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FY13 Sales Opportunities within the United States Army
 

FY13 Sales Opportunities within the United States Army

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  • Now, moving on to the Army
  • http://www.militaryaerospace.com/articles/print/volume-23/issue-3/news/trends/the-incredible-shrinking-budget-for-us-military-technology-research.htmlhttp://www.army.mil/article/74955/Shrinking_construction_budget_supports_key_projects/http://www.armytimes.com/news/2012/02/defense-spec-ops-to-grow-as-pentagon-budget-shrinks-020812/http://www.armytimes.com/news/2012/02/dn-2013-army-budget-calls-for-more-program-cuts-021312/http://www.federaltimes.com/article/20120327/ACQUISITION03/203270303/http://www.army.mil/article/85314/NETCOM_changes_command/Here is a look at Army’s total budget request and some top level contacts. As you can see, Army’s total budget will be dropping 9% in FY13 to about $185 billion. To save money, Army plans to acquire fewer aircraft and ships over the next several years. Troop pay raises and Veterans’ health benefits will be limited; and military construction budgets have been hacked by 30%. Also on the chopping block are costly aerospace and weapons systems, like the Global Hawk surveillance drone, the Defense weather satellite, and the Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System. Seven other programs related to weapons systems will be eliminated, saving the Army $5 billion over the next 5 years, and a list of those programs will be included in the territory planner. All in all, Army plans to shrink contract spending 38% to $14 billion in FY13. Thankfully for all of us, Army is not planning to make drastic across the board cuts, and in fact is investing more in some areas. Despite Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation budgets dropping 14% DOD wide over the last 2 years, the Army will actually see an increase in RDT&E of 2% to almost $9 billion. And while the IT budget will remain relatively flat in FY13, there is an agency wide push to invest more heavily in COTS products to help the agency increase efficiencies and cost savings.Personnel wise, Lt. Gen. Jeffrey Sorenson stepped down as Army CIO in November 2010. Deputy CIO Mike Krieger assumed position of Acting CIO until March of 2011, at which point Major General Lawrence stepped in. General Lawrence had previously served as Commanding General, NETCOM at Ft. Huachuca. As the Army CIO/G-6, Lawrence reports directly to the Secretary of the Army for setting strategic direction and objectives, and supervises all Army C4 (command, control, communications, and computers) and IT functions. As the G-6, Lawrence supports the Chief of Staff of the Army in performing information management, network operations (including computer network defense), force structure, and the equipping and employment of signal forces.  When she first took office, Lawrence stated that “Right now, the network is the Army’s number one modernization effort. We want a network that can provide Soldiers and civilians information of all categories and forms, as well as a means to collaborate in real-time, at the exact moment required, in any environment, under all circumstances.”  Then last year at land war net, she mentioned that “the first and most important thing is that we're going to build a single, secure, standard-based network.” These two statements really summarize the direction that the Army is headed, and what is influencing IT purchases over the next several years.  Gen Raymond Odierno was sworn in as Chief of Staff on September 7, 2011. He was second in command to Gen. Petraeus from late 2006 to early 2008, as U.S. troops poured into Iraq to tamp down the escalating violence. He took over as the top commander in September 2008 and was responsible for the start of the U.S. withdrawal from Iraq; but has been a huge advocate of incrementally drawing our forces back, not making rash decisions to slash troop numbers just to rein in the defense budget.
  • http://defensesystems.com/articles/2011/02/15/army-fiscal-2012-budget.aspxAs we just saw, Army’s overall budget will shrink 9%. IT budgets will remain mostly in tact, decreasing by less than 1%. Even with consecutive annual decreases, the Army remains the largest IT budget in both DOD and Civilian agencies.  Last year, DoD asked the armed services to find over $100 billion in efficiencies over the next 10 years, with the Army’s portion coming in around $26B. In FY 2012, Army found $2.6B in savings while still managing to keep budgets at respectable levels. In the coming year, the Army will be saving money through reductions in its active force, a 10% reduction in funds to support contractor costs, and a freeze in the civilian workforce to FY10 levels. I contend that the military and Congress both are placing a greater emphasis on the cost effectiveness and value of IT products systems, which is why IT budgets have remained consistent. Like I said before, the bad news is for the defense and services contractors is that tangible items, like weapons systems, because they have become targets for cuts. But IT products are still widely viewed as cost savers, so that’s the good news here.
  • http://www.army.mil/info/organization/This org chart represents Army from the HQ level. You can see that these offices are broken into Commands, Reporting Units, and Service Component Commands that all report up to the Secretary. Other components like ARCYBER and PEOs support the Chief of Staff.
  • http://ciog6.army.mil/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=ayfO1U7VONY%3d&tabid=36http://ciog6.army.mil/ArmyCIOG6Earns3rdStar/tabid/115/Default.aspxAs I mentioned earlier, Army’s G-6 is headed up by 3 star Susan Lawrence who oversees 5 component offices and indirectly manages 2 others. Major Gen. Steven Smith in the cybersecurity office says he will regularly meet with his counterparts in the Marines and other services to figure out how to share certified products more easily. Vendors say the process they have to go through to get on these certified lists is inconsistent, difficult and expensive. Smith says DoD recognizes the challenges and wants to increase collaboration among the services. The take home about the G-6 is they want to know your capability and how it saves them money day to day. Remember that they shape the policy and direction of the Army, so if you can get executive support by showing your value, that’s what’s important.
  • http://defensesystems.com/microsites/2012/peo-eis-catalog/command-group.aspxNow there are a number of relevant IT insertion points within the Army, and I have included many of them in this presentation, but given time constraints I’ll just touch briefly on them. All of this information will of course also be included in the planner. I’m sure you’re familiar with a number of program executive offices within the army. The most important one for you to be familiar with is PEO-EIS, which actually manages 40% of the Army’s IT procurement. Doug Wiltse is the Program Executive Officer, and I actually received an email from him about 3 weeks ago stating that there will be a new Biometrics office that will oversee the BEC and JPI programs, headed up by Col Sandy Vann Olejaaz. PEO EIS has its own CIO and G-6 – and it’s important to note that Hari Bezwada pulls a lot of weight in this PEO. The ERP component oversees several programs, including GCSS, LMP, GFEBS, IPPS, and IMS.
  • http://www.army.mil/article/46012/Army_establishes_Army_Cyber_Command/http://www.afcea.org/signal/signalscape/index.php/2011/08/25/13271/http://www.shephard.co.uk/news/digital-battlespace/landwarnet-2011-us-army-detail-cyber-vision-2020/9814/http://www.dodlive.mil/index.php/2011/08/u-s-army-blogger-roundtable-landwarnet-conference/http://www.fortgordonsignal.com/news/2011-08-19/News_Update/Army_Cyber_Command_focuses_on_protecting_vital_net.htmlhttp://www.belvoireagle.com/index.php/news-articles/arcyber_gathers_for_town_hall_at_belvoir/http://defensesystems.com/articles/2010/10/15/cyber-defense-army-cyber-command.aspxhttp://www.arcyber.army.mil/news-arcyber.htmlhttps://secureweb2.hqda.pentagon.mil/VDAS_ArmyPostureStatement/2011/information_papers/PostedDocument.asp?id=256http://federalsoup.federaldaily.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=38389&PID=418202http://www.afcea.org/signal/signalscape/index.php/2011/08/25/13271/http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yDrF8vACA5ohttp://www.disa.mil/news/pressresources/factsheets/go.htmlhttps://secureweb2.hqda.pentagon.mil/vdas_armyposturestatement/2010/information_papers/Cyber_Operations.asphttps://secureweb2.hqda.pentagon.mil/VDAS_ArmyPostureStatement/2011/information_papers/PostedDocument.asp?id=266Now taking a look at ARCYBER, which is located at Ft. Meade and was stood up in October of 2010. It has 14 component offices and 2 subordinate commands, including NETCOM out of Ft. Huachuca and INSCOM at Ft. Belvoir. I saw General Hernandez speak at TechNet last week, and the crowd had some interesting questions for him. He noted that ARCYBER’s basic responsibility is to maintain the Army’s freedom to operate its networks, and that he doesn’t measure success by protecting the networks from 100% of the attacks, because that’s impossible. DOD receives 50 thousand threats via email a month, and it’s impossible to keep up with every single attack. They measure success in the development and execution of a plan that will at least mitigate risk for the majority of the network.
  • http://fedscoop.com/u-s-cyber-command-names-policy-director/http://www.army.mil/info/organization/unitsandcommands/commandstructure/netcom/NETCOM’s focus is on achieving a Joint, Interagency and Multinational network enterprise. As I mentioned, it is based in Ft. Huachuca, but has elements in Arlington and Ft. Belvoir as well. Just in June, General Lynn took over as Commanding General of NETCOM, as General Napper was named the Director of Plans and Policy for USCYBERCOM.
  • The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology (or ASALT) is an acquisition shop that houses all of the Army’s PEOs, except for PEO EIS of course.
  • http://www.rdecom.army.mil/EDCG%20Telecoms/APPROVED%20(Signed)_%20AMC%20Strategic%20Plan%202013-2020.pdfhttp://www.army.mil/article/27982/DOIM_takes_new_name_but___039_mission_has_not_changed__039_/Army Materiel Command (or AMC) houses the contract shops for the Army, and is based out of Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, after moving from Ft. Belvoir during a BRAC in 2005. AMC was established in 1962 with the mission of supporting the warfighter, and today is a technology leader in the military; procuring not just bullets, guns, helmets, and helicopters, but IT systems, cybersecurity products, and software development tools. AMC works in collaboration with ASALT and TRANSCOM to provide end to end lifecycle management and sustainment of systems and equipment, as well as transportation and distribution services. AMC recently released its strategic plan for 2013 to 2020. It specifically points out that the Directorate of Information Management (or DOIM)’s transition to Network Enterprise Centers (NECs) was a change in name back in 2009, but not in function, and moving forward, it will also change where they report into. The NECs belonged to the 93rd signal Brigade out of Ft. Eustis, VA, but will now be managed under ARCYBER in Ft. Belvoir. This move is aligned with the Army’s transformation to an enterprise focus to achieve the network of 2020 and to obtain a “future operating environment” that can anticipate the needs of the warfighter.There are 3 very important components within AMC to the IT community. The first of which is the Aviation and Missile Command or AMCOM, based in Huntsville, which ensures the Army’s aviation and missile systems are technologically superior, affordable, and always ready. Second is the Communications Electronics Command or CECOM, which is housed at Aberdeen and supports and sustains C4ISR and information systems for the joint warfighter. Third, is the Tank Automotive and Armaments Command, or TACOM, out of Warren Michigan which develops, acquires, fields, and sustains ground systems for the warfighter.
  • Here is a map of the IT insertion points I just covered. NETCOM is out in Ft Huachuca, Materiel Command is in Huntsville, while ARCYBER and PEO EIS reside in Ft. Belvoir, Army G-6 and ASALT are in DC, and PEOs C3T and IEWS are located in Aberdeen.
  • So when considering IT drivers for the Army, I couldn’t help but to begin with budget cuts. Looking at different colors of money on the top line items, we can see that DME (or CapEx) will drop by 12%, while Steady State (or OpEx) funds will actually increase by 12%. This would indicate to me that Army is not prepared to invest much in procurement of new IT systems or enterprise licenses this year. Especially operating under a CR for the first half of the year; I would not expect the Army to begin any new programs, or make any large purchases of brand new hardware or software, unless you can prove to them that your product saves them money in the near term. Looking at the bottom line items, these represent pools of funds that the Army delegates for specific types of investments, and as you can see, now that we’re pulling out of Afghanistan and Iraq, the JIEDDO fund is nearly eliminated, total O&M funds and BRAC funds are nearly cut in half, and multiple other investments will feel the pinch just as badly.
  • http://www.fiercegovernmentit.com/story/key-dod-erps-8-billion-over-budget-say-auditors/2012-07-18?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internalhttp://www.fiercegovernmentit.com/story/gfebs-will-likely-go-over-budget-says-dod-oig/2012-03-28http://defensesystems.com/articles/2011/11/15/defense-it-1-army-enterprise-resource-planning.aspxhttp://defensesystems.com/articles/2012/09/06/project-manager-view-col-patrick-burden.aspx?s=ds_170912http://www.federalnewsradio.com/394/3051486/DoD-applies-tighter-scrutiny-to-business-IT-spendingThe sentiment around DOD’s Business Systems has been shifting from a positive outlook, to a gloomy one. DOD utilized nearly 2,300 business systems, and in FY12 requested over $17 billion for IT infrastructure and business systems.  There were over 500 legacy systems that were supposed to be consolidated to improve data sharing and efficiency, thus cutting costs. Unfortunately, a report released this July by DOD’s inspector general stated that 6 of the DOD’s 10 key ERPs are already over budget by $8 billion and some are as much as 12 years behind schedule. Another report just a couple weeks ago announced that DOD managers of business IT systems will be under tighter scrutiny when requesting funding for their systems as a result of the constant issues the ERPs have caused recently. Moving forward, investment review boards will not just examine spending for new systems under development, but the new process will now monitor and pass judgment on any funding request over $1 million over 5 years; whether it’s a request of steady state or DME dollars. One of Army’s major ERPs, the General Fund Enterprise Business System (or GFEBS) is the service’s web enabled financial, asset, and accounting management system that is supposed to account for over $140 billion in annual spending. GFEBS is supposed to replace over100 Army legacy accounting and financial systems and become one of the biggest ERP systems in the world. In March of this year, the DOD inspector general recommended that the Army should halt the rollout of GFEBS because the system will not resolve any long standing material weaknesses, and it will most certainly run over budget and out of time. But the Army is doing no such thing. In fact, GFEBS Program Manager Col Patrick Burden said last month that the system has been fully deployed and can currently produce auditable reports. He also noted that the Inspector General and GAO reports that blasted GFEBS were based on out dated information and were off base. What this should tell you is that personnel DOD wide, and specifically in the Army, will be sensitive to criticisms of their business systems, and they may soon be on the lookout for band aids to fix the wound left from its troubled and failed ERP systems.

FY13 Sales Opportunities within the United States Army FY13 Sales Opportunities within the United States Army Presentation Transcript

  • United States Army © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 1
  • Army Budget and Leadership Total Budget Mike Krieger John McHugh Deputy CIO / G-6 Secretary FY2012 FY2013 Gen. Raymond Odierno MG Stewart Dyer Chief of Staff Director, Cyber Directorate $202.97 $184.64 CIO/G-6Budget ($B) Lines of Business (FY13) MG Alan Lynn Gen. Lloyd Austin Commanding General Vice Chief of Staff NETCOM Healthcare RDT&E Heidi Shyu Assistant Secretary of the Army LTG Rhett Hernandez Procurement for Acquisition, Logistics, & Commander Technology ARCYBER/2nd Army O&M Military Personnel LTG Susan S. Lawrence MG Lee Price CIO / G-6 PEO-C3T 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 2
  • Army IT Budget IT Budget FY13 FORECAST FY2012 FY2013 Army’s total FY13 budget will shrink 9% $8.39 $8.33 Army’s base budget Lines of Business (FY13) (non OCO) will shrinkBudget ($B) 7% Financial Mgmt Army’s IT budget will Supply Chain Mgmt shrink 1% HR Mgmt Army has the largest IT Defense & Ntnl Security budget of DOD agencies IT Mgmt 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 3
  • Army Organization HQDA Chief of Staff Army CommandsCIO / G-6 ASA (ALT) FORSCOM / G-4 TRADOC AMC (ACOM)PEO-EIS Other PEOs ARCYBERUSAASC ATEC USACIDC NETCOM USARC Direct Reporting Units (DRU)IMCOM USACE MEDCOM USMA INSCOM USARPAC USAREUR ARSOUTH ARNORTH Service Component Commands (ASCC) USARF ARCENT USASOC SDDC SMDC © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 4
  • CIO/G-6 Organization CIO / G-6 LTG Susan Lawrence Deputy CIO / G-6 Mike Krieger Chief Integration OfficerMG James Walton NETCOM/Army 9th Signal Cyber Security CIO – USAR CommandMG Stewart Dyer COL Tom Cole MG Alan LynnArchitecture, Operations Policy and Resources PEO-EIS , Networks & SpaceRichard Sirney Theresa Salazar Doug Wiltsie © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 5
  • PEO-EIS Organization Program Executive Officer Douglas Wiltsie CIO Chief of Staff Hari Bezwada Patricia Lambert Deputy PEO Terry WatsonAssistant PEO Assistant PEO Enterprise Enterprise Biometrics PEO HQ Staff Management Resource PlanningSystems (EMS) (ERP) Business Program Operations and Transformation Management Theater Support and Strategic Communications © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 6
  • ARCYBER/2nd Army Organization ARCYBER LTG Rhett Hernandez NETCOM 9th SC INSCOM DCG ARFORCYBER 1st IO CMD DCG ARFORCBYER Ft. Huachuca, VA Ft. Belvoir, VA Army Cyber Operations 7th Signal Command and Integration Center Cyber Brigade (Theatre) Ft. Belvoir, VA STO Current and Future Ops Intelligence LNOsPlans & Exercises Capabilities Assessment Targeting IO © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 7
  • NETCOM/9th Signal Command Organization NETCOM Commanding General Ft. Huachuca, AZ MG Alan Lynn Deputy Commander Operations Ft. Huachuca, AZ Enterprise Services G-2/Intelligence Arlington, VA Ft. Huachuca, AZ Army Global NetworkInformation Assurance & Operations & Security Compliance Center Arlington, VA Ft. Belvoir, VA © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 8
  • ASA (ALT) Organization ASAALT Acquisition Executive Heidi Shyu Asst. Acquisition Exec LTC Gordon WallaceResearch & Acquisitions & Plans, Programs, Acquisition PEOs Medical Systems ProcurementTechnology Systems Mgmt & Resources Support CenterPrograms &Technology Transition PEO Ground PEO Missiles & PEO Aviation PEO-IEW&S PEO-C3T Combat Systems Space PEO PEO Combat PEO Chemical & Simulation, Traini Support & PEO Soldier Biological Defense PEO Ammunition ng ,& Combat Service Joint Instrumentation © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 9
  • Materiel Command Organization Commanding General CIO/G-6 ILSC ARDEC RDECOM CECOM TACOM AMCOMBarbara Machak Patricia O’Connor Beverly Siirila Laurie Hill Army Aviation & Sustainment ARL LOGSA Contracting Missile RD&E Command Command © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 10
  • Army IT Acquisition and Program Centers PEO C3T PEO IEWS Aberdeen, MD Aberdeen, MD ASA (ALT) ARCYBER/2nd Army Washington, DC Headquarters Ft. Belvoir, VA Acquisition Support CIO/G-6 Center Washington, D.C. Ft. Belvoir, VA PEO EIS Ft. Belvoir, VA NETCOM Ft. Huachuca, AZ Army Materiel Command Redstone Arsenal Huntsville , AL © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 11
  • Army IT Drivers – Budget Cuts © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 12
  • Army IT Drivers – ERPs Over 500 legacy systems are to be replaced by 10 DOD ERP initiatives The 2010 Defense Authorization Act requires DOD to be “audit ready” by 2017 DOD financial management has been on GAO’s high risk list since 1995; and 6 of 10 ERPs are behind schedule, over cost, and lacking fully integrated master schedule tool DOD’s ability to achieve audit readiness is dependent on the components’ ability to effectively develop and implement tracking and accounting programs that measure budgetary information and asset accountability © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 13