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Prof. Linda Hancock - Deakin University - Mature-aged workers - The opportunities and barriers to continuing work

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Prof. Linda Hancock delivered the presentation at the 2014 Skilling Australia Summit. …

Prof. Linda Hancock delivered the presentation at the 2014 Skilling Australia Summit.

The 8th Annual Skilling Australia Summit considered the current policy framework and examined state and national challenges for skilling the Australian economy at this time. Current skilled shortages within industry groups were addressed and debated.

For more information about the event, please visit: http://www.informa.com.au/skillingoz14

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  • 1. Mature  Age  Workers:     The  opportuni4es  and  barriers  to   con4nuing  work   Informa  Skilling  Australia  Summit  30  June-­‐1  July  2014   Prof.  Linda  Hancock  
  • 2. overview   •  Snapshot  ageing  workforce  and  Mature  age  migrant   workers   •  Barriers  and  facilitators  to  par4cipa4on  for  mature   age  mul4cultural  background  workers   •  The  u4lity  of  transi4onal  labour  market  theory  an  its   focus  on  targeted  training  for  enhancing  public  policy   in  this  area   •  Policy  issues  in  light  of  debates  on  raising  the   re4rement  age  in  Australia.    
  • 3. Industry  profile  M/A  workers   2001-­‐2011   •  Major  differences  in  the  industry  profile  of  mature  aged   workers  in  Australia  between  2001  and  2011:     •  Increase  in  the  total  number  of  mature-­‐aged  workers,  from   2,680,000  (32%)  to  3,691,000  (37%).     •  Increase  in  the  number  working  in  Health  Care  and  Social   Assistance  (increased  from  314,000  to  524,000;  39%  to  45%).     •  Increase  in  number  working  in  Manufacturing  (from  334,000   to  362,000)  as  total  persons  working  in  manufacturing  fell   (from  1,010,000  to  903,000).  Propor4on  increased  from  33%   to  40%.     •  Increase  in  number  working  in  Transport,  Postal  and   Warehousing  (increased  from  135,000  to  220,000;  from  38%   to  46%).  
  • 4. Industry  Profile  of  mature  aged  workers  born  in  a  non-­‐main  English   speaking  country  between  2001  and  2011:   •  Increase  in  number  working  in  Health  from  50,000  to  91,000.  In   2011,  8%  of  all  Health  workers  were  mature  aged  workers  born  in  a   non-­‐main  English  speaking  country,  compared  with  6%  in  2001.     •  Increase  in  number  working  in  Accommoda4on  and  Food  Services   from  25,000  to  45,000.  In  2011,  7%  of  all  Accommoda4on  and  Food   Service  workers  were  mature  aged  workers  born  in  a  non-­‐main   English  speaking  country,  compared  with  6%  in  2001.     •  Increase  in  number  working  in  Educa4on,  from  27,000  to  42,000   Propor4on  of  all  Educa4on  workers  who  were  mature  aged  persons   born  in  a  non-­‐main  English  speaking  country  remained  at  5%.     •  Number  of  mature  aged  workers  born  in  a  non-­‐main  English   speaking  country  working  in  Transport  and  Warehousing  more  than   doubled,  from  17,000  to  40,000  of.    
  • 5. Migrant  and  M/A  unemployment   •  For  migrants  arriving  in  the  past  20  years,  both  all   ages  and  mature-­‐age,  have  high  unemployment  rates   (8.1%  and  6.2%  respec4vely)  compared  with  all   Australian  residents  (5.6%  for  all  ages  and  3.9%  for   mature-­‐age  persons).     •  Recent  female  migrants  have  an  especially  high   unemployment  rate  (9.5%).    
  • 6. Overseas  born  a  higher  propor4on  of   45-­‐64  year  olds