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Class #23

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  • This is what I want to use for the Voicethread. Say that it gives a good sense of the passions on both sides of the debate. Also talks about socialism. As them what side the Church is on here and what someone representing the Catholic view would say to some of the other protestors. Say to use the other video "Sick in America" as background to viewing this one. In class, perhaps do the thing with the eligibility for Medicaid Passions can be helpful, but they can also blind us. Can you determine what sorts of things are behind the passion you see on this video about a topic that ordinarily tends to be pretty dry (health insurance!)? And can you identify blind spots on one or the other side (or both) based upon your reading for Tuesday, the video Sick Around America, and our discussions about social & economic injustice in general?
  • We’re in some kind of competition about the strangest place to doyour Voicethread. Maybe make announcement about when projects are due: --extensions beyond Dec. 2 nd absolute last day to turn in projects will be the last day of class—Thursday, Dec. 8 th
  • Medicaid eligibility is 36% of poverty line for working parents in IN (http://www.statehealthfacts.org/mfs.jsp?rgn=16&rgn=1&x=6&y=5) Big constitutional questions of whether the federal government can force you to buy something. just yesterday (Nov. 14, 2011), the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to rule on a challenge to this law US Court of Appeals for the 11 th Circuit was the only one so far striking down the individual mandate Health reform law will prohibit insurance companies from denying coverage because of a person’s medical history or health condition—starting in 2014. http://healthreform.kff.org/quizzes/health-reform-quiz/results-page.aspx with the exception of tobacco use “ Insurers will be prohibited from denying coverage or setting rates based on gender, health status, medical condition, claims experience, genetic information, evidence of domestic violence, or other health-related factors,” according to the summary. “Premiums will vary only by family structure, geography, actuarial value, tobacco use, participation in a health promotion program, and age (by not more than three to one). http://dorsi.hubpages.com/hub/WhattheHealthCareBillMeansForPeopleWithPre-ExistingConditions basically, if the insurance companies are going to do this, you have to require others to have insurance Sr. Carol Keehan, “the insurance market doesn’t work unless you have almost everybody in it.” The individual insurance mandate conservatives oppose, in the courts and in Congress, is an indispensable feature of health-care reform. The government can only require insurance companies to cover sick people as long as it also requires healthy people to buy insurance; otherwise premiums will skyrocket or insurance companies will go out of business. http://www.commonwealmagazine.org/theyre-back - But how, conservatives ask, can the government save money while at the same time making itself bigger? Columnist Charles Krauthammer thinks it’s absurd to go about reducing the deficit by adding $540 billion in new spending while increasing taxes by $770 billion. - The Act's provisions are intended to be funded by a variety of taxes and offsets. Major sources of new revenue include a much-broadened Medicare tax on incomes over $200,000 and $250,000, for individual and joint filers respectively, an annual fee on insurance providers, and a 40% tax on "Cadillac" insurance policies . There are also taxes on pharmaceuticals, high-cost diagnostic equipment, and a federal sales tax on indoor tanning services . Offsets are from intended cost savings such as improved fairness in the Medicare Advantage program relative to traditional Medicare Mortimer Zuckerman said that estimating the cost of this new bill is like estimating your your grocery bill in 10 years. This new law emphasizes preventive care No legal reform on this law, and Zuckerman says that the cheapest malpractice insurance is to order every test • maybe ask if this is socialism? -not really, because as said in the video, government healthcare doesn’t equal socialism -doctors remain in private practice, hospitals retain private ownership
  • Here’s a range from most gov’t involvement to least US spends 31% on administration—all these different plans, different deductibles, different means of reimbursement -vs. 1 form in Canada Hospitals and physicians in Canada are still mostly private ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medicare_(Canada)) -the Pastoral Letter on Health Care (XP, p. 137) calls “for the development of a national health insurance program.” Is it socialism if we provide firetrucks regardless of ability to pay? What’s the Church’s concern with the US law? -that it would use public money to pay for abortion (which already happens in 17 states—Sr. Carol’s figure—that cover abortion for Medicaid recipients with SEPARATE state money) -but the Hyde Amendment rules this out
  • OECD = Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development
  • The % of Americans who will live beyond age 65 is higher in Costa Rica than in the U.S.: http://www.aacu.org/liberaleducation/le-fa07/le_fa07_Bonner.cfm
  • “ Poverty Kills” says “Poverty increasingly is recognized as perhaps the single most important risk factor for premature death and disability.”
  • Task: try to predict what would happen so someone who didn’t have medical care from childhood on -what effects would that have upon his or her life, job, schooling, family, etc.? (meant to be a version of what’s up to you/what’s not up to you) -trace someone from pre-birth through death -and especially try to see how these things might be connected have different groups start with different ones of these so that everything is covered *Poor pre-natal care (lack of pre-natal care, regular check-ups, vitamins, pre-mature birth more likely, complications )  *Poor early childhood development (poor children 2x likely to die from birth defects, 4x from fires, 5x from infectious diseases)  *Inability or decreased ability to learn (more absences, undiagnosed vision problems, issues with speech and hearing from ear infections, less ability to learn if feeling sick, immunications)  *Poor work skills (what about untreated mental illness? Needing to care for sick children and stay home from work)  *Lack of a job or a low-paying job  *Poverty (inability to get health insurance, unpaid bills can ruin a credit rating)  *Poor or no health care  *Earlier death If you’re a homeless person with diabetes, what will you do? (how to control your diet, how to refrigerate your insulin, how to walk around with syringes) Poor health is both a cause of and is caused by poverty . -that’s the trap/cycle The Church’s statement (XP, p. 137) on health care speaks of the “responsibility by society TO PROVIDE adequate health care which is a basic human right.” -so this is a CLAIM RIGHT since it speaks about PROVIDING -that statement also speaks about “touching the social conditions that hinder the wholeness which is God’s desire for community.” -Laura Strack: Human dignity cannot be realized without a place in community. So, to deny health care is to exclude people from community. All human life is equally sacred, and so one person’s right to well-being is equal to another’s imagine if we made fire protection dependent on ability to pay? is that just good capitalism or does that strike us as strange? Jesus as healer—was in the healthcare business
  • Trinity Health is a national Catholic health network of 44 acute-care hospitals, 379 outpatient centers, 26 long-term care facilities, and numerous hospice programs and senior living communities in Michigan, Iowa, Indiana, Maryland, Ohio, Idaho and California. Headquartered in Novi, Michigan, Trinity Health is the fourth-largest Catholic health system in the United States based on total revenue. With 44,500 full-time staff and more than 8,000 active physicians, Trinity Health operates an integrated and aligned health care delivery system dedicated to improving the health of its communities. It is sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy, West Midwest Community, and the Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross. From CSC website: In May 2000, the Holy Cross Health System consolidated resources with the Sisters of Mercy’s Detroit Regional Health System, creating the fourth largest Catholic healthcare system in the United States, Trinity Health. http://www.sjmed.com/mission/ • Catholic hospitals serve 1 out of 6 patients in the United States and provide 15% of the hospital beds.
  • http://www.trinity-health.org/body.cfm?id=19
  • Trinity Health is a national Catholic health network of 44 acute-care hospitals, 379 outpatient centers, 26 long-term care facilities, and numerous hospice programs and senior living communities in Michigan, Iowa, Indiana, Maryland, Ohio, Idaho and California. Headquartered in Novi, Michigan, Trinity Health is the fourth-largest Catholic health system in the United States based on total revenue. With 44,500 full-time staff and more than 8,000 active physicians, Trinity Health operates an integrated and aligned health care delivery system dedicated to improving the health of its communities. It is sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy, West Midwest Community, and the Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross. From CSC website: In May 2000, the Holy Cross Health System consolidated resources with the Sisters of Mercy’s Detroit Regional Health System, creating the fourth largest Catholic healthcare system in the United States, Trinity Health. http://www.sjmed.com/mission/
  • Transcript

    • 1.  Justice & Rights Rights & Duties Liberty Rights & Claim Rights Rights in the Catholic tradition “Human rights are the minimum conditions for life in community.” Rights are a reflection of human worth Immigration Rights & Borders
    • 2. Passions can be helpful, but they can also blind us. Can you determine what sorts of things are behind the passionsvt you see on this video about a topic that ordinarily tends to be pretty dry (health insurance!)? And can you identify blind spots on one or the other side (or both) based upon your reading for Tuesday, the video Sick Around America, and our discussions about social & economic injustice in general?
    • 3.  discuss why access to medical care is a significant issue for social justice (especially in terms of ‘what’s up to you’ vs. ‘what’s not up to you’), and consider the Catholic contribution to the healthcare debate in this country.
    • 4. “In the end, the kind of health care we tolerate reflects the kind of society we are or want to be. The bedside reflects back to all of us where our treasure lies.” —Dr. Edmund Pelligrino (XP, p. 139)
    • 5.  Expands Medicaid coverage up to 133% of Poverty Line. Low-income individuals or families who make too much to qualify for Medicaid, but who are up to 400% of Poverty Line will be eligible for government subsidies to buy health insurance. Sets up health insurance exchanges in each state where individuals and small businesses can compare policies and premium prices to purchase health insurance. Will prevent insurers from denying coverage to people or for, in most cases, charging more for pre-existing conditions (excluding tobacco use) but including things such as being an abuse victim or being a woman. Young adults up to age 26 can be part of their parents’ plan. Companies employing 50 or more people have to offer health insurance to their employees. Requires people not covered by Medicaid, Medicare, or other health insurance to purchase health insurance (some exceptions). Should insure about 30 million more people, leaving about 20 million still uninsured. Will either reduce the federal deficit or increase the federal deficit (!)—depends whom you ask!
    • 6.  More government Government owns most hospitals and employs most physicians and nurses • Eg., Great Britain • In U.S., VA Hospitals work like this Government insures all people (‘single-payer’), but most hospitals are privately owned and physicians are in private practice • Eg., Canada Less government • In U.S., Medicaid and Medicare have similarities to this Government requires people to buy private health insurance and helps cover the poor who fall outside the market (Patient Protection & Affordable Care Act)
    • 7. How does American life expectancy compare to other countries?(Based on 2005 data reported in the 2007 United Nations Human Development Report) A. Number 1 B. In the top 10 C. 29th place Source: http://www.unnaturalcauses.org
    • 8. ANSWER: C. 29th placeAt 77.9 years, we are tied with South Koreaand Denmark for 29th – 31st place, despitebeing the second wealthiest country on the planet (measured by per capita GDP). Japan has the highest life expectancy at 82.3 years
    • 9. How much does the U.S. spend per person on health care?A. Three quarters as much as the other industrialized countriesC. The same as the other industrialized countriesE. More than double other industrialized countries
    • 10. ANSWER: C. More than double We spent $6102 per person on medicalcare in 2004 (estimates for 2007 are $7600). That’s more than double the $2552 median of the 30 OECD countries. Yet our health outcomes are among the worst.
    • 11. What is the greatest difference in lifeexpectancy observed between counties in the U.S.? A. 7 years B. 15 years C. 22 years D. 25 years
    • 12. ANSWER: B. 15 YearsPopulations in some wealthy communitieslive on average well into their 80s, whileothers in some inner city neighborhoodsand Native American reservations barely scratch 60.
    • 13. Between 1980 and 2000 the gap in lifeexpectancy between the most and least deprived counties in the U.S: A. Declined by 12% B. Remained the same C. Widened by 60%
    • 14. ANSWER: C Widened by 60% As economic inequality grew after 1980,so did the life expectancy gap betweenthe rich and the rest of us. In contrast, a recent study (Krieger et al)showed that premature death and infantmortality gaps narrowed between 1966and 1980.
    • 15. African American males in Harlem have ashorter life expectancy from age five than which of the following groups? A. Japanese B. Bangladeshis C. Cubans D. Algerians living in Paris E. All of the above
    • 16. ANSWER: E. All of the above The biggest killers of African American males in many poor, segregated urban neighborhoods are not violence nor drugs nor AIDS, but heartdisease, stroke and other chronic diseases that cut men down in middle age.
    • 17. On average, which of the followingconditions is the strongest predictor of your health? A. Whether or not you smoke B. What you eat C. Whether or not you are wealthy D. Whether or not you have health insurance E. How often you exercise
    • 18. ANSWER: C. Whether or not you are wealthy The wealthier you are, on average, the betteryour health, from the bottom all the way to the top. Genes, diet, exercise and other behaviors areimportant. But a poor smoker still stands a greater chance of getting ill than a rich smoker.
    • 19. True or False: The gap between white andAfrican American infant mortality rates is greater today than it was in 1950. A. True B. False
    • 20. ANSWER: A. True The total number of infant deaths among bothAfrican American and white Americans has fallen since 1950. But today the infant mortality rate for African Americans is two and a half times that ofwhite Americans, a greater gap than 60 years ago.In fact, the rate among African American mothers with college and professional degrees is higher than among white mothers who haven’t finished high school.
    • 21. Children living in poverty are how many times more likely to have poor health, compared with children living in high- income households? A. 3 times B. 4 times C. 5 times D. 7 times
    • 22. ANSWER: D. 7 Times Children are most vulnerable. Not only are they susceptible to sub-standard housing, poor food, bad schools, unsafe streets and chronic stress, but the impacts of childhood poverty are cumulative, leading to a pile-up of riskthat influences adult health and can even affect the next generation.
    • 23. I. Access to Health Care as a Social Justice Issue A. Consequences of not receiving health care B. Predict effects on life, job, education, etc.Pregnancy Old Age & Early School Work &Childbirth Childhood DeathII. Access to Health Care as a Catholic Issue A. What does the Church teach about health care? B. What’s the Catholic contribution to the healthcare debate? What does the Church have to say to the rest of society? C. The Consistent Ethic of Life
    • 24. I. Trinity Health A. Co-sponsored by the Sisters of the Holy Cross B. Fourth largest Catholic healthcare system in the U.S. C. St. Joe Regional Medical Center and the Sr. Maura Brannick, CSC, Health Center 4. Patients ineligible for Medicaid or Medicare 5. Unable to obtain health insurance
    • 25.  Respect  We value and esteem every human person because each and every one is created by God, in the image of God. Everyone, regardless of title or position, income, education or status, race, religion or ethnicity has a dignity that is sacred. Social Justice  Social justice commits us to the common good so that all may have their basic needs met. We recognize health and access to healthcare as a basic human right and seek to provide and advocate for it. Care of the Poor and Underserved  We seek out the poor and underserved as a special focus of our healthcare ministry. It is those without resources of their own who need us most. We seek to care not only for their immediate needs but also to change the structures that keep them in unhealthy environments and inhumane conditions. Through our ministry of health care and our persistent advocacy, we seek to serve the poor and underserved of our communities.
    • 26.  The right to life does not end at birth. Access to health care as a pro-life issue You can’t welcome life into the world and then not care about what happens to it after it gets here. In short: “We must defend the right to life of the weakest among us; we must also be supportive of the quality of life of the powerless among us: the old and the young, the hungry and the homeless, the undocumented immigrant and the unemployed worker, the sick, the disabled and the dying.” (Cardinal Bernardin)

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