RISSB - Group Presentation

927 views
699 views

Published on

Kevin Taylor, CEO, Jesse Baker, Manager - Safety & Systems, Joe Thompson, Manager – Interoperability, Alex Borodin, Manager – Rollingstock, Laurie Wilson, Manager - Infrastructure and Engineering of RISSB delivered this presentation at the Rail Safety Conference 2014. Rail Safety 2014 brought together the key national decision-makers to deliver new ideas and develop innovative ways to leverage technology for safer outcomes.

For more information, please visit http://www.railsafetyconference.com.au/rs14

Published in: News & Politics
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
927
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
16
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
29
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

RISSB - Group Presentation

  1. 1. RISSB Safety Conference Leveraging technology for safer outcomes March 2014 Kevin Taylor Jesse Baker Joe Thompson Laurie Wilson Alex Borodin
  2. 2. Scope •  Introduction •  RISSB issues and scorecard •  Safety – Jesse Baker •  Interoperability – Joe Thompson •  Infrastructure – Laurie Wilson •  Rolling Stock – Alex Borodin •  Conclusion
  3. 3. RISSB Issues A new way of doing business • Based on stakeholder feedback •  Products will be Performance based in lieu of prescription •  All standards will be made available in ‘Word’ as well as ‘Excel’ Format •  Technical standards will be condensed into one part •  Each standard and code will have a justification stage included to highlight benefits of the product. • Tap into other Orgs such as ASA • RISSB products will be mandated
  4. 4. Product Score Card In FY 13-14 RISSB has published •  7 x standards •  1 x Code of Practice •  5 x Guidelines 3 products less than that planned due to: •  Consensus issues •  People on Development Groups withdrawing without replacement
  5. 5. Future Challenges Meeting the development challenge •  Greater number of projects undergoing 5 year review •  Less money for new projects unless additional funders obtained Take up of RISSB Products •  Presently 60 percent of the rail Industry •  Another survey will be undertaken this year •  Working with other standards development organisations SISAR project •  Provide a risk based approach for developing RISSB products •  Share safety data and allow benchmarking
  6. 6. Safety and Systems JESSE BAKER
  7. 7. Published Train Control products •  Rail Network Control Mobile Communication Systems (standard - AS7660) •  Railway Level Crossings (standard - AS7658) •  Railway signal Cables (standard - AS7663) •  Railway Signalling Cable Routes, Cable Pits and Foundations •  (standard - AS7664) •  TPC Interoperability (standard - AS7666)
  8. 8. Published Safety products •  Consolidation of Public Level Crossings (guideline) •  Emergency Management Planning (guideline) •  Fatigue Risk Management (guideline) •  Hazard Register (guideline) •  National Rail Safety Strategy •  Near Misses Reporting (guideline) •  Rail Security Risk Management Handbook (guideline) •  SPAD Management (guideline)
  9. 9. Train Control products under development •  Signalling Systems Design Process Management (standard) •  Signals, Signage and Indicators (standard) •  Train Detection (standard) •  Signalling Systems – Testing and Commissioning Management (standard) •  Type Approval (standard)
  10. 10. Safety products under development •  Rail Safety Investigations (code of practice) •  Safety Performance Indicators (guideline) •  Taking Safe Decisions (guideline) •  …… SISAR
  11. 11. What is SISAR? •  A tool to support better safety decision making. •  Industry already collects data but…. •  It is for the benefit of Industry itself both directly, and indirectly via RISSB / ONRSR. •  SISAR Information lifecycle…. Data Analysis / Information Knowledge Decision Action Review
  12. 12. How SISAR fits in Data Analysis / Information Knowledge Industry will provide safety/WHS data via a reporting system (SMIS) Analysis of that data will generate information on incident rates / benchmarks etc as well as inform risk models (SRM) Knowledge will be recorded in the reports generated
  13. 13. PASSENGER 39% WORKFORCE 21% MEMBER OF THE PUBLIC 40% Fatalities (20.8%) Major injuries (55.9%) Reportable minor injuries (12.8%) Non-reportable minor injuries (9.0%) Class 2 shock/ trauma (1.6%) Fatalities (15.7%) Major injuries (48.0%) Reportable minor injuries (11.3%) Non-reportable minor injuries (17.1%) Class 1 shock/ trauma (4.1%) Class 2 shock/ trauma (3.9%) Fatalities (89.3%) Major injuries (9.6%) Reportable minor injuries (0.7%) Totalrisk = 141.3 FWI/yr
  14. 14. Why is RISSB pushing for SISAR, and why now? •  NTC Rail Safety Data Strategy 2008, •  Taig review of RISSB 2012 •  Business case (Industry benefit, ONRSR, RISSB) •  UK system developed after 1988 Clapham Junction accident (35 fatalities, 500 injuries) But we need industry support !!!
  15. 15. Interoperability JOE THOMPSON
  16. 16. THE DILEMMA Where we are: Same Requirement → Different Solutions The Solution = Interoperability Interoperability means: Same Requirement → Same Solution Reference – Neil Saville - UGL
  17. 17. Rail Systems Interoperability Overview Interoperability: •  is a vital part of rail systems in many parts of the world including Australia; •  has the potential to provide many benefits to the Australian rail industry in terms of safety, harmonisation, cost effectiveness and future proofing; and •  can be achieved through standardisation. AS 7450 Rail Systems Interoperability AS7666 TPC Interoperability
  18. 18. Principles The principles of interoperability should be applied across the entire spectrum of rail system processes. • Include within existing or proposed systems. • Opportunities to improve interoperability should be taken where practical. • Should: •  aim to support seamless operation now and in the future; •  be based on open Standards and interfaces where practical; •  aim to support a multi-vendor competitive market;
  19. 19. Principles •  be chosen to provide for technical harmonisation. •  In designing new systems or processes, remain capable of supporting new and emerging technologies; •  Planning should support the safety and business needs of ARO’s. •  Provide for evolution and efficient migration from one system or technology to another.
  20. 20. Rail Systems Interoperability Context
  21. 21. Rail Systems Interoperability Interoperability: • is not equivalent to “sameness” • is not the same as “interchangeability” Interoperability is achieved through various means including: • the use of similar hardware or software; • the use of common communications, languages, data or systems; and • through common and effective interfaces, processes or procedures.
  22. 22. Interoperability Achievements Currently the Australian Rail Industry has: •  Agreed Network Rules and Procedures (ANRP) •  Agreed RISSB Standards •  Agreed National Track Safety Induction (ARA initiative) •  Agreed Development Agenda
  23. 23. Interoperability Achievements - continued ANRP •  Several RIMs now utilizing the ANRP as the underpinning rules and procedures for their rulebooks. •  More RIMs are currently developing their rulebooks based on the ANRP. Rolling Stock Substantial percentage of the Rail Industry using the RISSB Rolling Stock Standards in their SMS. Infrastructure Substantial percentage of the Rail Industry using the RISSB Infrastructure Standards in their SMS. Development The Australian Rail Industry participate in the selection priority for future ACOP
  24. 24. What is Next Future Interoperability Development AS7450.1 • Interoperability Guideline (DRAFT) AS7666 – Guideline (DRAFT) • European Train Control Systems (ETCS) • Communications Based Train Control (CBTC) • Advanced Train Management System (ATMS)
  25. 25. Infrastructure LAURIE WILSON
  26. 26. Infrastructure Safety Principles •  Ensuring the integrity of the track and other infrastructure. •  Ensuring that both railway traffic, and the track and other infrastructure have compatible operating parameters. •  Ensuring the safety of persons and property on or adjacent to the railway. •  Communicating operating parameters, requirements and restrictions by adequate and effective means.
  27. 27. Approved Infrastructure Standards •  AS 7630 Railway Infrastructure - Track Classification •  AS 7638 Railway Infrastructure - Earthwork •  AS 7639 Railway Infrastructure - Track Structure •  AS 7635 Railway Infrastructure - Track Geometry •  AS 7636 Railway Infrastructure - Structures •  AS 7640 Railway Infrastructure - Rail Management •  AS 7642 Railway Infrastructure - Turnouts and Special Trackwork •  AS 7643 Railway Infrastructure - Track Stability
  28. 28. Infrastructure Rail Industry Standards Currently in draft Awaiting Validation = 3 • Hydrology and Hydraulics – Corridor Access – Corridor Management Currently in draft – development = 3 • Infrastructure Signs – Infrastructure Sighting – Infrastructure Wayside equipment Still to be allocated funding = 1 • Infrastructure - Survey
  29. 29. Infrastructure Related Projects RISSB Rail Safety Investigation •  Code of Practice RISSB Derailment Investigations and Analysis •  Guideline.
  30. 30. Rolling Stock ALEX BORODIN
  31. 31. Rolling Stock Overview •  Progressively replacing ROA Manual •  Started in 2007 •  First tranche published 2008 •  Published: •  19 Standards, 2 Codes, 6 Guidelines/Handbooks •  Currently in production: •  6 new standards, 2 Codes, 1 Guideline •  10 standards undergoing five yearly reviews (5 reviews started 2013, and 5 in 2014)
  32. 32. Recent Achievements (past six months) •  AS7529 Rolling Stock Fire Safety •  AS7527 Event Recorders •  Wheel-Rail Profile Development Guideline •  Wheel-Defects Guideline •  Concept of Operations Handbook
  33. 33. Philosophy Aims •  Replace ROA Manual •  Produce hazard-based standards •  Attempt genuinely national standards* by reducing arbitrary differences •  Cover all heavy-rail rolling stock •  Facilitate compliance tracking
  34. 34. Challenges/Tweaks •  Reducing perceived complexity (No. of parts, Excel vs Word) •  Integrating Hazard Registers •  Reducing State-based uniqueness •  Getting people to participate actively •  Supplier wars
  35. 35. Conclusion •  RISSB is making a positive harmonisation contribution through its products. •  Changing the way products are developed and presented. •  Review of products is becoming an issue as RISSB’s older products are now reaching the five year mark. •  40 products presently being developed. •  The SISAR Project is significant and will allow the Industry to share safety data, determine risks and undertake safety benchmarking. •  Risk based approach to standards development
  36. 36. Thank You

×