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Ronnie Watt, Gibb Engineering and Science - Ensuring operational value and reliability from signaling and control systems

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Ronnie Watt, Senior Associate (Railway Signalling), Gibb Engineering and Science delivered the presentation at the 2014 Heavy Haul Rail Africa Conference. …

Ronnie Watt, Senior Associate (Railway Signalling), Gibb Engineering and Science delivered the presentation at the 2014 Heavy Haul Rail Africa Conference.

The Heavy Haul Rail Africa Conference 2014 covers all the relevant issues including government and resource sector perspectives on future developments in heavy haul rail infrastructure, opportunities to source relevant funding, regulatory progress, challenges in planning and construction, rolling stock requirements, maintenance and capacity enhancement.

For more information about the event, please visit: http://www.railconferences.com/hhrafricaconference

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  • 1. Presented by: Ronnie Watt 19 March 2014 Ensuring operational value and reliability from signaling and control systems
  • 2. Ensuring operational value and reliability from signaling and control systems Improving operations of heavy haul through the application of suitable and innovative signaling and control systems •  The  role  of  signaling  and  communica2ons   in  achieving  safer  and  more  efficient  heavy   haul  rail  opera2ons  
  • 3. Ensuring operational value and reliability from signaling and control systems The role of signaling and train control systems in heavy haul operations •  Not  a  technical  presenta2on  
  • 4. The difference between the transportation of goods as general freight traffic and heavy haul traffic can be demonstrated in the following two slides SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL
  • 5. General freight traffic SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL
  • 6. Heavy haul traffic SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL
  • 7. In this very complex transportation system the signaling system can be identified as shown: SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL
  • 8. In this very complex transportation system the signaling system can be identified: SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Signaling   system  
  • 9. Layman’s definition of a signaling system: Signalling do for trains ....... ....... what traffic lights do for cars SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL
  • 10. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Function of signaling system •  To  ensure  the  safe  authorisa2on  of  train   movements   o Communicates  to  the  driver   o Provides  driver  exclusive  access  to  a  track     sec2on,  free  from  other  (conflic2ng)  train   traffic   o Authorises  driver  to  proceed  up  to  a   predetermined  posi2on  
  • 11. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Impact of signaling on operations 1.  Improves  opera2onal  safety  of  rail   opera2on   2.  Increases  rail  network  capacity   3.  Provides  opera2onal  flexibility   4.  Contributes  to  service  predictability  
  • 12. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Impact of signaling 1.  Improves  opera2onal  safety  of  rail   opera2on   3.  Increases  rail  network  capacity   4.  Provides  opera2onal  flexibility   4.    Contributes  to  service  predictability  
  • 13. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Improves safety of rail operations •  HOW?   •  Eliminates  human  interven2on   •  Reduces  human  error   •  Reduces  accidents   •  Reduces  incidents   o Reduc2on  in  direct  costs   o Reduc2on  in  indirect  costs  
  • 14. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Increases capacity of rail network HOW?   •  Improves  headway   •  Provides  for  more  efficient  use  of  exis2ng  rail   infrastructure  and  assets   o  Tracks   o  Rolling  stock   o  Power  consump2on   o  Staff  u2lisa2on  
  • 15. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Efficiency of the operation
  • 16. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Rail operation characteristics •  Typically  several  hundred  kilometres   •  Ideally  double  line  /  probably  single  line   •  Traffic  in  both  direc2ons   –  DOWN  direc2on  (loaded)   –  UP  direc2on  (empty)  
  • 17. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Line Capacity   Expressed  in  terms  of  the  number  of  train   slots  available  in  a  specific  direc2on     •  Determined  by  the  headway  provided  for   by  the  signaling  of  the  sec2on    
  • 18. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Principle of signaling •  To  “guarantee”  to  the  driver  the  exclusive  use  of   the  sec2on,  free  from  other  conflic2ng  train   traffic     •  Line  free  up  to  specified  des2na2on  -­‐  BLOCK   •  Line  free  beyond  specified  posi2on  for  a   minimum  pre-­‐defined  distance  –  OVERLAP  
  • 19. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Headway •  Headway  is  typically  a  func2on  of  signal   spacing  and  running  speeds   •  Headway  describes  the  2me  between  two   trains  following  each  other  travelling  at  line   speed     – Headway  (2me)     – Headway  distance  
  • 20. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Headway •  HD  =  S  +  2D  +  O  +  L  where     S  =  Sigh2ng  distance   D  =  Distance  between  signals   O  =  Overlap  distance   L  =  Train  length  
  • 21. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Line capacity •  Double  lines   o Determined  by  the  headway   •  Single  lines   o Determined  by  the  longest  sec2on  and  the  2me  it   takes  for  a  train  to  clear  that  sec2on   o Governed  by  the  opportuni2es  available  to  pass   trains  at  crossing  loops  that  are  long  enough  
  • 22. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Option 1: Capacity improvements •  Extend  passing  loops   •  Track  re-­‐alignment  –  fla`en  curves,  gradients   •  Increase  trac2on   •  Improve  train  dynamics  (braking)  
  • 23. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Option 2: Capacity improvements •  Addi2onal  passing  loops   •  Improve  train  control  (signaling)   •  Improve  planning  
  • 24. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Option 3: Capacity improvements •  Increase  axle  load  of  line   – New  rails,  sleeper  spacing,  ballast,  forma2on   •  Upgrade  other  infrastructure  –  bridges   •  New  track  gauge  
  • 25. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Option 4: Capacity improvements •  Reduce  the  journey  2me  (not  line  speed)   •  Upgrade  the  signalling  system   •  Improve  planning   •  Reduce  the  standing  2me  in  the  passing  loops  
  • 26. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Capacity constraints: single lines •  Distance  between  passing  loops   o Absolute  sec2on  –  one  train  only   o Headway  improved  by  adding  signal(s)   •  Length  of  passing  loops  
  • 27. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Categories of Train Control Systems 1.  TCO  communicates  with  driver   o  Paper,  radio,  track  warrant   3.  Colour  light  signalling   o  Conven2onal  line  side  signals   5.  Communica2on  based  signalling  (CBA)   o  No  line  side  signals   o  Communica2on  to    driver  on  HMI  in  cab  
  • 28. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Advantages of CBA •  No  line  side  signals   •  HMI:  Speed  informa2on  (speed  curves)   •  Line  informa2on  (gradients,  etc)   o Fuel  efficiency,  train  handling   •  Moving  block  technology   o More  (shorter)  trains     •  Precise  posi2on  –  staff  u2lisa2on,  etc  
  • 29. SIGNALING and TRAIN CONTROL Conclusion •  Introduc2on  of  appropriate  system  is  cost   effec2ve  way  to  improve  efficiency  of   heavy  haul  opera2ons   •  Not  “one  size  fits  all”  solu2on   o Fit  for  purpose  
  • 30. THE END GIBB   14  Eglin  Road   Sunninghill   2191   Telephone:       +27  11  519  4600     Fax:       +27  11  807  5670   Cell  phone   +27  83  258  6081   Email:     rwa`@gibb.co.za   Website:     www.gibb.co.za