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The Times They Are a-Changin' (again!): the second, great digital transition to the mobile space / David Nicholas
The Times They Are a-Changin' (again!): the second, great digital transition to the mobile space / David Nicholas
The Times They Are a-Changin' (again!): the second, great digital transition to the mobile space / David Nicholas
The Times They Are a-Changin' (again!): the second, great digital transition to the mobile space / David Nicholas
The Times They Are a-Changin' (again!): the second, great digital transition to the mobile space / David Nicholas
The Times They Are a-Changin' (again!): the second, great digital transition to the mobile space / David Nicholas
The Times They Are a-Changin' (again!): the second, great digital transition to the mobile space / David Nicholas
The Times They Are a-Changin' (again!): the second, great digital transition to the mobile space / David Nicholas
The Times They Are a-Changin' (again!): the second, great digital transition to the mobile space / David Nicholas
The Times They Are a-Changin' (again!): the second, great digital transition to the mobile space / David Nicholas
The Times They Are a-Changin' (again!): the second, great digital transition to the mobile space / David Nicholas
The Times They Are a-Changin' (again!): the second, great digital transition to the mobile space / David Nicholas
The Times They Are a-Changin' (again!): the second, great digital transition to the mobile space / David Nicholas
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The Times They Are a-Changin' (again!): the second, great digital transition to the mobile space / David Nicholas

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II Konferencja Naukowa : Nauka o informacji (informacja naukowa) w okresie zmian, Warszawa, 15-16.04.2013 r. Instytut Informacji Naukowej i Studiów Bibliologicznych, Uniwersytet Warszawski …

II Konferencja Naukowa : Nauka o informacji (informacja naukowa) w okresie zmian, Warszawa, 15-16.04.2013 r. Instytut Informacji Naukowej i Studiów Bibliologicznych, Uniwersytet Warszawski

The 2nd Scientific Conference : Information Science in an Age of Change, April 15-16, 2013. Institute of Information and Book Studies, University of Warsaw

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  • IDC forecasts a five per cent drop in sales of desk-based computers between 2012 and 2017, portable PC growth of at least 19 per cent, tabs soaring 174.5 per cent and smartphones rising 109.9 per cent.
  • Big issues of what is (truly) mobile – devices constantly challenging any classification; do it by info seeking behaviour Germany, USA, Netherlands, France and UK the big 5 Poland accounts for less than 1% of mobile visitors to Europeana. 113% growth in mobile visitors past six months but not as good as elsewhere However fbc.pionier (Digital Libraries Federation) sends more traffic to Europeana than Facebook
  • Alan Kay
  • Transcript

    • 1. CAR PURCHASE COMPARI texttextThe Times They Are a-Changin (again!): thesecond, great digitaltransition to the mobilespaceDavid Nicholas, CIBEResearch.eu/
    • 2. CAR PURCHASE COMPARIThe dam bursts!Not so long ago (2008) CIBER surprised information professionals withrevelations of what the Google Generation were up to in the virtual,unmediated information space [report opposite]But seen nothing yet, with information professionals barely takenbreath and stock, another revolution is on us, and is has a greaterforce behind itGoogle Generation (and the rest of us) have been empowered by amobile device (smartphone/tablet) that will take a form of behaviouralleged as extreme to a completely different level and may burymany of our institutions and belief systems with it. The end ofculture as we know it!While first transition, from physical to digital, transformed the way weseek, read, trust and consume information, the environment in whichwe conduct these activities had not really changed – still in thelibrary/office, and on a device primarily designed for thedesk/office bound.
    • 3. CAR PURCHASE COMPARIAnd bursts again!However, information behaviour no longer mediated or conditioned bythe office or library but by the street, coffee shop or home. Andtime-shifted.Another change: mobiles not computational devices but accessdevices; also social, personal, cool and massively popular. A veryheady cocktail!And they are the preferred device of social media users – mobilesstride the major information domains. There will be a knock on.According to industry estimates the mobile device will soon be themain platform for searching the web, so talking about a majorityactivityHave come a very long way in a very short period of time! It was notvery long ago that libraries banned the mobile andnow the mobile is the library!Little knowledge of how mobile users behave, and how differs fromdesktop users. Talk fills gap with analysis of logs of Europeana.
    • 4. CAR PURCHASE COMPARIBasic characteristics of digital informationseeking behaviourFoundations of digital behaviour already in place (brain rewiring) on which mobile-induced behaviour will build, so worth going over themHyperactive: love choice and looking. Connected to big fat information pipe 24/7Bouncers: most people view only 1-2 pages from thousands available; 3 is manyPromiscuous: around 40% do not come backOne-shots: one visit, one pageBecause:•Search engine searching (lists) and links (enjoined to go elsewhere)•Massive and changing choice•So much rubbish out there•Poor retrieval skills (2.2 words per query; first page up on Google)•Forget: leave memories in cyberspace; adds to ‘churn’ rate•Direct result of end-user checking•Multi-tasking - more pleasurable doing several things at once (not well!)
    • 5. CAR PURCHASE COMPARIHorizontal has replaced the vertical, reading is ‘out’ and fast information ‘in’• Information seeking wise ‘skitter’ (moving rapidly along a surface, with frequentlight contacts or changes of direction). Power browse.• Nobody does much reading or not what is traditionally thought to be reading(reading whole documents). A read can mean 10-15% of a doc. Logs tell us:• Scholars go online to avoid reading; prefer the visual• Only a few minutes spent on a visit; 15 minutes is a very long time;• Shorter articles have much bigger chance of being used; short story booksdesigned the digital universe• Abstracts never been so popular• Fast information. (Information) snack/bite has replaced the three course meal(whole document)• Conditioned by emailing, text messaging, tweeting and PowerPoint to like fastshots of information. Mobiles, of course, the ultimate take-away
    • 6. CAR PURCHASE COMPARINow what then of mobile behaviour: case studyEuropeana?
    • 7. CAR PURCHASE COMPARI• Mobile usage growing at 5 times greater than ‘fixed’ devices• A staggering rise of nearly 400% in last six months• 130,000 mobile users accessed Europeana in last 6 months• Over 90% Apple Mac devices; iPads the vast majority• Visits from mobiles much less interactive: fewer records/pages viewed,fewer searches conducted; less time spent on a visit. Information ‘lite’• Big differences between devices: limited screen real estate andslowness of Blackberry means use very abbreviated, iPhone quiteabbreviated and iPad generates metrics closer to desktops/laptops.Little depth research on show.• Mobile use peaks at nights and weekends; that from desktops onWednesdays and late afternoon. Time-shift.Europeana mobile use
    • 8. CAR PURCHASE COMPARIImplications for information science: the mobile, theborderless information environment and libraries• Constitutes another round of disintermediation and migration.Relatively speaking the library’s information universe has shrunk as a resultof everyone else’s being massively expanded. Researchers’ informationhorizons once bound by the library but not anymore.• Libraries perceived as incomplete sources of information and researchersincreasingly less likely to trust librarians to make the critical decisions onwhat is and what is not in the walled garden on their behalf.• On top of that Google Scholar, Social media etc. create a new valueproposition by providing citation and other (alt) metrics so users can formown views on what is a good. Substitute for the intermediary.• Libraries find it difficult to articulate the value or even the rationale for theircollections in a borderless information environment. Mobile just adds totheir woes.• Location, location, location is the watchword!
    • 9. CAR PURCHASE COMPARIFinal reflections "There is the desire of a consumer society to have no learningcurves. This tends to result in very dumbed-down products thatare easy to get started on, but are generally worthless and/ordebilitating. We can contrast this with technologies that do havelearning curves, but pay off well and allow users to becomeexperts (for example, musical instruments, bicycles)."• “In a viral YouTube video from October 2011 a one-year-old girl sweeps her fingers across an iPads touchscreen, shuffling groups of icons. In the following scenes she appears to pinch, swipe and prod the pages of paper magazines as though they too were screens. When nothing happens, she pushes against her leg, confirming that her finger works just fine”
    • 10. AppendixPolish use of Europeana v. rest of world: 6 month comparison, by type of deviceOct 1, 2012 to ­ Mar 31, 2013 Oct 1, 2011 ­ to Mar 31, 2012Visitors Visits Page viewsPagesvisitDuration(mins)BouncerateNewvisitors Visitors Visits Page viewsPagesvisitDuration(mins)BouncerateNewvisitorsAll 2,696,246 3,473,308 13,288,682 3.83 2:19 49.8 74.88 1,413,735 1,842,392 9,537,422 5.18 2:37 55.85 74.42cf year before 91% 89% 39% -26% -11% -11% 1%Poland 143,631 200,062 779,394 3.9 3:06 44.62 68.5 109,032 141,886 683,640 4.82 2:43 53.69 74.48change 32% 41% 14% -19% 14% -17% -8%All Mobile 132,608 157,887 446,043 2.83 1:29 57.25 81.4 27,918 34,173 131,928 3.86 1:39 61.33 80.89change 375% 362% 238% -27% -10% -7% 1%All Tablet 119,948 143,758 423,040 2.94 1:32 55.99 80.6 23,172 28,130 108,521 3.86 1:43 61.88 80.48change 418% 411% 290% -24% -11% -10% 0%Poland M&T 1,043 1,255 4,000 3.19 1:11 44.06 76.33 489 575 1,596 2.78 0:46 66.61 77.74change 113% 118% 151% 15% 54% -34% -2%Poland accounts for 5% of ALL Europeana visitors despite 6thbiggestpopulation in Europe. Only accounts for 0.4% of mobile visitors. Generalgrowth in visitors 32% compared to 91% overall. Better growth in mobilevisitors (113%) but not as good as elsewhere
    • 11. CAR PURCHASE COMPARICIBER dashboard: fixed and mobile user information seeking comparedDuration of visit (seconds)Time per page (seconds)Record views per visitPage views per visitQueries per visitVisits from mobile devices are much less interactive: fewer records/pages viewed, fewer searches conducted;less time spent on a visit but longer on a page.
    • 12. CAR PURCHASE COMPARICIBER dashboard: mobile platforms comparedDuration of visit (seconds)Time per page (seconds)Record views per visitPage views per visitQueries per visitReally big differences: limited screen real estate and slowness of the Blackberry is clearly a limiting factor for in-depth research. On theother hand, the tablet iPad generates usage metrics that are not hugely dissimilar from desktops or laptops.
    • 13. CAR PURCHASE COMPARIWhen is Europeana used?Day of weekFixed peak(Weds)Mobile peak(Sat)Percentage of Europeana page views within category: mobile and fixed users by day and timeOctober 2010 to July 2011Intensity of Europeana use, as expressed by page views, varies between the week and the weekend and at different times of the day aspeople shift between different contexts and personas, from the professional to the personal. Clearly, mobile devices have considerablywidened access to Europeana at weekends and outside of traditional office hours.Fixed peak(17h-18h)Time of day of weekMobile peak(23h)%pageviews

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