The Inchicore Works and Estate an illustrated history <ul><li>Sources include: </li></ul><ul><li>Maps from 1685 - 1943 </l...
 
 
Dublin  1837 In 1837 Inchicore was a townland outside the city of Dublin
Inchicore and Goldenbridge (1) In this map of 1837 the area on which Inchicore Works was to be built was still farmland. A...
Inchicore did not exist then as an urban centre or even a village. Goldenbridge was the main local settlement. As well as ...
In 1843, at a meeting in the Imperial Hotel in Sackville Street, Dublin, a railway company was set up that was to become t...
Walls were built surrounding the land.
With an entrance onto Grattan Terrace for both the Works and the Estate
The 1843-66  map clearly shows that both of these developments were part of a planned strategy. From the beginning, we see...
During the 1860s, much of the Works and Estate were laid out - the quadrangle containing the smithy was completed, and in ...
South Terrace:
North Terrace:
National School:
Most of the houses came with allotment gardens. Note also the development of houses at Woodfield Terrace opposite the mode...
The institute at this stage was a single storey rectangular building set centrally on the western perimeter of the square....
A   close up view shows this park separating the estate from the works yet marrying the two together.
Sometime before 1889, further sheds were added In the works including General Stores, Timber Stores and the Foundry.
In the Estate Granite Terrace, Abercorn Terrace, St Patrick’s Terrace and St Georges Villas were added, and the parkland w...
This map, circa 1897, shows developments in relation to the Institute buildings.  We can see that the Institute is marked ...
A schematic illustration that hangs in the club today shows this was a phased development. With the library facing the Squ...
1907 MAP In this we can see the full H layout of the club, and that a handball alley has been added
1936 Map: In 1925 the Great Southern Railways was established as an amalgamation of all railway companies in the 26 counti...
1943 MAP This map dates two years before the creation of CIE. We can see that outside the sports ground, which has been fe...
1962 AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH CIE was formed in 1945. In this 1962 photograph taken from the book “The Works” by Gregg Ryan, we c...
Within the works, the Post War Years The end of the steam era led to some dereliction within the works. New diesel engined...
SLIDE - 1962 AERIAL/GOOGLE EARTH TODAY In the late 1960s a residents’ association, called the CIE Residents’ Association, ...
CURRENT DEVELOPMENT PLAN As ownership of most of the property is now in the hands of residents, they along with DCC which ...
Carpark & Filter Beds New Apartments
Google Earth:
Future Development Potential?   This will be handled in another presentation but this is the only view of the future suppl...
The Murray O'Laoghaire model of development is entirely ill thought out, the high density version shows new buildings on t...
As a residents association and through IOT, we have tried to engage creatively in the planning process and with CIÉ, but w...
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Who we are: Estate history

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Inchicore on Track's presentation at the ABP Oral Hearing in March 2011, in relation to the Dart Underground coming Above ground in Inchicore. Chapter 1: Who we are

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  • In 1837 Inchicore was a townland outside the city of Dublin
  • Inchicore did not exist then as an urban centre or even a village. Goldenbridge was the main local settlement. As well as a substantial cluster of dwellings, it contained Richmond Barracks, several mills along the Camac river, the well known Goldenbridge Cemetery, and the Black Lion Pub which is at the heart of Inchicore today. In this map of 1837 the area on which Inchicore Works was to be built was still farmland. Also visible is Inchicore House, and the Cow and Calf pub.
  • In 1843, at a meeting in the Imperial Hotel in Sackville Street, Dublin, a railway company was set up that was to become the Great Southern and Western Railway company. A Railway Act of 1844 granted the GSWR the right to develop a railway west from Kingsbridge, passing through Inchicore. Land was purchased at Inchicore for the purpose of developing an engineering site and for the construction of houses for key skilled workers.
  • Walls were built surrounding the land. (PHOTOS)
  • SLIDE Reprise - THE BEGINNING This map clearly shows that both of these developments were part of a planned strategy. From the beginning, we see the first elements of the core quadrangle within the works and the initial layout of the Housing Estate.
  • During the 1860s, much of the Works and Estate were laid out - the quadrangle containing the smithy was completed, and in the Estate the terraces of Inchicore Terrace South (PHOTO) and North (PHOTO), West Terrace, (PHOTO) and Inchicore Square North (PHOTO), South (PHOTO) and East (PHOTO), with the west of the Square containing the Railway Institute, (PHOTO) around which a parkland was developed complete with walkways, a bandstand and a fountain.
  • South Terrace
  • North Terrace
  • In 1853 the model school was completed on the site of the Cow and Calf tavern (PHOTO)
  • Most of the houses came with allotment gardens. Note also the development of houses at Woodfield Terrace opposite the model school.
  • The institute at this stage was a single storey rectangular building set centrally on the western perimeter of the square.
  • The institute at this stage was a single storey rectangular building set centrally on the western perimeter of the square.
  • Sometime before 1889, further sheds were added In the works including General Stores, Timber Stores and the Foundry.
  • In the Estate Granite Terrace, Abercorn Terrace, St Patrick’s Terrace and St Georges Villas were added, and the parkland was adjusted to accommodate these developments. Nearly 150 houses had been provided at this stage. Houses reflected particular professions. (Expand) (note on wider Inchicore village)
  • This map, circa 1897, shows developments in relation to the Institute buildings. We can see that the Institute is marked as Dining Hall. The frontage had been extended left and right and there were extensive additions at the rear, creating the H shaped building which exists today.
  • A schematic illustration that hangs in the club today shows this was a phased development.
  • SLIDE - 1907 MAP In this we can see the full H layout of the club, and that a handball alley has been added.
  • 1936 In 1925 the Great Southern Railways was established as an amalgamation of all railway companies in the 26 counties, including the GSWR. In year xxx the GSR Athletic Union was formed, now known as the CIE Athletic Union. The Institute is here clearly marked as the GSR Institute and Club. The pond was filled in and a playing field created. Dormitory buildings for the drivers were built at the western end of North Terrace and two houses were added on South Terrace (Photo). Note also the British Legion Hall, which is now part of the CIE Athletic Union and used now as a boxing club. Note also the extensive allotment areas.
  • SLIDE - 1943 MAP This map dates two years before the creation of CIE. We can see that outside the sports ground, which has been fenced off, a reduced but still intact parkland has been maintained with walkways and greens. Interesting also to note the preliminary layout of Lower Ballyfermot.
  • SLIDE - 1962 AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH CIE was formed in 1945. In this 1962 photograph taken from the book “The Works” by Gregg Ryan, we can clearly see allotment plots and gardens within the Estate. The parkland is somewhat degraded and some of the pathways have disappeared. A water filtration plant has been added. A car park has been established within an area that was part of the parkland. In the bottom right hand corner of this photograph the dormitory building and handball alley can be seen.
  • SLIDE - 1962 AERIAL/GOOGLE EARTH TODAY In the late 1960s a residents’ association, called the CIE Residents’ Association, was formed. Initially it was set up to deal with issues such as the upkeep and maintenance of communal areas. It soon became instrumental in lobbying for and brokering of the right to purchase homes. In the early 1970s, CIE began to sell the houses in the Estate to the sitting tenants. In 1981, Dublin City Council became responsible for the roads, the walls and public structures within the estate. By 2007 all the houses had been sold. CIE still retain ownership of property within the Estate, including the Institute and Club, now known as the Inchicore Sports and Social Club, the sports ground, all the original parkland (much of it used as a carpark or disused), the boxing Club and the adjacent green, the greens of Inchicore Square and the triangular Green at Abercorn and St Patricks Terraces, and the area of land that used to be the allotment gardens of St Georges Villas. Since the 1980s there have been several developments within or on the edge of the estate, including Abercorn Square (date) (photo), Grattan Court (date/photo), Wheaton Court (date/photo), The Works houses (date/photo), the new apartments at the entrance to the Estate (date/photo), the permanent way compound (date/photo), the sculptural site (date/photo). Although there have been degradations and derelictions of important parts of the original Estate (including the parkland, the dormitories, the club and institute, the limestone walls within the estate and sleeper walls in the back lanes), much of it is still intact and now is an important moment in ensuring that more is not lost.
  • SLIDE - CURRENT DEVELOPMENT PLAN As ownership of most of the property is now in the hands of residents, they along with DCC which has responsibility for roads and walls have become important stakeholders in the future of the Railway Estate, as well as custodians of its rich heritage. Building a relationship based on partnership between residents, the local authority and the railway company is essential to ensuring that any future developments in this area are properly planned and sustainable. Residential conservation area etc
  • SLIDE – Future Development Potential
  • Who we are: Estate history

    1. 1. The Inchicore Works and Estate an illustrated history <ul><li>Sources include: </li></ul><ul><li>Maps from 1685 - 1943 </li></ul><ul><li>The Inchicore Works and the community it created - Helen McLeod </li></ul><ul><li>Inchicore & Kilmainham - Seosamh O Broin </li></ul><ul><li>The Works - Gregg Ryan </li></ul><ul><li>Dublin City Development Plan 2011 - 17 </li></ul><ul><li>Contemporary Photographs </li></ul><ul><li>Aerial Photographs </li></ul>
    2. 4. Dublin 1837 In 1837 Inchicore was a townland outside the city of Dublin
    3. 5. Inchicore and Goldenbridge (1) In this map of 1837 the area on which Inchicore Works was to be built was still farmland. Also visible is Inchicore House, and the Cow and Calf pub Where the Model School now stands.
    4. 6. Inchicore did not exist then as an urban centre or even a village. Goldenbridge was the main local settlement. As well as a substantial cluster of dwellings, it contained Richmond Barracks, several mills along the Camac river, the well known Goldenbridge Cemetery, and the Black Lion Pub which is at the heart of Inchicore today. Inchicore and Goldenbridge (2)
    5. 7. In 1843, at a meeting in the Imperial Hotel in Sackville Street, Dublin, a railway company was set up that was to become the Great Southern and Western Railway company. A Railway Act of 1844 granted the GSWR the right to develop a railway west from Kingsbridge, passing through Inchicore. Land was purchased at Inchicore for the purpose of developing an engineering site and for the construction of houses for key skilled workers.
    6. 8. Walls were built surrounding the land.
    7. 9. With an entrance onto Grattan Terrace for both the Works and the Estate
    8. 10. The 1843-66 map clearly shows that both of these developments were part of a planned strategy. From the beginning, we see the first elements of the core quadrangle within the works and the initial layout of the housing estate.
    9. 11. During the 1860s, much of the Works and Estate were laid out - the quadrangle containing the smithy was completed, and in the Estate the terraces of Inchicore Terrace South and North , West Terrace, and Inchicore Square North , South and East, with the west of the Square containing the Railway Institute, around which a parkland was developed complete with walkways, a bandstand and a fountain.
    10. 12. South Terrace:
    11. 13. North Terrace:
    12. 14. National School:
    13. 15. Most of the houses came with allotment gardens. Note also the development of houses at Woodfield Terrace opposite the model school.
    14. 16. The institute at this stage was a single storey rectangular building set centrally on the western perimeter of the square. There was a pond and bandstand and park to the east of the works.
    15. 17. A close up view shows this park separating the estate from the works yet marrying the two together.
    16. 18. Sometime before 1889, further sheds were added In the works including General Stores, Timber Stores and the Foundry.
    17. 19. In the Estate Granite Terrace, Abercorn Terrace, St Patrick’s Terrace and St Georges Villas were added, and the parkland was adjusted to accommodate these developments. Nearly 150 houses had been provided at this stage. Houses reflected particular professions.
    18. 20. This map, circa 1897, shows developments in relation to the Institute buildings. We can see that the Institute is marked as Dining Hall. The frontage had been extended left and right and there were extensive additions at the rear, creating the H shaped building which exists today.
    19. 21. A schematic illustration that hangs in the club today shows this was a phased development. With the library facing the Square and the Dining room behind it facing the pond
    20. 22. 1907 MAP In this we can see the full H layout of the club, and that a handball alley has been added
    21. 23. 1936 Map: In 1925 the Great Southern Railways was established as an amalgamation of all railway companies in the 26 counties, including the GSWR. In 1929 the GSR Athletic Union was formed, now known as the CIE Athletic Union. The Institute is here clearly marked as the GSR Institute and Club. The pond was filled in and a playing field created. Dormitory buildings for the drivers were built at the western end of North Terrace and two houses were added on South Terrace. Note also the British Legion Hall, which is now part of the CIE Athletic Union and used now as a boxing club. Note also the extensive allotment areas.
    22. 24. 1943 MAP This map dates two years before the creation of CIE. We can see that outside the sports ground, which has been fenced off, a reduced but still intact parkland has been maintained with walkways and greens. Interesting also to note the preliminary layout of Lower Ballyfermot.
    23. 25. 1962 AERIAL PHOTOGRAPH CIE was formed in 1945. In this 1962 photograph taken from the book “The Works” by Gregg Ryan, we can clearly see allotment plots and gardens within the Estate. The parkland is somewhat degraded and some of the pathways have disappeared. A water filtration plant has been added. A car park has been established within an area that was part of the parkland. In the bottom right hand corner of this photograph the dormitory building and handball alley can be seen. Water filtration plant Ball alley and Dormitory Car park
    24. 26. Within the works, the Post War Years The end of the steam era led to some dereliction within the works. New diesel engined trains gradually edged out the steam locomotives and landmarks like the Coal Tower were demolished. It was an era of financial stringency when conservation was not high on the agenda. Much rolling stock and many trains were scrapped and many of the skills associated with the 19 th century steam technology went largely into abeyance. It should be remembered when discussing the works that what we have is a precious legacy which has already been partly damaged and needs to be preserved as the only remaining exemplar in the State of such a train works. Planners in Swindon have made their works a Conservation Area, and the residents association have been trying for similar status for our works for many years.
    25. 27. SLIDE - 1962 AERIAL/GOOGLE EARTH TODAY In the late 1960s a residents’ association, called the CIE Residents’ Association, was formed. Initially it was set up to deal with issues such as the upkeep and maintenance of communal areas. It soon became instrumental in lobbying for and brokering of the right to purchase homes. In the early 1970s, CIE began to sell the houses in the Estate to the sitting tenants. In 1981, Dublin City Council became responsible for the roads, the walls and public structures within the estate. By 2007 all the houses had been sold. CIE still retain ownership of property within the Estate, including the Institute and Club, now known as the Inchicore Sports and Social Club, the sports ground, all the original parkland (much of it used as a carpark or disused), the boxing Club and the adjacent green, the greens of Inchicore Square and the triangular Green at Abercorn and St Patricks Terraces, and the area of land that used to be the allotment gardens of St Georges Villas. Since the 1980s there have been several developments within or on the edge of the estate, including Abercorn Square, Grattan Court, Wheaton Court, The Works houses, the new apartments at the entrance to the Estate, the permanent way compound, the sculptural site. Although there have been degradations and derelictions of important parts of the original Estate (including the parkland, the dormitories, the club and institute, the limestone walls within the estate and sleeper walls in the back lanes), much of it is still intact and now is an important moment in ensuring that more is not lost.
    26. 28. CURRENT DEVELOPMENT PLAN As ownership of most of the property is now in the hands of residents, they along with DCC which has responsibility for roads and walls have become important stakeholders in the future of the Railway Estate, as well as custodians of its rich heritage. Building a relationship based on partnership between residents, the local authority and the railway company is essential to ensuring that any future developments in this area are properly planned and sustainable. A great deal of the housing stock is now a Residential Conservation area and Granite Terrace, the Model School and part of the surrounding walls are Protected Structures.
    27. 29. Carpark & Filter Beds New Apartments
    28. 30. Google Earth:
    29. 31. Future Development Potential? This will be handled in another presentation but this is the only view of the future supplied in the EIS.
    30. 32. The Murray O'Laoghaire model of development is entirely ill thought out, the high density version shows new buildings on top of the works heritage buildings with no explanation as how these would be designed. It also shows Abercorn and Patrick's Terraces, but omits the buildings in George's Villas. This omits to show how those houses would be sandwiched between high buildings and cut off from the rest of the estate. The club, half of which seems to have disappeared, is shown in a truncated form facing the square. It is not even clear whether the building shown is the remnants of the club or a new building.
    31. 33. As a residents association and through IOT, we have tried to engage creatively in the planning process and with CIÉ, but we have to say that the vision placed before us here fills us with dismay. We are looking for a vision for the future which accommodates both the residents and the works in a meaningful way, while preserving the heritage of the entire area, which was, from the first, intended to operate as a single entity. Submission to DCC in relation to previous Development Plan

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