• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Tim Munday, CSIRO: Facilitating long-term outback water solutions to support mining in South Australia – The Goyder Institute’s FLOWS Project
 

Tim Munday, CSIRO: Facilitating long-term outback water solutions to support mining in South Australia – The Goyder Institute’s FLOWS Project

on

  • 353 views

Tim Munday, Senior Research Scientist, CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering, Water for a Healthy Country & Minerals Down Under Flagships delivered this presentation at the 2013 Mining South ...

Tim Munday, Senior Research Scientist, CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering, Water for a Healthy Country & Minerals Down Under Flagships delivered this presentation at the 2013 Mining South Australia conference. The conference has been produced specifically for the South Australian mining and regional development community and represents a unique opportunity to hear the latest developments from the major projects, mines and explorers in South Australia. For more information on the annual event, please visit the conference website: http://www.informa.com.au/miningsa2013

Statistics

Views

Total Views
353
Views on SlideShare
353
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Tim Munday, CSIRO: Facilitating long-term outback water solutions to support mining in South Australia – The Goyder Institute’s FLOWS Project Tim Munday, CSIRO: Facilitating long-term outback water solutions to support mining in South Australia – The Goyder Institute’s FLOWS Project Presentation Transcript

    • Facilitating Long-term Outback Water Solutions (FLOWS) to support mining in South Australia Tim Munday, Mat Gilfedder, Y Ley Cooper, Tania Abdat, Kevin Cahill, Fred Leaney, Andrew Taylor and Adrian Costar WATER FOR A HEALTHY COUNTRY/GOYDER INSTITUTE
    • Acknowledgements 1. Traditional owners of the APY Lands 2. Richard Preece, Rex Tjami, Gary McWilliams, Andrew Cawthorn, Brian Dodson 3. DEWNR, Neil Power and Adrian Costar 4. DMITRE, Ted Tyne, Miles Davis, Steve Hill, Ian Hopton 5. Goyder Institute, Tony Minns 6. CSIRO, Glen Walker, Ian Jolly
    • Drivers for the Conjunctive use of Geophysics 1. Many areas of active exploration in Australia are characterised by a paucity of information on the groundwater resources present. 2. This lack of knowledge commonly extends to the aquifers present, the water they contain, variability and sustainability of the resource and its relationship to environmental and cultural assets.
    • Water – Key to a Sustainable Minerals Industry  Water is identified as a major challenge facing the development of the mining industry  Annual water demand across the SA Resource Industry is forecast to increase from ~43,000 ML in 2010 to ~130,000 ML in 2019. • In WA is demand is expected to increase from ~250,000 ML in 2009 to ~382,000 ML per year by 2020
    • A Receptive Industry • The exploration and mining industry is embracing initiatives that seek to exploit “exploration “ geophysical data sets for environmental purposes including, particularly where groundwater is concerned. AEM Data Gravity Data
    • But..... • Conjunctive use of exploration data sets is not always without its problems, because • Choice of systems • Approaches to data interpretation are not necessarily the same. Fast approximate transforms versus.......
    • But..... • Conjunctive use of exploration data sets is not always without its problems, because • Choice of systems • Approaches to data interpretation are not necessarily the same. Full Inversion • Accurately define conductivity structure, aquifer character, and groundwater quality......
    • Water Resources in Arid regions of SA Knowledge gaps Lack of knowledge and data about the location, capacity, quality and (ecological) sensitivities of non prescribed groundwater resources in the SA’s arid areas. Groundwater resources in these region do not have a high level of modern replenishment and may already be in decline.
    • FLOWS (Goyder - Facilitating Long-Term Outback Water Solutions) Objectives: 1. For resource development priority areas, – identify the location, geometry and characteristics of key aquifers, – their potential capacity, and – the quality and variability of the contained groundwater resources through the integrated analysis and interpretation of geological and airborne geophysical data 2. Develop a spatial understanding of the recharge and discharge processes and rates across the priority areas 3. Desktop study groundwater dependant ecosystems, cultural assets and high value environmental assets in arid parts of State
    • Priority areas for Stage 1 Musgrave Block North/Western Gawler Frome
    • Priority areas for Stage 2 North Eyre Peninsula
    • Musgrave Province
    • APY Lands – Aquifer Systems Groundwater in the APY Lands occurs in the weathered and fractured sections of the Precambrian bedrock, palaeovalley sands, calcrete and alluvial and aeolian sediments, and the onlapping sediments of the Officer Basin in the south eastern part of the area
    • Groundwater Quality – Review (Varma 2012)
    • Existing AEM Data Fragmented coverage Different systems
    • Philosophy: 1. Accurate system characterisation 2. Calibration 3. Common inversion approach
    • Using AEM to Understand Palaeovalley Structure and Relation with Current Landscape
    • Complex Palaeolandscape Current topo Palaeo topo Litho-Structural Control
    • Combine with magnetics
    • Conceptual Hydrogeology Pre-Pliocene landscape in the west and central Musgrave Province. Contemporary landscape in the west and central Musgrave Province.
    • Examine with contemporary topography Multi-resolution Valley Bottom Flatness index (MrVBF) (Gallant and Dowling, 2003). Classifies degrees of flatness using a DEM and operates at range of scales combining the results into a single index.
    • Combine with regional topographic trends
    • An offset Palaeovalley thalweg
    • Contemporary Landscape Reflects Palaeolandscape
    • AEM Palaeovalley vs Contemporary Topography
    • Hydrogeological framework model
    • Magnetics informs the framework model Palaeozoic sediments in in Levenger Graben
    • Upscaling
    • Framework and contemporary sand cover
    • Framework and Hydraulic Gradient
    • Groundwater residence using isotopes and anthropogenic gases 4He 81Kr 36Cl 14C 39Ar CFC's, SF6 85Kr 3H/3He 0.1 3 1 10 100 1000 10000 100000 Approximate Groundwater Age (years) 1000000 10000000
    • Framework and 4He
    • Inferred groundwater flow paths
    • Trends across APY Lands In the northern area, groundwater wells are predominantly screened to the regolith of the Precambrian basement rock of the ranges – Higher rates of recharge – direct and diffuse – A modern groundwater age - mean residence time <50 yrs – Fresh groundwater associated with localised recharge from episodic rainfall events In the central/southern area away from the ranges, groundwater wells are screened to Tertiary and Quaternary sediments – Lower rates of recharge where diffuse recharge dominates – Groundwater ages derived from 14C, high concentrations of 4He and higher Cl– indicate much older groundwater
    • Method 1. It has been tested in the Musgrave province of South Australia. 2. Has application in other parts of outback South Australia, including the SAA Lands, but also other parts of the Alinytjara Wilurara NRM Region. 3. Also be applicable to the Northern Eyre Peninsula.
    • Follow-up Hydrogeological Investigations: A Possible Workflow Physical Hydrogeology • A framework for ground investigation • Target – industrial scale groundwater resource? Ground EM soundings to locate thick sequences of sediment Drilling Resource Characterisation
    • Summary (cont) 1. Conjunctive use of exploration geophysical data sets providing input into conceptual hydrogeological model development  Critical data sets – AEM – Mag – DEM 2. Re-Processing AEM with common inversion kernels providing the basis for comparison of results from different areas, but accurate system description is important –  Will not generate seamless maps
    • Summary 1. Encouraging companies and contractors to ask for and supply that information, even though water/aquifer characterisation maybe less important in the first instance! 2. Work with companies on extending data acquisition – not expensive, but information will add significant knowledge ref groundwater and geology 3. Linking data with an understanding of groundwater age, and recharge through collection of isotopic and tracer data is important -> better conceptual hydrogeological models
    • Key Gaps in Knowledge Very little information on the hydrogeology of the palaeovalley aquifers – Materials – Transmissivity – Water quality – Quantity – Yields
    • What/where next....?
    • Using Geophysics ...
    • Tells us about aquifers....
    • Further Data Acquisition Options/Opportunities Build on Exploration Company activity Add new lines Extend Survey lines •$ Cost relatively low – eg 10kms for ~$1500-2000 •No Mob costs •Value to State
    • Thank you Tim Munday CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Exploration t e w +61 8 6436 8634 tim.munday@csiro.au www.csiro.au WATER FOR A HEALTHY COUNTRY