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Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application
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Neil Walters, Invensys: Experiences with mid-life controls upgrade for Gas Turbine Generators in Peaking Power Plant application

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Neil Walters, Turbomachinery Control Consultant, Invensys delivered this presentation at the 2013 Gas Turbines conference. The event is designed as a platform for discussion on the latest technologies …

Neil Walters, Turbomachinery Control Consultant, Invensys delivered this presentation at the 2013 Gas Turbines conference. The event is designed as a platform for discussion on the latest technologies & developments in gas power generation. For more information on the annual event, please visit the conference website: http://www.informa.com.au/gasturbinesconference

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  • 1. CASE STUDY OF A MID-LIFE CONTROLS UPGRADE ON GAS TURBINE GENERATORS USED IN A PEAKING POWER PLANT Presented to: 14th Australian Gas Turbines Conference Presented by: Neil Walters 30-31st October 2013 Slide 1 Based on Whitepaper by Dinesh Damodaran, Neil Walters and Sven Grone
  • 2. Agenda 1. Who is Invensys – peaking plant upgrade experience 2. Peaking plant commercial & operational drivers 3. Challenges of ageing controls & drivers for upgrade 4. Regulatory compliance issues & best practice 5. Grandfathering of existing controls 6. How “off the shelf” safety PLC addresses GTG upgrade challenges 7. Examples of control functions considered “safety critical” 8. Real-world examples of safety loop implementations Slide 2
  • 3. 1 Who is Invensys - turbine & peaking plant upgrade experience Slide 3 I
  • 4. Who is Invensys • UK listed public multinational – approx. $1B PA revenue • Employs 10,000 people & operates in 80 countries • Software, Industrial Automation, Energy Control, Appliance Control • Includes industry leading automation Software, Control & Automation brands Slide 4 Invensys proprietary & c
  • 5. Who is Invensys • Automation, Control, Safety, HMI, SCADA, Instrumentation • Energy, Power, O&G, petrochemical, MMM, Food & Beverage – 23 of the top 25 petroleum companies – 48 of the top 50 chemical companies – 18 of the top 20 pharmaceutical companies – 35 of the top 50 nuclear power plants – All of the top 10 mining companies • Specialist Turbomachinery Solutions Provider – 25 year heritage in TMC – 4,500 machines under control – Gas turbine, steam turbine, compressor and generator controls & protection Slide 5
  • 6. Invensys Australia turbine upgrade experience Slide 6 Invensys prop
  • 7. Invensys Australia Peaker upgrade experience • 27 machines upgraded over last 10 years • Gas turbines, generators, hydraulics & instrumentation • Case study not site specific - based on lessons learned Slide 7 Invensys proprietary & l
  • 8. 2 Peaking plant commercial & operational drivers Slide 8 © Invensys 00/00/00 Invensys proprietary & confidential
  • 9. Peaker plant – commercial & operational drivers • Commercial – Revenue from power production during peak demand times – Revenue from proven generation capacity (availability) • Operational – Many plants commissioned decades ago – Rarely operate compared to base load (hours/weeks per year) – Major costs – fuel, manning, maintenance – Focus on reducing operational costs – Ensuring machine availability and reliability – Retirement of experienced workforce Slide 9
  • 10. 3 Challenges of ageing controls & drivers for upgrade Slide 10
  • 11. Challenges of ageing equipment • Ageing controls introduce risk • Commercial risk – Revenue risk from “fail to start” on demand – Revenue from fail to synchronise within contracted time – Revenue risk from poor on-line performance Slide 11
  • 12. Challenges of ageing equipment • Operational risk – Equipment reliability degraded – Availability of spare parts becomes limited – Workforce expertise disappearing – OEM technical support withdrawing – Visibility - older controls have limited diagnostic capability – If operating a fleet with different OEM machines – challenges are compounded, requiring knowledge/experience with multiple systems Slide 12
  • 13. Challenges of ageing equipment • Regulatory risk – Older controls unable to meet current standards & best practice – Operations most hazardous when tripping or starting back up – lower reliability = lower safety – HSE reporting burden may increase Slide 13
  • 14. Drivers for controls upgrade • Reduce commercial, operational and regulatory risk • Extend the useful life of the machine • Increase machine availability and reliability • Increase machine start/stop, synch and on-line performance • Eliminate single points of failure in control system • Eliminate instances “fail to start” on demand • Increase machine maintainability Slide 14
  • 15. Drivers for controls upgrade • Increase machine safety, provide high fidelity HMI and diagnostic capability • Reduce cost of maintenance, parts and technical support • Provide current/modern controls for current emerging workforce • Lower total cost of ownership for the asset • Bring controls in line with current regulatory standards and best practice • Provide auditable evidence of best practice compliance Slide 15
  • 16. 4 Regulatory compliance issues & best practice Slide 16
  • 17. Applicable regulations and standards • Various standards apply depending on the scope of the upgrade • Applicable regulations and standards include – AS3814 (2009) Australian Standard for Industrial and Commercial gas-fired appliances – AS 1375 Australian Standard for Industrial fuel fired appliances – AS5601 Australian Standard for Gas Installations – AS61508 (2010) Australian Standard for Functional Safety for all Industry Sectors – AS61511 (2004) Australian Standard for Functional Safety of Safety Instrumented Systems in the Process Industry Sector – ISO 21789 (2009) International Standard for Safety requirements in Gas Turbine Applications – AS 62061 (2006) Australian Standard for Machine Safety – AS 4629 (2005) Slide 17 Australian Standard for Automatic shut-off and vent valves
  • 18. Applicable regulations and standards • For gas fired appliances drawing fuel from a commercial network AS3814 applies • For liquid fueled turbines AS1375 applies • For gas turbines with liquid fuel capability – both apply • AS3814 and AS1375 are national regulations requiring 3rd party regulatory inspection for compliance • Any non- mandatory (best practice) standards that referenced within also become mandatory – E.G. AS3814 (2009) references AS61508 when using a programmable electronic system (PES/PLC) for safety controls. Thus by reference, compliance to AS65108 is required – Proposed changes to AS1375 will make similar references for safety controls using a PES Slide 18
  • 19. Applicable regulations and standards • Compliance to current applicable regulations mandatory for a “modification or relocation” of a “Type B gas Appliance” under AS3814 Section 1.2.5 • AS3814 defines a “Type B gas Appliance” in Section 1.4.4.2 • AS3814 defines “modification” in Section 1.4.74 • If applicable compliance for safety functions on GT will require more than just a controls hardware upgrade – AS61508 referenced by AS3814 requires 3rd party certification of PES/PLC performing GT safety functions – Also requires a Process Hazard Analysis/Risk Assessment to be performed – Requires safety functions to be identified and assigned a safety integrity level (SIL) – Requires SIL design verification & validation – Defines a minimum requirement for fuel gas train valve arrangement – Requires regular periodic proof testing of safety related field devices Slide 19
  • 20. Regulatory Bodies • Each state has a different regulatory body responsible – QLD: DEEDI Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation – NT: Department of Minerals and Energy – WA: Office of Energy/Department of Mines and Petroleum – VIC: EnergySafe Victoria – NSW: Gas Supply (Safety management) Regulations 2002 – SA: Office of Technical Regulator – TAS: Office of the Tasmanian Economic Regulator • The regulator has ultimate power to enforce compliance in conjunction with any other local law or requirement • Knowledge and application of standards by individual inspector will vary from region to region • Always best to involve regulator from beginning to ensure smooth approval process Slide 20
  • 21. Regulatory Bodies • The Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) will require compliance to NER Chapter 5 for modifications affecting electrical characteristics for grid connection • Relevant sections are – excitation control system - S5.2.5.5, S5.2.5.7, S5.2.5.12,S5.2.5.13 – voltage control system - S5.2.5.5, S5.2.5.12, S5.2.5.13 – governor control system - S5.2.5.7, S5.2.5.11, S5.2.5.14 • This may require revalidation of Governor, Generator / AVR models originally registered with AEMO. • Many older machine models may not comply to current AEMO standards and may require development of new R1/R2 models • Involving AEMO / Technical Regulator at concept stage will avoid problems later Slide 21
  • 22. 5 Grandfathering of existing controls Slide 22
  • 23. What is “grandfathering” • Many plants were installed prior to application of current standards • “Grandfathering” acknowledges best practices of the past and protects operators from being forced to upgrade every time standards change • Allows for continued operation of existing controls even if they don’t meet current requirements provided…… – Machine controls are operated and maintained as per the original license to operate – Are not “modified or relocated” as defined in AS3814 Sect. 1.2.5 & 1.4.74 Slide 23
  • 24. Potential down side of “grandfathering” • Many operators perceive compliance to current standards as cost prohibitive • Grandfathering leads to continued operation of ageing or obsolete controls beyond useful life of hardware • Hardware at end of life (EOL) experiences increased random failure • Potentially significant impact on plant availability and performance & increased operational cost • Potential degradation of plant safety • Potential increase in plant downtime if spares and/or technical support no longer available • Potential legal/regulatory impact if an incident occurs Slide 24
  • 25. Grandfathering using “Like for Like” upgrade • Some GT OEM’s offer “card replacement” control hardware upgrades claiming “like for like” functionality • Can provide justification for continued grandfathering even after upgrade (not classified as “modification” under AS3814) Slide 25
  • 26. Grandfathering using “Like for Like” upgrade • Cautionary issues to be considered: – Seek regulator assessment to validate “like for like” justification – Regulator may require complete system re-testing to validate – Onus is on operator to prove case for grandfathering – Will not be able to address current regulatory standards – Does not address other parts of ageing control, system (field device reliability, HMI/Diagnostic visibility, hydraulic circuit integrity etc.) – If original system was not fault tolerant – reliability issues from hardware failures may persist – Does not address any issues with field wiring degradation or “lost” documentation Slide 26
  • 27. 6 How “off the shelf” safety PLC addresses GTG upgrade challenges Slide 27
  • 28. Using “off the shelf” PLC • Improving machine availability and reliability • Improving machine maintainability • Reducing total cost of ownership • Making the plant safer, regulatory compliance Slide 28
  • 29. Using “off the shelf” PLC • Improving machine availability and reliability – Provides open hardware and software (no more “black boxes”) – Allows operator to take “total ownership” of the machine – Provides improved machine controls, faster time to synch, better on-line performance characteristics – Provides modern hardware fault tolerant architectures – Provides no single point failure – Eliminates spurious trips – Provides open platform for high fidelity operator HMI – Provides platform for integration of all plant controls – not just machine controls – EG. Building ventilation, R.O. plant, F & G, H.V. protection etc. Slide 29
  • 30. Using “off the shelf” PLC • Improving maintainability – Allows on-line repair and “hot swap” of faulty components – Application can be optimised for individual plant requirements (not OEM limitations) – Provides advanced system diagnostic, better visibility, faster fault finding – Provides high resolution sequence of event capture for fast root cause analysis – Spares, service, support and training available locally from vendor global network – Can be applied to different OEM machines for standardised design, implementation and operation – Fewer skills to maintain, no special tools required – Better documentation, manuals, on-line support Slide 30
  • 31. Using “off the shelf” PLC • Reducing total cost of ownership – Upgrade capital cost usually less than OEM – Improved machine performance = less operational cost – Improved machine reliability = less operational cost – Reduction in unplanned downtime = less operational costs – Improved visibility = faster recovery from trips – Fault tolerance + on-line repair = less spares holding – Spares, service, support and training available locally at local rates – Using same controller for all control function reduces hardware, spares and skills to maintain – Applied as a standard design across entire fleet = less training and skills maintenance – Open “off the shelf” system makes acquisition of skills from the open market easier and less expensive Slide 31
  • 32. Using “off the shelf” PLC • Making the plant safer, regulatory compliance – Improved machine reliability = safer operation – Adopting current best practice & standards = safer operation – Using TUV Certified hardware provides basis for regulatory compliance – Open system allows implementation by both vendor and/or qualified system integrator – Open system allows operator to own and optimise controls to his needs = safer plant Slide 32
  • 33. 7 Examples of control functions considered “safety critical” Slide 33
  • 34. Specifically required by AS3814 • Section 2.10 Gas supply over pressure protection • Section 2.11 Gas supply lower pressure protection • Section 2.14.9.3 Shutoff Valve feedbacks discrepancy • Section 3.5.5 Flame Failure • Section 5.8.2.4 b) Fail to Ignite • Section 2.17.4 Air Flow Fails (Loss of Speed ) • Section 2.19 & 5.8.3 Turbine Purging Slide 34
  • 35. Other functions also considered safety critical • Not listed in AS3814, however our experience is that functional safety assessment will reveal as very likely to be safety functions. – Over Speed Protection – Low Lube Oil Pressure – High Vibration – Turbine Emergency Stop – High Exhaust Temperature – High Bearing Temperature Slide 35
  • 36. 8 Real-world examples of safety loop implementations Slide 36 © Invensys proprietary &
  • 37. TYPICAL VALVE TRAIN UPGRADE THE VALVE ARRANGMENT SHOWN BELOW IS FROM A 35+ YEAR OLD GAS TURBINE. IT IS NON COMPLIANT WITH AS 3814 Slide 37 ©I Invensys proprietary &
  • 38. TYPICAL VALVE TRAIN UPGRADE AS 3814 FIGURE C6 (b) FUEL GAS SYSTEM FOR TURBINES AND LARGE ENGINES >5 Gj/hr – MINIMUM ARRANGEMENT Slide 38 © Invensys proprietary & c
  • 39. TYPICAL VALVE TRAIN UPGRADE AFTER MODIFICATION, THE VALVE TRAIN ARRANGMENT IS NOW COMPLIANT WITH MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS PER AS 3814 FAST ACTING SHUTOFF VALVE – CLOSED AT EVERY SHUTDOWN FLOW CONTROL VALVE MANUAL ISOLATION VALVES X 2 FILTER 2 X VENT LINES 2 X AUTO SHUTOFF VALVES Slide 39 Invensys proprietary & c
  • 40. CALCULATION OF PURGE TIME PER AS 3814 BELOW IS A TYPICAL GAS TURBINE WITH A COMPLEX EXHAUST SYSTEM. {For information only as a HRSG would rarely be used on a peaking generator.} Slide 40
  • 41. CALCULATION OF PURGE TIME PER AS 3814 Slide 41 Invensys proprietary &
  • 42. THANK YOU Neil Walters Turbomachinery Consultant neil.walters@invensys.com © Invensys 00/00/00

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