Damian Vujchich, Fluor, Case Study: Modularisation for Iron Ore Plant in Western Australia

1,006 views
654 views

Published on

Damian Vujchich delivered the presentation at 2014 Bulk Materials Handling Conference.

The 11th annual Bulk Materials Handling Conference is an expert led forum focusing on the engineering behind the latest expansions and upgrades of bulk materials facilities. This conference will evaluate the latest engineering feats that are creating record levels of throughput whilst minimising downtime.

For more information about the event, please visit: http://www.informa.com.au/bulkmaterials14

Published in: Engineering, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,006
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
8
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
35
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Damian Vujchich, Fluor, Case Study: Modularisation for Iron Ore Plant in Western Australia

  1. 1. Geography 1 SEA TRANSPORT ROAD TRANSPORT CHINA (Fabrication) PORT FACILITIES, WESTERN AUSTRALIA Project Site 4000 NAUTICAL MILES PORT FACILITIES, WESTERN AUSTRALIA
  2. 2. Steelwork Totals 2 STEELWORK TOTALS - 19 000 T of STEELWORK 15 000 T FABRICATED OFF SHORE (CHINA) {136 MODULES + ADDITIONAL LOOSE STEEL AND BREAK BULK ITEMS} 4 000 T FABRICATED IN AUSTRALIA
  3. 3. Steelwork Totals 3 STEELWORK TOTALS - 19 000 T of STEELWORK 15 000 T FABRICATED OFF SHORE (CHINA) {136 MODULES + ADDITIONAL LOOSE STEEL AND BREAK BULK ITEMS} 4 000 T FABRICATED IN AUSTRALIA ADDITIONAL 1500 TONNES OF SHIPPING STEEL DUE TO OFF SHORE FABRICATION – ROUGHLY 10% ADDITIONAL STEEL
  4. 4. Movement of Modules – Off-shore Fabrication 4 FABRICATE MODULE IN YARD DELIVER MODULE TO WHARF LOAD ONTO SHIP SHIP TO SITE UNLOAD ONTO ROAD TRANSPORT TEMPORARY STORAGE AT PORT LAYDOWN YARD ROAD TRANSPORT TO SITE BY CONVOY UNLOAD ONTO LAYDOWN AREA INSTALL INTO FINAL POSITION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 NUMBERED STAGES
  5. 5. Movement of Modules – Off-shore Fabrication 5 FABRICATE MODULE IN YARD DELIVER MODULE TO WHARF LOAD ONTO SHIP SHIP TO SITE UNLOAD ONTO ROAD TRANSPORT TEMPORARY STORAGE AT PORT LAYDOWN YARD ROAD TRANSPORT TO SITE BY CONVOY UNLOAD ONTO LAYDOWN AREA INSTALL INTO FINAL POSITION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 FABRICATION CONTRACTOR INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING CONTRACTOR ROAD TRANSPORT CONTRACTOR SMP INSTALLATION CONTRACTOR TRANSPORT MANAGEMENT CONTRACTOR MARINE WARRANTY SURVEYOR CONTRACTOR RESPONSIBILITIES
  6. 6. Movement of Modules – Off-shore Fabrication 6 FABRICATE MODULE IN YARD DELIVER MODULE TO WHARF LOAD ONTO SHIP SHIP TO SITE UNLOAD ONTO ROAD TRANSPORT TEMPORARY STORAGE AT PORT LAYDOWN YARD ROAD TRANSPORT TO SITE BY CONVOY UNLOAD ONTO LAYDOWN AREA INSTALL INTO FINAL POSITION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 FABRICATION CONTRACTOR INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING CONTRACTOR ROAD TRANSPORT CONTRACTOR SMP INSTALLATION CONTRACTOR TRANSPORT MANAGEMENT CONTRACTOR MARINE WARRANTY SURVEYOR
  7. 7. Constructability & Transportation Requirements 7 ♦  Each phase / stage will have restrictions on what type of module they can handle, lift, rotate, move, fit, approve, insure, transport and install. ♦  These size restrictions & transport loads need to be compiled into envelopes and guidelines for the design & construction team before detailed design taking place. ♦  This approach, which has been built up from experience on several projects, requires input and close collaboration between engineering, fabrication and construction teams for successful project delivery. ♦  Strong and clear guidelines minimises the potential for issues, delays and rework along the detailed engineering, fabrication, transportation & construction processes.
  8. 8. Fabrication Requirements Fabricator’s capability ideally should include: ♦  Crane capabilities – lifting and rotation. ♦  All weather work areas – size can limit module work. ♦  Load out capabilities – are wharves wide & deep enough for Heavy Lift Vessels? ♦  Paint shop and ventilated blasting yards – large enough to handle long modules. ♦  Transportation of modules around yard via vehicles. ♦  Capabilities to perform pre-assembly, trial fitting and match drilling of large inter connected modules. 8
  9. 9. Fabrication Requirements Fabricator’s capability ideally should include: ♦  Weighing facilities for modules larger than 50T. Weight reports must be provided to engineering and shipping contractor prior to load out. ♦  Internal teams to handle Quality Assurance including certification of materials, welding, welders, tolerance and trial assembly sequences. ♦  Capabilities for support and shadowing services by EPCM and client representatives for QA, planning, scheduling and engineering. 9
  10. 10. Fabrication Requirements 10 Crane Capacity Covered Paint Sheds / Ventilated Blasting Sheds All Weather Workshops Outdoor Work Areas
  11. 11. Fabrication Requirements 11 Wharf Capacity – Length and Depth Issues Wharf Capacity – Access for Movement of Modules
  12. 12. Fabrication Requirements 12 MODULE WEIGHING THREE TESTS DONE TO GET ACCURATE RESULTS FABRICATOR TO PROVIDE WEIGHT REPORT FOR EACH MODULE OVER 50T PROJECT WIDE WEIGHT CONTROL IS IMPORTANT FOR BOTH HANDLING OF MODULES AND TRACKING OF QUANTITIES FOR INVOICING
  13. 13. Fabrication Requirements 13 TRIAL ASSEMBLY AND MATCH DRILLING OF A MODULED TAKE UP TOWER CRITICAL CONNECTION AT SITE – WORKING AT HEIGHTS
  14. 14. Fabrication Requirements 14 TRIAL ASSEMBLY MATCH DRILLING ASSEMBLE MODULES TOGETHER TO CHECK FABRICATION – ANY ERRORS TO BE CORRECTED PRIOR TO MODULE LEAVING FABRICATION YARD MATCH DRILL CONNECTION TOGETHER TO ENSURE CORRECT FIT UP AT SITE
  15. 15. Fabrication Requirements 15 END PRODUCT – MODULE INSTALLED AT SITE WITH CORRECT FIT UP USING ONE LIFT ONLY – EFFICENT AND AVOIDS WORKING AT HEIGHTS ISSUES.
  16. 16. Marine Warranty Surveyor ♦  The MWS acts on behalf on the underwriters providing third party reviews for high value transportation projects. ♦  MWS have requirements for lifting on and off the vessels and these must be followed. ♦  Design team must understand MWS requirements for transport & submit calculations prior for review. The MWS reviews transportation calculations as well as the structural design to assess suitability for transportation. 16
  17. 17. Marine Warranty Surveyor 17 Surveyor Present at Lifts > 50T – Providing Approval of Rigging prior to each Lift Provides Sailaway Certificates of Insurance of Seafastening Prior to Vessel Departures
  18. 18. Transport & Logistics Management ♦  Responsible for customs and employment of international shipping & road transport. This could be done by EPCM if experienced personal are within the project team or alternatively by a external contractor. ♦  Fabricators must be able to provide clean modules with wash down facilities wharf side (including EWP for access). Module must be clean to be accepted by local quarantine agencies. Transport management conducts inspections of wharf side cleaning and washing down of modules prior to loading onto vessel. 18
  19. 19. Transport & Logistics Management ♦  Consideration for wash down & access about modules responsibility of the engineering design team. Temporary handrail can provide safe access about modules and seal plates around difficult access areas can provide for an easy wash down process. ♦  Additional responsibility with co-ordination role with local road authorities for acceptable road transport procedures. These include but are not limited to: 19 o Bridge width and strength o Permitted turning circles o Road widths and height limits o Clashes with power lines
  20. 20. Transport & Logistics Management 20 Transport Management Contractor Supervises and approves Module wash down for AQUIS approval at Local Port.
  21. 21. International Shipping Requirements ♦  Responsible for the transport from off-shore wharves to local ports. ♦  Has restrictions with respect to lifting arrangements and to module sizes transported (ships have dimensional constraints). ♦  Must work with port’s local stevedores to rig and release module loadings. ♦  Responsible for sea fastening of modules to boat deck. ♦  Responsible for providing actual sea force accelerations for review, inclusion in design and approval by the MWS. 21
  22. 22. International Shipping Requirements 22 STOWAGE PLANS Document Provided For Each Voyage. Must be approved by Engineering and MWS. Outlines Lifting, Stowage & Seafastening Procedures. METHOD STATEMENT DOCUMENT Voyage’s Method Statement Outlines Actual Sea-Forces. Restraint Provide on Boat Deck.
  23. 23. International Shipping Requirements 23 Module By Module Lifting Plans with each piece of equipment detailed. Overall Height critical for clearance over Ships Rails.
  24. 24. International Shipping Requirements 24 LIFTING - DUAL CRANE SEAFASTENING 240T MODULE TRANSPORTER MODULE GRILLAGE STOPPER (RESISTS SLIDING) CLIPS (RESISTS SLIDING & UPLIFT
  25. 25. Road Transport Requirements ♦  Responsible for the transport of the modules from the local wharf to the construction site lay down yard. ♦  Has dimensional and tie down restrictions which govern grillage design with respect to placement of stiffeners. ♦  Provides road transport accelerations for review by Engineering. ♦  Details convoy movements for clearance by local authorities, including the arrangement of police escorts, road blocks, temporary road houses, mechanics and road side pull overs. 25
  26. 26. Road Transport Requirements 26 EXAMPLE OF ARRANGEMENT OF ROAD TRANSPORT 4 FILE TRAILER PROVIDES WIDER BASE FOR BETTER SUPPORT AND STABILITY 8 AXLES 4 FILE TRAILER TRESTLES
  27. 27. Road Transport Requirements 27 SAFELY DELIVERED TO SITE 4 FLOOR PIECESLIFTING LUGS GRILLAGE TRAILERS CAN BE LOWERED – MODULE STORED ON CONCRETE BLOCKS – NO NEED FOR CRANAGE
  28. 28. Installation Requirements ♦  Design team to provide lay-down area for modules with sufficient bearing capacity for module storage. ♦  Installation contractors to be aware of special crane requirements and construction procedures for module construction. ♦  Must be prepared for free issued pre-module inspection & time requirements for bolting, unbolting, rotating and rigging of modules. ♦  Engineering to assist by providing safe access around lifting lugs for rigging teams. 28
  29. 29. Installation Requirements 29 Long Lead Item – 750T Crawler Crane – rented by EPCM for use by SMP
  30. 30. Prior to the design team commencing work, a set of project guidelines needs to be formed to control the properties of the modules. 30
  31. 31. Formation of Project Guidelines ♦  Module Envelope 31 IMPORTANT INFORMATION. MODULE DIMENSIONS PROVIDED TO ALL ENGINEERS AND DESIGNERS IN EASY TO REFERENCE FORMAT.
  32. 32. Formation of Project Guidelines ♦  Shipping Loads 32 Referenced from “Simplified Motion Criteria” – DNV – “Rules for Planning & Executing Marine Operations” IMPORTANT CRITERIA FOR STRUCTURAL DESIGN TEAM
  33. 33. Formation of Project Guidelines ♦  Road Transport Loads 33 DISTANCE BETWEEN TRAILER HARD POINTS IS CRITICAL FOR DESIGN TEAM Overall Module Stability during Road Transport is the responsibility of the Road Contractor. IMPORTANT CRITERIA FOR STRUCTURAL DESIGN TEAM
  34. 34. Using these guidelines, the engineering team is able to arrange module split lines. 34 Designs were developed for all off-shore fabricated structures. Resulted in four different “types” of modules.
  35. 35. Type 1: Flat Pack Stacks (Floors & Trestles) ♦  Used for flat pack floors and trestles. ♦  Dimensions & connection locations needs to be similar ♦  Efficiency of transport is achieved as module does not have a high percentage of transported air. ♦  SMP will be required to unbolt module to install each floor item. ♦  Requires detail consideration to how SMP will “lift & drop” into place. Temporary support must be considered. 35
  36. 36. Type 1: Flat Pack Stacks (Floors & Trestles) 36 FLAT PACKED FLOORS TRESTLES TRANSPORT & GRILLAGE DRAWINGS PROVIDE CONTRACTORS (AND OTHER MEMBERS OF EPCM TEAM) INFORMATION REGARDING MODULES GRILLAGE LIFTING POINT INFORMATION
  37. 37. Type 1: Flat Pack Stacks (Floors & Trestles) 37 SAFELY DELIVERED TO SITE LIFTING LUGS GRILLAGE TRAILERS CAN BE LOWERED – MODULE STORED ON CONCRETE BLOCKS – NO NEED FOR CRANAGE LAYDOWN STORAGE INFORMATION ROAD TRANSPORT CONFIGURATION
  38. 38. Type 1: Flat Pack Stacks (Floors & Trestles) 38 INSTALLATION OF TRESTLES TEMPORARY STABILITY OF TRESTLES BY SMP CONTRACTOR TEMPORARY SUPPORTS ALLOW SMP TO LIFT & DROP MODULE – MINIMISES MEN WORKING AT HIGH NEAR RIGGED LOADS
  39. 39. Type 2: Rotated Tower Structures 39 ♦  Used for stair towers as well as Take Up Towers for conveyors. Can not be transported standing up as would be outside of the module envelopes. ♦  Requires two sets of four lifting lugs such that the module can be rotated in the fabrication yard and the site by SMP. Extra analysis required by structural engineers. ♦  Often requires horizontal braces to aid stability during transport. ♦  Lands directly onto concrete pedestals. ♦  Can be have internal stairs fully installed as to provide instant access for construction.
  40. 40. Type 2: Rotated Tower Structures 40 LIFT 1: SUCCESSFUL LIFTING ONTO VESSEL GRILLAGE LIFTING POINT INFORMATION TRANSPORT & GRILLAGE DRAWINGS PROVIDE CONTRACTORS (AND OTHER MEMBERS OF EPCM TEAM) INFORMATION REGARDING MODULES ROTATION DETAILS PROVIDED TO CONTRACTORS BY ENGINEERING SHOWED LIFTING ASSUMPTIONS (EQUALISING SHEAVES) USED BY DESIGN TEAM FOR INSTALLATION.
  41. 41. Type 3: Large Modules with Mechanical Components 41 ♦  Used for trusses, large screens, bins & hoppers. ♦  Shipped with handrail, grating, mechanical chute work and all liners. Typical weight is between 150 T and 250 T. ♦  Modules can be installed onto of other modules and tolerances can be provided to ease installation. ♦  Large Modules can be provided with 85T lifting lugs or alternatively, lifting trunnions to minimise work at height on site.
  42. 42. Type 3: Large Modules with Mechanical Components 42 USE OF TRUNNIONS ALLOWS FOR RIGGING & RELEASING FROM GROUND LEVEL. THIS MINIMISES WORK AT HEIGHT AND REDUCES RISK. HOWEVER THIS COMES AT A LARGE FABRICATION COST. LIFT ONTO SHIP
  43. 43. Type 3: Large Modules with Mechanical Components 43 UTILISATION OF LARGE CRANE FOR MODULE INSTALLATION MODULE INSTALLED INTO BUILDING WITH VENDOR SUPPLYIED GATES ALREADY INSTALLED
  44. 44. Type 4: Large Modules with Vendor Items, Electrical Cabling and Piping – known as Smart Modules 44 ♦  EPCM delivered to site commissioned, with gates installed as well as electrics and piping. ♦  Module could be dropped onto concrete pedestals and connected to services, minimising commissioning time on-site.
  45. 45. Type 4: Large Modules with Vendor Items, Electrical Cabling and Piping – known as Smart Modules 45 FABRICATION AT AMC HENDERSON. TRANSPORTED BY HEAVY LIFT VESSEL TO PORT HEDLAND. INSTALLED & TRANSPORTED WITH AUSTRALIAN VENDOR SUPPLYIED COMPONENTS. POTENTIAL FOR COMMISSIONING PRIOR TO ARRIVAL ON SITE. VENDOR SUPPLIED EQUIPMENT ALREADY INSTALLED
  46. 46. Summary – Part 1 46 ♦  Complete logistics study prior to setting module split lines. ♦  Award all contracts early so that inputs can be made to the design engineering effort. This results in less rework and more efficient grillage. ♦  Contractors to work with EPCM to establish criteria for transport forces, tie down methods and trailer configurations. ♦  Early information provides opportunity to build shipping grillage & temporary braces into the structures, minimising rework and resulting in cost savings for the client. ♦  The planning and creation of schedules needs to be realistic to the tasks performed with allowances for trial fitting and unforeseen transport delays.
  47. 47. Summary – Part 2 47 ♦  Location of offshore fabrication is critical to successful project delivery and the providing of early information to the engineering design team. Issues include: ♦  Steel Material Grade ♦  Section Size & Availability ♦  Bolt and Weld Quality ♦  Paint Availability ♦  Providing this information to the design team early in the project lifecycle avoids rework and delays for: ♦  Engineering ♦  Shop Detailing ♦  Fabrication ♦  On-site Construction ♦  Language Issues ♦  Cultural Issues ♦  Approach to Safety ♦  Efficient Transport Routes
  48. 48. Questions 48

×