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Fall Planting for Your Winter Garden
Fall Planting for Your Winter Garden
Fall Planting for Your Winter Garden
Fall Planting for Your Winter Garden
Fall Planting for Your Winter Garden
Fall Planting for Your Winter Garden
Fall Planting for Your Winter Garden
Fall Planting for Your Winter Garden
Fall Planting for Your Winter Garden
Fall Planting for Your Winter Garden
Fall Planting for Your Winter Garden
Fall Planting for Your Winter Garden
Fall Planting for Your Winter Garden
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Fall Planting for Your Winter Garden

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It’s not too late to sow an edible garden that will bear through winter and/or set you up for an early spring harvest! In this class, we will cover cold-hardy veggie varieties and how to prepare your …

It’s not too late to sow an edible garden that will bear through winter and/or set you up for an early spring harvest! In this class, we will cover cold-hardy veggie varieties and how to prepare your garden space to be fruitful through winter.

Published in: Self Improvement, Technology
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  • 1. Fall Planting for Your Winter Garden Independence Gardens Portland, OR January 2012 © Independence Gardens LLC Download the handout that goes along with this slideshow! http://bit.ly/yL0TxS Tuesday, January 31, 2012
  • 2. Winter gardening? Sure! If you: • Choose the right varieties of the right plants • Plant them at the right time in the right location(s) • And protect them adequately Fresh tomatoes are probably not on the menu this winter...unless...our summer ‘maters don’t ripen before then! Tuesday, January 31, 2012
  • 3. In winter, plants... • Grow slower or not at all; many go dormant through the cold months • Can be harvested if they are full-grown before winter sets in • Need protection from the elements • May die, or at least die back Tuesday, January 31, 2012
  • 4. • Find your first frost date ~Oct. 24, in Portland; this is conservative, and a more experimental gardener might use Nov. 15 • Count backward an appropriate length of time! – Varies by plant; general formula and example follow When to plant Tuesday, January 31, 2012
  • 5. The Formula/Example: Radishes # of days from seeding or transplanting outdoors to harvest (find on seed packet)/28 days # of days from seed to transplant (if you grow your own transplants)/0 “Fall Factor” (~2 weeks—this accounts for slower growth during cool, short autumn days)/14 days # of days to count back from first frost date to planting date/42 days (Sept. 12 - Oct. 4) When to plant + + = Tuesday, January 31, 2012
  • 6. Fall garden activities September • Sow seeds/transplanting starts • Build season extenders • Control pests (esp. slugs and snails)—if you do it now, you’ll have fewer problems through the winter and into the spring • Fertilize: top-dress with a little bit of compost or use a small application of a complete fertilizer to restore nutrients to depleted soils; don’t use too much nitrogen, because it will stimulate excess growth of weak leaves • Harvest frost-tender crops (tomatoes, summer squash, melons, eggplants, cukes, peppers) and storing them—chart follows Tuesday, January 31, 2012
  • 7. Frost-tenderness Tender Vegetables Semi-Hardy Vegetables Hardy Vegetables (damaged by light frost) (tolerates light frost) (tolerates hard frost) Beans Beets Broccoli Cucumber Carrot Brussels Sprouts Eggplant Cauliflower Cabbage Muskmelon Celery Collards New Zealand Spinach Chard Kale Okra Chinese Cabbage Kohlrabi Pepper Endive Mustard Greens Pumpkin Lettuce Onion Squash Parsnip Parsley Sweet Corn Potato Peas Sweet Potato Salsify Radish Tomato Spinach Watermelon Turnip Tuesday, January 31, 2012
  • 8. Fall garden activities October • Start to use your season extenders • Cease and desist with fertilizers—too much nitrogen (N) will make your plants grow new leaves, which will be susceptible to freezing November • STOP WATERING, if you’ve been keeping it up; don’t resume till February at the earliest—having less water in them will help keep your crops from freezing Tuesday, January 31, 2012
  • 9. Planting calendar • This chart shows what to plant and when you can expect to harvest it in Zone 8 (USDA)/6 (Sunset) • The gray columns are months in which we usually don’t plant much, if anything...but we can continue to grow/harvest Tuesday, January 31, 2012
  • 10. Location • Mobile: take your garden on the road or move it around as the sun changes direction; grow herbs in containers • Stationary: most gardens are; location ideally carefully considered • Easily accessible: minimize the need for trekking through the rain • South-facing: sun will be coming from further south in the winter • NOT at bottom of slope: cold air flows downhill like cold water, so it will frost first in the pools at the bottom • Sheltered from the wind: air movement is more stressful to plants than temperature fluctuations • Good drainage: raised beds suggested • Crop rotation: plant similar things in different beds Tuesday, January 31, 2012
  • 11. Protection • Straw • Leaves • Buckets, bags, baskets, boxes, milk jugs • Cloches • Cold frames • Hotbeds • Greenhouses • Sunrooms • Windowsills (with supplemental light) NOTE: You cannot and should not try to recreate spring or summer during fall and winter, but you can protect your plants from getting beaten up, frozen, or blown to smithereens Tuesday, January 31, 2012
  • 12. Final notes • If this is your first fall-winter garden, strive for but don’t expect perfection • Weather, scheduling, etc. are unpredictable, and they may get in your garden’s way • Unless the stakes are really high, any effort is a good effort • Keep track of what works and what doesn’t • And do it again next year even better! Tuesday, January 31, 2012
  • 13. Questions? Tuesday, January 31, 2012

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