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Managing track through wheel
maintenance
Dr Martin Murray
29 May 2013
Newcastle
Who am I?
• Director of KCPM Consulting (track consulting business)
• BE (Civil) 1973, PhD (Melb) 1978
• 22 years of R&D p...
What’s the problem?
But aren’t track forces well understood?
Accepted wisdom for safe operation of trains & track and to
ensure long life in t...
A rich source of data from real trains & track
Typical maximum
permitted impact
force Weibull
distribution
What are the real forces? - 1
What are the real forces? - 2
What’s a Weibull distribution?
I = magnitude of impact force (kN)
f = frequency of occurrenc...
Typical maximum
permitted impact
force
What are the real forces? - 3
1.5% of all axles
> 1 million axles /annum each site
=1 axle/year
What are the real forces? - 4
Four WID sites
Three Aust....
What are the real forces? - 5
What are the real forces? - 5
What are the real forces? - 5
What are the real forces? - 5
What are the real forces? - 6
A1
A2 B
What are the real forces? - 7
What are the real forces? - 7
What’s going on here?
• Large impact forces at WID sites are from
defected wheels, eg wheel flats
• So, smaller impact for...
And the consequences are?
The policies and practices of the operator
can dramatically affect maximum track
forces, which m...
Managing the track asset through
wheel maintenance
Dr Martin Murray
29 May 2013
Newcastle
Thank you
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Martin Murray, KCPM Consulting - Managing Track through Wheel Maintenance

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Martin Murray, Director, KCPM Consulting delivered the presentation at the RISSB’s 2013 Rail Turnouts Workshop.

The RISSB’s National Rail Turnouts Workshop 2013 gives all those involved an in-depth forum to consolidate and share the latest technical information for rail turnouts. Drawing on industry expertise, the workshop features technical and practical presentations that address key turnout functions in an every-day operational context.

For more information about the event, please visit: http://www.informa.com.au/railturnoutsworkshop13

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Transcript of "Martin Murray, KCPM Consulting - Managing Track through Wheel Maintenance"

  1. 1. Managing track through wheel maintenance Dr Martin Murray 29 May 2013 Newcastle
  2. 2. Who am I? • Director of KCPM Consulting (track consulting business) • BE (Civil) 1973, PhD (Melb) 1978 • 22 years of R&D projects and consulting work for railway industry • Published >60 international papers on rail track • Created railway infrastructure MEng @ QUT • University academic for 35 years • Grandfather, pastor, grey & bald, & >50! • Presentation drawn from CORE2012 conference paper..
  3. 3. What’s the problem?
  4. 4. But aren’t track forces well understood? Accepted wisdom for safe operation of trains & track and to ensure long life in train & track components: • Maximum impact force for wagons: ~230kN • Maximum impact force for locos: ~300kN • Where these forces are exceeded due to wheel-tread defects, the wheels should be removed and machined..
  5. 5. A rich source of data from real trains & track
  6. 6. Typical maximum permitted impact force Weibull distribution What are the real forces? - 1
  7. 7. What are the real forces? - 2 What’s a Weibull distribution? I = magnitude of impact force (kN) f = frequency of occurrence of force (the rest are constants defining the shape of the curve)…
  8. 8. Typical maximum permitted impact force What are the real forces? - 3
  9. 9. 1.5% of all axles > 1 million axles /annum each site =1 axle/year What are the real forces? - 4 Four WID sites Three Aust. states Three track owners Coal & ore trains All >100MGT/a 60-68kg/m rail Heavy conc sleepers ≥ 250mm ballast 25-35TAL 70-80km/h Many Gb of data 2005 to 2011
  10. 10. What are the real forces? - 5
  11. 11. What are the real forces? - 5
  12. 12. What are the real forces? - 5
  13. 13. What are the real forces? - 5
  14. 14. What are the real forces? - 6 A1 A2 B
  15. 15. What are the real forces? - 7
  16. 16. What are the real forces? - 7
  17. 17. What’s going on here? • Large impact forces at WID sites are from defected wheels, eg wheel flats • So, smaller impact forces must mean less severe wheel defects in the fleet (esp for large axle loads) • Less severe fleet defects are related to operator issues: • Harder steel chosen for wheel treads, and/or • “Gentler” driver behaviour through training & supervision, & better braking systems, and/or • Better policy & practice with defect detection, removal, rectification… www.sodahead.com www.trainboard.com
  18. 18. And the consequences are? The policies and practices of the operator can dramatically affect maximum track forces, which means for the track owner: • better operator policies & practices can mean cheaper track; • with this sort of WID data analysis, the track owner can: • reward a diligent operator and/or penalise lower quality operator; • make informed decisions about future growth in traffic volumes, speeds and axle loadings… www.kenyan-post.com
  19. 19. Managing the track asset through wheel maintenance Dr Martin Murray 29 May 2013 Newcastle Thank you
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