Professor Paul Ramadge, Vice Chancellor’s Professorial Fellow, Director, Australia Indonesia Centre, Monash University - Indonesia
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Professor Paul Ramadge, Vice Chancellor’s Professorial Fellow, Director, Australia Indonesia Centre, Monash University - Indonesia

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Prof. Paul Ramadge delivered the presentation at the 2014 Australia Asia Education Engagement Symposium. ...

Prof. Paul Ramadge delivered the presentation at the 2014 Australia Asia Education Engagement Symposium.

The Australia Asia Education Engagement Symposium explores key drivers for engagement and set in context the urgent need for Australia to focus attention on building deeper and broader education coalitions and partnerships with Asia.

For more information about the event, please visit: http://www.informa.com.au/ausasiaeducation14

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    Professor Paul Ramadge, Vice Chancellor’s Professorial Fellow, Director, Australia Indonesia Centre, Monash University - Indonesia Professor Paul Ramadge, Vice Chancellor’s Professorial Fellow, Director, Australia Indonesia Centre, Monash University - Indonesia Presentation Transcript

    • Australia Asia Education Engagement Symposium     Paul  Ramadge,  Australia-­‐Indonesia  Centre   31  March  2014  
    • The  story  so  far     October  2013   !  The  new  Australian  Government  makes   Indonesia  a  priority.  Monash’s  thought   leadership  is  acknowledged.     !  The  Australia-­‐Indonesia  Centre  is   announced,  along  with  the  New  Colombo   Plan  and  a  fresh  commitment  to  complete   a  Closer  Economic  Partnership  Agreement.   From  February  2013   !  Monash  University  steps  up  its  engagement   in  Indonesia,  capped  by  the  awarding  of  an   honorary  doctorate  to  the  Vice-­‐President.     !  Monash  conducts  a  series  of  dialogues  in   Jakarta  on  leadership,  innovaHon,  health,   educaHon  and  sustainability.    
    • The  story  so  far     The  next  month     !  Federal  Funding  Agreement.   !  CollaboraHon  Agreement.   !  Strategic  Plan,  Business  Plan.   !  First  Board  meeHng.   !  Advisory  Board  and  Patrons.   !  Website  launch,  Events  Schedule.   !  Recruitment  Phase  II.   Since  October  last  year   !  Headquarters  at  Monash’s  Caulfield  campus.   !  Our  own  logo.   !  Two  research  networks  –  one  in  Australia,   one  in  Indonesia.     !  Governance,  organisaHonal  structures.     !  First  corporate  commitments.   !  A  start-­‐up  team!   Start-­‐up   phase   Go-­‐live   phase  
    • The  core  objecHves       1.  Promote  greater  community       understanding  of  contemporary   Indonesia  and  its  growing   importance  to  Australia.   2.  Strengthen  and  deepen  Australia-­‐ Indonesia  linkages  in  government,   business,  educaHon,  science,     research  and  communiHes.     3.  Deliver  soluHons  to  shared  naHonal   challenges  in  areas  such  as  health,   food,  energy  and  infrastructure  via   highly  collaboraHve  research.    
    • Our  presHgious  research  network     * More universities or research centres may be invited to be part of the centre’s activities as the need arises. Australia-­‐ Indonesia   Centre           Monash               University   Universitas   Gadjah   Mada   InsHtut     Teknologi   Bandung   Universitas   Airlangga     The   University   of  Sydney     The   Australian   NaHonal   University     The   University   of   Melbourne   CSIRO   InsHtut   Pertanian   Bogor   Universitas   Hasanuddin   Universitas   Indonesia    
    • Director Deputy Director (Engagement) Education and Culture Committee Executive Officer Cross-disciplinary teams with input from Government and Industry Executive Assistant Deputy Director (Research) Manager, Projects and Programs Projects  and  programs  to  deliver  core  objecHves   The  start-­‐up  team     MONASH  SERVICES   (HR,  Legal,  Finance,  Audit,  IT,  etc)   Manager, Media Research Advisory Group Engagement Advisory Group Manager, Indonesia
    • Our  strategy,  core  objecHves  and  projects  are  aligned   CapabiliHes   mapping   Top  six   research   challenges     NaHonal  and   cross-­‐border   research   workshops   Research   RelaHonships   mapping   Top  six   relaHonship   opportuniHes   NaHonal  and   cross-­‐border   relaHonship   programs   RelaHonships   Joint  AIC-­‐Lowy   InsHtute   polling   Public-­‐ engagement   strategies   High-­‐profile   documentary   series   A]tudes   IniHal  Year  1   acHviHes  to   address  Core   ObjecHves  
    • Why  the  centre  ma_ers         Ross  FitzGerald,  Visy  Director  and  AIC  Board  member   “Every  now  and  again  an  opportunity  comes  along  to   make  a  difference  in  life,  to  change  life  for  the  be_er.  The   Australia-­‐Indonesia  Centre  is  such  an  opportunity.”   Tony  AbboJ,  Prime  Minister   “Strong  relaHonships  are  based  on  mutual  knowledge   and  understanding,  which  is  why  this  centre  will  make   such  an  important  contribuHon.”   Ed  Byrne,  Vice-­‐Chancellor  of  Monash  University   “What  is  exciHng  is  that  the  AIC  will  foster  high-­‐value   linkages  between  government,  business  and  academia.  This   is  the  best  way  to  develop  big,  high-­‐impact  innovaHons.”  
    • Why  the  centre  is  needed  .  .  .  the  state  of  relaHons     Strong   relaHonships,   trust  and   global   ambiHon       Genuine   partnerships,   innovaHon   and  mutual   benefits     Respect  for   cultural  and   religious   differences     •  Acer  decades  of  effort,  the  bilateral  relaHonship  is  weak.     •  In  Australia,  there  are  pockets  of  excellence  but  .  .  .     •  It’s  a  love-­‐hate  relaHonship.   •  Australia  points  to  economic  naHonalism,  protecHonism,  corrupHon  and  weak   role  of  law.   •  Indonesia  points  to  a  lack  of  trust,  cultural  literacy  and  understanding.     •  Both  governments  are  seeking  .  .  .    
    • Asia  is  changing  rapidly     “Shale  gas  will  change  the  energy  balance  across   the  world.  We  really  need  to  prepare.  InnovaHon   and  human  capital  are  criHcal.  We  want  to  do  the   high  R&D  in  Indonesia  .  .  .  the  dream  is  to  be  a   knowledge  economy.”                                                                 Indonesian  Minister  or  Finance  ChaOb  Basri   “The  improvement  of  educaHon  in  China  will  bring  about   a  new  modern  workforce  with  be_er  vision  and  skills  .  .  .   we  will  build  a  system  of  technological  innovaHon,   working  with  universiHes.”                                  President  Xi  Jinping   of  China     “Successful  naHons  do  two  things  right  –  they  get  it   right  on  naHonal  policy  (infrastructure,  skills  and   innovaHon),  and  they  work  to  improve  supply  chain   flows,  pursue  free  trade  agreements,  and  create  the   right  business  environment.”                                                                                                                                 Prime  Minister  of  Singapore  Lee  Hsien  Loong  
    • And  Indonesia  is  rising       McKinsey  Global  Ins0tute  Report,  September  2012  
    • The  bigger  picture  involves  global  networks     Global  Players   (governments,   mulHnaHonals)   Asia                                   ASEAN     Indonesia         (Government,   Industry  &   Academia)   Australia               (Government,   Industry  &   Academia)   !  Ensuring  that   Australia  and   Indonesia  are  part   of  the  most   dynamic  global   value  chains.   !  Becoming  part  of     high-­‐impact   networks  –  sector   by  sector.   !  Unpacking  the  R&D   prioriHes  of   mulHnaHonals  and   responding  to   research  gaps.   !  Finding  new  ways   to  deepen   relaHonships  and  to   collaborate.  
    • How  culture  varies:  Linear-­‐AcHve,  MulH-­‐AcHve  and  ReacHve  
    • We  don’t  want  to  waste  the  opportunity     Think  differently     Act  differently     Make  a  bigger  impact     Leave  a  lasHng  legacy     !  Change  the  way   Australians  think  about   Indonesia.   !  Develop  stronger,  more   resilient  cross-­‐border   relaHonships.   !  Bring  together  the   smartest  thinkers  in  both   naHons  from  Academia,   Government  and  Industry   –  the  leaders  commi_ed   to  making  a  difference.   !  Consistently  explain  the   value  of  Australia-­‐ Indonesia  collaboraHon   and  shared  innovaHon.  
    • Australia Asia Education Engagement Symposium     Paul  Ramadge,  Australia-­‐Indonesia  Centre   31  March  2014