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History of Medicine 2.0: using creative media to enhance information literacy teaching for 1st year medical students - Catherine Bazela, Vicky Grant & Anthea Tuckerr.
 

History of Medicine 2.0: using creative media to enhance information literacy teaching for 1st year medical students - Catherine Bazela, Vicky Grant & Anthea Tuckerr.

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LILAC 2014 Poster

LILAC 2014 Poster

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    History of Medicine 2.0: using creative media to enhance information literacy teaching for 1st year medical students - Catherine Bazela, Vicky Grant & Anthea Tuckerr. History of Medicine 2.0: using creative media to enhance information literacy teaching for 1st year medical students - Catherine Bazela, Vicky Grant & Anthea Tuckerr. Document Transcript

    • History of Medicine 2.0 Using creative media to improve information literacy teaching for 1st year medical students. The Learning and Research Services Team is responsible for the provision of information literacy in the University of Sheffield Library. This year, the liaison team for medicine replaced a leaflet, which introduces the resources needed for Phase 1 MBChB students to complete their first essay, ‘The History of Medicine’, with a short video using the Library’s creative media facilities. This was shown in the mandatory ‘Introduction to the Library Services’ lecture. The main aims behind switching to a video format from a leaflet were… To make the information more accessible. To make it more visually engaging. To effectively demonstrate the Library’s online re- sources. The video format allowed the students to access the information anywhere, at anytime. Uploaded onto YouTube the video was well-suited to being shared and pro- moted on social media. It was also made available on the Medical School’s VLE, Minerva, and from the Library’s Information Skills Resource. To ensure the video was en- gaging and maintained the students’ attention; pictures, music and visual aids were used. Creative Commons pictures courtesy of the Wellcome Trust provided interest and allowed us to engage with the subject area. Screencasts of the Library’s catalogue, StarPlus, and online database, Medline via Ovid, enabled us to give clear search tips and highlight key aspects of the interfaces. The video was broken up into four clear chapters to allow the students to easily navigate the video to find the infor- mation they needed. The video was produced in-house using Camtasia which was licensed and available for staff use. Assis- tance was provided by the University’s Creative Media Team, with special thanks to Pete Mella [pictured] Vicky Grant, Faculty Librarian Anthea Tucker, Liaison Librarian Cat Bazela, Information Assistant