Peter Dingle - Dingle Wellness - Environmental impacts on health, wellbeing and productivity

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Peter Dingle delivered the presentation at the 2014 Perth Safety in Action Conference.

The 2014 Perth Safety in Action Conference focused on enhancing compliance, productivity and affordability for big and small business. Highlights included an international keynote address from Neville Rockhouse, the Safety and Training Manager for Pike River Coal in New Zealand.

For more information about the event, please visit: http://www.safetyinaction.com.au/SIAPerth14

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Peter Dingle - Dingle Wellness - Environmental impacts on health, wellbeing and productivity

  1. 1. Environmental impacts on health, wellbeing and productivity Peter Dingle PhD Dingle Wellness www.drdingle.com peter@drdnigle.com Facebook: Drpeter dingle Linkedin
  2. 2. Our environment • the word “environment” has its roots in fourteenth-century Middle English and means, “that which surrounds us.” • The biggest advances in our health and longevity are the result of improvements in our environment
  3. 3. LEAD workplace wellness program • Lifestyle •Environment • Attitude • Diet
  4. 4. Toxic food/ environment/ lifestyle/ attitude • Inflammation • Oxidation • acidosis
  5. 5. Illness Triad Illness Inflammation Heart attack Stroke Cancer Diabetes 1&2 Psoriasis Alzheimer’s Parkinson’s Chrones Arthritis Autoimmune MS depression Obesity premature aging Oxidation Acidosis Same underlying conditions
  6. 6. Genes Vs Environment • Genetic determinism • everything is determined by our DNA and that we are a victim of our hereditary • If we get a disease it is genetic. • However, only a very few diseases can be blamed entirely on one faulty gene • Only 5% of diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular can be attributed to heredity. • The vast majority of diseases that afflict us today are a result of complex interactions of genes and the environment.
  7. 7. Air pollution • Each day we – Eat up to 5 kg of food – Drink a few liters of liquid and – Breathe 20000 litres of air • Fatigue • Asthma, allergies • Weight gain, CVD, diabetes • Asbestos - extreme
  8. 8. Outdoor Air pollution • WHO • Most work is now done in cities which are polluted • About 3–7% of the annual burden of disease is associated with the included environmental risk factors. • Airborne particulate matter (diameter ≤ 2.5 μm; PM2.5) is the leading risk factor associated with 6,000–10,000 DALYs (Disability-adjusted life years (DALYs)/year and 1 million people. • traffic noise (including road, rail, and air traffic noise)
  9. 9. Primary pollutants • Gases – CO (taxi study) – CO2 – NOx • Hydrocarbons – PAHs • Particulates – Heavy metals – Asbestos
  10. 10. Our study • Asthma recorded a mean value of 1.8 at Leach Highway signifying higher asthma levels in this location than either Camm Avenue and Darley Circle which had results of 1.9 and 2.0 respectively. • Wheezing recorded the same result as asthma. • Tight chest recorded values of 1.85 (Leach), 1.8 (Camm) and 2.0 (Darley Circle). • Camm Avenue recorded equal incidence levels of bronchitis with Leach Highway. • Shortness of breath recorded a large number of positive responses at Leach Highway with a result of 1.65, with Camm Avenue and Darley Circle both recording 1.95.
  11. 11. Why Indoor Air • We spend 90% of our time indoors • Buildings are increasingly airtight • Indoor air from outdoor air sources • More chemicals and materials which emit chemicals are used inside • Ideal conditions for microbial growth (dust mite and fungi) • Pollution from outside also goes inside.
  12. 12. Particulate matter • A collection of physical, chemical and biological components. – Allergens – mould • Size is important • PM 2.5
  13. 13. Three Critical Requirements for Microbial Growth • Temperature • Moisture • Physical and nutritional substrata
  14. 14. Symptoms of acute discomfort include: •Headaches •Eye, nose and throat irritations •Dry cough •Dry or itching skin •Dizziness & nausea •Difficulty in concentration •Fatigue •Sensitivity to odours Sick Building Syndrome (SBS)
  15. 15. Results • 70% reduction in indoor fungi • 38% reduction in particulate matter
  16. 16. 16 ATS Labs: Antimicrobial Performance on Surfaces
  17. 17. Hydroxl radicals •Reduce workplace odour •Save on sanitizers and deodourizers •Save on emissions and odour fines •Reduce bacterial/mould contamination •Reduce viral or bacterial cross-infection: hospitals, schools, daycare, physicians offices, vets, clinics
  18. 18. PM concentrations in air filter group compared to controls
  19. 19. Worlds first barrel vacuum cleaner
  20. 20. Significance of particulate matter reduction after one intensive vacuuming Before Mean (SD) (g/m3) After Mean (SD) (g/m3) Average % reduction P-value PM 10 78.11 (55.49) 44.27 (24.86) 43.33 0.0000 PM 2.5 61.32 (34.74) 36.14 (14.95) 41.06 0.0000
  21. 21. major sources of chemicals Contents of the building: • furniture, • office equipment, • furnishings, • cleaning equipment and chemicals
  22. 22. Formaldehyde concentrations with plants as filters (Dingle)
  23. 23. Hydroxlys • Neutralizes volatile organic compounds (VOC) and toxic inorganic gases (H2S, ammoniaUltimately breaks them down to harmless small natural (gaseous) molecules such as CO2, H2, N2 or O2 • The hydroxyl is chemically HO• (sometimes •OH)
  24. 24. Potential impacts of toxins • Weight gain • Diabetes • CVD • Cancer • Stress • Poor sleep • Fatigue • Immune system depletion • Specific health conditions
  25. 25. But I NEED my antibiotics!!!Society is becoming obsessed with hygeine and cleanliness
  26. 26. Gut bacteria environment interaction Probiotics Toxic effect
  27. 27. On each cm2 of your hand there are about 1,500 bacteria. An average hand has a surface area of: 448cm2 = male 392cm2 = female This means on an average hand there are… 672,000 588,000
  28. 28. Susceptible groups • Infants • Children • Pregnant mothers • Lactating mothers • Aged • Sick and infirm • Stressed • Nutrient depleted • Overweight • Medicated
  29. 29. Environmental Sleep killers • Television / telephone/internet. • Daylight • Thomas Edison • Noise • Mould • Toxic chemicals • Medication
  30. 30. Obesogenic workplaces • Weight gain may be associated with some workplaces and practices. • Including long work-hours, high-demand and low-control pressures and extended periods of performing sedentary tasks (laIa and Pronk, 2001; Kiser, 2007; White and Jacques, 2007, Schulte et al (2007). • Such working conditions are exacerbating the effects of obesity and, in turn, increasing obesity related costs (The National Obesity Taskforce, 2005). • Loss of mobility for extended periods of time not only results in loss of opportunity for energy expenditure but it also increases risk to injury the musculoskeletal system due to sudden, rapid movement (Hamilton, et al, 2007).
  31. 31. Sitting disease • New evidence identifies relationships of too much sitting with overweight and obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, some cancers and other adverse health outcomes. • underlying mechanisms and dose-response relationships • potentially modifiable environmental and social determinants of sedentary behaviour
  32. 32. Medication and OHS • Fatigue • Sleep • Obesity • Accidents • Injury
  33. 33. Theoretical wellness/productivity loss from medication Percentage Reduction in productivity Number of drugs
  34. 34. Wellness begins at home • Stress • Sleep • Fatigue • Pollution • Viruses • Nutrition resilience • Medication
  35. 35. LEAD workplace wellness program •Lifestyle •Environment •Attitude •Diet
  36. 36. LEAD program • Wellness architecture and infrastructure • Wellness culture • Wellness motivation
  37. 37. Dr Peter Dingle www.drdingle.com .com
  38. 38. Dingle Wellness Corporate health Workplace Wellness Programs Social media Facebook Drpeter dingle Linkedin www.drdingle.com Peter@drdingle.com The END Dr Peter Dingle www.drdingle.com .com

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