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Paul Smyth, University of Melbourne: Inclusive Growth and the Social Determinants of Health
Paul Smyth, University of Melbourne: Inclusive Growth and the Social Determinants of Health
Paul Smyth, University of Melbourne: Inclusive Growth and the Social Determinants of Health
Paul Smyth, University of Melbourne: Inclusive Growth and the Social Determinants of Health
Paul Smyth, University of Melbourne: Inclusive Growth and the Social Determinants of Health
Paul Smyth, University of Melbourne: Inclusive Growth and the Social Determinants of Health
Paul Smyth, University of Melbourne: Inclusive Growth and the Social Determinants of Health
Paul Smyth, University of Melbourne: Inclusive Growth and the Social Determinants of Health
Paul Smyth, University of Melbourne: Inclusive Growth and the Social Determinants of Health
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Paul Smyth, University of Melbourne: Inclusive Growth and the Social Determinants of Health

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Professor Paul Smyth, Professor of Social Policy, The University of Melbourne and General Manager of the Research & Policy Centre, Brotherhood of St Laurence …

Professor Paul Smyth, Professor of Social Policy, The University of Melbourne and General Manager of the Research & Policy Centre, Brotherhood of St Laurence
delivered this presentation at the 2013 Social Determinants of Health conference. The conference brought together health, social services and public policy organisations to discuss how social determinants affect the health of the nation and to consider how policy decisions can be targeted to reduce health inequities. The agenda facilitated much needed discussion on new approaches to manage social determinants of health and bridge the gap in health between the socially disadvantaged and the broader Australian population. For more information about the event, please visit the conference website: http://www.informa.com.au/social-determinants.

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  • 1. Inclusive Growth and the Social Determinants of Health Paul Smyth University of Melbourne and Brotherhood of St Laurence
  • 2. Sdh and social policy • Sdh uncertain policy future • Siloed but linked to wider social policy environment • Sp = social services and Income Support • welfare state consensus 1940s-1970s • Social welfare and economic policy polarised (1990s) • Building a new consensus 2010s: sdh fits?
  • 3. Sdh and the old welfare state consensus • Post-war welfare state consensus – social policy as adjunct to the economy. Keynes underpins huge social services expansion • Social policy against the economy: welfare state as site of social rights altruism; capitalism as egoism, competition etc 1970s sdh • 1990s efficiency and growth versus social welfare • Get economy right first with health and social policy a cost to be contained
  • 4. To new consensus: ‘social investment state’ • 2000s from welfare state to social investment state (new labour; giddens; EU) • Capability • early years (Heckman) • life course human capital welfare to work • Place based joined up sdh • COAG 2008-13 (education, health, ‘closing the gap’) • European Commission (2013) ‘Social Investment Package’
  • 5. Social investment state needs inclusive growth • Social investment and the GFC • World bank-IMF and Inclusive Growth • ‘The erstwhile parochial focus on economic growth as the sole precondition for development has been supplanted by a more holistic understanding of development that places social policies at the centre of development and poverty reduction.’
  • 6. After ‘washington consensus’ • Economic growth cannot be a proxy for development but success must be measured against both economic and social goals. • Benefits don’t ‘trickle down’ after you achieve growth: policies for inclusion and growth must happen together. • Growth needs to be broad-based across sectors (no two-speed economy with, say, a gap between urban and rural citizens). • Social infrastructure must underpin equality of opportunity.
  • 7. World bank • Productive employment, not just taxes and transfers, is the key to inclusion. • Human capital should be understood as productive investment not ‘consumption’. • Some inequality provides incentives but excessive inequality harms cohesion and growth. • Redistribution engenders popular support for tough economic reforms.
  • 8. OECD 2013-14 • The truth is that our economic growth models have not equitably distributed benefits. Inequalities were brewing under the surface prior to 2007 … We need to reverse this trend. Inclusive Growth has an important role to play in responding to the pressing needs of today and addressing the underlying trends that pushed our economic and social systems into disequilibrium
  • 9. Sdh and inclusive growth • Sdh can gain from larger consensus around reducing inequalityboosting growth • strengthen the coag human capital base of social investment state in Australia Along side education • The social gradient approach and the targeted universal challenge for australians • Emerging agenda on ‘civil society’ – importance of joined up community interventions including sdh

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