Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Elizabeth Tosti, Director: Health, Safety and Environment, Goodman Fielder - Developing a safety strategy to achieve your company goals
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Elizabeth Tosti, Director: Health, Safety and Environment, Goodman Fielder - Developing a safety strategy to achieve your company goals

  • 403 views
Published

Elizabeth Tosti delivered this presentation at the Safety in Action 2014 Conference in Melbourne. This conference brings thought leadership and showcases topical, innovative safety methods and …

Elizabeth Tosti delivered this presentation at the Safety in Action 2014 Conference in Melbourne. This conference brings thought leadership and showcases topical, innovative safety methods and practices.

For more information, please visit http://www.safetyinaction.net.au/SIA2014Melbourne

Published in Health & Medicine
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
403
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
53
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. GOODMAN FIELDER LIMITED ___________________________ Safety in Action 2014 Elizabeth Tosti Director, Safety, Health and Environment Developing a safety strategy to achieve your company’s goals
  • 2. Agenda 2 1.Developing a strategy with ‘buy in’ from senior leaders. 2.Building the strategy – and engaging the workforce in its implementation 3.Ensuring your safety systems support your strategy
  • 3. 1. Developing a strategy with ‘buy in’ from senior leaders 3 1.Determine the maturity of your organisation’s safety culture. 2.Engage your senior leadership team in this discussion. Agree where you want to be. Ensure everyone understands what ‘better’ looks like. 3.Develop your strategy to meet your agreed vision and implement at the appropriate pace.
  • 4. 1. Developing a strategy with ‘buy in’ from senior leaders 4 Dependent Harm Reactive FELT LEADERSHIP Natural Instincts Supervision Self Team Peer’s Keeper Independent Interdependent Dependent Top-Down Condition of Employment Safety for the Regulator Disincentives for Outcomes Plant/equipment Focus Fault finding Safety is Important Quick Fix Main Hazards Identified Independent Bottom-Up Personal Commitment Safety for Self Incentives for Outcomes Behaviour Focus Fact finding Safety is a Priority Eventual Fix Risk Mgmt Processes used Interdependent Empowerment Team Commitment Safety for Others Recognition for Behaviour Plant, People & Systems Systems Thinking Safety is a Value Continuous Improvement Risks are managed/Hazard Registers are ‘live’
  • 5. 2.How we will get there? Building the strategy. Four essential elements 5 v Plant and Equipment Guarding, maintenance, isolation points, bunding, lifting equipment, handrails, non slip floors, PPE etc People Everyone trained and following procedures, Golden Rules adhered to, near misses and hazards reported, everyone involved and taking action Systems Procedures – easy to understand and apply, training, Inductions, incident reporting tools, Work Permits, JSAs etc People and the environment protected
  • 6. 2.How we will get there? Building the strategy. 6 Ensuring our sites, plant & equipment are safe Enabling SHE outcomes through effective tools & systems Engaging & developing our people to work safely Empowering our leaders to drive the SHE agenda 1. Protecting our people from moving machinery & electricity • LOTO • Guarding • Traffic Management 2. Changing the way we work to improve safety Redesign to reduce manual handling 3. Reducing our environmental impact • Redesign to improve 1. Managing our critical risks • Standards & Procedures − LOTO − Guarding − Traffic Management − Manual Handling − Travel Security 2. Building a robust SMS/EMS • Risk Management • Incident Investigation • Contractor Management • Recording & reporting • Audit & Inspection • EMS Aspects and impacts procedure • EMS – Legal Requirements • EMS – Objectives and Targets 1. Building awareness of SHE • Branding & Comms • Inaugural SHE Competition • Newsletters • Health 2. Training to ensure key SHE skills 3. Everyone actively involved in SHE • Near miss / hazard reporting • Environment incident reporting • Risk assessments • WALKS • Health & Wellbeing • competitions 4. Recognising & reinforcing positive behaviour • Reward & recognition program • Benchmarking sites 5. Understanding attitudes and safety values • SHE culture survey • Feedback email to Group SHE 1. Developing our leaders in SHE awareness & skills • Training in critical SHE leadership skills • Coaching (one-on-one) 2. Demonstrating active SHE leadership • WALKs • Reward & recognition • Just Culture • Safety first in meetings • Safety Cycle Checks 3. Holding our leaders to account for SHE outcomes • Scorecard • Responsibilities & accountabilities(PDs) 4. Providing effective SHE support • SHE Structure • SHE Practitioners skill development • Building the SHE community
  • 7. 3. Ensuring your safety system supports your strategy 7 1. Ensure policies, procedures, standards are concise, easy to understand, easy to access. 2. Implement a process to continually review and improve your system, through consultation with end users. 3. Develop training tools to support key elements of the system. 4. Start with risk management and incident management, performance monitoring. 5. Prioritise your system review with those that address your highest risks.
  • 8. 3. Ensuring your safety system supports your strategy 8 1. Risk Management: 1. How well do managers and leaders understand ‘likelihood’ and ‘consequence’? 2. How well do your managers and leaders understand the ‘hierarchy of controls’? 3. How well do managers and leaders understand the appropriate frequency of review of controls’ 4. Are Risk Registers ‘live’? Are top hazards cascaded upwards and regularly reviewed by all levels of the organisation? 5. How often does your organisation stop and ask ‘what if’?
  • 9. Managing risk well involves a four step process 9 IDENTIFY RISK • Determine the sources and potential for harm ASSESS THE RISK • Determine the likelihood of occurrence and severity of consequences CONTROL THE RISK • use ‘hierarchy of controls’ – aim for highest level possible – especially for high risks REVIEW EFFECTIVENESS OF CONTROL • Determine frequency of review • The higher up the ‘hierarchy of controls’ the less frequent review required. Elimination Engineered Administrative Controls Personal Protective Equipment Substitution Hierarchy Of Controls Once off Review for effectiveness Regular review to check for effectiveness Continuous review and monitoring whenever the activity underway Continuous review and monitoring whenever the activity is underway Risk Assessment & Hazard Control GFTools&Processes outlineonIntranet Guideline for Management Review & Monitoring Requirements
  • 10. 3. Ensuring your safety system supports your strategy 10 2. Incident Management: 1. How well does your organisation understand systemic failures? What is your system to ensure investigations indentify all root causes? 2. How well does your organisation understand individual/team actions contributing to an incident? (slip, lapse, mistake, violations) 3. What is your system to ensure that incidents are investigated and actions are closed out in a timely manner to prevent recurrence anywhere else in the organisation? 4. How do you ensure that your leaders are driving effective investigations?
  • 11. 11 The ‘Swiss Cheese Model’ All actions to be reviewed six months after their completion to ensure that they are effective
  • 12. Key Messages – delivering outcomes 12 1. Create a desire for change. 2. Develop a strategy that ‘fits on a page’ – and that can be understood by all levels of the organisation. Communicate on progress regularly. 3. Ensure key systems are robust – Risk Management and Incident Management. Provide regular training and review. 4. Continually refine your systems to ensure that they are simple, effective and understood. Start with your highest risks. 5. Keep it simple! ‘One size fits all’ is best approach!