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Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
Time management powerpoint
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Time management powerpoint

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  • This was a top issue for all in both the sales group and for the recruiters.I’d like to have a discussion on the topic and share with you a few tips I have seen work at past companies where I have worked.
  • Let's strip away all this complexity and get back to basics for a moment. What is time management? The essence of time management is the following:1. Decide what to do2. Do it
  • Be proactive, take back your time or value your time more by not wasting it. ― Tony Morgan and Stephen Richards are an author.
  • Ask the group- So why can’t we get all our work done in the allotted time? There is no 1 right answer. People are making millions on time management techniques, ideas and systems and gadgets.Give examples of how different people organize.
  • Protect the limited time you have to get things done. Most work 9-5 so that is the best time to call.
  • 60 planned calls per day or 300 per week will net you 10+ hours of phone time!Keep calling until you make 15 call or connect with 8-10 people
  • 60 planned calls per day or 300 per week will net you 10+ hours of phone time!Before you end your call block, make 1 more call. Post a sign that reminds you to make 1 more call. Put it in a prominent place on your desk.
  • I challenge you to track it for a day at a min. We engage in a lot of wasted time.We ask for 10 hours of phone time per week so what happened to the other 30 hours?
  • This is great for Leaders training new employees. Have them come to you at the beginning, middle or end of the day. This way you can help train and mentor and still be productive.
  • List out the tasks that consume our day. Ask the group.Give example of important VS urgent tasks.
  • Importance is on the horizontal axes. High importance is to the left, low importance is to the right.Urgency is on the vertical axes. High urgency is at the top, low urgency is on the bottom. This is just a sample.
  • Time is money and I believe that your time is more valuable than most the clients and/or candidates that we interact with on a regular basis!
  • People are becoming rich on T.M. systems. Per Steve Pavlina- It's tempting to say that excellent time management is a result of having a great time management system. But I have not found this to be the case. I think the general mindset of time management is far more important than any system. And the mindset of time management is simply that you value your time. Time management systems are seductive. They lure you in with the promise of greater productivity, more free time, faster income generation, and higher self-esteem. And some of those benefits may indeed be realized. However, another possibility is that your system becomes a distraction that prevents you from achieving real gains. You find yourself investing more and more time in meta-activities like getting organized, prioritizing objectives, and learning the latest productivity software. Actually doing the tasks that your system is designed to manage becomes almost an afterthought... perhaps even an annoyance. Instead of helping you increase productivity, your system becomes a means to disguise low productivity.
  • 1. Stick to the 15-minute rule. Womack recommends organizing your workday into 15 minute chunks. If you work eight hours a day, you've got 32, 15-minute chunks. A 10-hour workday gives you 40, 15-minute chunks. Womack emphasizes 15 minutes because, he says, it's long enough to get something done and short enough to find in your day. When you have to schedule a meeting or conference call that would typically take an hour, Womack tells his clients to start it at 15 minutes past the hour and to end it on the hour. He believes people can accomplish in 45 minutes (that is, three, 15-minute chunks) what they think they need 60 minutes for. Containing the meeting to 45 minutes forces you to keep it on point and gives you an extra 15 minute chunk in which you can address another item on your to-do list. 2. Know when you're done. Continuing to work on something when it is essentially done is a significant time-waster that most professionals aren't even aware of. People need to think through the, 'When am I done' question, says Womack, who is also the author of Your Best Just Got Better: Work Smarter, Think Bigger, Make More (Wiley 2012). "When I get a nonfiction book, I'm done with that book when I've learned something from the author that I didn't know before," he says. "I've picked up books, paid $24.95, read it for two or three 15-minute chunks, learned something and given the book to my seatmate on a plane." 3. Eliminate distractions. Eliminating distractions may not be a new time management tip, but Womack's advice for avoiding specific distractions—such as a niggling coworker or a nagging manager—is novel and effective. If your manager is prone to interrupting you with questions, Womack suggests preempting her. For example, instead of waiting for your manager to show up at your desk or ping you, approach her first at a few minutes before the hour, say, a 10:52 or 10:55 AM, ideally before a meeting or call. He says to tell her, "I have a bunch of things I'm working on, and a meeting at 11, and I'm trying to get any interruptions out of the way. Do you have anything you need to tell me or ask me before my meeting and before my work gets underway?" Another tip from Womack: If you have a quick question for someone but don't want to get caught up in a protracted conversation around it, call your contact (or stop by his desk) a few minutes before the hour, knowing that he might have a meeting on the hour and won't have time for chit-chat, either. 4. Identify verbs that need attention. Womack recommends organizing your to-do list around verbs, such as call, draft, review, prepare and schedule. Those are tasks you can generally complete in one sitting and that help move a larger project forward, he says. If you have big-picture verbs on your to-do list, such as plan, discuss, create or implement, replace them with action steps that break down the big picture project, adds Womack. Doing so will help you get started and reduce any feelings of being overwhelmed. 5. Be prepared for bonus time. The next time you find out your flight's been delayed or your doctor is running late, don't get annoyed. Recognize that you've just been given the gift of "bonus time." If you bring some work with you wherever you go, as Womack suggests, you'll have the chance to tackle it, whether that's responding to email, making a call, reviewing a proposal or drafting a plan. 6. Use email shortcuts. Womack notes that both the BlackBerry and iPhone allow users to create quick keys or keyboard shortcuts when using the smartphones for email. He created several keyboard short cuts that call up boiler plate text that he frequently reuses. For example, if someone emails Womack asking him for information on how to use Microsoft Outlook more effectively, all he has to do is type his shortcut, "OL," which automatically populates his email with a response to the question. (This video demonstrates how to create these keyboard shortcuts on an iPhone 4S. This one shows how to create them on a BlackBerry.) These shortcuts save Womack a ton of time since he's developed several for answers to some of the most common questions people ask him. It prevents him from having to recreate the answer every time someone emails him. It also saves him from having to search his sent folder and having to copy and paste the answer into email.
  • Transcript

    • 1. PRESENTED BY: Doug Klares Tim Donohue John Silver Cost Effective Workforce SolutionsTime Management
    • 2. 2 A Definition from Dictionary.com time management [tahym] [man-ij-muhnt] Noun 1. The analysis of how working hours are spent and the prioritization of tasks in order to maximize personal efficiency in the workplace. Time Management- Definition
    • 3. Time Management- Quotes “You get to decide where your time goes. You can either spend it moving forward, or you can spend it putting out fires. You decide. And if you don't decide, others will decide for you.” ― Tony Morgan “Habitual procrastinators will readily testify to all the lost opportunities, missed deadlines, failed relationships and even monetary losses incurred just because of one nasty habit of putting things off until it is often too late.” ― Stephen Richards 3
    • 4. Time Management- Why is it so challenging? What is the right answer? What is the best way to maximize your time and be more productive? What are you doing specifically? 4
    • 5. 5 Prime Time is in session Can it wait? whenever possible, conduct your blitz of daily marketing calls in one hour blocks of time, four times per day Time Management- Prime Time
    • 6. 6 Time Task 7:30– 9:00 am Morning meetings, plan & make matching calls, priority calls, Office visits or client meetings. *9:00 – 10:00 am Prime-Time calls. Attempt 15 marketing or recruiting calls. All other calls except placement oriented calls should be held. 10:00 – 10:30 am Documentation of info in the system (mini’s, etc.), priority calls or returns calls. *10:30 – 11:30 am Prime-Time calls. Attempt 15 marketing or recruiting calls. All other calls except placement oriented calls should be held. 11:30 – 1:30 pm Documentation, priority calls, return phone calls, lunch, office visits, client meetings. *1:30 – 2:30 pm Prime-Time calls. Attempt 15 marketing or recruiting calls. All other calls except placement oriented calls should be held. 2:30 – 3:00 pm Documentation of info in the system (mini’s, etc.), priority calls or returns calls. Time Management- Suggested Daily Schedule
    • 7. 7 Time Task *3:00 – 4:00 pm Prime-Time calls. Attempt 15 marketing or recruiting calls. All other calls except placement oriented calls should be held. 4:00 – 4:30 pm Documentation of info in the system (mini’s, etc.), priority calls or returns calls. 4:30 – 6:00 pm Conduct office visits or client meetings. Analyze the day’s results. Re-plan planner with a total of sixty calls for next day. Be sure to include both marketing & recruiting calls and list out ALL priority calls. 6:00+ pm Night calls, recruiting follow-ups, debriefs, placement calls. Time Management- Suggested Daily Schedule Continued
    • 8. Time Management- Flexible Planning Build in some time in anticipation of problems, issues and challenges. Don’t be surprised by these everyday events. When you sense your plan spinning out of control, STOP, look at your schedule and start doing what is listed on the plan. Most people will wait until the next week or day to get back on track. If you adjust faster, you will stay on plan, accomplish more and be more productive in the same amount of time. 8
    • 9. Time Management- Time Wasters Document your activities over the course of a week Keep a time log in 15 minute increments See what tasks take up the most time See what people take up most of your time You will be amazed at how much time you waste in a day let alone a week 9
    • 10. Time Management- “No” is a Powerful Tool Learn how to say “NO” or not now in a professional way You are not being rude, you are being focused Explain to your team (office) when you are available Politely ask your team member if the issue can wait until your scheduled down time. 10
    • 11. Time Management- Ask 2 Questions Is your task Urgent? Is your task important? 11
    • 12. 12 High Importance High Time Pressing Low Importance High Time Pressing High Importance Low Time Pressing Low Importance Low Time Pressing (“no brainers. .. they have to get done.) »Taking a Job Req »Client calls in with offer »Dealing with an upset client/candidate »Debriefing a client/ cand. »These are “NO BRAINERS”…they are VERY important and are very time pressing. (anything that is re-active and is not planned) »Your phone is on its third ring »Questions from other recruiters... »A candidate calls in »Reacting to others in the office »Unplanned interviews or incoming phone calls »Anything reactive and not planned (these are the keys to your success. requires discipline and being pro-active.) »Creating your marketing and recruiting plan »Prime Time- NBD calls »Client Meetings / Office Visits »Matching calls »Briefing candidates and clients »Spending time in job Req meeting »Spending time in training meeting (usually people do this stuff to feel busy) »Do computer stuff/ admin. work »Organizing your desk »Making copies, faxing, etc. »Outbound f/up calls for small/unimportant tasks »Engaging people in conversation not related to your plan. »Sending e-mails This is where people spend much of their time!!! Time Management- Urgency VS Importance
    • 13. 13 When your desk is full of activity, use this guide to set and balance your priorities. 1. Confirm an offer or a new hire. 2. Debrief a Candidate or a Client. 3. Brief a Candidate or a Client. 4. Make a matching call. 5. Complete references on all pending Candidates. 6. Arrange for an interview with a matched Candidate. 7. Complete all Priority Calls. 8. Focus on new Calls (sales or recruitment). Time Management- Adjusting Priorities
    • 14. 14 Time and performance experts state that by blocking out time to complete specific tasks, your results will go up significantly. Your added focus puts you in a rhythm or a “make it happen” zone! Every time you start, stop and restart again on important tasks, you lose focus, momentum and ultimately money! Time Management- Time = Money
    • 15. Time Management- Organize Your Way The internet is full of time management self help tips and tricks Know yourself- pick something that works Experiment- push your comfort zone Evaluate your system- make corrections Find a mentor- what do they use 15
    • 16. Time Management- Tips from CIO.com Stick to the 15 minute rule Know when you are done Eliminate distractions Identify verbs that need attention Be prepared for bonus time Use email shortcuts 16
    • 17. Time Management- Summary Protect your time! It’s valuable (Prime Time) Use a schedule to keep you on track Use flex planning Watch and eliminate time wasters Learn to say “no” Is the task at hand urgent or important Set Priorities Time = Money Organize in a way that makes sense to you Tips from CIO.com 17
    • 18. PRESENTED BY: Doug Klares Tim Donohue John Silver Cost Effective Workforce SolutionsTime Management Q & A

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