Michael Wall - KPMG - Skilled Migration Policy – Winding back the clock?
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Michael Wall - KPMG - Skilled Migration Policy – Winding back the clock?

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Michael Wall delivered the presentation at the 2014 Skilling Australia Summit. ...

Michael Wall delivered the presentation at the 2014 Skilling Australia Summit.

The 8th Annual Skilling Australia Summit considered the current policy framework and examined state and national challenges for skilling the Australian economy at this time. Current skilled shortages within industry groups were addressed and debated.

For more information about the event, please visit: http://www.informa.com.au/skillingoz14

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Michael Wall - KPMG - Skilled Migration Policy – Winding back the clock? Michael Wall - KPMG - Skilled Migration Policy – Winding back the clock? Presentation Transcript

  • 1© 2014 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. Agenda The role of migration policy in supporting economic development A greater role for the business in shaping migration policy Emerging trends in global mobility
  • 2© 2014 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. A message from Arthur Calwell
  • 3© 2014 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. •  Net growth in working age population aged 15-64 in Australia based on 2008 outlook with different annual migration assumptions 1972 20562012 -100,000 - 50,000 0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 300,000 1972 1975 1978 1981 1984 1987 1990 1993 1996 1999 2002 2005 2008 2011 2014 2017 2020 2023 2026 2029 2032 2035 2038 2041 2044 2047 2050 2053 2056 ERP Proj - 0k NOM Proj -70k NOM Proj -180k NOM Australia is moving from baby boom to baby bust … the effect of Net Overseas Migration Source: Based on Australian Bureau of Statistics data; KPMG Demographics Estimated Resident Population
  • 4© 2014 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. Japan’s prime tax-paying population has been in decline for 20 years -1,500,000 -1,000,000 -500,000 0 500,000 1,000,000 1,500,000 2,000,000 1951 1953 1955 1957 1959 1961 1963 1965 1967 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015 2017 2019 2021 2023 2025 2027 2029 2031 2033 2035 2037 2039 2041 2043 2045 2047 2049 2051 Demographic Faultline 1951 20512012 Net change in working age population (15-64) over 100 years in Japan Source: KPMG Demographics, utilising data from United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2011). World Population Prospects: The 2010 Revision, CD-ROM Edition
  • 5© 2014 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. China must manage its demographic faultline later this decade -15,000,000 -10,000,000 -5,000,000 0 5,000,000 10,000,000 15,000,000 20,000,000 25,000,000 1951 1953 1955 1957 1959 1961 1963 1965 1967 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 2015 2017 2019 2021 2023 2025 2027 2029 2031 2033 2035 2037 2039 2041 2043 2045 2047 2049 2051 1951 20512012 Net change in working age population (15-64) over 100 years in China Source: KPMG Demographics, utilising data from United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division (2011). World Population Prospects: The 2010 Revision, CD-ROM Edition Demographic Faultline
  • 6© 2014 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. Australia’s migration programmes Permanent Migration Programme ■  Set by government on an annual basis ■  Wide Industry consultation and labour market research ■  Main components –  Family –  Employer sponsored –  General Skilled Migration –  Business Innovation and Investment ■  Humanitarian programme Temporary Programme ■  Ongoing policy revision ■  Demand-driven – no quotas ■  Main components –  Subclass 457 visa –  Student visa –  Working Holiday visa
  • 7© 2014 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. Skilled migration – Australian Government’s stated objectives ■  To build economic growth through addressing skills shortages, preventing labour force decline and ameliorating our declining aged dependency ratio (workers to retirees) ■  To assist the three ‘P’s’ of economic growth – Population, participation and productivity ■  To attract the best and brightest skilled migrants ■  To complement but not displace Australian workers (jobs and training for Australians remains the government’s top priority) ■  To ensure that skilled migration is only used to fill genuine skill shortages
  • 8© 2014 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. Skilled migration – Key features ■  Makes up 67.7% of the Migration Programme for 2013 – 2014* ■  Increased 19% from 107,868 in 2009 – 10 to 128,973 in 2012-2013* ■  Employer sponsored increased 15% from 40,987 to 47,250 in same period* ■  Introduction of SkillSelect in 2012 - A move to a demand driven program ■  Increased focus on regional programs leading to an increase in visa numbers Source: 2012-13 Migration Program Report DIBP
  • 9© 2014 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. SkillSelect ■  Introduction of the Skilled Occupation List (SOL) cutting eligible occupations under General Skilled Migration from around 400 to 180 ■  SOL developed and maintained by the Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency (Department of Industry from 1 July 2014) ■  Thorough skills assessment process required through Government appointed assessing authorities deemed appropriate for the nominated occupation ■  Quotas set for each occupation ■  Individuals must be invited to apply ■  Ability for employers to directly access SkillSelect applicants via the Employer Portal of SkillSelect
  • 10© 2014 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. A greater role for the business ■  Significant industry consultation including: –  457 integrity review –  SIV review –  BIIP review –  Offshore Resources Act –  Migration Programme Consultations ■  Increase in employer sponsored migration as a key policy initiative.
  • 11© 2014 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. Employer sponsored outcome from 2003-04 to 2012-13 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 40,000 45,000 50,000 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 Offshore Onshore Source: 2012-13 Migration Program Report DIBP
  • 12© 2014 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. Regional Sponsored Migration Scheme (RSMS) outcome from 2003-04 to 2012-13 Source: 2012-13 Migration Program Report DIBP 2,183 3,166 3,454 3,784 5,062 8,811 10,213 11,120 16,471 20,510 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 14,000 16,000 18,000 20,000 22,000 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13
  • 13© 2014 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. Emerging trends in global mobility ■  Global mobility pushing up the Boardroom Agenda ■  Mobility on the rise but taking a different form ■  A move away from the traditional 2-4 year international expatriate assignment ■  Increase in short term assignments and business travellers due to factors including: –  Cost control –  Speed of deployment –  Technology advancements –  Family commitments ■  Increase in international mobility of the below 35 year age bracket ■  Greater focus on linking talent with mobility
  • 14© 2014 KPMG, an Australian partnership and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International Cooperative (“KPMG International”), a Swiss entity. All rights reserved. The KPMG name, logo and “cutting through complexity” are registered trademarks or trademarks of KPMG International. Liability limited by a scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation. Emerging trends in global mobility (continued) ■  Increased compliance focus by Governments around the world and the corporate response –  Global centralisation of immigration programs –  Greater use of technology to track international assignments –  Linking the tax and immigration functions – the two areas of greater risk
  • Thank you Michael Wall Partner National Leader – Immigration Services KPMG Australia +61 2 9335 8625 mwall@kpmg.com.au MARN 9576974