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Shamus Walsh, Hardface Technologys: Advancing processes for the in-situ repair of damaged heavy haul track
 

Shamus Walsh, Hardface Technologys: Advancing processes for the in-situ repair of damaged heavy haul track

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Shamus Walsh, General Manager, Hardface Technologys delivered this presentation at the 2013 Heavy Haul Rail conference. The highly anticipated event is the annual meeting place for mining and rail ...

Shamus Walsh, General Manager, Hardface Technologys delivered this presentation at the 2013 Heavy Haul Rail conference. The highly anticipated event is the annual meeting place for mining and rail representatives from around the country to discuss all the latest rail projects in the heavy haul sector. For more information about the event, please visit the conference website: http://www.informa.com.au/hhrail14

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    Shamus Walsh, Hardface Technologys: Advancing processes for the in-situ repair of damaged heavy haul track Shamus Walsh, Hardface Technologys: Advancing processes for the in-situ repair of damaged heavy haul track Presentation Transcript

    • In-situ Repair and Rebuilding of Railway Track
    • Rail suffers many different types of wear and damage. The following shows some very common examples.
    • Damaged Crossing (Metal Flow)
    • Close-up
    • Broken Flow
    • Piece fallen out
    • Head Damage
    • Cracks
    • Extreme wear
    • Broken Switch tip
    • Wheelburns
    • Transverse defect
    • Large cracks in crossing nose
    • The current method of dealing with these problems is to replace the rail. This is a costly and labour intensive method.
    • It is now possible to permanently repair these problems. In some cases the repair methods can actually improve the wear characteristics of the repaired component.
    • History and Development
    • Excessive spatter and porosity
    • Excessive porosity
    • Better weld
    • X-ray of manganese weld
    • Fusion line defect. Manganese weld.
    • Failed repair
    • Manganese Weld samples
    • Crack in weld sample
    • Small cracks on manganese rail
    • Hardness test showing large variation
    • Hardness test showing large variation
    • Hardness test showing consistency
    • Hardness test showing consistency
    • Steel Crossing Repair
    • In-Situ repair at Brighton Beach
    • In-Situ repair at Brighton Beach Close-up of wear on wing and small defect on nose
    • In-Situ repair at Brighton Beach Grinding wing rail
    • In-Situ repair at Brighton Beach Close-up of head damage on wing rail
    • In-Situ repair at Brighton Beach Head-damage removed from wing rail
    • In-Situ repair at Brighton Beach Large defect in nose rail
    • In-Situ repair at Brighton Beach Close-up of nose defect
    • In-Situ repair at Brighton Beach Nose and wing defects removed by grinding rail
    • In-Situ repair at Brighton Beach The rail is heated if required
    • In-Situ repair at Brighton Beach Rebuilding wing rail
    • In-Situ repair at Brighton Beach Wing rail build-up complete
    • In-Situ repair at Brighton Beach Coarse grind completed on wing rail
    • In-Situ repair at Brighton Beach Build-up completed on nose rail
    • In-Situ repair at Brighton Beach Coarse grind completed on nose rail
    • In-Situ repair at Brighton Beach Final grinding completed on both rails
    • After Before In-situ repair
    • Large repair on steel crossing
    • Switchblade Repair
    • Switchblade with broken tip. This had been removed from track as it was too dangerous to allow it to remain in service.
    • Switchblade during repair
    • Switchblade tip during repair.
    • Completed repair
    • Switchblade after repair.
    • Repaired Switchblade
    • Before After In-situ repair of switchblades
    • Rebuilt 2007 July 2013 In track for six years
    • Damaged switchblade – Hunter Valley Up Main track
    • Switchblade after repair.
    • Switchblade photographed July 2013 In track for 6 years.
    • Swing-Nosed Crossing Repair
    • Swingnose crossing with head defect on wing
    • Close-up of head defect
    • Swingnose crossing with small head defect on nose
    • Swingnose crossing with large damaged area on wing
    • Same swingnose crossing during repair.
    • Repair is 18 months old. 32 tonne axle loads. 90 million tonnes annually
    • Same repair. Different view.
    • Manganese components are generally removed from track before rebuilding. Fumes and dust can be easily controlled in a workshop environment thereby protecting workers form the harmful effects of manganese.
    • Bolts are cut and steel rails separated from manganese insert
    • Manganese insert is lifted out
    • Interior of crossing cleaned of debris and glue
    • New insert being lifted in
    • Crossing is re-bolted
    • Completed Swap takes between one and two hours
    • Rebuilt manganese inserts ready for delivery
    • On manganese rail, very large defects can be repaired. Here, a large crack is removed, ready for welding
    • Hedkote® can be used as an alternative to explosive hardening
    • Casting defects in crossing nose. Cannot be removed using Explosive Hardening
    • Casting defects
    • Brand new insert as received from ARTC
    • Transition areas ground out and crack tested prior to hardfacing
    • Hardfacing complete. Coarse grinding and final profiling has not been completed yet.
    • Photo taken after 28 months. Toe wear. Nose is in very good condition. Wing has small notch missing. Total tonnage approximately 254MGT
    • Condition of the manganese insert as it was received for rebuild.
    • Condition of the manganese insert as it was received for rebuild.
    • Applying Hedkote to a brand new insert has greatly improved the performance of the component. Normal service life 9-12 months. This was extended to 31 months by hardfacing. It can now be removed and hardfaced/rebuilt again. It is possible to rebuild inserts up to four times giving a huge extension in service life and performance.
    • RBM damage
    • RBM damage
    • Extreme repair on manganese crossing Example 9
    • Recycling
    • Recycling Crossings that have been removed due to wear or damage, should not be scrapped. Again, service life is the same as a new crossing. They can be recycled and returned to service as new crossings.
    • Switch- blades and manganese monoblocks ready for recycling
    • Steel and manganese crossings during recycling
    • Dismantled RBMs ready for recycling
    • Rebuilt insert ready for delivery
    • Monoblock after painting and ready for delivery
    • Rebuilt Monoblock before painting
    • Severe wear on steel crossing Before
    • After
    • Steel Crossing Rebuilt crossings have the same service life as new crossings. After
    • Wheelburn and Squat Repairs
    • Before
    • After final profiling, the defect has been completely removed.
    • After
    • The end result is rail back to its original condition. CWR remains continuous. No aluminothermic welds. Repaired area has the same hardness as the original rail. No possibility of “dips” No cutting of rail. No lifting equipment required. 10-15 per day. 80% cost saving over traditional closures Guaranteed for three years against defects. Permanent removal of defect. Approved for Heavy Haul
    • Before After
    • Record Keeping and Documentation
    • Casting defects which require grinding to the bottom of the flangeway in order to completely remove.
    • ID numbers stamped here for steel and here for manganese inserts
    • Hardface wins WTIA Fabricator of the Year for 2006
    • Type Approval for the Hedkote® Process 13/09/2010
    • Southern Cross Station Melbourne
    • Conclusions Possible to permanently refurbish damaged/worn rail Improve safety Extremely cost effective Recycle old/worn components Proven/Certified in Heavy Haul applications. “Green” process
    • What does all this mean for the rail operator?
    • Hardface Technologys 6/28 Coombes Drive, Penrith, NSW 2750 Australia PO Box 635, Penrith, NSW 2751 Australia Tel. +61 2 4721 4088 Fax. +61 2 4732 4988 Mob. +61 4 13 64 0526 E-mail hardface@netspace.net.au www.hardface.com.au Hedkote® Saving Rail The Permanent Way