Throughcare: The health needs of prisoners re-entering the community

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Ingrid Johnston, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare delivered this presentation as part of IIR Healthcare's 4th Annual Correctional Services Healthcare Summit – Addressing the gaps, promoting multidisciplinary care and improving the continuum of care into the community. IIR Healthcare's inaugural Canadian Correctional Services Healthcare Conference will take place in Ottawa in late November 2013. Find out more at: http://www.healthcareconferences.ca/correctional/agenda

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Throughcare: The health needs of prisoners re-entering the community

  1. 1. Throughcare: The health needs of prisoners re-entering the community Ingrid Johnston
  2. 2. 2 AIHW and prisoner health information • AIHW’s role as a statutory authority • AIHW’s role on prisoner health project: – Overall project coordination – Secretariat for national committees – Technical expertise – Data custodianship
  3. 3. 3 National Prisoner Health Data Collection (NPHDC) • Conducted in 2009, 2010 and 2012 • Originally prison entrants, clinic visits, medications, clinic manager • 2012 added prison dischargees
  4. 4. 4 2012 data • 794 prison entrants • 387 prison dischargees • 9,000 medications • 4,000 clinic visits
  5. 5. 5 Prison dischargees • 84% male • 31% Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander • Median age of 31 • Median length of most recent stay in prison: 152 days (or about 5 months) • 74% been in prison or youth justice before
  6. 6. 6 What do we know about their time in prison? • Health issues • Use of health services • Changes to health in prison • Programs, industry and education • Planning and preparation for release
  7. 7. 7 Health issues • 40% diagnosed with a health condition in prison • 57% received treatment for a health condition • 52% prescribed medication
  8. 8. 8 Alcohol consumption & treatment 68 17 48 10 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 Risky alcohol consumption prior to prison Accessed alcohol progam in prison Indigenous Non-Indigenous
  9. 9. 9 Smoking and quitting 84 46 35 8 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Current smokers Would like to quit Attempted to quit Successfully quit Entrants Dischargees
  10. 10. 10 Dischargees – prison clinic • 93% of dischargees had a health assessment on entry to prison • 93% visited the prison clinic • 88% reported they could easily see a health professional
  11. 11. 11 Changes to health • More than half reported an improvement: 37% - a lot better 20% - a little better • 12% - a little or a lot worse • Females and older – more likely to say ‘worse’
  12. 12. Health changes and Indigenous status 12 54 21 16 9 29 20 35 13 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 A lot better A little better Stayed the same A little or a lot worse Indigenous Non-Indigenous
  13. 13. 13 Dischargees – programs, training • 35% of dischargees completed a correctional program • 66% worked in a prison industry • 19% completed a qualification in prison
  14. 14. 14 Dischargees – socioeconomic factors 84% 43% 88% 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Contact in past 4 weeks Expect to be homeless on release Expect a government payment
  15. 15. 15 Medicare card • 76% had access to valid Medicare card • More likely to have one – females, older • More likely to not have one – Indigenous • More likely to not know - younger
  16. 16. Psychological distress and sex 16 4 11 20 62 5 26 23 46 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Very high High Moderate Low Male Female
  17. 17. 17 Employment upon release and return to work programs 31 32 10 40 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 Paid employment on release Registered with return to work Male Female
  18. 18. 18 Planning and preparing for release • 77% who received treatment or were prescribed medication had a plan to continue care after release • 46% had a referral to a health professional outside prison: 55% to GP, 22% for AOD
  19. 19. 19 Preparedness for release • 46% of dischargees felt ‘very prepared’ • 40% felt ‘prepared’ for their release • 6% said ‘unprepared or ‘very unprepared’
  20. 20. 20 Next steps • Memorandum of Understanding negotiations with states and territories • Next data collection (pending MoU) either 2014 or 2015
  21. 21. 21 Further information Download report from: www.aihw.gov.au Contact: prisoner.health@aihw.gov.au or ingrid.johnston@aihw.gov.au

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