  Sensitivities in the aged care system – finding people not straight- forward. •  Coincidental deinstitutionalisation and ‘decamping’ by ADHC of their service provision, mirrored in other states •  Existing experience and knowledge means not duplicating effort already completed or underway – partnerships 17
  18. 18. Preliminary findings ! •  Iden2fica2on,  engagement  and  support  for  YPINH  in  RAC  in  the  pilots   regions  needs  ‘leg  work’    –  we  are  making  this  systema2c  rather  than   remaining  opportunis2c  and  anecdotal   •  Lowered  expecta2ons  –  what  it  has  meant  for  some  families,  YP  who   have  lived  in  RAC  for  quite  some  2me,  to  be  offered  choices   •  Discharge  planning  is  a  very  mixed  business   •  Advocates  have  made  a  difference,  and  can  be  found  in  many  forms,   and  anywhere   •  The  emo2onal  core  of  this  work  is  s2ll  very  distressing   18
  19. 19. Preliminary findings 2 ! •  Dilemmas  for  discharge  planners  both  in  and  out  of  the  NDIA  pilot   sites   •  Welcoming  of  a  partnership  approach  with  NDIA  –  Planners,  LAC’s,   management.     •  The  stories  we  encounter  con2nue  to  challenge  us  at  a  personal  and   professional  level.   •  It  will  be  a  challenge  to  meet  all  young  people  in  RAC  in  the  pilot   areas  within  the  projects,  and  track  outcomes  within  our  2meframes   19
  20. 20. What next? ! •  Collate the evidence, from directly working with YP and their families •  Maintain a strong partnership with the planners and LAC’s from NDIA – acknowledging both their workloads and their responsibilities regarding case-finding •  Use of action research framework to measure outcomes •  Work within a broader context – housing, networking, policy, innovation, workforce development 20
  21. 21. Policy and practice opportunities and barriers for YPINH that arise from the NDIS ! •  Access to alternative housing and support is still one of the biggest challenges we face – there simply isn’t enough accessible and affordable housing stock •  It would be reasonable to assume that case management or case coordination will be required for plans for YPINH – as a group they have high and complex needs and many have experienced institutionalisation in RAC, that requires time to change. •  Specialist knowledge about disability such as Acquired Brain Injury, Neurological conditions, and the impact on family and social networks cannot be replaced by generic service provision, if we are to achieve good outcomes. 21
  22. 22. “ 22 Michelle Newland, Summer Foundation Ambassador
  23. 23. Facebook Building Better Lives Twitter @SummerFoundtn LinkedIn Summer Foundation Ltd. youtube.com/user/SummerFoundation Keep in touch 23
  24. 24. Website www.summerfoundation.org.au For further information and updates: 24

×