Grant Hickson, Worley Parsons, Examining Dust and Control Methods for Bulk Material Handling Systems
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Grant Hickson, Worley Parsons, Examining Dust and Control Methods for Bulk Material Handling Systems

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Grant Hickson delivered the presentation at 2014 Bulk Materials Handling Conference. ...

Grant Hickson delivered the presentation at 2014 Bulk Materials Handling Conference.

The 11th annual Bulk Materials Handling Conference is an expert led forum focusing on the engineering behind the latest expansions and upgrades of bulk materials facilities. This conference will evaluate the latest engineering feats that are creating record levels of throughput whilst minimising downtime.

For more information about the event, please visit: http://www.informa.com.au/bulkmaterials14

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Grant Hickson, Worley Parsons, Examining Dust and Control Methods for Bulk Material Handling Systems Grant Hickson, Worley Parsons, Examining Dust and Control Methods for Bulk Material Handling Systems Presentation Transcript

  • Grant Hickson, Environmental Consultant, WorleyParsons Examining Dust and Control Methods for Bulk Material Handling Systems
  • Contents Examining Dust and Control Methods for Bulk Material Handling Systems 1.  Introduction to WorleyParsons Consulting 2.  Air Quality – Why is it Important? 3.  Regulatory Framework 4.  Regulatory Requirements 5.  Particulate Matter Impact Assessment a)  Overview b)  Inputs c)  Output / Impacts d)  Models 6.  Emission Mitigation Measures 7.  Particulate Matter Monitoring Methods 8.  Case Study: Air Quality Model Base Lining 9.  Case Study: Train Unloader – Particulate Matter Monitoring 10.  Case Study: Cumulative Impact Assessment – Port Hedland 11.  Case Study: Environmental Impact Assessment – Timor Lesté 12.  Summary 13.  Questions
  • “Our consultants combine proven project experience and leading edge skills with unorthodox and creative thinking to give our customers the competitive advantage.” Introduction to WorleyParsons Consulting We are driven by a commitment to four enduring principles: §  to build and sustain long-term relationships with our customers; §  to continually enhance our world class expertise to support our customer’s challenges; §  to provide an outstanding home for the best people to work and nurture their talents; and §  to develop and maintain thought-leadership in all of our markets. Consulting services include: §  Environmental – EIA, Approvals, EPs, Risk and Liability, Restoration, Heritage, Marine §  Minerals and Metals §  Advanced Analysis – Computational Fluid Dynamics, FEA and dynamic structural §  Total Water Solutions – Hydrology and Hydrogeology §  Geotechnical and Geomatics
  • Impacts Air Quality – Why is it Important? §  Human Health – Respiratory Illness §  Vegetation – Reduced Photosynthesis §  Heritage Degradation (e.g. Rock Art in the Burrup Peninsula) §  Amenity Issues Pollutant Categories §  Airborne Particulate Matter (PM) §  PM10 PM2.5 TSP Metals §  Chemical Pollutants §  NOX SO2 VOCs §  Photochemical Smog as O3 §  Air Toxics
  • Governmental Approvals Regulatory Framework §  Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) §  Air Quality is a key component for Bulk Materials Handling facilities Compliance Monitoring §  Emissions Monitoring §  Stack Testing §  Dust Monitoring §  Continuous Emissions Monitoring System (CEMS) §  Impact Monitoring §  Occupational Hygiene (Personal monitoring) §  Static Monitoring
  • National Level Regulatory Requirements §  National Environment Protection (Ambient Air Quality) Measure (2003) §  National Environment Protection (Air Toxics) Measure (2011) WA State Level §  Environmental Protection (EP) Act 1986 §  Department of Environment Regulation (DER) Ambient Air Quality Guidelines (2004) Specific Localities §  Environmental Protection (Kwinana) (Atmospheric Wastes) Policy (1999) – Kwinana EPP §  Port Hedland Air Quality and Noise Management Plan (2010) §  Collie Air Quality Management Strategy Other Guidance When specific guidelines are not available in the jurisdiction, it is commonplace to approach well-known entities for guidance: §  WHO, US EPA
  • Regulatory Requirements for Particulate Matter Legislation Pollutant Averaging Period Statistic Concentration Exceedence Goal / Comments AAQ NEPM PM10 1 day Max 50 µg/m3 5 days per year Lead 1 year Max 0.5 µg/m3 None PM2.5 1 day Max 25 µg/m3 Advisory Standard 1 year Max 8 µg/m3 Kwinana EPP TSP Policy Area 15 mins Limit 1,000 µg/m3 Applicable to Kwinana policy areas, but can be adopted as guidance values in other jurisdictions Area A 24 hours Standard 150 µg/m3 Limit 260 µg/m3 Area B 24 hours Standard 90 µg/m3 Limit 260 µg/m3 Area C 24 hours Standard 90 µg/m3 Limit 150 µg/m3 Port Hedland PM10 24 hours Max 70 µg/m3 10 days per year (Applies east of Taplin St, Port Hedland)
  • Particulate Matter Impact Assessment – Overview Modelling Method Topo. / Land Use Met. Conditions Emissions
  • Primary Input Information Particulate Matter Impact Assessment – Inputs §  Emission Sources (Majority of the effort involved) §  Particulate Matter categories §  Physical Locations / Sizes §  Mobile (e.g. Wheel-generated) vs Static (e.g. Transfer Point) Sources §  Erosion §  Meteorological Conditions §  Wind Speed / Direction §  Atmospheric Stability / Turbulence / Mixing Height §  Temperature §  Precipitation §  Topography and Land Use §  Obstacles (e.g. Mountains, natural / man-made valleys, etc.) §  Influences plume behaviour down-wind §  Deposition
  • Types of Emission Sources Particulate Matter Impact Assessment – Emission Sources §  Stackers / Reclaimers §  Ship Loaders §  Wind Erosion from Stockpiles (big contributor) §  Transfer Points / Chutes §  Train Loaders / Unloaders §  Wheel-generated dust from heavy vehicles §  Processing (i.e. Crushing, Blending, Screening, etc.) Example Sources of Emissions – Bulk Materials Handling §  Point Sources – Stacks (Not usually applicable to Bulk Materials Handling) §  Fugitive Sources – Area and Volume Sources (No single source point) §  Neutrally buoyant, ambient temperature / pressure, low altitude releases, diffuse source §  Can be mobile or static depending on the relevant equipment §  Emissions can vary wildly over time and are often influenced by the environment
  • Primary Factors Particulate Matter Impact Assessment – Meteorological Conditions §  Wind Speed / Wind Direction §  Atmospheric Stability / Turbulence §  Mixing Layer §  Temperature §  Precipitation
  • Primary Factors Particulate Matter Impact Assessment – Topography / Land Use §  Obstacles §  Roughness Length §  Open land §  Forest §  Cities / Towns §  Mountains §  Valley Channelling Not much of an issue in WA!
  • Output Information Particulate Matter Impact Assessment – Output §  Ambient Concentration §  Human Health Impacts §  PM10 (µg/m3) §  PM2.5 (µg/m3) §  TSP (µg/m3) §  Deposition Rate §  Vegetation / Heritage / Amenity Impacts §  Grams per square metre per month (g/m2/month) §  Differential Analysis
  • DER – Required Information Particulate Matter Impact Assessment – Impacts §  Ground-Level Concentration (GLC) Contour Plots §  Numeric Data for GLCs at maximum impact locations and specific receptors §  Comparison against relevant assessment criteria Location Assessment Criterion GLC (µg/m3) Maximum 30 µg/m3 24 hour average (Example) 115 Receptor A 15 Receptor B 22 Receptor C 16 Receptor D 29
  • Particulate Matter Impact Assessment – Models Most conventional regulatory models used in Australia are based on either: §  Gaussian distribution/statistical relations (Ausplume or AERMOD); or §  Dynamic “puff” (Lagrangian) models (CalPuff) Note: Ausplume is as of 1st January 2014 no longer the EPA Victoria preferred model. Other options are more advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modelling §  TAPM (developed by CSIRO); or §  CFD itself for detailed modelling (useful for localised impacts or source characterisation) Regulatory Model Selection Note: All models require some form of output data post processing and validation to evaluate applicability and to provide context to results.
  • Common Mitigation Measures Emission Mitigation Measures §  Extinction Moisture Level (Suppression) §  Water Cannons §  Road Watering §  Water with additives §  Crusting Agents §  Saline Water §  Chute Design §  Encapsulation §  Shrouds / Hoods §  Enclosures §  Sheds §  Dust Extraction Systems §  Negative Pressure §  Vacuum Systems §  Wind Breaks
  • Particulate Matter Monitoring Methods Method Attended / Unattended Pros Cons Suitable Application TEOM Unattended § Accurate measurement § Near real-time data § Telemetry option § Low maintenance § Moderate capital outlay for setup § Only one size of PM at a time § Requires permanent power source § No sample collection Long-term industrial ambient monitoring Hi-Vol Unattended § Accurate data § Precise measurement § Sample collection § Uses filter paper requiring ongoing maintenance § Only one size of PM at a time § Requires permanent power source Long-term urban/town ambient monitoring E-BAM Unattended § Inexpensive § Can run on solar power § Telemetry option § Low maintenance § Radiation measurement less accurate § No sample collection Long-term remote ambient monitoring DustTrak Attended / Short-term Unattended § Cheap § Portable / Hand held § Can run on solar power § Low maintenance § Laser measurement less accurate § No sample collection § Only one size of PM at a time Short-term compliance monitoring Comparison of Methods
  • Particulate Matter Monitoring Methods Method Attended / Unattended Pros Cons Suitable Application Personal monitors Short-term Unattended § Personal dosimetry § Occupational exposure § Attached to worker § Collects samples § Multiple applications: Indoor AQ / Hazmat § Less accurate / reliable § Samples are only measurement § Requires laboratory analysis § Requires regular maintenance Daily occupational exposure monitoring Dust Deposition Gauge Unattended § Measures dust deposition § Passive measurement – no power requirement § Collects samples § Low tech / Easily deployed § Requires laboratory analysis § Monthly sample collection § Sample quality subject to rainfall § Can be fragile Dust deposition measurement medium-long term Comparison of Methods
  • Particulate Matter Monitoring Methods TEOM E-BAMHi-Vol (TSP) Hi-Vol (PM10) DustTrak Personal Monitoring Dust Deposition Gauge
  • Modelling for Current and Future Case Study: Air Quality Model Base Lining AQ Study for Plant Modifications Existing facility treating significant amount of heavy and precious metals Notable Features: §  Compared to significant amount of measured data from: §  TEOM §  Hi-Vol §  On Site AWS §  Dust from roads and stockpiles significant §  Significant community impact due to heavy metals
  • Occupational Risk Assessment Case Study: Train Unloader – Particulate Matter Monitoring Indoor and Ambient Dust Monitoring Field investigation to assess the risk of indoor and ambient particulate matter concentrations on construction contractors during commissioning of the first of two connected train unloaders. Using an existing operating train unloader as an analogue for anticipated operating conditions. Notable Features: §  Dust Extraction System §  Construction workers adjacent to plant being commissioned §  DustTrak utilized for short-term exposure monitoring
  • Case Study: Train Unloader – Particulate Matter Monitoring Construction Area Analogue Area during Operation
  • Air Quality Impact Assessment Case Study: Cumulative Impact Assessment – Port Hedland Particulate and Pollutant Impact Study Cumulative air quality impact assessment incorporating previously modelled data to determine the impact from a proposed power station. Notable Features: §  Simulation and validation of a 3D meteorological model for the Port Hedland airshed §  Incorporation of existing modelling data §  Particulate matter and chemical transport §  Civil Aviation Safety Authority Plume Rise Impact Assessment
  • Environmental Impact Assessment Case Study: Environmental Impact Assessment – Timor Lesté Particulate Baseline Study Environmental Impact Assessment of three sites along the southern coast of Timor Lesté. This was the first stage of a multi-year development of industrial clusters that will form the backbone of the developing Timor Lesté petroleum industry Notable Features: §  Baseline ambient particulate monitoring §  Regional area §  Logistical challenges with transportation §  Meteorological data analysis
  • Summary §  Air Quality can impact: Human health, ecology, cultural heritage and amenities §  Pollutant Categories: Particulate matter and chemical pollutants §  Legislation: National → State →   Specific Localities → Other entities Approvals require an environmental impact assessment to be conducted Bottom Line: It’s the law §  Particulate matter impact assessments: §  Input Data → Model → Post Processing → Output §  Emissions mitigation measures: Can vary and need to be suitable for purpose §  Particulate matter monitoring methods: Also vary and need to be suitable for conditions §  Case Studies: §  Air Quality Model Base Lining §  Train Unloader – Particulate matter monitoring §  Cumulative Impact Assessment – Port Hedland §  Environmental Impact Assessment – Timor Lesté