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Moira Jenkins - Aboto Psychology & Workplace Conflict Management Services - The importance of reporting and seeking to analyse bullying trend patterns in your organisation
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Moira Jenkins - Aboto Psychology & Workplace Conflict Management Services - The importance of reporting and seeking to analyse bullying trend patterns in your organisation

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Moira Jenkins delivered the presentation at 2014 Workplace Bullying Conference. ...

Moira Jenkins delivered the presentation at 2014 Workplace Bullying Conference.

The Workplace Bullying Conference 2014 focused on the effects of the legislative changes to date and on implementing practical policies and programs for bullying prevention.

For more information about the event, please visit: http://www.informa.com.au/workplacebullyingevent14

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    Moira Jenkins - Aboto Psychology & Workplace Conflict Management Services - The importance of reporting and seeking to analyse bullying trend patterns in your organisation Moira Jenkins - Aboto Psychology & Workplace Conflict Management Services - The importance of reporting and seeking to analyse bullying trend patterns in your organisation Presentation Transcript

    • BULLYING IS NOT ABOUT THE PSYCHOPATHS: RATHER, THE WAY WE MANAGE THE RISKS OR The importance of reporting and seeking to analyse bullying trend patterns in your organisation
    • Carlo Caponecchia and Anne Wyatt, Preventing Workplace Bullying: An evidence- based guide for managers and employees, Allen & Unwin, Crows Nest, NSW, 2011, p. 139 Bullying is the key workplace health and safety issue of our time. It can affect anyone in any job, regardless of what task they perform, what kind of people they work with, or of what industry they are part of. These issues are not easy and they need to be tackled head on, rather than ignored until they become so unbearable for people that they cannot face going to work.
    • Its not about the psychopaths “People will always prefer black-and-white ,over shades of grey, and so there will always be the temptation to hold overly-simplified beliefs and to hold them with excessive confidence” Thomas Gilovich, How We Know What Isn't So: The Fallibility of Human Reason in Everyday Life
    • It is about the Risk. “The line between good and evil is permeable and almost anyone can be induced to cross it when pressured by situational forces.” Philip G. Zimbardo, The Lucifer Effect: Understanding How Good People Turn Evil
    • A risk management approach  There are risks in all organisations that can contribute to bullying emerging and escalating,  Risks allow poor behaviours and badly managed conflicts to emerge, worsen… become patterns, accepted behaviours, part of the culture and …….. bullying to occur,  Some risks common to all organisations,  Different risks can produce different ‘types’ of bullying,  Not all bullying is the same.
    • A risk management approach depends on  Systems of reporting  Analysing bullying trend patterns  In order to identifying the risks that may have contributed to those trends
    • 1. Identify the Hazard 2. What risks can contribute to the hazard? 3. Evaluate and prioritise the risks 4. Develop a risk management strategy 5. Evaluate your strategy
    • 1.Identify the risk: When it comes to risk, every organisation is different  Organisational and industrial issues:  Social team cultures : including impact of geographical locations and physical environment  Policies and processes including industry standards:  Human resources : characteristics of managers / leaders/ targets / perpetrators
    • 2. Evaluate and prioritise the risks  This involves working out the likelihood of the risk occurring and the consequence to the organisation or a member (or members) of that organisation if that risk eventuates.  How likely it is a risk will occur ? On a 1: 5 scale (1 for Almost Certain, 2 for Likely, 3 Possible, 4 Unlikely, 5 Rare).
    • 3.Developing a risk management strategy  Rank each risk in terms of the consequence or the severity of the result to your organisation or individuals). Extreme, Severe, Moderate, Small, Negligible.  This will help you decide an appropriate risk management strategy:
    • Groups of risks:  Industrial issues and the way that work is organised (including management culture);  Policies and procedures (or lack of);  Workgroup / department / cultures including geographical location of group;  Target, perpetrator and witness characteristics, including management style.
    • This risk management approach highlights the importance of:  Identifying and analyse bullying trend patterns in your organisation  Identifying and assessing the risks in your organisation that lead to these trends
    • Inherent in all forms of bullying are:  Power  Threatening / humiliating  Repeated behaviours  Escalating behaviours  Behaviour is of a nature, and longevity that it presents a risk to the health and safety of the target/s
    • Bullying my be… intentional or unintentional
    • However: there are different types of bullying  Conflict escalation  Predatory bullying  Mobbing  Normalised behaviours (which are in fact bullying)  Upwards bullying  Victimisation (of a whistle-blower)  Overlap between bullying, repeated acts of discrimination and sexual harassment
    • Normalised behaviours  When the teacher told his employer that the long hours and stress flowing from juggling roles and particular unrealistic demands was affecting his health, the school and Education Department failed to adequately respond.  Justice Anderson said the school harassed and victimised the teacher and the behaviour directed towards the teacher was “sinister”  The principal "demeaned" the teacher when he complained about the victimisation
    •  The teacher sought a meeting with his principal and district superintendent to talk about his complaints which amounted to a request for a grievance procedure, Justice Anderson said.  The teacher later resigned, which Justice Anderson accepted was a constructive dismissal arising from an irretrievable breakdown in the employment relationship..  He said the teacher "was truly left to his own devices", performing a job "much different and much more onerous" than the one he applied for. The school and the department failed to deal with his grievances – instead harassed and victimised him - and the principal showed him no compassion or understanding.  McDonald v State of South Australia [2008] SASC 134 (21 May 2008)
    • Stuart.  Apprentice, age  Employment relationship (Host employer)  Poor complaint resolution processes – not followed  No training, policies and procedures  Culture of the kitchen  Witness who didn’t speak up / act  Perpetrators behaviour not addressed – perpetrator characteristics  Management style  Targets ways of coping = mental illness
    • Risk management approach  System of identifying and managing risks  A system that is built around individual organisations – what they look like, what they do, where they are, and what the trend patterns look like..  Communication is inherent in building and maintaining the system  More than silos or traditional HR approach
    • After a bullying complaint…  A ‘Risk Management Approach’;  Complaint resolution options including facilitated discussion, mediation, and investigation;  How did this start? Why did this start?  What risks allowed the conflict to escalate to this point?  What stratergies do we now need to put in place to address those risks:  Individual  Team  Organisation
    • Take a minute to think about your own organisation and the risks to bullying. Where does MY responsibility sit?