• Like

Timothy Hart and Vera Laptev - Disability and student experience

  • 272 views
Uploaded on

Timothy Hart, Business Development Officer , Centre for Disability Studies, Sydney Medical School and Vera Laptev, National Disability Coordination Officer, Sydney Region delivered this presentation …

Timothy Hart, Business Development Officer , Centre for Disability Studies, Sydney Medical School and Vera Laptev, National Disability Coordination Officer, Sydney Region delivered this presentation at the Social Inclusion in Education 2013 Conference. The conference explores diversity, equity and inclusion in higher education.

For more information about the event, please visit the conference website: http://www.informa.com.au/socialinclusion2013

More in: Education , Career
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
272
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. DISABILITY AND THE STUDENT EXPERIENCE Vera Laptev (National Disability Coordination Officer, Sydney Region) Timothy Hart (Business Development Officer, Centre for Disability Studies)
  • 2. Happy IDPWD!
  • 3. What is the National Disability Coordination Officer Program? An Australian Government initiative that aims to improve the access and participation of people with disability in post-school education, training and subsequent employment.
  • 4. Key Objectives of the Program Establish better links Improve transitions Increase participation
  • 5. Program Outcomes • • • • Services that facilitate transitions and participation in tertiary education and subsequent employment are coordinated Local networks collaborate to identify and overcome barriers Stakeholders have the knowledge and capability People with a disability make decisions based on knowledge of their rights, entitlements, supports available, educational options and pathways
  • 6. What is Disability? • 1 in 5 Australians has a disability • Disability is broad (includes mental health conditions, learning difficulties and chronic medical conditions) • 80% of disabilities are hidden • The Social Model of Disability
  • 7. ABS 2012 Disability Survey • estimated that 4.2 million Australians, or 18.5% of the population, had a disability. • A further 4.7 million people (21%) had a long-term health condition that did not restrict their everyday activities. • 3.7 million (88% of the 4.2 million with disability) had a specific limitation or restriction that meant they were limited in the core activities of self care, mobility or communication, or restricted in schooling or employment.
  • 8. Challenges for students with disability in higher education • People with disabilities are more likely to be undereducated and as a result are less likely to be interested in higher education. • In 2012, the proportion of people with a disability aged 15 to 64 years, who had completed high school was 36% while for those without disabilities, 60% (ABS 2012 Survey). • The proportion of people with a disability aged 15 to 64 years who have completed a bachelor degree or higher was 13%, compared to those without disabilities, 26% (ABS 2012 Survey). • While for people with a disability that had attained a certificate level qualification it was 26%, for those without disabilities, 21% (ABS 2012 Survey).
  • 9. Challenges for students with disability in higher education • Students with a disability who managed to get to university are: • roughly 1 in 20 students • most are not likely to have been identified as having a disability at school, some of these do not know they have a disability, • or they do not identify as having a disability, as they wish to avoid having a label, • or reluctance to disclose their disability/or connect with student support services,
  • 10. Challenges for students with disability in higher education • unfortunately most disability services require the student to have a identification of disability (a label) to be able to access services.
  • 11. Challenges for students with disability in higher education This is before they get to: • inflexible delivery of education and course-related material, course design, • access to non-digital texts (e.g. text books remember them), • limited access to inclusive technology or training/knowledge of, • educators demonstrating unhelpful attitudes about and/or towards people with disability. • Assessment & Exams
  • 12. What supports are available to higher education students? Legislative supports • Disability Discrimination Act (1992) • Education Standards (2005) – This is the responsibility of everyone • Article 24 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – The right of persons with disabilities to education
  • 13. What supports are available to higher education students? Practical supports • Reasonable Adjustments – Adjustments are made in consultation with the student • Disability Support Staff • NDCO Program
  • 14. What supports are available to higher education students? Social supports • Family, partners, friends, carers, peers • Student Representative Councils
  • 15. The employment outcomes for graduates with disability • In 2012 the labour force participation of Australians aged 15 to 64 years with disability was 53%, with 9.4% being classified as unemployed, (ABS 2012 Survey) • Compared to 83% for the general population, with 4.9% being unemployed (ABS 2012 Survey) • people with disability have suffered from persistent employment disadvantage. Regardless of their qualifications they are more likely to be unemployed, to move out of fulltime into part-time work, and to be paid less than colleagues without disability
  • 16. The employment outcomes for graduates with disability • It is good business sense to employ people with disability. • 90% of employers of people with disability said they would be happy to continue to do so • 90% of employees with disability have average or superior productivity rates • 98% have average or superior safety records • 86% have average or superior attendance records Graffam, Shinkfield, Smith and Polzin. “Employer Benefits and Costs of Employing a Person with a Disability.” Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation 17 (2002): 251-63.
  • 17. The employment outcomes for graduates with disability • Access to education is important in helping individuals to reach their full potential, while access to employment is essential in achieving greater economic independence and inclusion. • Accessibility to education is especially important for people with disability
  • 18. Resources • ADCET supports disability practitioners, teachers and learning support staff in their work with people with disability or medical conditions in post-secondary education, training and employment. • http://www.adcet.edu.au/ • Creating Accessible Teaching and Support (CATS) http://www.adcet.edu.au/CATS_for_University.chpx
  • 19. Questions? Contact details: Vera Laptev Timothy Hart vera.laptev@sydney.edu.au t.hart@sydney.edu.au 02 9036 3610 02 9036 3612