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Competitive Collaboration: the Impact of Social Media on Medicine by Emma D'Arcy

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The era of participatory medicine describes the shift from illness to wellness with patients at the centre, taking greater responsibility for management of their health. This role encompasses all …

The era of participatory medicine describes the shift from illness to wellness with patients at the centre, taking greater responsibility for management of their health. This role encompasses all aspects of participatory medicine -- digital innovation to create new health solutions, managing multichannel education for HCPs and aligning with healthcare organisations to creatively disrupt and drive provision of better answers to how we practice medicine in a digital age.

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  • The Hunger Games has been translated into 26 languages
    Fashion verdict (most popular show in russia)
  • "Generally, drug development is expensive, takes a long time and most things don't work," Joseph said. Risks have grown exponentially, with clinical trial costs rising by an estimated 70% between 2008 and 2011. Partnerships help spread the burden.
    Re:Search project: For example, the project will make it easier for a researcher in Tanzania to connect with pharmaceutical giants for additional biomedical information, resources and detailed product knowhow, Joseph said. Such information has often been carefully guarded because of intellectual property rights, but transparency between partners will be the key.

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  • 1. Introducing Social Hx An in-house team at inVentiv digital+innovation dedicated to creating Social Health Experiences in partnership with our clients to help add value to all external stakeholders and truly build communities of purpose Our belief in the power of social media is taken from the theories of sociology social change is sparked by the people who are closest to the problem and whose drive for better outcomes creates real, actionable solutions We therefore believe that social platforms should enable communities of purpose in health, empowering people to deliver experiences of value to patients and consumers alike
  • 2. Competitive Collaboration: the Impact of Social Media on Medicine By Emma D’Arcy Head of Participatory Medicine, inVentiv digital+innovation
  • 3. Socialised Medicine Means 1 2 3 An era of participatory An era of participatory medicine that can be medicine that can be personalised and is consumed personalised and is consumed by personality ––person first by personality person first New classes New classes of opinion leadership of opinion leadership Amplification //dilution of Amplification dilution of influence with great channel influence with great channel choice choice 4 5 Real time insights & dialogue Real time insights & dialogue about disease, drugs, doctors about disease, drugs, doctors Changing dynamics of clinical Changing dynamics of clinical research and evidence research and evidence
  • 4. Let me introduce you Constantly multitasking Shorter attention spans “Busier” than ever But that doesn’t mean they don’t still love to be inspired and entertained…
  • 5. What’s Your Health Personality? Healthy Laidback Focused on aabalanced, healthy lifestyle –– Focused on balanced, healthy lifestyle confident they are already healthy confident they are already healthy Like websites that offer good general Like websites that offer good general advice, apps that support maintenance of advice, apps that support maintenance of health, trackers and diagnostic online tools health, trackers and diagnostic online tools Health Hedonists Health Hedonists Keen to suppress illness asap Keen to suppress illness asap Like to search for quick answers, use Like to search for quick answers, use websites that are simple and contain websites that are simple and contain immediate direction and recommendations immediate direction and recommendations Health Expert Highly conscious, believes in prevention and Highly conscious, believes in prevention and will actively collect information about will actively collect information about health health Confident digital consumers who research Confident digital consumers who research directly about drugs directly about drugs Non-Conformists Much less-engaged about their health Much less-engaged about their health Would rather change their habits than take Would rather change their habits than take medication. medication. Might appreciate encouragement and Might appreciate encouragement and empathy from community ‘peers’ empathy from community ‘peers’
  • 6. Trend --Taking Your Doctor Home We don’t always do what we’re told – or, even what we agree to. The problems of adherence and compliance are as old as medicine itself, but new research on remote monitoring tools and payer interventions are showing an incredibly efficacious way to help more people be more successful managing their health and illness.
  • 7. Trend -- Increasingly Ageless Society 60 is the new 50 is the new 40, which, of course, is the new 30. Driven partly by medical innovations and prolonged life expectancy, consumers are staying forever young—mentally as well as physically. Meanwhile, Gen Y is turning the age expectation on its head, too, creating what cultural anthropologists are calling an increasingly ageless world.
  • 8. Communities of Purpose Volunteering is increasingly an entrepreneurial activity, fueled by new niche social networks that let users convene around specific objectives. The ad hoc groups join forces around the world to effect a specific change or create something entirely new.
  • 9. Serialized Storytelling Our fractured attention spans still want the drama of big plots, but maybe just not with so many pages or viewing minutes. New devices and media distributors are fueling a move toward more serialized storytelling – “episodes” of content that offer the right time commitment at the right time.
  • 10. The Digital Default State 2006 Twitter founded 1971 1960 1960 1990 1980 1980 1970 1970 Word 'weblog' used Internet search engine Personal computer 1973 Mobile phone used 2005 1991 2010 2010 iTunes launched WWW publicly available 2010 2006 Crowdsourcing' coined 1995 Amazon & eBay launch 2001 Wikipedia founded 2010 App store, 400k apps, 10b downloads 2003 1998 Google founded 2020 2020 YouTube launched 'social bookmarking' coined First smartphone demo WWW proposed Apple iPad/tablet 2003 1997 1989 1970 UK Digital Economy Act 2010 LinkedIn launches 2000 2000 1990 1990 2011 Facebook launched 2003 1997 Word 'internet' used 2004 dotcom crash Webtrends launched 1974 1965 Mail command introduced 2001 1993 @ sign used 2007 iPhone launched Wikipedia logs 100million human hours of labour
  • 11. The rise, reach and relevance of social media all online adults use sites in 6y (went up from 5% to 65%) 5 million - 845 million in 6y 1-12 million in 6m >1,200 hospitals participate in 4,200 >200 HCP communities networking sites “It’s like my personal electronic megaphone...”
  • 12. Translating social data to social transactions 5 million – 845 million in 6y >1 billion LIKEs/day 460,000 new accounts/day >1 billion LIKEs/day >1,200 hospitals participate in 4,200 networking sites >200 HCP communities Direct relations hips Share and a ppeal
  • 13. ‘Like-lihood’ of sharing positive/negative experiences using social media Care received at hospital/ medical facility Experience with medication/ treatment Specific doctor, nurse, healthcare provider Health insurer customer service Cost of health insurance Coverage by health insurer Cost of care at a hospital/ healthcare provider 44% 43% 42% 40% 37% 38% 38% Positive Negative 40% n=1,000 33% 35% 37% 35% 34% 36%
  • 14. Social health has altered consumer approach, attitudes and expectations 1 5% Post reviews of health insurers Share health-related images/videos 16 % 17% Post reviews of medication/treatment 18 % Post reviews of doctors 17% Track and share symptoms / health behaviours Post about health experiences Comment on other’s health-related experiences 20% Join health forum or community Support health-related causes Percentage of consumers using social media for health-related activities PWC HRI Social Media Consumer Survey 2012 28 % 24% 2 7%
  • 15. Consumers are proficient users of social media for health Find answers – to wants, needs, preferences 42% consumers have used social media to access health-related reviews Entitlement and responsiveness >75% consumers expect healthcare companies to respond within 1 day Trust influences willingness 61% trust fellow social media providers vs 37% trust pharma info Healthcare actions are influenced 45% say info from SoMe affects their decision to seek opinion, Age influences participation (and sharing) Healthcare management is influenced 40% find SoMe affects how they approach/ manage a chronic condition 90% 18—24 ‘young invincibles’ trust and engage in health activities vs 56% 45—65 ‘baby boomers’ Monitoring is acceptable 1/3 willing to be monitored if data leads to improved care Facebook and YouTube – most commonly used SoMe channels Source: Percentage of consumers using social media for health-related activities PWC HRI Social Media Consumer Survey 2012
  • 16. Proliferation of patient networks Using social networks for patient-directed research Real-World Efficacy Becoming a condition of continued reimbursement Pressure of daily life – not as per physician / trial protocol Oncology Endocrinology Psychiatric &behaviour General health Effect in patients with co-morbidities Inflammation & autoimmune “Authenticity in drug performance” Rare/and or severe disease Lifestyle Data from online patient communities Improve compliance Identify areas of unmet need Generate new hypothesis for trials Support reimbursement CNS Awareness of Facebook is close to 100% Cardiovascular Orthopedic Ob/gyn More than 1 billion people (>70% of internet population) use social networks Infectious disease Allergies/asthma 0 10 20 30
  • 17. Socialised Medicine Means 1 2 3 An era of participatory An era of participatory medicine that can be medicine that can be personalised and is personalised and is consumed by personality –– consumed by personality person first person first New classes New classes of opinion leadership of opinion leadership Amplification //dilution of Amplification dilution of influence with great channel influence with great channel choice choice 4 5 Real time insights & dialogue Real time insights & dialogue about disease, drugs, doctors about disease, drugs, doctors Changing dynamics of Changing dynamics of clinical research and evidence clinical research and evidence
  • 18. Building New Classes of Opinion Leadership Academia no longer the exclusive domain of KOLs Informal, personally-invested leaders, non-medical Clinical dossier / currency of followers, readers, influence
  • 19. Today’s HCP: from information to interaction overload NOW PREVIOUSLY eDetails Mobile apps Blogs Data eJournals Email eForums Detail aid Manuscript Reps Sales Rep Journal Doctor eLearning Meetings Portals Doctor (passive recipient of info) SMS Social networks Instant messaging
  • 20. HCP Activity Exceeds Company Use 1 5 million HCPs use LinkedIn 2 Innovations in Health network has 20,000 ‘actions’/month 3 271 medical blogs written by HCPs in 2007 4 95% US Medical Schools (45% Students) have an active FB account 5 45% activity is positive role-modeling 6 Gold standards published by governing bodies 7 42% described interactions with patients (16% identifiable)
  • 21. Docs Are People too HCPs consume by personality, so delivery must be personalized as engagement confidence matures Insight 1: Digital proficiency traditional native Insight 2: Knowledge preference high science peer validation Insight 3: Engagement preference ongoing on demand
  • 22. Accepting Socialised medicine “These days I’m recommending more apps than meds...” Topol 2013 90% use SoMe (Modahl, 2011) 95% US Medschools Doc-preneurs Teaching others (McGowan, 2011) Digital KOLs Intersection
  • 23. Trend -- App’versation In the Exam Room Today’s empowered patients want more than a diagnosis and a prescription. They want to participate in their care – from bringing new data points to the conversation to taking action to improve their health with new tools and digital coaching. The big news: They’re looking to their doctors to be their guides.
  • 24. Socialised Medicine Means 1 2 3 An era of participatory An era of participatory medicine that can be medicine that can be personalised and is consumed personalised and is consumed by personality ––person first by personality person first New classes New classes of opinion leadership of opinion leadership Amplification //dilution of Amplification dilution of influence with great channel influence with great channel choice choice 4 5 Real time insights & dialogue Real time insights & dialogue about disease, drugs, doctors about disease, drugs, doctors Changing dynamics of clinical Changing dynamics of clinical research and evidence research and evidence
  • 25. Trend – Real World Data in the Practice The shift to more outcomes-driven reimbursement is changing the kind of data doctors want. EHR will power the Investigator-Initiated Mini Trial • Physicians working in large practices will increasingly pilot new drugs/indications with small numbers of patients • They’ll mine/compare the data before rolling it out to larger segments. • Creating entirely new kinds of KOLs – ones driven by numbers, relevant to small groups of peers, and connected across digital networks
  • 26. Trend – Real World Data in the Consumer World Transparency across other “buying” decisions is spurring consumer demand and expectation for real data Access: Advocacy: Participation: Real World Data will uncover new unmet needs – both for our customers and our brand • New skillsets needed in both how to interpret and compare real world data • New influencer networks created, with increasingly micro KOLs and POLs • New bridges needed from clinical learnings to real world experience
  • 27. Dissonance in the System LESS THAN 1/2 of chronic disease brands have a patient support program MORE THAN 70% of doctors seek colleagues' opinions through digital channels 80% ad ults want to be empowered about treatment
  • 28. Socialised Medicine Means 1 2 3 An era of participatory An era of participatory medicine that can be medicine that can be personalised and is consumed personalised and is consumed by personality ––person first by personality person first New classes New classes of opinion leadership of opinion leadership Amplification //dilution of Amplification dilution of influence with great channel influence with great channel choice choice 4 5 Real time insights & dialogue Real time insights & dialogue about disease, drugs, doctors about disease, drugs, doctors Changing dynamics of clinical Changing dynamics of clinical research and evidence research and evidence
  • 29. Changing dynamics of clinical research and evidence Clinical research Rigor of randomised trials 2011, REMOTE Pfizer’s first virtual clinical trial 2008, Lithium and ALS PatientsLikeMe conversational study published Complex systems – micro narratives, spontaneous, unconstrained Ubiquity of online conversation Self-selected participants Subjective exchange Communities
  • 30. Trend -- Real World SOCIALIZED Data Will Be The New Authority Performance will increasingly be tracked and published in healthcare, creating a transparent meritocracy that will drive everything from consideration to adoption to income.
  • 31. Trend -- Innovation From (True) Insiders A growing trend in collaborative health research is creating potentially lifesaving global partnerships between pharmaceutical companies, large practices, disease advocates and people living with a disease. Enabled by new technologies and new connections, they’re crowdsourcing the next big innovations in treatment and experience.
  • 32. Started with faster solutions for neglected diseases Collaborations Competitions Connections The Re:Search brings together 185 UN member states to create a more global interpretation of intellectual property to spur health innovation Foldit poses puzzles to players and then tests variations on the players’ best designs in the lab. Researchers have created an enzyme with more than 18-fold higher activity than the original. NASA, USAID, Department of State, and NIKE host LAUNCH events that bring together ten innovators and 40 thought leaders will to address issues in human health
  • 33. Will quick grow to identify high-potential solutions for mass adoption Accelerating high-potential ideas: Enabling bio-hacking pioneers who have created highpotential ideas on their own with technology and tools. (Like the $5 “bionic” hand blueprint created in part due to a hardware donation by Makertbot) Co-creating with practices: Joining with inspired doctors –like Endo Goddess– to quickly prototype and test new tools and approaches with their patient populations Cycling improvement with the crowd: Testing ideas with the audience and creating a process of rapid improvement based on their feedback, like the U.S. Veterans administration has done with break-thru telehealth tools That’s creating new expectations for global leaders and innovators "Competitive advantage now comes from having more people working with you than with anyone else”
  • 34. Trend -- Innovation from Outsiders The next innovation in healthcare may not come from healthcare at all. Google, Microsoft, Turkcell, AT&T and others are investing in completely new approaches to diagnostics and care. These outside influencers bring bold new perspectives and high expectations for what healthcare really could and should do.
  • 35. Competitive Collboration THE MORE CONNECTED, THE HEALTHIER THE SOCIETY proliferation of symptom trackers, digital dosing guides, IVAs, electronic medical records, EMR wristbands, connected patient communities, shared medical appointments, customized health content, bio-connected devices, virtual hospitals
  • 36. Illness to wellness by 2017 with parallel customer responsibility Wearable devices 100million sales LifeGame mHealth adherence NIH tech grants Point-of-treatment personalisation EHR & big data donorship Health entrepreneurs
  • 37. Truth About Wellness 2012
  • 38. Acceleration of technology The creative destruction & Innovation of medicine Social networks Sequencing Digital devices The Great Inflection of Medicine Internet Cell phone 1970 Personal computer 1980 1990 2000 2010 Timings of the big 6 major digital advances over the past 40 years that have set up the Great Inflection of Medicine Topol, 2013 2020
  • 39. The Era of Participatory Medicine Digital platforms, communities and tools have changed the landscape and empowered customers New medicine Wireless sensors Genomics Imaging Information systems Mobile connectivity Super convergence Old medicine Internet Social networking Computing power and data universe
  • 40. Personalizing medicine Digital natives HCP as health-broker Tenets of professionalism New clinical trial approaches Accuracy of content Real-time management Qualitative participation More authentic engagement Blurred relationships Expedited education Dilution of leadership Transparency D’Arcy, 2013 CHALLENGES INSIGHTS Impact of Socialized Medicine
  • 41. To find out more: Emma D’Arcy Head of Participatory Medicine, inVentiv digital+ innovation emma.darcy@inventivhealth.com