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Lindsay Crossen, Chair, National Infrastructure Advisory Board - Planning for efficient infrastructure development in New Zealand
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Lindsay Crossen, Chair, National Infrastructure Advisory Board - Planning for efficient infrastructure development in New Zealand

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Lindsay Crossen delivered the presentation at the 2014 NEW ZEALAND INFRASTRUCTURE SUMMIT. …

Lindsay Crossen delivered the presentation at the 2014 NEW ZEALAND INFRASTRUCTURE SUMMIT.

The New Zealand Infrastructure Summit brings you the most up to date infrastructure news combining case studies and key presentations, addressing developments in the some of the main infrastructure hubs, such as Auckland and Christchurch.

For more information about the event, please visit: http://www.informa.com.au/nzinfra14

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  • 1. The National Infrastructure Advisory Board Demand Management & Optimising Infrastructure Investment Speaker: Lindsay Crossen Chair NIAB
  • 2. The National Infrastructure Advisory Board • The National Infrastructure Unit & Advisory Board • Context: Direction of travel, the National Infrastructure Plan, and the Evidence Base • Demand Management: The Challenges • 2014: Next Steps Content
  • 3. The National Infrastructure Advisory Board The National Infrastructure Unit & Advisory Board • NIU was established 2009, located within Treasury. • Work with central government, local government and private sector. • Steered by the National Infrastructure Advisory Board. • Focused on supporting delivery of “High performing infrastructure supporting higher living standards”. • Look across all the infrastructure sectors to facilitate and co-ordinate. • Promote common understanding / consideration of future challenges. • Work with sector experts. • Additional focus on transport, telecommunications, LG and Auckland.
  • 4. The National Infrastructure Advisory Board Context: Current direction of travel 4 NewZealand National Infrastructure Plan Context Strategic direction Evidence Story Response 2010 2011 2012 2013 2013 2014 20152014 2015
  • 5. The National Infrastructure Advisory Board The 2011 National Infrastructure Plan Vision By 2030 New Zealand’s infrastructure is resilient, coordinated and contributes to economic growth and increased quality of life Outcomes Better use of existing infrastructure Better allocation of new investment Principles Investment analysis Accountability/ Performance Resilience Regulation Funding mechanisms Coordination
  • 6. The National Infrastructure Advisory Board Expectations of the next Plan 1.Reinforce the current strategic direction (the vision and outcomes) 2.Mature the debate around future needs and responses 3.Be a collective infrastructure plan by NZ Inc across the private sector, central and local government 4.Have increased specificity about the action plan and future investment programme required to achieve the strategic direction 5.Be underpinned by a more robust evidence base of future need and current performance Focus shifting from 3 and 5  2 and 4. 6
  • 7. The National Infrastructure Advisory Board Evidence Base 7 Evidence Base Overview Resilience Assessment 10yr Capital Intentions Plan Sector Specific Narratives Scenario / Trend Analysis Performance Indicators
  • 8. The National Infrastructure Advisory Board Summary of findings • The overall state of New Zealand infrastructure is positive. • New Zealand has broadly the right infrastructure, in the right place, providing the right quality of service. • However, there are a number of challenges ahead and traditional systems will not be sufficient to meet these. • It will not be possible to address these challenges with supply side options alone; infrastructure sectors will need to consider new ways to manage demand, deliver alternative sources of funding, & optimise investment where it is made. • Changes in behaviour and technology will be crucial to delivering infrastructure services efficiently. 8
  • 9. The National Infrastructure Advisory Board Demand Management: The Challenges • Optimising existing infrastructure for desired Levels of Service. • Taking a network approach to future investment • Moving away from supply-side solutions alone by considering new ways to manage demand
  • 10. The National Infrastructure Advisory Board Demand Management: Many Forms Action to influence demand on services & assets could include; Education & Awareness Spatial Planning Using Alternatives Pricing & Charging Emerging Technology Time/Cost Incentives • An opportunity for “demand management options” to be more explicit in BBC process for new infrastructure. 10
  • 11. The National Infrastructure Advisory Board 2014: Next Steps • Evidence Base Response Work • Publishing Case Studies on Demand Management • Improve Industry knowledge and awareness of demand management potential
  • 12. The National Infrastructure Advisory Board We always welcome feedback. Please contact us through: The National Infrastructure Unit The Treasury 1 The Terrace PO Box 3724 Wellington New Zealand www.infrastructure.govt.nz info@infrastructure.govt.nz 12 Contact Us