Barbara Anderson - Integrated Care Branch, NSW Ministry of Health - KEYNOTE ADDRESS| Enhancing the Profile of Transition Care
 

Barbara Anderson - Integrated Care Branch, NSW Ministry of Health - KEYNOTE ADDRESS| Enhancing the Profile of Transition Care

on

  • 351 views

Barbara Anderson delivered the presentation at 2014 Transition Care Conference: Improving Outcomes for Older People. ...

Barbara Anderson delivered the presentation at 2014 Transition Care Conference: Improving Outcomes for Older People.

The 2014 Transition Care Conference: Improving Outcomes for Older People formed a National account of the consumers' transition care journey within the current aged care environment, highlighted new initiatives to improve TCP access and quality of care, and showcased innovative service delivery models across jurisdictions.

For more information about the event, please visit: http://www.informa.com.au/transitioncareconference14

Statistics

Views

Total Views
351
Views on SlideShare
351
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Barbara Anderson - Integrated Care Branch, NSW Ministry of Health - KEYNOTE ADDRESS| Enhancing the Profile of Transition Care Barbara Anderson - Integrated Care Branch, NSW Ministry of Health - KEYNOTE ADDRESS| Enhancing the Profile of Transition Care Presentation Transcript

  • 3rd Annual Transition Care Conference ENHANCING  THE  PROFILE  OF  TRANSITION  CARE   Barbara  Anderson   Principal  Policy  Adviser  –   Ageing  &  Disability   Aged  Care  Unit   Integrated  Care  Branch   NSW  Ministry  of  Health   30  May  2014  
  • Transition Care in this time of reform • Bridging the gap between acute care and community services BUT…. • Is it as well utilised as it might be? • Should more be done to promote this valuable service and, if so, what?
  • My Aged Care website “ When you have been in hospital, often the most desirable place to go when you leave is to your own home … but sometimes you might need extra help to recover. This is where the Transition Care Program may be able to help.”
  • • Even in discussions of a more streamlined national aged care system, the role of Transition Care seems overlooked. • Do hospital clinicians and discharge planners know when to give an older inpatient the option of being discharged to Transition Care? • Including time to make a decision about their long term accommodation arrangements? National Health & Hospital Reform
  • Older people tend to be seen as ‘bed blockers’
  • Noeline Brown, Ambassador for Ageing • Transition care gives older people that rare commodity, namely time. • Time to reflect, to think through decisions, to consider options.
  • Transition Care is not care awaiting placement We need greater promotion of its benefits and its eligibility criteria so that Commonwealth Guidelines governing its operation are more widely understood.
  • • Currently  a  dearth  of  published  arOcles  providing  evidence  of   the  benefits  of  TransiOon  Care.   • Anecdotal  evidence  that  some  older  inpaOents  with  potenOal  to   benefit  are  not  being  recognised.   • Also  easier  to  refer  to  short-­‐term  State-­‐funded  support  services   post  hospitalisaOon  meaning  they  miss  out  on  the  benefits  of   goal-­‐oriented,  restoraOve  therapy  focused  on  re-­‐ablement  and   improved  capacity  to  remain  living  independently  in  the   community.   More research and evaluative studied needed
  • Acute to Age-Related Care Services (AARCS) • Specialist aged health staff employed in NSW public hospitals to facilitate access to community and residential aged care • Help identify the older inpatient potentially likely to benefit from Transition Care and to facilitate timely referral to ACAT when medically stable. • Good working relationships between Transition Care services and hospital specialist staff important.
  • Addressing the needs of Aboriginal and CALD patients • Avoid  residenOal  TransiOon  Care  units  being  viewed  as   ‘insOtuOons’  and  address  the  fear  of  isolaOon  from  family   and  community.   • Reassure  older  people  that  they  will  be  returning  home   aXer  their  short  stay  in  TransiOon  Care.   • Promote  a  culturally-­‐appropriate  environment.   • By  2026,  one  in  every  four  people  over  age  of  80  will  be  from  a   non-­‐English  speaking  background.   • Ensure  home-­‐based  services  not  seen  as  intrusive  and   respect  the  client  who  may  not  want  ‘an  outsider’  telling   them  what  to  do  and  how  to  live.  
  • Picture (photo or graphic) of an Aboriginal person over background Aboriginal Artwork EXAMPLE. LOCAL INDIGENOUS ARTWORK MAY BE USED HERE AND THROUGHOUT DOCUMENT→ TEMPLATE [NAME] Local Health District
  • Promoting Transition Care services in rural and remote locations • Address  discrete  access  barriers  include  non-­‐availability  of   experOse  locally,  distances  involved,  and  lack  of  available   transport.     • Discuss  issues  up  front  with  prospecOve  client  and  their  family.   • Tailor  services  to  local  circumstances  and  avoid  unrealisOc   expectaOons.  
  • Where have we come from? Where are we at? • Since  2002,  4,000  TransiOon  Care  places  now  operaOng   naOonally   • Reduced  numbers  of  paOents  experiencing  extended   length  of  stay  in  hospital  –  only  1,197  in  2012-­‐13   BUT   • NaOonal  occupancy  rates  have  only  improved  from  82%  in   2009-­‐2010  to  85%  in  2012-­‐13   • And  variaOons  in  rates  across  jurisdicOons  and  locaOons   range  from  55%  to  91%  
  • Why a 2nd national evaluation needed • To  assess  the  factors  affecOng  current  occupancy  rates   • To  gain  a  more  accurate  picture  of  whether  the  TransiOon  Care   program  is  meeOng  demand  and  being  accessed  appropriately   by  all  older  people  potenOally  able  to  benefit  following  a   period  of  hospitalisaOon   • To  idenOfy  what  acOon  can  be  taken  to  improve  access  and   equity,  including  whether  and  where  more  places  are  needed  
  • Transition Care Program Guidelines State  and  Territory  governments  required  to  collaborate  with  the   Australian  Government  in  the  na4onal  evalua4on  of  the   Transi4on  Care  Programme  (draX  Guidelines  2014).     ….  to  ensure  the  Program  remains  current  and  consistent  with   new  developments  in  health  and  aged  care  and  to  facilitate   changes  iden4fied  through  growing  experience  with  the  Program   (Guidelines  2011).