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Transparency, trust, confidence and comparability are emerging as key themes in the new economic climate. There is a growing 'body of evidence' which underpins the business case for responsible ...

Transparency, trust, confidence and comparability are emerging as key themes in the new economic climate. There is a growing 'body of evidence' which underpins the business case for responsible business practice.

A coherent ‘CSR’ strategy, based on integrity, sound values and a long-term approach can offer clear business benefits. These cover a better alignment of corporate goals with those of society; maintaining the company's reputation; securing its continued license to operate; and reducing its exposure to liabilities, risks and associated costs. Björn Stigson, President, World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) www.wbcsd.org



The business case relies on genuine intention and a well informed course of action. An approach which sees only business advantage and fails to engage in the underlying ethical purpose will be unlikely to reap the full benefits of responsible business practice … and more likely to fail when challenges emerge, such as the global financial crisis, where risk is pitched against opportunity.

There are eight broad clusters of recognised business benefits for companies that engage in the responsible business practice ‘journey’:

Reputation management and competitive advantage: including enhanced reputation with customers, market differentiation, building brand, goodwill and public trust – creating access to new markets
Enhanced social license to operate - stronger relationships with communities
Employee satisfaction - improved management performance, productivity and capacity to attract, retain and motivate talented staff. Increased learning, innovation and productivity. Reduced hiring and retention costs
Risk management - long-term security
Access to capital - improved relations with the investment community and better access to capital
Financial performance - stronger financial performance and profitability through operational efficiency gains
Minimised environmental impacts - cost savings and creation of business efficiencies
Long-term perspective - benefits from operating with a perspective broader and longer than immediate, short-term profits

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    Business ethics presentation peter greenham iigi Business ethics presentation peter greenham iigi Presentation Transcript

    • Page  1Let’s Put Ethics into the Biz
    • Page  2Independent Inspections Pty LtdP: 1300 857 149F: 1300 857 150M: 0402 259 479admin@iigi.com.auBusiness EthicsRisk Management and Lessons Learned,The Ten Minute ArgumentBy Peter Greenham
    • Page  3Introduction Introduction Trust? Trust as a Commodity How do you demonstrate beinga responsible business? United Nations Principles Responsible Business Rating? Corporate Reporting Methods?
    • Page  4Introduction (cont.)With the low levels of trust within thecommunity there is a demand fortransparency in a Changing Landscapein Business operations that impacts thewhole of business operations. Trust isnow a Economic Driver in determiningthe integrity of a business. Businessescan use a roadmap to measure andgrow their employees to reduce risk.
    • Page  5Trust2013 Edelman Trust BarometerFinds a Crisis in LeadershipLess Than One in Five Trust Leadersto Tell the TruthLess than one in five respondents in the2013 Edelman Trust Barometer believesa business or governmental leader willactually tell the truth when confrontedwith a difficult issue. This lack ofconfidence in traditional authority figureswas continually reinforced in 2012against the backdrop of high-profilescandals involving CEO and governmentofficials.http://www.edelman.com/trust-downloads/press-release/
    • Page  6Trust is a commodity in the business Ethics puts the gut feel. Dealing with responsible companies back trust inyour employees and your suppliers. Aristottle who would thin I would quote him? Virtue ethics emphasizes the role of ones characterand the virtues that ones character embodies fordetermining or evaluating ethical behavior. Virtue ethicsis one of the three major approaches to normativeethics, often contrasted to deontology which emphasizesduty to rules and consequentialism which derivesrightness or wrongness from the outcome of the actitself. [1]
    • Page  7How do you Demonstrate Being a ResponsibleBusiness? ISO 26000 is the Standard for Corporate and Social Responsibility and isembedded by United Nations Global Compact Principles. The UN Global Compact asks companies to embrace, support and enact,within their sphere of influence, a set of core values in the core areas of :– Human Rights– Labor– Environment– Anti-Corruption Independent Inspections Pty Ltd is one of 37 Australian companies thathas supported the Global Compact
    • Page  8How do you Demonstrate Being a ResponsibleBusiness? ISO 26000 is the Standard for Corporate and Social Responsibility and isembedded by United Nations Global Compact Principles. The UN Global Compact asks companies to embrace, support and enact,within their sphere of influence, a set of core values in the core areas of :– Human Rights– Labor– Environment– Anti-Corruption Independent Inspections Pty Ltd is one of 37 Australian companies thathas supported the Global Compact
    • Page  9The United Nations 10 PrinciplesHuman Rights Principle 1: Businesses should support and respect the protection of internationallyproclaimed human rights; and Principle 2: make sure that they are not complicit in human rights abuses.Labour Principle 3: Businesses should uphold the freedom of association and the effectiverecognition of the right to collective bargaining; Principle 4: the elimination of all forms of forced and compulsory labour; Principle 5: the effective abolition of child labour; and Principle 6: the elimination of discrimination in respect of employment andoccupation.Environment Principle 7: Businesses should support a precautionary approach to environmentalchallenges; Principle 8: undertake initiatives to promote greater environmental responsibility; and Principle 9: encourage the development and diffusion of environmentally friendlytechnologies.Anti-Corruption Principle 10: Businesses should work against corruption in all its forms, includingextortion and bribery.
    • Page  10Responsible Business Rating? ISO 26000 Validation of the current company procedures implementationand methodology can work for your organisation. It provides a progressivesystematic management approach that encompasses best practice forapplication , monitoring and communication of progress as a responsiblebusiness to the local community and business economy Businesses depending on size operate at 3 main levels in demonstratingCSR and Sustainability and these can be categorised as:o Basic: May have some community involvement but not recorded,o Intermediate: Community engagement, records and reporting,o Advanced: Corporate Reporting to United Nations and GRIGuidelines
    • Page  13Carbon FootprintSuppliers that do not manage CO2 will be deselected from‘Approved Supplier’ List to competitors who have Carbonmanagement plans.The results indicate that companies are making real changes totheir operating models, most frequently in procurement, resulting ingreater reductions in greenhouse-gas emissions and greatermonetary gains across the entire supply chain.The business case is strong and growing suppliers that do notmeasure, quantify, and manage their greenhouse-gas emissionswill soon see their business move to competitors that can providebetter information and clearer evidence of change.Of the 49 Carbon Disclosure Project Supply Chain member companies—the companies who are requesting climate information from their suppliers—90% of responding companies have a climate change strategy with at leastgeneral guidelines for procurement, an increase from 79% in 2010 and 74%in 2009. Some 62% reward suppliers that employ employ good carbon-management practices (up from 19% in 2009 and 28% in 2010), 39% willbegin deselecting suppliers that do not adopt such measures (compared to17% in 2009 and 23% in 2010), and 30% factor climate change into theirevaluation of suppliers.
    • Page  14Action Rests with You
    • Page  15Independent Inspections Pty LtdIndependent Inspections Pty LtdMr. Peter GreenhamQualifications:- Diploma of Civil Engineering- Associate Diploma of LaboratoryOperations- Diploma of Quality Management- Diploma of Business- Lead Environmental Auditor- Diploma of workplace training andAssessment- NATA AsessorYour Carbon AuditorsP: 1300 857 149F: 1300 857 150Sales TeamMr. Jonathan Yuen (B.Bus)M: 0419 188 779jyuen@iigi.com.auMr. Peter GreenhamM: 0402259479peter@iigi.com.au