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This is the presentation for the National Inclusion Project's foundational Let's ALL Play training.

This is the presentation for the National Inclusion Project's foundational Let's ALL Play training.

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  • What is Let’s ALL Play?
  • Wide Diversity of Programs: YMCAs, Parks & Recs, Boys & Girls Clubs, Independent Camps, Drama Programs, Therapeutic Riding Programs.
  • Defining InclusionInclusion is based on the idea that people with disabilities should be allowed to participate equally alongside their peers without disabilities When we talk about inclusion, we need to think about three levels of inclusion. At the most basic level, there is physical inclusion – where people with disabilities are physically placed in the classroom or in the community. Physical inclusion often involves making adaptations to the physical environment that would make it possible for a person with a disability to be in that environment. Functional inclusion is the next level. It recognizes that in addition to adaptations to the physical environment, people with a disability may need other supports that will enable them to participate in activities. In the classroom, this is often referred to as instructional inclusion. Social Inclusion is the final level of inclusion. People often assume that if people with disabilities are in the classroom, or on the sports team, they will automatically become a part of the social environment. However, as will show later – this is not the case. Social Inclusion occurs when people are social accepted by their peers and are enabled by others to participate fully in community activities.
  • To do inclusion successfully, it must start with belief. Your actions are a product of your belief. Some people can fake it for a while, but with the intensity of working in a kid program, there will be a “heat of the moment” situation where your beliefs will be betrayed.To do inclusion successfully, you must believe 100%:Every child can make friends – If you do not believe that every child can make friends, essentially you are saying that there is a child out there who is destined to be miserable and lonely. This does not mean that every child will be friends with every other child. That is unrealistic. But you have to believe that every child that comes into your program will be able to build positive relationships with others.Every child can participate – Will every child want to participate in everything? No. But believing that every child CAN participate will help you in being creative to find ways that a child can be involved beyond just making them a “scorekeeper” or a “cheerleader.”Every child can be successful – What does success mean? We define it as “taking a step” from where you are. There are many ways to take that step and each child’s success may look different, but each child can experience success. Why is this important? When we help a child stretch and accomplish even a small step forward, it makes them eager to replicate that feeling they get. You then have children striving after success. And even if they stretch and don’t quite make it, it gives a teachable moment about how small failures when we learn from them actually lead us to greater success in the future.
  • Why is it important to believe so strongly?
  • So…
  • Pass out Mikayla books to groups of 5-8 and have them break up and read through the book either with everyone taking a turn or one “storyteller.” When they come back, ask for their highlights. Point out a few of your own to either get things going or close out the discussion.Several highlights:“One of us even thought it was contagious.” Real fear. If they had not cleared that up, what would have happened for that child and Mikayla?The bowling/kickball ramp: Make sure to point out that it was the kids’ idea because they did not want to see their friend on the sideline of something they enjoyed so much.That you don’t hear the voice of the person with a disability at all in the story. Point out the benefits of inclusion to kids without disabilities.
  • When are mistakes okay? When you learn from them.Who are the only people who don’t make mistakes? People who don’t do anything.When you are making inclusion successful, you are going to make mistakes. You have to learn to be forgiving of yourself and others. When the adults have this mindset, it will trickle down to establish an atmosphere where kids feel safe to try new things and participate more fully because they know that they will not be slammed for making mistakes. It will create more opportunities for team development and relationship building.
  • If you don’t know, you should: when you are in a position of leadership in the life of a child, every word you say takes on greater meaning. You can very quickly tear a child down with a careless word thrown in in the heat of the moment, but you can also make a huge positive difference with the words you pour into a child’s life.
  • The word “retarded” gets tossed about way too casually and generally is used in a situation where we are calling ourselves or someone else “stupid,” “dumb,” or other negative words. The other problem is that the “R-word” has been used to describe multiple types of disabilities where it does not necessarily fit. So, if the “R-word” is used casually in your program and you have a child with autism, cerebral palsy, Down syndrome, or other disabilities, you have essentially started them out with the impression that they somehow are dumber or lesser than other children, and you’ve given them something to prove that they shouldn’t have to in order to stand on equal footing with their peers.
  • A. How bout that?
  • B./C. It may not take a person with a disability any extra time, but do be sensitive when planning. Never make an accommodation that’s not needed, but be flexible enough to make one if it is.
  • A. For a person with total hearing loss, it does not matter how loudly you speak, they will not hear you. They will know, however, that you are yelling at them, and no one appreciates that. Speak directly to the person in your normal way of speaking. It is the companion’s job to tell you if you need to speak up or slow down.
  • C. Getting at eye level with anyone is the respectful way to communicate on a one-to-one basis.
  • C. This is very hard to do sometimes, especially in the rush of our program. However, it is important that you give them the respect to understand what they are actually saying versus what you assumed they said because you were in a hurry.
  • B. Initiate verbal contact before physical.
  • C. When you help without asking or listening, you are reinforcing the stigma of “helplessness” for people with disabilities. There are people who want to do things by themselves (both people with and without disabilities) and that is certainly their right. However, it is never wrong to ask, and this does not extend to common courtesy things like holding the door open for someone.
  • C. Example: You are in Arts & Crafts and you hold up Johnny’s project to the group and wildly exclaim, “LOOK EVERYONE! Look at what Johnny did!” The problem: Johnny’s project looks exactly like everyone else’s. The other kids then understand that you are excessively praising him because he has a disability and wasn’t expected to do the same kind of work that they were. Avoid that!
  • D. And we come full circle. When setting the atmosphere, relax! You’re going to make mistakes, but if you set an atmosphere where mistakes are ok, words are used to build up, and actions are respectful, you will have the makings of a very positive inclusion experience.
  • Defining InclusionInclusion is based on the idea that people with disabilities should be allowed to participate equally alongside their peers without disabilities When we talk about inclusion, we need to think about three levels of inclusion. At the most basic level, there is physical inclusion – where people with disabilities are physically placed in the classroom or in the community. Physical inclusion often involves making adaptations to the physical environment that would make it possible for a person with a disability to be in that environment. Functional inclusion is the next level. It recognizes that in addition to adaptations to the physical environment, people with a disability may need other supports that will enable them to participate in activities. In the classroom, this is often referred to as instructional inclusion. Social Inclusion is the final level of inclusion. People often assume that if people with disabilities are in the classroom, or on the sports team, they will automatically become a part of the social environment. However, as will show later – this is not the case. Social Inclusion occurs when people are social accepted by their peers and are enabled by others to participate fully in community activities.
  • Start with Fence, Grouping, and line up scenarios where they can’t talk.
  • Answer every question with “What do you mean?” so that:You have time to catch your breath. Many times a question about another kid can blindside you and in the rush of the day, you do not want to treat a serious question flippantly.They can clarify what they mean. Instead of just “Why does she make those sounds?”, you can answer the real question, “When she gets excited, why does she grunt?”You can form the best answer. And sometimes the best answer is, “I’m not sure, but I’ll find out.” Just make sure you actually find out.
  • What is Let’s ALL Play?
  • A little different take. Give Darius background. Play the San Francisco Zoo scene.What word do the boys stress that would have been a barrier to them in forming relationships? PITYPity comes from a good place. Pity comes from compassionate people. However, we must move past pity quickly because pity communicates that somehow because I don’t have a disability I’m better off and I need to “help” you.
  • Ask the questions
  • When it comes to making accommodations, many people can get overwhelmed thinking it has to be something elaborate. Just by changing from M&M’s to gum drops, though, you were able to exponentially increase your success. Keep a “M&M’s to gum drops” mentality when it comes to accommodations. Sometimes it will take more than one simple change or you will have to try several different ones, but start with the simple change first.
  • Let them answer…
  • Play video

Transcript

  • 1. www.inclusionproject.org
  • 2. What is Inclusion? Social Inclusion • Persons with a disability are socially accepted and Functional Inclusion enabled to • Persons with a participate in school disability have and community necessary supports to activities participate inPhysical Inclusion normative experiences• Persons with a disability are present in the classroom, a sports team, in a recreational setting etc. Schleien et al. 1999
  • 3. What is Inclusion? Everyone Participates Everyone Belongs
  • 4. The #1 Factor in Ensuring Successful Inclusion is…A GROUP OF PEOPLE WHO BELIEVE TOGETHERTHAT IT IS POSSIBLE AND WORK TOGETHER TO MAKE IT HAPPEN.
  • 5. Statements of Belief…• EVERY child can make friends.• EVERY child can participate.• EVERY child can be successful.
  • 6. When it comes to leading kids…• If you’re ON FIRE, they’re HOT.• If you’re HOT, they’re WARM.• If you’re WARM, they’re COLD.• If you’re COLD, you’re FIRED!
  • 7. Be Honest…
  • 8. What are the benefits of inclusion?
  • 9. Your First StepsSet the Atmosphere
  • 10. Establishing an Atmosphere Where Mistakes are OK Oops!
  • 11. Words arePOWERFUL!
  • 12. The “R” Word
  • 13. “People-First” LanguageDescribing Words used often enough become Defining Words.
  • 14. How should I act?
  • 15. If you are unsure of what to say when youfirst meet, try:a. “Hello.”b. “I’m not sure about this.”c. “How long have you been disabled?”
  • 16. For activities you are doing, it might take aperson with a disability:a. forever. Don’t worry about waiting.b. extra time so be sensitive when planning.c. no more time than anyone else.
  • 17. If a person with a disability has acompanion or sign language interpreter:a. speak directly to the person with a disability.b. speak as loudly as you can.c. speak directly to the companion or interpreter.
  • 18. When you talk to a person in a wheelchairfor more than a few minutes:a. lean on the wheelchair to let the person know you are paying attention.b. bend over and put your hands on your knees.c. try to sit down so that you will be at eye level with that person.
  • 19. If a person has difficulty speaking:a. give the person unhurried attention.b. don’t pretend to understand when you don’t – ask the person to repeat what they said.c. Both A and B.
  • 20. When you greet a person who is visuallyimpaired:a. grab their hand and shake it.b. tell the person your name and where you are.c. pat them on the back.
  • 21. Before you assist a person with a disability:a. ask.b. listen carefully to any instructions.c. Both A and B.
  • 22. When people with disabilities accomplishnormal tasks,a. make it a big deal and show everyone around.b. ignore it.c. avoid excessive praise.
  • 23. Which of the common expressions shouldyou avoid around people with disabilities?a. “I’ve got to run now.”b. “See you later.”c. “Have you heard?”d. Relax. People with disabilities use these phrases all the time.
  • 24. ApplyChange Teach
  • 25. Serving Families• Build trust!• Be empathetic.• Be consistent.• Communicate!• You’re on the same team! CELEBRATE YOUR SUCCESS!
  • 26. Helping Campers Establish Friendships
  • 27. Keys to Building Friendships•Be Intentional!•Emphasize Similarities•Teach Nonverbal Responses•Aid and Fade
  • 28. Keys to Building Friendships•Be Intentional!•Emphasize Similarities•Teach Nonverbal Responses•Aid and Fade•Answer Camper Questions
  • 29. What Do You Mean?
  • 30. Power Tower
  • 31. Power Tower
  • 32. Power TowerWhat was the same in the activity? What was different?
  • 33. Making Accommodations M&M’s to Gum Drops
  • 34. Basic Questions to Think About• Time—How long/short will an activity need to be?• Tools—What do I need to change/add for an activity?• Cues—What will help reinforcement?• Transitions—How do we get to it, through it, and away from it?• Success—How do we (re)define success?
  • 35. Achieving Positive Behaviors
  • 36. What are behaviors that challenge you?
  • 37. Understanding Challenging Behaviors • I have an unmet need.
  • 38. Understanding Challenging Behaviors • I have an unmet need. • I lack the skill.
  • 39. Understanding Challenging Behaviors • I have an unmet need. • I lack the skill. • There’s a lack of fit.
  • 40. A change in a child’s behaviorusually only occurs when there is a change in the adult’s behavior or practice. - Novella Ruffin Ph.D
  • 41. Prevention & Management Strategies• Structure Routine  Transitions• Positive redirection
  • 42. Prevention & Management Strategies• Structure Routine  Transitions• Positive Redirection• Group Control• Balance• Fidgets, Picture Schedules, Activity Scripts, Task Cards
  • 43. Fidgets• Putty • Small wind-up toys• Playdoh • Small beanbags• Koosh balls • Vibrating toys• Stress balls • Squeeze toys• Stretch men/animals • Exercise band for• Finger puppets pulling• Mini Etch-a-Sketch
  • 44. Picture ScheduleFree Play Music Snack
  • 45. Activity Script LunchWe have lunch at camp.Before we eat, we line up.We take turns washing our hands.We have a special area for eating.I will get my lunch and find a seat with my friends.I can talk quietly to my friends while I am eating.When I’m done I need to throw my trash away.When I clean up my trash, I can help clean up the area.
  • 46. Task CardDirections____________________________________________________________________ The activity ends at:
  • 47. Prevention & Management Strategies• Structure Routine  Transitions• Positive redirection• Group Control• Balance• Fidgets, Picture Schedules, Activity Scripts, Task Cards• Specific Praise• Feel, Felt, Found• Consistency• Evaluation• Know the child
  • 48. Accessible Activities•#1: Kids stay engaged!•Set the example byparticipating•Competition canexist, but makeadjustments as necessary•Process over product•Recognition forachievements
  • 49. Activities• Eggs, Chickens, Dinosaurs• Eye Tag• Elbow Tag• Everyone’s It• Musical Chairs