What the 10 Greatest Children's Authors Tell You About Remarkable Content
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What the 10 Greatest Children's Authors Tell You About Remarkable Content

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Learn what the 10 greatest children's authors of all time teach us about creating more remarkable content to improve our marketing campaigns.

Learn what the 10 greatest children's authors of all time teach us about creating more remarkable content to improve our marketing campaigns.

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What the 10 Greatest Children's Authors Tell You About Remarkable Content Presentation Transcript

  • 1. What the 10 GreatestChildren’s AuthorsTeach You AboutRemarkable Content
  • 2. Consider this…
  • 3. The following authors allwrote for the sameaudience,yet still found ways tostand out and beremarkable.
  • 4. Dr. SeussDr. Seuss crafted a world and characters so unique, that Jim Carrey even found itchallenging to fully capture The Grinch. Not only did the Doc write some of the mostrevered children’s tales of our time, but he did so in rhyme. He even made up words! Hecreated a style all his own. Poet transfused with children’s writer.
  • 5. Roald DahlFrom Charlie and the Chocolate Factory to Matilda, Dahl’s tales often took a similarpath from bookshelves to the silver screen, bringing worlds we only imagined to life. Hewas a master of seeing darker subject matter through the eyes and imagination of achild. His wit and unique characters transported children everywhere to the landscapeof his choosing.
  • 6. J.K. RowlingFrom Hogwarts, to Quidditch, to “expecto patronum,” Rowling crafted a unique worldfull of characters and conflicts to the likes that children had never seen. The responsewas immediate and expansive, resulting in theme park-like lines at bookstores andmovie theaters across the world. She brought imaginative fiction to a completely newlevel, and her work will continue to reach children for generations to come.
  • 7. Shel SilversteinFor children of all ages, reading Where the Sidewalk Ends during spare time at recess isalmost a rite of passage. Silverstein’s witty, sometimes strange and often brief poemscoupled with his unique illustrations form an experience children remember forever.
  • 8. R.L. StineStine not only pioneered children’s horror with Goosebumps, but he also introducedcontext into his stories by allowing readers to choose their own plot twists in his YouChoose the Scare series. Unprecedented at the time, readers decided their own ending.
  • 9. E.B. WhiteWhite was another children’s author who didn’t shy away from heavy subject matter.The difference? He often told his stories through an animals perspective. From StuartLittle to Charlotte’s Web, his stories are woven into the fabric of American culture.
  • 10. Judy BlumeBlume’s novels acted as a narrative for the experience children and young adults facedduring their formative years. From bullying to religion, Blume was a master of relatingher subject matter to exactly the right audience. She wrote with both clarity andempathy, detailing each coming-of-age tale as if it were non-fiction.
  • 11. Lewis CarrollMost known for writing Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Carroll was way ahead of histime in that he created fantasy worlds completely void of anything considered to be“normal” or “standard” in regards to the industry at the time. The result? A story so richin imagination that it was still a box office draw…145 years later.
  • 12. C.S. LewisLewis created a fictional fantasy realm known as Narnia, and using tales of magic andand mythical beasts, created a seven part series that’s sold over 100 million copieswhile also becoming a box office hit. His stories tell the tale of children from the realworld magically transported to the fictional Narnia to protect it from evil. The lesson? Ifthere doesn’t exist a world that suits your creativity, then make one.
  • 13. Eric CarleCarle needed very few words to tell his story and effectively exercise the imagination ofhis young audience. He didn’t limit himself to relying on words to create an experience.In The Very Hungry Caterpillar, there’s actually holes eaten out of some of the pages.The beautiful illustrations and experience is what pushes the story along.
  • 14. How will you createmore unique andremarkable content?
  • 15. By John Bonini@Bonini84