Class #22

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  • Announcement change seats! defeat of personhood bill in Mississippi next several classes will be on different topics health care (next Tuesday) women in the priesthood (next Thursday) the death penalty (Tuesday before Thanksgiving) the theme that unites all of these very different topics (as well as the topic today of immigration) is EXCLUSION of various sorts (from the US, from access to health care, from the priesthood, and the ultimate exclusion of the death penalty)—Sr. Helen (death penalty is opposite of baptism) and we do all this against the backdrop that many of you mentioned of the kingdom of God, which the bishops say in §16 of EJFA “excludes no one”
  • Class activities: what rights to you want? What rights do you have? Why the difference? Have them come up with a list of basic rights, and then do a think-pair-share. Or: what I did in fall of 2011 is put two contrary statements from Vts on the board and put them into groups to discuss them Justice and Rights • rights are what we are owed • justice and rights are interdefined: justice tells you THAT you are owed certain things; rights tell you what those things are Rights & Duties • how many rights do you want? as many as possible • how many duties to you want? as few as possible rights seem to enhance our freedom, but duties seem to restrict it (rights are for us, duties for others) • what’s the problem? Benedict says that rights and duties go together ( “grave inconsistency” ) anytime someone has a right, someone else has a duty (duties are the inverse of rights) “ rights presuppose duties if they are not to become mere license” (CV §43) meaning? If no corresponding duties, then one can claim a right to anything so, “appeals are made to alleged rights, arbitrary and non-essential in nature, accompanied by the demand that they be recognized” rights can “run wild” people have rights, animals have rights, trees have rights, inanimate objects, etc. and rt to life, rt to die, rt to choose, rt to a child, etc. anyone think of any examples? why assert a right to something? it’s useful language to demand services, a trump card (another one of those things that always gets applause on Oprah) and, again, it seems to expand our freedom • rights, duties and society - since rights and duties always go together, any time you ask a question about what rights people have, you're asking about what duties other people have - a nd therefore, any time you ask about what kind of rights people should have or should recognize, you're asking about what kind of society there should be - because the duties people have will affect the kind of society that results (Benedict: “Duties reinforce rights and call for their defence and promotion as a task to be undertaken in the service of the common good.” -let’s look at rights we recognize in the US and what that says Kinds of Rights • claim rights vs. liberty rights liberty rights are like freedom of speech, religion, assembly, rt to bear arms, rt to privacy what do those mean?  that others can’t interfere with you (§81: “immunity from interference”) so a liberty rt is a rt not to be interfered with free speech doesn’t give you a rt to your own tv show to spout your opinions rt to bear arms doesn’t mean that the government owes you a handgun claim rights require “positive action” • what do we have more of in the United States? • do we have any claim rights in the U.S. schooling, attorney (schooling is a rt even for illegals) rt to life? liberty rt not to be interfere with not the right to be provided with the things needed to sustain life: food, clothing, shelter, med. Care one of the things the market doesn’t care about is whether you live or die how about a rt to health care? even if you qualify for Medicaid, a doctor doesn’t HAVE to see you • why do we have more liberties than claim rights? What does this tell you about the U.S.? (what rights  what duties  what kind of society) emphasis on a society of independent (rather than dependent) individuals where each person pays his or her own way and has minimal obligations to others (bootstrap myth) liberties are free: if you have a liberty rt, what’s it cost me? claim rights cost money and bind us more tightly together as Benedict says, we’re made for gift (CV §34) this is anthropological point (no one is self made  we’re our brother/sister’s keeper) Benedict: “duties reinforce rights” and call for defence and promotion “as a task to be undertaken in the service of the common good” • rights according to the Church “ minimum conditions for life in community ” (EJFA §17, and §79) things due to people solely in virtue of their being people EJFA §80 speaks of “the minimum conditions for social institutions that respect human dignity” remember that the Church holds that dignity is realized in community these are the things that bring people up to the starting line  ∆ EMPOWERMENTS “ In Catholic social thought, therefore, respect for human rights and a strong sense of both personal and community responsibility are linked, not opposed” (§79) food, clothing, shelter, basic medical care (EJFA §17) what does the Church mean by these rts? you need it, you don’t have it (and can’t get it on your own), you are provided with it “ those goods without which it is impossible for a person to lead a decent human life must be equitably provided to those who lack them” (Church and Housing) in general, what we think people have a right to tells us what we think people are worth Immigration rights • you see some of the tensions here -right to migrate vs. right to protect borders the whole issue here is how we draw the borders between the “us” and the “them” (EJFA §13—Human dignity does not come “from nationality”) Fr. Corpora’s essay was trying to call that whole enterprise into question what does that fence mean/symbolize? -right to protect borders vs. duty to protect human dignity -right to secure borders is really more a liberty rights; but the rights OF IMMIGRANTS is more a claim right to have what’s needed for human dignity ‘ comprehensive immigration reform’ (Wester mentions) is really more than just enforcement of borders and the JUSTICE issues here try to get to the root causes of migration in a fully just word, forced migration should be unnecessary • immigration is about borders; the Kingdom of God “excludes no one”—has no borders (EJFA §16) -calls into question the whole notion of ‘taking care of ourselves’ vs. ‘taking care of others ’ -how arbitrary are borders of various sorts? • ask T or F (illegal immigrants pay taxes) and then ask them to write about this, but not put names on paper: Illegal immigrants are taking American jobs (then pass papers around and ask people to read them aloud)—or can have them get into groups to discuss this (in Fall ‘11, I put two statements on board about immigrant work—these came out of Voicethreads for today) -then move to thought experiment - Then say that I am a watermelon grower in Yuma, AZ, with 200 acres of watermelon ready to harvest in August. It’s 114 degrees. Ask who would do this for minimum wage, then $10, then $15, then $20/hour. Then ask what they’d expect to pay for one watermelon. -Benedict said (CV §34): “every economic decision has a moral consequence.” • religious communities have always followed immigrants (Holy Cross priests and sisters came to minister to French settlers in what is now northern Indiana, who needed schoolteachers and then they needed a dome, and here we are) • and what happens once you’re here? What dangers do you face? -you have no rights in the workforce. Say something and your employer can either fire you or report you (eg., cleaners and rubber gloves) -and certainly you’ll have to work for less
  • First hear from those interning at the Center this semester Does anyone have any questions you’d like to ask them? Or maybe just divide into groups with at least one person from the CFH in each group (count off by 6s, skipping the 6 students who are at CFH) Have them go through questions on the sheet And come up with one definition of homelessness between them (#4), to put on board Then continue with why do we blame the homeless? Then throw it open to the rest of the class What were you looking for? (#2 on the sheet) What kind of preconceptions did you have? (be honest—we won’t judge anyone) What did you notice? Impressions of physical surroundings? Things that struck you on a sensory level? (#3 on the sheet) What surprised you? What was most unlike what you thought you were going to see? How did your perceptions change? (from #1  #4) Why did they change? Personal experience Harder to buy into stereotypes when we have the personal experience Dale—up to him vs. not up to him? (#5) What is the most important thing about homelessness that you learned from visiting the Center that you did not know or realize previously (or that you think most Americans don’t know or realize about homelessness)? That is, what does the Center have to teach us about homelessness and those who are homeless? Or maybe put them into groups of 4 and ask them to share their response to #6, and then go around and hear from each group. If we were making a commercial about the CFH, what would be in it? What do you think most Americans don’t know about homelessness/homeless? What questions do you still have? (#6) Center’s mission: Break the cycle of homelessness. Bring together disparate groups so that each can discover the worth, dignity and potential of the other. Pioneer a service model worthy of replication.  In light of all these things, how should we define homelesness (maybe a group activity?)—b/c how we define a problem affects how we think we should solve it (or could do a snowball with pairs, 4s, 8s—keep combining the definitions) Or maybe put things on the board for #6 (go around the room) And then come up with a definition out of these things homelessness > houselessness (which is why the CFH is not a shelter) there’s a spiritual dimension relating to the loss of hope, absence of respect homelessness means being cut off from community , the kind that most of us enjoy or could depend upon if we were in a pinch if we’re all group projects, what happens when the group abandons us? so one of the things the CFH tries to do is restore a sense of community among the guests (saw this with Dale); also everyone has chores most important lesson anyone interested in justice can learn is that we all benefit/are penalized from things that weren’t up to us homelessness as symptom of deeper problem does the underlying problem cause the homelessness, or does the homelessness cause the underlying problem? (first one) so to really address the homelessness, have to address the underlying problem Church: [The poor and marginalized] “are also hoping for economic, political, and social transformation, since the problem of the homeless, as well as the housing crisis, are only the consequence of a DEEPER CAUSE which must be remedied.” Why do we blame/criminalize the homeless? (point to definition and ask why do we criminalize THIS?) there’s clearly a fear operating here we generally don’t criminalize things that aren’t in people’s control blaming them for their situation can make us feel comfortable (protects from need to empathize) shows the world is not arbitrary (an arbitrary world is frightening—means we don’t have control) finding fault may be a way of distancing ourselves that the other person isn’t like us, and this can’t happen to us putting a wall between us and the poor takes the problem out of our sight and out of the realm of our responsibility I’m sure some of you have encountered homeless individuals out on the street they frequently don’t come across as Dale did could be a survival mechanism the rate of sexual assault against homeless women exceeds the general population by a factor of 20 many times the homeless make us uncomfortable we fear most what destroys our biggest dreams (so is there something about the IDEA of homelessness in the U.S. that scares us and makes us want to put it out of our sight?) so, the bootstrap myth the notion that anyone willing to work hard can always make it in this country and it’s easier to be impatient with people than to live with sadness we single out the most vulnerable (in violation of community), keep them at the edge of society and tell them they’re a burden Church and the Housing Problem lots commented on the idea of family speaks about the RIGHT to housing—so be homeless is not to receive what you’re owed so if you’re homeless without fault of your own, you’re a victim of injustice and if we’re making homelessness illegal, then we’re penalizing the victims of injustice homelessness has a STRUCTURAL cause what do you think that means? may take us to look at our economic system let’s get to the root of the problem “ those goods without which it is impossible for a person to lead a decent human life must be equitably provided to those who lack them” (§13) What does this mean? Provided by whom? And if you’re running on this platform, how do you think you’d do in contemporary American politics? If we get to the root of the problem, this is more than providing someone with a check (need job training, parenting skills, etc.) each of us had a part in getting people where they are so what are our responsibilities in light of that? How could society be MORE supportive of people in these circumstances? education subsidies for people who have just lost their jobs? job search help for people about to be laid off? thus, the Church says, “to be homeless means to suffer from the deprivation or lack of something which is due. This, consequently, constitutes an injustice..... Any person or family that, without any direct fault on his or her part, does not have suitable housing is the victim of an injustice. In the light of what has been previously stated, it is evident that this injustice is clearly a structural injustice....” because “the right to housing is a universal right” (§12)
  • First hear from those interning at the Center this semester Does anyone have any questions you’d like to ask them? Or maybe just divide into groups with at least one person from the CFH in each group (count off by 6s, skipping the 6 students who are at CFH) Have them go through questions on the sheet And come up with one definition of homelessness between them (#4), to put on board Then continue with why do we blame the homeless? Then throw it open to the rest of the class What were you looking for? (#2 on the sheet) What kind of preconceptions did you have? (be honest—we won’t judge anyone) What did you notice? Impressions of physical surroundings? Things that struck you on a sensory level? (#3 on the sheet) What surprised you? What was most unlike what you thought you were going to see? How did your perceptions change? (from #1  #4) Why did they change? Personal experience Harder to buy into stereotypes when we have the personal experience Dale—up to him vs. not up to him? (#5) What is the most important thing about homelessness that you learned from visiting the Center that you did not know or realize previously (or that you think most Americans don’t know or realize about homelessness)? That is, what does the Center have to teach us about homelessness and those who are homeless? Or maybe put them into groups of 4 and ask them to share their response to #6, and then go around and hear from each group. If we were making a commercial about the CFH, what would be in it? What do you think most Americans don’t know about homelessness/homeless? What questions do you still have? (#6) Center’s mission: Break the cycle of homelessness. Bring together disparate groups so that each can discover the worth, dignity and potential of the other. Pioneer a service model worthy of replication.  In light of all these things, how should we define homelesness (maybe a group activity?)—b/c how we define a problem affects how we think we should solve it (or could do a snowball with pairs, 4s, 8s—keep combining the definitions) Or maybe put things on the board for #6 (go around the room) And then come up with a definition out of these things homelessness > houselessness (which is why the CFH is not a shelter) there’s a spiritual dimension relating to the loss of hope, absence of respect homelessness means being cut off from community , the kind that most of us enjoy or could depend upon if we were in a pinch if we’re all group projects, what happens when the group abandons us? so one of the things the CFH tries to do is restore a sense of community among the guests (saw this with Dale); also everyone has chores most important lesson anyone interested in justice can learn is that we all benefit/are penalized from things that weren’t up to us homelessness as symptom of deeper problem does the underlying problem cause the homelessness, or does the homelessness cause the underlying problem? (first one) so to really address the homelessness, have to address the underlying problem Church: [The poor and marginalized] “are also hoping for economic, political, and social transformation, since the problem of the homeless, as well as the housing crisis, are only the consequence of a DEEPER CAUSE which must be remedied.” Why do we blame/criminalize the homeless? (point to definition and ask why do we criminalize THIS?) there’s clearly a fear operating here we generally don’t criminalize things that aren’t in people’s control blaming them for their situation can make us feel comfortable (protects from need to empathize) shows the world is not arbitrary (an arbitrary world is frightening—means we don’t have control) finding fault may be a way of distancing ourselves that the other person isn’t like us, and this can’t happen to us putting a wall between us and the poor takes the problem out of our sight and out of the realm of our responsibility I’m sure some of you have encountered homeless individuals out on the street they frequently don’t come across as Dale did could be a survival mechanism the rate of sexual assault against homeless women exceeds the general population by a factor of 20 many times the homeless make us uncomfortable we fear most what destroys our biggest dreams (so is there something about the IDEA of homelessness in the U.S. that scares us and makes us want to put it out of our sight?) so, the bootstrap myth the notion that anyone willing to work hard can always make it in this country and it’s easier to be impatient with people than to live with sadness we single out the most vulnerable (in violation of community), keep them at the edge of society and tell them they’re a burden Church and the Housing Problem lots commented on the idea of family speaks about the RIGHT to housing—so be homeless is not to receive what you’re owed so if you’re homeless without fault of your own, you’re a victim of injustice and if we’re making homelessness illegal, then we’re penalizing the victims of injustice homelessness has a STRUCTURAL cause what do you think that means? may take us to look at our economic system let’s get to the root of the problem “ those goods without which it is impossible for a person to lead a decent human life must be equitably provided to those who lack them” (§13) What does this mean? Provided by whom? And if you’re running on this platform, how do you think you’d do in contemporary American politics? If we get to the root of the problem, this is more than providing someone with a check (need job training, parenting skills, etc.) each of us had a part in getting people where they are so what are our responsibilities in light of that? How could society be MORE supportive of people in these circumstances? education subsidies for people who have just lost their jobs? job search help for people about to be laid off? thus, the Church says, “to be homeless means to suffer from the deprivation or lack of something which is due. This, consequently, constitutes an injustice..... Any person or family that, without any direct fault on his or her part, does not have suitable housing is the victim of an injustice. In the light of what has been previously stated, it is evident that this injustice is clearly a structural injustice....” because “the right to housing is a universal right” (§12)
  • Class #22

    1. 1. Immigration picks up on the topic of rights, the political nature of Christian commitment, economic justice, and the relation between being a member of a worldwide Church and a citizen of a particular nation. Please reflect on the story Fr. Corpora relates about mass on the Rió Grande in light of the points made by Bishop Lester concerning the rights of immigrants. vt
    2. 2. <ul><li>see where rights come from in the Catholic tradition, </li></ul><ul><li>explore the relationship between rights and duties </li></ul><ul><li>discern the difference between liberty rights and claim rights, </li></ul><ul><li>see how emphasizing one or the other leads to different notions of society, and </li></ul><ul><li>focus on immigration as an example of human rights crossing national boundaries. </li></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>I. Justice & Rights </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A. What are rights? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>II. Rights & Duties </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A. How many rights do you want? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>B. How many duties do you want? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>C. “Inconsistency” according to Pope Benedict? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>III. Kinds of rights </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>B. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1. Human rights according to the Church? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2. Tensions with present U.S. policies? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>IV. Immigration rights </li></ul>Liberties (“immunity from interference”) Claim rights (or “empowerments”)
    4. 4. <ul><li>“ It is important to call for a renewed reflection on how rights presuppose duties if they are not to become mere licence.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Nowadays we are witnessing a grave inconsistency. On the one hand, appeals are made to alleged rights, arbitrary and non-essential in nature, accompanied by the demand that they be recognized and promoted by public structures, while, on the other hand, elementary and basic rights remain unacknowledged and are violated in much of the world.” </li></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>“… [I]ndividual rights, when detached from a framework of duties which grants them their full meaning, can run wild, leading to an escalation of demands which is effectively unlimited and indiscriminate.” </li></ul><ul><li>“ An overemphasis on rights leads to a disregard for duties. Duties set a limit on rights because they point to the anthropological and ethical framework of which rights are a part….” </li></ul><ul><li>“ Duties thereby reinforce rights and call for their defence and promotion as a task to be undertaken in the service of the common good.” </li></ul>
    6. 6. Rights & Community

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