Thanks to Nigel Ford for the beautiful
photography on the theme of reflection
Supporting Information Literacy
educators: Reflective pedagogic
planning improving information
literacy practice.
Barbara ...
In this session
• We will explore how reflective practice can be used
in practical ways to support teaching practice
• We ...
For context…a
little bit of
theory
Reflection
• “Reflection provides an active and structured way of
thinking and of facilitating professional
development.”
...
The Reflective Dynamic
Outcome of
reflection
Future
needs
Current
Influences
Past
Experience
What change is
needed?
How wi...
Reflection in a work based
setting (Grant 2007):
• “reflection in action”
– During a training session,
you become aware, a...
Reasons for reflection
• Self appraisal
• Personal development
• Professional development
• To recognise the need for lear...
Reflective thinking is good
• But it often helps to write things down
– It helps consolidate your thoughts.
• Use the firs...
What is Inquiry-based
learning?
• Student-centred and student-
directed learning – students pursue
their own research
• Le...
Some examples of IBL for IL
• Search for and review a journal article on a topic
of interest to the student
• Interview an...
An opportunity to practise reflective writing
Exercise – reflective writing
Working on your own and working quickly
• Using the template, in Box 1, write about a recent...
Jacobs (2008)
“reflection means that we ask questions “
Copyright - Barbara Sen
Reflection
• Basic questions:
– What happened?
– How did you feel?
– How did it affect others, how did they feel?
– What d...
Exercise - reflecting
• Now reflect on the experience you have written
about.
• Consider the questions below. Write your a...
Four levels of reflection: Moon, J.
(2008)
1. Descriptive writing
– Descriptive and contains little
reflection. May tell a...
Applying the theory to
improve practice
Exercise
• In pairs:
• Look at your writing, considering Jenny Moon’s four
levels of reflection, which one of the descript...
Exercise: In your pairs.
Reflective discussion
• Help each other consider how you might improve your
reflective writing an...
What is a pedagogic planner?
• A tool to help us reflect on different
aspects of our teaching
• A practical tool for desig...
Using the pedagogic planner
• Look again at the teaching experience you reflected
on
• Using the pedagogic planner, identi...
Reflective discussion
Now again in your pairs discuss the
changes you could make
• How could you improve the
experience fo...
Becoming deeply reflective
• Descriptive writing often considers what happened
from one point of view.
• Being more deeply...
Tools to support your reflective
practice as teachers
• Jenny Moon’s model of
reflection to increase the depth
of your ref...
Further reading
• Chapman, M. (2008) Reflective writing. In. (Watson, M.) Building your
portfolio: The CILIP guide. London...
Supporting information literacy educators: reflective pedagogic planning improving information literacy practice - Pam McK...
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Supporting information literacy educators: reflective pedagogic planning improving information literacy practice - Pam McKinney & Barbara Sen

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Supporting information literacy educators: reflective pedagogic planning improving information literacy practice - Pam McKinney & Barbara Sen

  1. 1. Thanks to Nigel Ford for the beautiful photography on the theme of reflection
  2. 2. Supporting Information Literacy educators: Reflective pedagogic planning improving information literacy practice. Barbara Sen & Pamela McKinney Copyright - Barbara Sen Images – Prof. Nigel Ford, Information School
  3. 3. In this session • We will explore how reflective practice can be used in practical ways to support teaching practice • We will explore key theories on reflection • You will gain practical skills in reflective practice. – Through reflective writing and reflective discussion • You will gain an understanding of and use a pedagogic planner for improving teaching practice Copyright - Barbara Sen
  4. 4. For context…a little bit of theory
  5. 5. Reflection • “Reflection provides an active and structured way of thinking and of facilitating professional development.” » SchÖn (1983) • With this idea of reflection, reflection is not just an abstract concept; it is dynamic (“active”), and practical (“thinking and facilitating”), giving a framework (“structured way”) for professional change and development. Copyright - Barbara Sen
  6. 6. The Reflective Dynamic Outcome of reflection Future needs Current Influences Past Experience What change is needed? How will the change be achieved? Reflect on the success of any change.
  7. 7. Reflection in a work based setting (Grant 2007): • “reflection in action” – During a training session, you become aware, and act upon, the need to rearrange the layout of the room so that all participants can watch a demonstration. – Reflecting whilst doing. • “reflection on action” – After a team meeting, you consider how you responded to a particular comment or criticism, how this made you feel, what you have learnt from the experience, and how you might respond on the future. – Reflecting back on an event. BOTH INVOLVE LEARNING
  8. 8. Reasons for reflection • Self appraisal • Personal development • Professional development • To recognise the need for learning • To improve learning or performance • To embed learning • Problem solving • Priority setting • Planning and evaluation • To inform future practice • To manage change • To improve understanding • Stress management All of these can have applications in a teaching context.
  9. 9. Reflective thinking is good • But it often helps to write things down – It helps consolidate your thoughts. • Use the first person – “I”. – e.g. “It was during the training session that I first noticed that there was something wrong. Afterward I considered the reactions of the participants and reviewed the feedback forms…”. Copyright - Barbara Sen
  10. 10. What is Inquiry-based learning? • Student-centred and student- directed learning – students pursue their own research • Learning driven by questions • Consistent with constructivist theories of learning • Problems, case scenarios, small and large investigations. Messy and ‘real world’ • Individual and collaborative projects • A way to involve students in research and link teaching with research
  11. 11. Some examples of IBL for IL • Search for and review a journal article on a topic of interest to the student • Interview another student about their information need, conduct literature search & present the results • Develop research questions based on reading a text, search for literature to investigate that research question • Week long collaborative inquiry induction activity developing familiarity with the Library
  12. 12. An opportunity to practise reflective writing
  13. 13. Exercise – reflective writing Working on your own and working quickly • Using the template, in Box 1, write about a recent experience of teaching using inquiry-based pedagogy. • Think of a time in your teaching when you came away feeling that you had learnt something from the situation. Maybe you felt that as a result you need to change your behaviour, or the way you or others do things, or you felt the need to develop new skills. • Be prepared to share what you write with a partner (you may wish to avoid any names or personal comments). Write neatly. Copyright - Barbara Sen
  14. 14. Jacobs (2008) “reflection means that we ask questions “ Copyright - Barbara Sen
  15. 15. Reflection • Basic questions: – What happened? – How did you feel? – How did it affect others, how did they feel? – What did you learn from the experience? – Have you developed as a result of this experience? – What improvements or changes can be made? – How will you achieve them? – How will you/the situation develop as a result? – What impact might changes have? Copyright - Barbara Sen
  16. 16. Exercise - reflecting • Now reflect on the experience you have written about. • Consider the questions below. Write your answers in Box 2 • Write neatly as you will share this with others. – What happened? – How did you feel? – How did it affect others, how did they feel? – What did you learn from the experience? – Have you developed as a result of this experience? – What improvements or changes can be made? – How will you achieve them? – How will you/the situation develop as a result? – What impact might changes have? Copyright - Barbara Sen
  17. 17. Four levels of reflection: Moon, J. (2008) 1. Descriptive writing – Descriptive and contains little reflection. May tell a story but generally from one point of view. 2. Descriptive writing with some reflection – A descriptive account that signals points for reflection while not actually showing much reflection. What little reflection there is lacks depth. 3. Reflective writing (1) – Description, but it is focused, with particular aspects accentuated for reflective comment. Shows some analysis, some self-questioning. 4. Reflective writing (2) – Clear evidence of standing back from the event. Shows deep reflection. Self- questioning, and the views and motives of others are also taken into account. Observation that learning has been gained. Copyright - Barbara Sen Fuller explanations can be found in Moon’s paper.
  18. 18. Applying the theory to improve practice
  19. 19. Exercise • In pairs: • Look at your writing, considering Jenny Moon’s four levels of reflection, which one of the descriptions most describes the reflective writing? Look at your first attempt, and then your second. Is there any difference in your level of reflective writing?Copyright - Barbara Sen
  20. 20. Exercise: In your pairs. Reflective discussion • Help each other consider how you might improve your reflective writing and gain more from it. • How can you demonstrate evidence of standing back from the event? • How can you show deep reflection? • Is there evidence of self-questioning? • Have you considered the views and motives of others ? • Is there any evidence of learning? • How will that learning lead to change? Copyright - Barbara Sen MAKE NOTES FROM YOUR DISCUSSION
  21. 21. What is a pedagogic planner? • A tool to help us reflect on different aspects of our teaching • A practical tool for designing learning – in this case IBL • A structured way of discussing and sharing IBL designs, facilitates collaborative teaching development • Combine with previous experiences of teaching for inspiration and adaptation.
  22. 22. Using the pedagogic planner • Look again at the teaching experience you reflected on • Using the pedagogic planner, identify an aspect or aspects of design for IBL where improvements or changes could be made in your teaching. What could you do differently?
  23. 23. Reflective discussion Now again in your pairs discuss the changes you could make • How could you improve the experience for students? • How could you support the students’ inquiry more effectively? • How could you make your teaching more inquiry-based?
  24. 24. Becoming deeply reflective • Descriptive writing often considers what happened from one point of view. • Being more deeply reflective you start to consider other people’s perspectives; become more aware. • What can be learned from the event? • What is needed to develop, change or move on? • Reflection is dynamic, drawing on the past, considering the present situation, looking to the future. • How can any changes be achieved? What impact might those changes have? • What have you/will you put in place to make the changes? Copyright - Barbara Sen
  25. 25. Tools to support your reflective practice as teachers • Jenny Moon’s model of reflection to increase the depth of your reflection • IBL pedagogic planner to help reflect on different aspects of teaching through inquiry and aid in future planning
  26. 26. Further reading • Chapman, M. (2008) Reflective writing. In. (Watson, M.) Building your portfolio: The CILIP guide. London: Facet. • Grant.M.J (2007) The role of reflection in the library and information sector: a systematic review. HILJ, 24 (3) 155-166 • Jacobs, H.L.M (2008) Perspectives on information literacy and reflective pedagogical praxis. The Journal of Academic Librarianship. 34 (3) 256-262 • McKinney, P & Sen, B (2012) Reflection for learning: Understanding the value of reflective writing. Journal of Information Literacy. 6 (2) URL: jil.lboro.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/JIL/article/download/LLC-V6- I2.../1726 • Moon, J. (2007) Getting the measure of reflection. Journal of Radiotherapy. 6, 191-200. • SchÖn (1983) The reflective practitioner. Basic Books New York. • Sen, B. (2010) Reflective writing: A management skill. Library Management. (1/2) 79-93. Copyright - Barbara Sen
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