Professor Chris Roche, Associate Professor and Chair in International Development, La Trobe University - Opportunities offered through developmental and community projects in Asia
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Professor Chris Roche, Associate Professor and Chair in International Development, La Trobe University - Opportunities offered through developmental and community projects in Asia

  • 357 views
Uploaded on

Prof. Chris Roche delivered the presentation at the 2014 Australia Asia Education Engagement Symposium. ...

Prof. Chris Roche delivered the presentation at the 2014 Australia Asia Education Engagement Symposium.

The Australia Asia Education Engagement Symposium explores key drivers for engagement and set in context the urgent need for Australia to focus attention on building deeper and broader education coalitions and partnerships with Asia.

For more information about the event, please visit: http://www.informa.com.au/ausasiaeducation14

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
357
On Slideshare
357
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Development  in  Asia-­‐Pacific:  opportuni6es   for  researchers,  students  and  ac6vists   CHRIS  ROCHE   INSTITUTE  FOR  HUMAN  SECURITY  AND  SOCIAL  CHANGE,   LA  TROBE  UNIVERSITY   31S T MARCH- 1 APRIL 2014, INAUGURAL AUSTRALIA ASIA EDUCATION ENGAGEMENT SYMPOSIUM
  • 2. My  argument  in  a  nutshell  is:     1.  Australia  is  part  of  the  Asia-­‐Pacific  not  separate  from  it,   2.  There  a  number  of  important  and  common  challenges  that  face  the   region  e.g.  Disasters  &  Climate  Change;  Poverty  &  Inequality;  Youth   Employment;  Trafficking  &  Violence  against  Women;    Indigenous  people   and  Development,  and  Popula6on  Movements.     3.  Australia  has  as  much  to  learn  from,  and  with,  other  countries,   ins6tu6ons  and  people  in  the  region  as  it  has  to  offer,   4.  Universi6es  could  play  a  greater  role  in  brokering  collabora6on  on  these   issues,  AND  build  the  capabili6es  to  work  in  this  way,  but  this  would   need    a  number  of  changes.  
  • 3. There  a  number  of  important  and  common    challenges  that  face  the  region    
  • 4. Poverty  and  inequality  in  Asia/Pacific   ‘Asia-­‐Pacific  Aspira6ons:  Perspec6ves  for  a  Post-­‐2015  Development  Agenda’  ,  ESCAP/ADB/UNDP     Regional  MDGs  Report  2012/13   •   743m  people  s6ll  living   on  less  than  $1.25  per  day   •   60%  of  the  world’s   hungry   •   The  popula6on-­‐weighted   mean  Gini  coefficient  for   the  en6re  region  has  risen   from  33.5  in  1990  to  37.5.  
  • 5. ‘Asia-­‐Pacific  Aspira6ons:  Perspec6ves  for  a  Post-­‐2015  Development  Agenda’  ,  ESCAP/ADB/UNDP     Regional  MDGs  Report  2012/13,  p.19  
  • 6. Disaster  Risk  Reduc6on  and  Response   Disasters  present  a  serious   development  challenge:     • 61%  of  global  losses  from   disasters  was  sustained  by  the   region  in  the  past  20  years.   • 40%  of  floods  worldwide   happened  in  the  region  in  the   past  30  years.   More  than  1.6  billion  people   were  affected  by  disasters  in  the   region  since  2000.   “Strong,  Safe  and  Resilient  –  A  Strategic  Policy  Guide  for  Disaster  Risk  Management  in  the  East  Asia    and  the  Pacific,”    World  Bank    2013  
  • 7. Unemployment   ‘Asia-­‐Pacific  Aspira6ons:  Perspec6ves  for  a  Post-­‐2015  Development  Agenda’  ,  ESCAP/ADB/UNDP     Regional  MDGs  Report  2012/13,  p.29  
  • 8. • Over  60%  of  the  world’s  youth  live   in  Asia-­‐Pacific.   • Youth  make  up  about  19%  of  the   region’s  total  popula6on.     • This  translates  into  more  than  750   million  young  women  and  men   aged  15  to  24  years.     • Pacific  Youth  Unemployment  stands   at  c.  23%,  SE  Asia  c.13%   Youth  Unemployment   REGIONAL  OVERVIEW:  YOUTH  IN  ASIA  AND  THE    PACIFIC,  UNESCAP  2012    
  • 9.          Australia  has  as  much  to  learn  from,  and  with,   other  countries,  ins6tu6ons  and  people  in  the   region  as  it  has  to  offer,  
  • 10. Why  is  this  Important?   •   Complex  problems    requires  drawing  together  mul6ple   perspec6ves,  mul6ple  cons6tuencies  and  diverse  world-­‐views.     •   It  is  olen  the  collision  of  ideas,            perspec6ves  and  hunches  that            creates  true  innova6on.     •   We  need  to  avoid  crea6ng            ‘paper  bridges’ See  Ramalingam  (2013  )  ‘Aid  on  the  Edge  of  Chaos’,  Johnson  (2010)  ‘Where  Good  Ideas  Come  From’,   Lant  Pritchep  et  al  (2010)  ‘The  Mechanisms  of  Persistent  Implementa6on  Failure’  
  • 11. Oh  and….   Inequality  is  increasing   in  Australia  too….   Not  to  men6on  the     ‘gaps’  in  Indigenous   Health,  educa6on  &   employment  
  • 12. Oh  and….   The  risk  of  disaster  related     events  is  expected  to  grow   The  IPCC  5th  Assessment  Report  30  March  2014   chapter  on  Australasia  listed  some  key  risks,   including:   •  Increasing  risk  of  death,  infrastructure  losses  and   ecosystem  damage  due  to  wildfires,  heat-­‐waves  and   floods   •  Increasing  risk  to  coastal  infrastructure  and  low-­‐lying   ecosystems  in  Australia  and  New  Zealand  from   conKnuing  sea  level  rise   •  Significant  change  in  community  composiKon  and   structure  of  coral  reef  systems  in  Australia   •  Constraints  on  water  resources  in  southern  Australia  and   a  significant  reducKon  in  agricultural  producKon  in  the   Murray-­‐Darling  Basin  and  far  south-­‐eastern  and  south-­‐ western  Australia  if  scenarios  of  severe  drying  are   realised.   •  The  intensity  of  tropical  cyclones  is  also  projected  to   increase.  
  • 13. Oh  and….   Youth  Unemployment     is  a  key  issue  for  us  too   Not  to  men6on   trafficking,  popula6on   movement  etc   AUSTRALIAN    YOUTH  UNEMPLOYMENT  2014:    SNAPSHOT,  BROTHERHOOD  OF  ST  LAURENCE  
  • 14.          Universi6es  could  play  a  greater  role  in  brokering   collabora6on  on  these  issues,  AND  build  the   capabili6es  to  work  in  this  way,  but  this  would  need     a  number  of  changes.  
  • 15. What  could  Universi6es    do  more  of?   1.  Build  capabili6es*    commensurate  with  the  issues:  inter-­‐disciplinary   &  systems  thinking;    adap6ve  leadership  &  inter-­‐cultural  skills;     network  &  mobilising  skills;    a  global  ethic/solidarity  e.g.  ‘Making   Social  Change  Happen’  subject  at  La  Trobe.   2.  Understand  and  share  the  ‘front-­‐line  prac6ce’  of  community-­‐based   organisa6ons,  reform  coali6ons  and  social  movements,  and  use   ‘posi6ve  deviance’  to  explore  how  these  types  of  ini6a6ves  might  be   beper  encouraged  e.g.  Ins6tute  for  Human  Security  and  Social   Change  agenda   *  Rufus  Black  ‘Educa6ng  the  Millennial  Genera6on’  
  • 16. A  movement  made  up  of  2,400     organisa6ons  in  six  South   Asian  countries.   The  central  force  of  the   campaign  is  people  who  bring   change  –  Change     Makers.  There  are  now  over   2.7  million  Change  Makers     WE  CAN  
  • 17. Encourage  collabora6on  between  Universi6es   Roche(2103)  Effec6ve  partnerships  between  NGOs,  civil  society  organisa6ons  &  universi6es    h$ps://beyond2015.acu.ac.uk/submissions/view?id=47  
  • 18. Incen6ves  for  change?   Within  universi6es:   •  devote  more  resources  to  collabora6ve   partnerships,  learning  &  applied  research  outside     universi6es,   •  buy-­‐in  at  senior-­‐level  for  collabora6on  -­‐  6me   devoted  to  rela6onship-­‐building,  influen6al  outputs   (e.g.  blogs)  and  policy  engagement,   •  Changed  Metrics  &  the  ‘habits  of  ins6tu6ons’  to   reward  researchers  &  teaching  staff  for  connec6ng,   and  policy  dialogue,  not  only  mee6ng  academic   demands  for  peer-­‐reviewed  ar6cles  or  aprac6ng   the  research  or  teaching  dollar.  
  • 19. “If  you  have  come  here  to  help  me,  you  are  was6ng   our  6me.     But  if  you  have  come  because  your  libera6on  is  bound   up  with  mine,  then  let  us  work  together.”     Lilla  Watson