Rosalie O'Neale, Australian Communications and Media Authority - Bullying through the internet
 

Rosalie O'Neale, Australian Communications and Media Authority - Bullying through the internet

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Rosalie O'Neale, Senior Advisor, Cybersmart Outreach, Australian Communications and Media Authority delivered this presentation at the Child Protection Forum 2013. ...

Rosalie O'Neale, Senior Advisor, Cybersmart Outreach, Australian Communications and Media Authority delivered this presentation at the Child Protection Forum 2013.

The Child Protection Forum 2013 focusses on ensuring the welfare and safety of Australia's children. Find out more at http://www.informa.com.au/childprotectionforum2013

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Rosalie O'Neale, Australian Communications and Media Authority - Bullying through the internet Rosalie O'Neale, Australian Communications and Media Authority - Bullying through the internet Presentation Transcript

  • Understanding and mitigating the effects of online bullying on children Rosalie O’Neale Senior Advisor – Cybersmart Australian Child Protection Forum 10-11 October 2013
  • Let’s Fight it Together
  • About us Cybersmart: the national cybersafety and cybersecurity education program managed by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA). .
  • Our evidence base • Evidence-based, targeted program • Like, post, Share: Young Australians experience of social media (August 2013) • Discussions with students through our Outreach program • Other authoritative research
  • Countering perceptions • The majority of children and young people have not engaged in risky behaviours online • For the majority of children and young people, being online is ‘mostly or always good’ • Exposure to online risk does not always = harm • Risky experiences can help develop coping strategies, resilience • Limiting experiences may increase vulnerability
  • Being online: both + and - • Integral to identity building, social connections • For the majority – a positive experience • Risks and challenges: • Content • Conduct • Contact
  • What is cyberbullying? The use of technology to bully a person or group. Bullying is repeated behaviour by an individual or group with the intent to harm another person or group.
  • What does it include? • Hurtful/abusive texts, emails, posts, images or videos • Imitating others online (impersonation, ridicule) • Excluding others online • Spreading nasty rumours and gossip • Flaming, griefing, bash boards, happy slapping
  • ‘Part and parcel’ • Cyberbullying perceived by children to be an inevitable consequence of using social networks. “It’s sort of part and parcel of it all. You use social networks and you’re going to see cyberbullying.” • Impact of online ‘distance”. ”I reckon some people get this extra confidence to be someone different online. They’ll say all this stuff there is no way they’d say to your face.”
  • Experienced cyberbullying 0 5 10 15 20 25 8 to 9 year olds 10 to 11 year olds 12 to 13 year olds 14 to 15 year olds 16 to 17 year olds 1 10 16 18 19 4 10 17 21 16 2009 2012
  • Witnessing cyberbullying • The majority of SNS users reported witnessing cyberbullying at least sometimes. • 5 to 12% say they have witnessed it frequently. • 14 to 15-year-olds were the most likely to say they’ve witnessed it frequently.
  • By gender In 2011, where primary or secondary reason for contact was related to cyberbullying: Female 79% Male 21%
  • Sexting Sending provocative or sexual photos, messages or videos, generally using a mobile phone. It can also include posting this type of material online. • Serious social and legal consequences for both males and females. • Short term embarassment/long term reputational damage.
  • Experience of sexting 0 5 10 15 20 Total Males Females 13 12 14 18 19 18 Sent Received Have you or someone within your group of friends sent/received sexually suggestive nude or nearly nude photos or videos to someone else?* * Question asked of children 16-17, with parental consent
  • Recognising cyberbullying • Changes in personality – becoming withdrawn, anxious, sad or angry • Becoming more lonely, distressed • Unexpected changes in friendship groups • Avoidance of school, clubs, friends • Decline in school work • Change in sleep patterns • Decline in physical health
  • Legal framework • No specific ‘cyberbullying’ laws in Australia but other general criminal laws may apply: • Stalking • Defamation • Assault • Vilification • Civil Action
  • Cyberbullying - how aware are parents? 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 8 to 9 Parents of 8-9 10 to 11 Parents of 10-11 4 4 10 6 96 93 89 90 3 4 1 1 Yes No Don't know Prefer not to say
  • Cyberbullying - how aware are parents? 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 12 to 13 Parents of 12-13 14 to 15 Parents of 14-15 16 to 17 Parents of 16-17 17 16 21 17 16 9 80 77 77 71 81 75 3 6 2 12 2 16 1 1 1 1 1 Yes No Don't know Prefer not to say
  • Sexting – how aware are parents? 0 5 10 15 20 Parents Young people 3 13 8 18 Sent Received Sending/receiving sexually suggestive nude or nearly nude photos...
  • Dealing with cyberbullying • Talk to someone you trust • Don’t retaliate or respond • Block the person, change your settings • Report to the service • Keep the evidence...but don’t keep revisiting it
  • Standing up and speaking out - bystanders • Bullying generally stops very quickly with peer intervention • Students who are defended recover better • More likely to have positive resolution if peers intervene.  Don’t join in, forward or share  Support and report in whatever way you can.  This isn’t ‘dobbing’, it’s about being a good friend.  Don’t be part of the bullying cycle.
  • Eyes and ears
  • Parents • Open communication is critical • Know the strategies and make a ‘just in case’ plan • Get professional support
  • Schools • Important partner in the education process. • Trusted sources of advice and help. • Duty of care – robust policies + effective implementation
  • Technology and young people • Technology is central to young people’s lives • Children and young people need the knowledge and skills to engage in a positive way with the virtual world... • ...and it’s critical that we start the education process early
  • Cybersmart
  • Cybersmart Outreach • Internet safety presentations • PD workshops for educators • Pre-service teacher program • Connect-ed—online cybersafety education program
  • Social media
  • Pamphlets and posters
  • Tagged
  • www.cybersmart.gov.au @CybersmartACMA @RosalieACMA fb.com/cybersmartcloud youtube.com/user/ACMAcybersmart