FY13 Department of Defense Budget Briefing
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FY13 Department of Defense Budget Briefing

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This presentation is from the October 2012 FY13 DoD Budget Briefing delivered by Tim Larkins, immixGroup Senior Market Inteligence Consultant.

This presentation is from the October 2012 FY13 DoD Budget Briefing delivered by Tim Larkins, immixGroup Senior Market Inteligence Consultant.

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  • 4 Divisions providing technology resale, channel development, contract management, and IT services Relationships with virtually every federal agency as well as state and local governments Represents large manufacturers (e.g. Oracle, IBM, McAfee) & smaller, emerging companies The Revenue Growth refers to total sales through our program – includes direct sales plus revenues that our partner do through our contracts Revenue breakdown: $900 million in top line sales through our programs
  • Goal: reinforce the credibility of the company – we have won multiple awards and have been validated by third parties in the industry.These are some of the distinctions we’ve earned as we’ve grown over the last few years. A few I’d like to point out:We are the 2nd largest IT Schedule 70 vendor and the 4th largest SEWP prime contractor. Most people think of us as a federal contractor but we also are the #5 top cooperative purchasing IT vendor for state and local government under GSA.We’ve won several awards based on our growth over the last few years. The Washington Business Journal named us as its #1 Small Technology Company in 2007. We’ve been named the #4 value-added reseller and #22 privately held company on Washington Technology’s Top 100 Federal Prime Contractors list. As you can see, we also show up on all the independent lists of top government contractors. We encourage you to ask around about our reputation. We’ve built a great reputation for professionalism, integrity and experience. I think you’ll even hear that from our competitors, many of whom are also partners under some of our partner programs.
  • Key Points:The next few slides provide an overview of where our revenue comes from.We started out in 1997 providing outsourced contract management services for manufacturers who wanted to hold their own GSA schedules. Today we handle contract negotiation, formation, and compliance for prime contractors like Apple, Lenovo, Trane, and many others. We have a team of government contracting experts, in-house attorneys, and all the systems and processes our clients need to manage their contract modifications, price list distribution to partners, compliance monitoring, audit assistance and more. By outsourcing these functions to us, our clients are able to maintain compliance and reduce their risk of doing business with the government. It also enables them to focus their energy and resources on selling instead of on contract administration. We’ve done this for hundreds of companies of all sizes and we’re known as experts in this area. Some people still think of us as contracting consultants, but in reality this is one of the smallest parts of our business now.After a number of years of providing these contracting services, it became clear many of our clients preferred to use an intermediary contract holder to sell their products and services to the government, rather than holding their own contracts, so we formed a resale division.
  • Key Points: Technology Sales Division is a proactive technology reseller we are driven by proactive sales we are trusted by some of the industry’s largest brandsOur Technology Sales Division is a proactive technology reseller with specific expertise in providing commercial technologies to the public sector. We help them sell their products to the government through our contracts and relationships. This has grown into the largest part of our business.Our goal is to increase their revenue through proactive sales and demand generation activities that lead to meetings and sales. On the back end we manage the opportunities from leads through orders using ISO-registered business processes. In addition, we handle all the contracting headaches by including their products on our contract vehicles. The Division is led by experienced sales executives who’ve been selling technology to the government for years, as well as highly-trained senior account managers and account managers that perform inside sales and other services.Clients in this division tend to be in a position where they: are selling enterprise products representing a complex sale have a direct sales force have lower transaction volume but higher total sales have limited partner involvement want maximum control of sales processWe have more than 100 clients in this division ranging from the big guys like IBM, Oracle and EMC to dozens of small and emerging technology companies…
  • Key Points: Position channels division as our fastest growing area. Reinforce that we can help a manufacturer beyond resale and contracting, and that we work with the manufacturer to run these programs based on their unique needs.As our Technology Sales division grew, we encountered clients who were driving a large percentage of their business through the channel. In many cases they were not as interested in adding us as a reseller because they were having trouble managing the ones they had. So we built our Government Channels division to help them make their public sector channel efforts more productive, including working with their partners to help them increase their sales. This is our fastest-growing division right now and, with our acquisition of a company called EC America in 2008, we are now the largest provider of government channel programs for technology manufacturers.The Government Channels Division develops very customized programs and uses a variety of business models to meet each manufacturer’s specific needs. We provide the necessary control, scalability, and consistency to manage complexity and remain in compliance with government regulations. We help make the manufacturer’s channel more efficient by managing the contract details, reporting on channel sales activities, and helping them train their partners. We also help them reward and protect their best resellers through reporting and support for deal registration programs.On the front end, we’re focused on growing the business by generating leads through sales and marketing activities that we turn over to partners.It’s a very interesting model, because many of the partners we work with in our Government Channels division are also competitors of our Technology Sales division. This forces us to maintain a strict separation within our systems and personnel. The partners have come to trust that we’re professional enough to protect their information and work together with them to grow their business for specific manufacturers.Manufacturers in this division tend to be in a position where they: are selling hardware or software have more commoditized products rely on a channel for their sales tend to be larger with an established public sector sales force have a higher public sector transaction volumeWe work with more than 60 hardware and software technology companies and more than 200 channel participants. These are companies like Symantec, Cisco, Juniper, and NetApp. In some cases, the partners might leverage our contracts to sell to the government. Right now we’re finding a lot of clients are looking for us to play the role of a “vertical value-added distributor” for the public sector. We’ve been doing that for McAfee and we were recently brought on to do that for companies like Brocade, Adobe, Citrix and Vbrick.The bottom line is we take our direction from the manufacturer and run the program the way they want us to.
  • Key Points: Quickly introduce the IT Solutions Group but do not spend much time on it with this audience.Our fourth division, IT Solutions, is a small IT services provider. This group provides IT planning, execution and support services to government agencies and commercial customers. They specialize in areas like: Cyber Security Information management Project managementWe have cleared IT consultants, forensics experts and PMP-certified project managers.This group can work with our clients if requested to help implement their product solutions within government agencies. They also team with clients or other services companies to act as a prime or subcontractor on specific opportunities.So they provide us with a professional IT solutions support capability as well as access to Top-secret and above people and facilities.This is the one part of our business that is not focused exclusively on the public sector. About half of their business comes from commercial clients like Fox News. We also do a significant amount of work with agencies like DHS.
  • Key Points: This completes the overview which describes how immixGroup earns its money. This final portion of the slide presents the additional services available from immixGroup, which can be leveraged by our clients or other companies on a one-off basis.These include:A team of market intelligence analysts that provide opportunity identification and trainingTraining and recruiting to help companies develop their public sector sales teams, andLeasing and financing programsIn summary, we can provide the resources that most manufacturers need – but don’t often have – when they are trying to grow and manage their business with the government.In all of our models, we are supporting the demand creator– whether that is the manufacturer or the partner.
  • Good morning everyone. For those of you who attended the civilian briefing, thanks for sticking around; for those of you who are just joining us for the DOD briefing, welcome. Thank you to everyone for spending your morning with us, the purpose of today’s presentation is to provide the IT product community with market intelligence around DOD’s IT budget, and to provide you with some actionable information about funded DOD opportunities.
  • To begin with, I’ll discuss some of the resources I utilized to put this presentation together, I’ll touch on some of the drivers affecting IT procurement in the coming year including budgets, sequestration, and relevant policies, then we’ll dive into a description of the IT landscape and programs within these 5 DOD organizations.
  • If the font size is too small on any of my slides here, don’t worry, you can follow along with the handouts you received coming in the door, and of course all of this information will be included in the Territory Planner that you’ll receive on your way out today. Important to note, the planner isn’t just a stack of slides that recaps what we cover today. The planner will include points of contact for each program, so this is definitely a valuable tool that can assist you in positioning yourself within DOD this year.
  • Also in the planner you’ll notice a list of upcoming DOD industry events. Hopefully today’s briefing will prepare you for discussions with your customers at these events.
  • I’d like to take a second to help you understand the methodology immixGroup’s Market Intelligence team utilizes to create these presentations. When government agencies submit their budget requests, the IT programs are organized into a collection of line items called Exhibit 53s. These line items give us a clear understanding of the funding each program will receive. For another level of granularity regarding IT requirements, we turn to the OMB documents called the Exhibit 300s. These documents provide the business case for why this initiative is necessary for the agency, and justifies why it should receive funding. Beyond these documents, our market intelligence team is constantly scouring government agency websites, and other resources like the IT Dashboard, FPDS, FedBizOpps, GAO Reports, and of course all of the industry rags. To stay plugged into the community, we’re attending industry events, and participating in relevant organizations and associations like ACT/IAC, AFCEA, NDIA, Tech America, and CGP. Additionally, our team constantly calls into Program Offices to develop a stronger grasp on how to match up customer needs with client competencies. Our efforts are extremely time consuming (with hundreds of man hours going into this presentation alone); but in the end, we are thrilled to provide our clients with this service, because the information we gather is product focused, and we offer unique and actionable intelligence that is relevant to you; providing insight on the opportunities you should attack to win more business, regardless of the budget climate.I wanted to refer back to the Exhibit 53s for just one moment. Our analysts take a programmatic approach to our research here at immixGroup, meaning that the opportunities I discuss later will not be contracts, they will not be PMOs, rather they will be major and funded programs of record listed on the exhibit 53. And when discussing these programs, you’ll hear me reference two different colors of money. The first is SS, which stands for Steady State. You may have heard of SS being referred to as OpEx money, which is basically used for operations and maintenance. The second color is DME, which stands for Development, Modernization, and Enhancement. You may have heard of DME being referred to as CapEx, or money for new IT investment. We generally feel that programs with the most DME funding offer the most opportunity for COTS vendors to sell into, but the lines between the two colors of money has gradually been fading over the years. Often times agencies will utilize OpEx money to fund tech refreshes, to fund infrastructure upgrades, or to beef up storage or cybersecurity. I think eventually we won’t have to recognize a divide between the two types of funds as budgets become more constrained and program managers are looking for more flexibility, but for the time being, it’s important to know the difference between the two.
  • http://www.actgov.org/knowledgebank/documentsandpresentations/Documents/Program%20Events/Innovation%20to%20Achieve%20the%20DoD%20Joint%20Information%20Environment%20-%20Rob%20Carey-DoD%2004-13-12.pdfI wanted to rattle off a few statistics about DOD that you may find interesting… I certainly did. The DOD has 1.4 million IT users on active duty plus an additional 1.1 million National Guard and Reserves and 750 thousand civilian personnel who are IT users. The US Military operates in over 600 thousand buildings in 150 countries. To support all of these users in all of these locations, DOD manages over 10,000 operational IT systems, nearly 800 data centers and 65,000 servers. There are currently 7 million laptop and desktop computers in use by the DOD, and nearly 300 thousand mobile devices managed by the agency. This is an IT environment with truly unparalleled size, scope, and complexity.
  • http://www.cio.gov/FY2013-IT.pdfhttp://www.usgovernmentspending.com/budget_pie_gs.phphttp://nlihc.org/article/house-and-senate-propose-fy13-budget-levelshttp://useconomy.about.com/od/usfederalbudget/p/Discretionary.htmhttp://www.federalnewsradio.com/130/2911052/Lockheed-CEO-warns-of-increased-government-costs-from-sequestration-http://thehill.com/blogs/defcon-hill/navy/214735-sequester-cuts-like-government-shutdown-for-pentagon-warns-admiralhttp://www.defensenews.com/article/20120614/DEFREG02/306140004/U-S-Sequestration-Won-8217-t-Happen-Levin-Predictshttp://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/memoranda/2012/m-12-13.pdfManaging all of those assets is not cheap. The DOD IT budget is only 7% of the total DOD budget, and only 1% of total Federal expenditures. But let’s be honest, 1% of $3.8 trillion is an enormous number, so we’re still dealing with huge amounts of money here. The $3.8 trillion in total Federal expenditures that will be spent in FY13, is about even with FY12 levels. Looking at discretionary spending last year, between the minibus and megabus appropriations, the government received $1.39 trillion in funding. Now, the Budget Control Act actually established a cap on FY12’s discretionary funding at $1.05 trillion, And the CR that was just passed approved discretionary spending at FY12 levels, so we’re again looking at $1.05 trillion for discretionary spending in FY13. Luckily, despite budget constraints over the last couple years, the IT budgets remained mostly in tact; but depending on what happens with sequestration… this might be the last year that even IT budgets are safe. The FY13 IT Budget request came in at $78.9 billion, which isn’t even a 1% reduction from prior year levels. And of that, DOD will take up $37.2 billion, which is not even a 3% decrease from last year’s levels. Getting a little more granular on the IT budget; nearly $25 billion of the DOD’s IT budget will be dedicated to Infrastructure or cybersecurity related investments.
  • Here is a 3 year view of the 3 services branches, plus DISA and MHS. As you can see, with the exception of DISA, IT budgets are now shrinking for the most part. In some cases, that is due to agencies realizing operational efficiencies and not needing the funds they once received. In other cases, policy and legislation are the driving forces behind shrinking budgets. OMB actually issued a mandate back in May requiring that agencies cut their IT budgets by 10% in 2014. Whether or not CIOs pay any attention to that mandate remains to be seen because OMB can only offer guidance and set policies… not create laws that agencies must abide by. But one law that is certain to affect IT budgets in the future is the sequestration component of the Budget Control Act. When looking at these numbers, keep in mind that all of the FY13 budget plans were made without considering the possibility of sequestration.
  • http://www.heritage.org/federalbudget/budget-control-acthttp://comptroller.defense.gov/defbudget/fy2013/FY2013_Budget_Request_Overview_Book.pdfhttp://www.bgov.com/news_item/hEr6OxfzrNvvQQPKfOIbGQIn case some of you are unfamiliar, I will do a quick review of what sequestration actually is. The Budget Control Act of 2011 mandated that Congress find $1.2 trillion in spending cuts over a 9 year period so that we could rein in our budget deficit as a nation. Some of you may recall the “supercommittee” that consisted of 12 congressmen whose purpose it was to create and pass a deficit reduction plan. As we all know, around this time last year, the supercommittee failed to come up with a deficit reduction bill, so this led to the triggering of automatic spending cuts across the board, this is what’s known as sequestration. As this graphic depicts, the largest share of cuts resulting from sequestration will come from defense spending. There is no shortage of speculation over what the specific ramifications of sequestration will be; but for the sake of time, I’ll try to be brief with my analysis: The total sequester is slated to be $1.2 trillion over 9 years beginning on January 2nd. The amount that will actually affect government programs totals $984 billion. DOD’s share of that is $492 billion. Carried out over 9 years, this means that DOD will be reducing its budget roughly $55 billion a year. As we saw a few slides ago, DOD’s FY13 base budget request was roughly $525 billion; so assuming sequestration occurs, DOD will instead be faced with a base budget of $470 billion, which is a 9% decrease.
  • http://www.bgov.com/news_item/hEr6OxfzrNvvQQPKfOIbGQAs we can see from this slide, to suggest that DOD is taking the largest hit of all agencies is no exaggeration. Publically, DOD representatives are claiming that all programs are subject to the same cuts across the board. Historically, IT budgets have remained secure despite budget cuts, and specifically, the IT Product space has been a bit of a haven in an otherwise tumultuous budget environment. Unfortunately, OMB Sequestration update last month did not offer any guidance suggesting that any budget is completely safe at this point, except for obligated funds. Obligated funds – that is to say old money that has been specifically marked to buy something or used for O&M – are not eligible for sequester. Thus I believe we can look for the three month period of October, November, and December to be a bit busier than normal, as program managers and contract officers try to obligate funds by purchasing new products so that their budgets will take less of a hit. Also, one other caveat to consider, is that the continuing resolution that passed in September approved funding to keep the government operating through March, but at FY12 spending levels. So any new program that was slated to begin in FY13 will be put on hold until an official budget is created, or in a more likely scenario, Congress continues to pass more CRs. So later on when I present the programs and opportunities in each agency, you’ll see that I list steady state and DME funds for both FY12 and FY13. The best way to plan for next year’s budgets is to ignore the FY13 numbers. Steady state will remain safe at FY12 levels, but for DME, you’ll need to subtract 9% from FY12 levels, and that is the funding the program will most likely receive. Now to put the CR and sequestration together in context; FY11 discretionary spending was $1.3 trillion. FY12 discretionary spending was $1.05 trillion, and the CR for FY13 approved us at FY12 levels: $1.05 trillion. Sequestration is going to knock 9% off of what the CR approved, so we’re looking at a discretionary spend of $956 billion for FY13, which, since 2011, is actually a reduction of 26%. Clearly, these cuts are going to lead to program realignments and contract modifications, which, truthfully, will lead to quite a bit of anxiety in the contracting community. The government will continue in its trend toward smaller procurements, incremental investments, and relying on Lowest Price Technically Acceptable as a procurement strategy. If you’ll recall last year’s budget briefing, the overarching theme was Cost Savings. The other major themes and drivers I discussed last year were cloud computing, telework, and cybersecurity. And when developing this years budget drivers and considering trends moving into FY13, I realized that not much had changed from last year. I think it’s a safe bet to assume that in the foreseeable future, cost savings will continue to be the overarching driver affecting IT procurement in the government, and key technologies will be related to cloud, telework, and cybersecurity. So rather than harp on the same topics, I’d like to talk for a minute about some of the policies and guidance offered by governing bodies that are shaping the way agencies procure technology.
  • http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/egov/digital-government/digital-government-strategy.pdfhttp://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/egov/digital-government/digital-government.htmlhttp://thehill.com/blogs/hillicon-valley/technology/166917-kundra-leaves-omb-with-mixed-recordhttp://www.informationweek.com/government/policy/report-cards-planned-for-federal-it-refo/229301134http://www.gao.gov/assets/600/590984.txthttp://www.nextgov.com/cio-briefing/2012/05/omb-exaggerated-25-point-plan-performance-gao-says/55916/As we all know, the nation’s first Federal CIO,VivekKundra, stepped down from his post back in June of 2011, just six months after releasing his 25 point plan to reform Federal IT Management. When Steven VanRoekel took the reins as the new Federal CIO in August of 2011, he aimed to continue the execution of his predecessor’s plan. The 25 point plan expired in June of this year, and the progress on its agenda was met with mixed reviews. VanRoekel believes that 19 of the 25 points had been completed (including added budget and management authority and flexibility for CIOs, deliverables for data center consolidation and cloud computing, and efforts to bolster IT project management and acquisition practices and workforces), while GAO sings a different tune – stating that progress on the 25 points has been ambiguous, at best. In December of 2011, GAO assessed just 10 of the 25 points and found that OMB had only 3 key action areas had been fully completed. VanRoekel responded by saying that the 25 point plan served its purpose by providing a shock to the system, and raising awareness of IT management reform, but GAO disagrees. In any case, with the expiration of the 25 point plan came the arrival of VanRoekel’s own IT management agenda, called the Digital Government Strategy. In it, VanRoekel notes that the Federal Government needs a Digital Strategy that embraces the opportunity to increase innovation with fewer resources, and enables businesses to leverage government data to improve the quality of services they provide to the American people. The Digital Strategy is a 12 month roadmap that proposes 10 pillars that fall under 4 major strategy principles.
  • http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/omb/egov/digital-government/digital-government.htmlhttp://radar.oreilly.com/2012/05/white-house-launches-new-digit.htmlhttps://www.fbo.gov/?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=af02219de6ae7d396d7961975ef02df2&tab=core&_cview=0Those principles are information centric, shared platform, customer centric, and security and privacy. VanRoekel and OMB seek to make data on IT spending and management open and available to the public. They plan to establish a shared services center and advisory group to allow specific agencies to focus their efforts and funds on developing innovative and unique solutions that other agencies are not duplicating. Also, the plan prompts agencies to move to enterprise wide asset management and procurement models. OMB notes that the government spends $1.2 billion a year on mobile and wireless services with an inventory of 1.5 million active accounts. Of course these numbers are only going to grow, so by moving to an enterprise model and adopting shared services the government can consolidate contracts to streamline the acquisition process. OMB has called for GSA to establish a government wide contract vehicle for mobile devices and wireless services by November of this year; and as a matter of fact GSA has complied, by releasing a Managed Mobility RFI back in August. By developing a conduit through which it can purchase mobile devices and services while consolidating existing contracts, OMB will improve the availability of government information to the general public for mobile use. Duplicative government websites will be curtailed, and paper based content will e translated to the web and optimized for modern platforms. Finally, the strategy called on DHS, DOD, and NIST to develop a government wide security baseline for mobile and wireless technologies. This includes integrating effective security measures into the design and adoption of all new technologies used by the federal government.
  • http://dodcio.defense.gov/Portals/0/Documents/ITMod/IT%20Modernization%20One%20Pager%20-%20Talking%20Points.pdfhttp://www.asmconline.org/2012/03/dods-it-modernization-plan-to-provide-more-efficient-and-effective-capabilities/Building on top of the Digital Government Strategy, DOD CIO Terri Takai has developed a DOD IT Modernization Plan to overcome the Department of Defense’s own information technology challenges. The plan outlines 3 major strategies implemented through 10 major points to enable a more agile, secure, efficient, and effective DOD IT environment. Taking queues from both VivekKundra and Steve Van Roekel, Takai notes that hundreds of data centers are underutilized, causing millions in unnecessary costs. Limited interoperability across services significantly reduces information sharing, and increased cybersecurity vulnerabilities threaten to endanger national security. Additionally, the current IT delivery process is hindering DOD’s ability to utilize new commercial technology, despite the increased demand for new software and evolving devices. Major programs of record are currently unable to meet warfighter needs because they lack the ability to acquire new technology in a timely fashion. So by following these 10 points, Takai plans to improve the way DOD procures and manages IT.
  • http://dodcio.defense.gov/Portals/0/Documents/ITMod/CIO%2010%20Point%20Plan%20for%20IT%20Modernization.pdfhttp://www.actgov.org/knowledgebank/documentsandpresentations/Documents/Program%20Events/Innovation%20to%20Achieve%20the%20DoD%20Joint%20Information%20Environment%20-%20Rob%20Carey-DoD%2004-13-12.pdfThe first three points concern the consolidation of infrastructure. Consolidating Enterprise networks will allow the agency to develop enterprise level guidance and policies for IT optimization and consolidation, and it will promote the use of centrally managed architectures that utilize standardized joint processes. Delivering Enterprise Cloud solutions across DOD will allow the agency to adopt a cyber secure and dependable enterprise cloud computing environment and develop relationships with trusted cloud providers by leveraging commercial clouds that meet cybersecurity requirements. By Standardizing IT Platforms the agency can minimize the number of program unique programs that exist, and provide governance around the modernization of old and adoption of new technologies that will create more efficient environments over time. DOD has begun its data center consolidation initiative to shrink its number of data centers from nearly 800 to under 100. Additionally it will limit network operations centers from 65 to 25, and it will also create joint information environment where all branches of the military can access the same network securely.
  • http://dodcio.defense.gov/Portals/0/Documents/ITMod/CIO%2010%20Point%20Plan%20for%20IT%20Modernization.pdfhttp://defensesystems.com/articles/2012/06/25/interview-mg-mark-bowman.aspxhttp://www.disa.mil/News/Conferences-and-Events/DISA-Mission-Partner-Conference-2012/~/media/Files/DISA/News/Conference/2012/DoD_ESI_JIE.pdfhttp://www.dodenterprisearchitecture.org/program/Documents/(U)%202012-05-01%20Cybercom%20EA%20Conf-%20RDML%20Lytle%20-%20clean.pdfSome important notes on the Joint Information Environment (or the JIE) – this is a high profile initiative across all of DOD. The agency recognizes that the warfighter expects and deserves secure access to information from anywhere at any time; so all branches of the military have made JIE a priority. It’s important to remember that JIE is a framework, or a construct that will be used to build common architectures across DOD to increase interoperability and efficiency. It is NOT a single network that will be shared, and it actually is not a program of record, so funding will come from current programs. The effort is led by a triumvirate consisting of DISA, USCYBERCOM, and the J-6. Rear Admiral David Simpson at DISA is taking the lead with the technical synchronization office to enable mobile information sharing capability across the service branches. General Alexander at USCYBERCOM is responsible for cyber command and control and establishing seamless secure access to data across the JIE. The Joint Staff J6 directorate was disbanded two years ago, but was resurrected back in January – placing Major General Mark Bowman at the helm for C4 operations and to provide functional expertise to shape the JIE. I actually spoke with General Bowman at an event last month, and he strongly believes that COTS solutions are the only way that a joint environment will ever be created across DOD. He also noted that in order to combat the growing threat of cybercrime within current budgets, COTS products are the only solution. So this is a bit of good news to temper the cloud of gloom and doom that budget constraints that is sort of looming over the industry. At present, the JIE’s focus is on strengthening governance to improve standardization, and to improve the effectiveness of enterprise architecture. DOD is currently looking to leverage strategic sourcing for commodity IT products, and to embed policies and oversight that promote information sharing. In the next year, DOD agencies will be focusing on application rationalization and standardization, as well as security architecture standardization and optimization so the road can be paved for eventual network consolidation to build the joint information enterprise architecture. Realizing the JIE means more secure information, faster delivery of capabilities to warfighters, and most important, lower costs for the DOD. And as the military establishes common IT infrastructures for US forces operating within the Future Mission Network, the opportunities for COTS vendors to show how they maximize value will increase.
  • http://dodcio.defense.gov/Portals/0/Documents/ITMod/CIO%2010%20Point%20Plan%20for%20IT%20Modernization.pdfhttp://www.disa.mil/News/Conferences-and-Events/DISA-Mission-Partner-Conference-2012/~/media/Files/DISA/News/Conference/2012/DoD_ESI_JIE.pdfhttp://www.esi.mil/LandingZone.aspx?zid=1We see this theme surfacing over and over again as we dive into IT requirements of programs and contracts for both civilian and DOD agencies. Using COTS solutions to create and leverage common networks and infrastructure platforms is an important focal point for all DOD entities, so keep that in mind as you develop your sales approach and messaging. Ms. Takai really wants DOD to become more responsive to DOD users’ IT needs, and utilizing interoperable systems will assist in that effort. The 10 point plan calls for a restructure of IT governance boards to improve on DOD IT strategy, compliance, and decision making processes, and it offers guidance around leveraging strategic sourcing to more efficiently procure hardware and software to strengthen the effectiveness of DOD IT purchases and to improve the agency’s enterprise architecture and security posture. Streamlining contracting processes for rapid task and delivery order execution will enable the adoption of a more agile approach to IT development and management. To achieve this vision, DOD will lean more heavily on enterprise agreements for COTS solutions (like the Enterprise Software Initiative, or ESI) in order to reduce the agency’s total cost of ownership. Since DOD has begun utilizing the ESI contract in 2004, the agency has realized over $4 billion in cost avoidance, and has improved overall IT asset visibility of product manufacturers. ESI has established over 80 agreements with nearly 50 software manufacturers, and has become a leader in management of enterprise COTS agreements.
  • http://dodcio.defense.gov/Portals/0/Documents/ITMod/CIO%2010%20Point%20Plan%20for%20IT%20Modernization.pdfThe final strategy outlined in Takai’s DOD Modernization plan is to Strengthen the Workforce, primarily through modernizing IT guidance and training. Offering guidance to DOD employees on adoption of agile IT will assist in incorporating best practices and developing a robust IT acquisition community. Through training on agile IT methodology, strategic sourcing, and IT acquisition best practices, the DOD workforce will better understand how to procure IT products and services in a more efficient and effective manner. Now that we’ve covered some of the guidance coming from the Federal CIO and from the DOD CIO that will affect IT procurement, let’s take a closer look at some of the DOD agencies.
  • And we’ll start off looking at the Air Force. The Air Force operates 178 bases around the world, 159 domestically.
  • http://www.af.mil/information/afchain/index.asphttp://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2012/07/air-force-spencer-vice-chief-073112/http://blog.chron.com/txpotomac/2012/08/sen-john-cornyn-receives-pentagon-assurances-on-sex-scandal-allows-new-air-force-chief-of-staff-nominee-to-receive-a-vote/http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2012/07/air-force-spencer-vice-chief-073112/http://fedscoop.com/marion-to-be-air-force-space-command-cto/http://www.airforcetimes.com/news/2012/07/airforce-welsh-testimony-new-chief-of-staff-071912/http://defense.aol.com/2012/08/08/air-force-is-slowly-going-out-of-business-service-stands-on/http://www.stripes.com/news/budget-breakdown-air-force-1.134830http://www.infosecisland.com/blogview/21066-Air-Force-Vice-Commander-Everyone-is-Focused-on-Cyber.htmlThe Air Force’s budget will be cut 4% in FY13, which Chief of Staff General Welsh says is “simply not executable.” Included in the cuts will be the removal of 5,100 Air National Guard, 900 Reserve, and 3,900 Active Duty personnel and the retiring of 227 aircraft. There will still be heavy investment in long range bombers, military construction for Airmen living in Japan will increase, the Air Force will purchase 2 new satellites, and 19 more Joint Strike Fighter Jets. In terms of personnel, Bill Marion left Air Combat Command in May, and took over as CTO of SPACECOM in early July. General Norton Schwartz stepped down and General Welsh replaced him as Chief of Staff.There has been an enormous amount of change out at the ESC and to all of the PEOs, but I’ll discuss that in a bit.The CIO/A6unit led maintains responsibility of setting policy and governance oversight for all Air Force Information Technology. General Lord retired in August of this year, and was replaced by GeneralBasla, who has noted that cybersecurity and migration to the AFNET will be his main areas of focus over FY13.
  • General Basla will have an IT budget of about $5.7 billion to work with in FY13, which is a 14% decrease from FY12 levels. IT programs within the Air Force will see a 7.5% decrease in funding as well. You keep hearing me talk about budget cuts, but I don’t want to cause panic here. When I’m out at industry events like ACT/IAC acquisition excellence, or AFCEA industry days, or doing TechAmerica interviews, I hear a lot of perceived anxiety over budget cuts. When budgets are strained, program managers,contract specialists, andadministrators tend to act a bit more conservatively, so you may sense a bit of hesitance or reluctance on their part to purchase new products. But at the end of the day, no matter what the budget environment is, every federal agency still needs to complete its missions. I contend that it’s the product manufacturers with the ability to show they can increase efficiency and save money in the short term who are in a good place, because these cuts that we’re seeing are being brought about by a need to eliminate redundancy and unneeded expenditures. Some of the efficiency objectives the Air Force set to accomplish in FY13 include: Adopting enterprise-provided services (including enterprise e-mail), Consolidating Data Centers, Collapsing AF Gateways/Use DoD security boundaries, providing infrastructure services, Centrally Control IT Purchases, Adopt Unified Communications & Collaboration solutions, Creating organizational efficiencies, and Commercial SATCOM consolidation. So these are initiatives that you can build solutions and messaging around when you approach your customer.
  • http://defensesystems.com/articles/2012/07/24/interview-maj-gen-craig-olson.aspxhttp://www.af.mil/information/bios/bio.asp?bioID=7883http://www.gunter.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-120312-045.pdfThis slide depicts the organizational structure of the Air Force with respect to the headquarter functions and the MAJCOMs. The HQ functions are shown along the left side and the major AF commands are shown across the top and along the right side with an additional level of detail for the commands that may offer the most opportunities for COTS vendors in the middle. As I mentioned, there have been some organizational changes at the Electronic Systems Center (ESC) within the AF Materiel Command. In September of last year, Lt. General Charles Davis assumed command of ESC at Hanscom AFB and the PEO structure within ESC was realigned. After that, there were four PEOs instead of five under ESC. These Program Executive Offices included the PEO for Battle Management lead by Ron Mason and the PEO for Theater Command and Control lead by Steven Wert. These two PEOs included a portfolio of IT programs associated with mission planning and warfighting while the PEO for Business and Enterprise IT Systems lead by Brig Gen Craig Olson included more of the business, ERP, and logistics type programs. PEO EIS and ELS were consolidated to form PEO BES. And finally PEO C3I & Networks, lead by Lt. Gen Charles Davis, includes the IT programs for networking and data links. However, in May of this year, General Davis announced that he was moving to the Pentagon to the Secretary’s office in an Acquisition capacity, and this is just the first of several more changes to come. On October 1, 2012, Air Force Materiel Command was officially restructured from 12 centers to five (including the elimination of the ESC), and where there had previously been a 3 star commanding officer, the new PEO heads are 2 stars. The restructure is one of several efficiency initiatives across the air force to save on overhead while preserving mission capability. Materiel Command now consists of the Air Force Test Center at Edwards Air Force Base; the Air Force Nuclear Weapons Center at Kirtland AFB; the Air Force Sustainment Center at Tinker AFB; and the Air Force Research Laboratory and the Air Force Life Cycle Management Center, both at Wright-Patterson AFB.
  • http://washingtontechnology.com/articles/2012/10/12/af-materiel-command-new-initiative.aspx?s=wtdaily_151012http://www.gunter.af.mil/events/businessandenterprisesystems/index.aspThis org chart represents the new PEO organization. On July 25th, General Olson announced that he’ll be leaving PEO BES to take over PEO C3IN for General Davis. Moving forward, the C3IN Directorate will be responsible for integrating cyber capabilities across all Air Force programs, according to a June 18th letter from Air force Secretary Michael Donley. Not only is General Olson is replacing General Davis to oversee the programs run out of Hanscom, but the 3 PEOs that were at Hanscom will be consolidated into 2 (Battle Management and Theater C2 will be consolidated into Battle Management along side of C3IN). Furthermore, the BES will move to Gunter Annex, AL on Maxwell AFB, and as of August 15th, that Directorate will be overseen by ShofShofner. Most of the remaining ESC staff functions will be consolidated under the lifecycle management center at Wight Patterson AFB. So the takeaway here is that, Olson, Lombardi, and Shofner at Battle Management, C3N, and BES respectively will be your PEOs to focus on moving forward; because these are the guys purchasing all new infrastructure and cyber integration systems.
  • Looking more closely at SPACECOM, it’s headed up by 4 star General Shelton in Colorado Springs. Within SPACECOM, you’ll want to direct your attention to the Communications & Information Directorate where Brig General Ian Dickenson was recently replaced by Col Kevin Wooten, who now oversees infrastructure projects with General Shelton at Peterson AFB. Also at Peterson are the Requirements Directorate and the Plans, Programs & Analysis Directorate. The 24th air force or CYBERCOM controls cybersecurity initiatives out of Lackland AFB and the AF Network Integration Center in Scott AFB is basically in charge of communications across the AF managing the AFNet evolution. One other recent personnel change is that Bill Marion became the Chief Technology Officer of SPACECOM back in July.
  • http://www.bgov.com/news_item/2QDhHSESEMCs0I_le_gIsAhttp://www.bgov.com/news_item/lx4qwE-7r7EY15uacHnK1QThis slide represents the Air Force cyber components and relationships between USCYBERCOM and the 24th Air Force which is headquartered in Lackland AFB, TX and establishes, operates, maintains and defends AF networks and conducts full-spectrum operations in cyberspace. As I said earlier, Cybersecurity is among General Basla’s top priorities – and in fact, the Air Force has spent more than any other defense agency over the last 5 years, totaling over $2.4 billion in cybersecurity contract awards during that time, and $620 in 2011 alone. The 24th Air Force is comprised of the 624th Operations Center and three operational space wings. As far as the specific missions and functions, the 624th Conducts cyber C2, mission assurance, operational planning. One recent change of note is that the 3rd combat communications group was disbanded, so now only the 5th remains under the 689th combat communications wing. The Air Force has had quite a few cyber threats of note; all of last year they were dealing with fake AF Portal websites designed to steal user login info, and other AF websites have been hacked. The 624th informed personnel of the activity, communicated with google so they would disable the fake websites from appearing in search rankings, and they worked to restore security to their sites. Big priorities in FY12 and 13 for the 24th are the Big Cs: Capacity, Capability, and Collaboration.
  • http://www.afspc.af.mil/pressreleasearchive/story.asp?id=123302007Here is a look at the Air Force MAJCOMS and some of the other relevant IT organizations. At the beginning of this presentation, I noted that $25 billion of the DOD’s IT budget will be dedicated to Infrastructure or cybersecurity related investments. If you sell products related to Infrastructure or cybersecurity, you’ll likely want to focus 4 particular areas: the A6 in DC to discuss the policy and guidance perspective, SPACECOM at Peterson AFB because that’s where the funding is flowing into, the 24th Air Force (also known as Air Force CYBERCOM) at Lackland because that’s where the requirements are coming from, and up until recently, the ESC at Hanscom AFB is where the procurement has taken place – the focus there really will have shifted to the Lifecycle Management Center within Materiel Command at Wright Patterson, but I’ll tell you more about that in just a second. Also of note is the AFNIC, which is located at Peterson with SPACECOM, and that is where new IT products are evaluated.
  • http://www.informationweek.com/news/government/mobile/232900371Now that we’ve covered budgets and relevant organizational landscapes, let’s look at some of the drivers affecting the Air Force relevant to IT Products. As I just mentioned, with more and more budget cuts looming, the Air Force is concerned with eliminating redundancy and increasing efficiency. To do that, policies are being implemented and investments are being made to design and implement architecture and infrastructure that will allow for information exchange and support mobile computing, so cybersecurity protocols are being put in place to protect the data being shared.Interoperability is really the driving force behind the majority of the Air Force’s infrastructure investments right now… the agency needs to create infrastructures that allow applications to talk to each other across multiple platforms, that have traditionally been stove piped. The agency will also have to design and move to an entirely new client architecture beginning in 2014 to support 80% of AF users with virtual desktop infrastructure. AF will be investing in nearly 3,000 iPads to be used as a flight management and reference device for flight crew members, which compliments a $10 million AF Mobility Command contract awarded in March for 18,000 ipads. The agency seeks to support 9,000 users on its unclassified network, and an additional 6,000 users on the classified network at Scott AFB. DISA operated data centers would then centrally store user profile information, stream individual applications based on users’ security groups, and support unified communications.
  • This slide represents the IT capability paradigm shift at the air force. All of the agency’s programs currently build on mission capabilities, which are built on top of disparate infrastructures, on top of a network. This leads to significant redundancy, and program requirements that are not aligned. By creating an integrated and interoperable platform that supports its programs, the air force allows end to end performance and eliminates the limitations of silos.
  • http://www.misawa.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123297041One example of the progress toward interoperability is AFNet, which is the Air Force’s solution to eliminate multiple independent networks and centralizing control into a single Air Force wide network. Right now, the agency has over 100 service delivery points that are not standardized, that are difficult to defend, and that are redundant and costly.
  • http://www.fiercegovernmentit.com/story/air-force-will-audit-systems-it-has-rather-erps-it-wants/2012-04-19?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internalBy migrating to AFNet, the Air force will make the network easier and more convenient for users. Network infrastructure opportunities will be awarded throughout 2013 supporting this initiative, as multiple bases migrate their networks. Now, as I proceed into the opportunities section and discuss major funded programs within the Air Force, you’ll notice that I will continue with the focus on infrastructure, networking, and security related programs, and I do not cover any of their ERP systems. I will go into more detail later about the plight of DOD’s failed business systems, but suffice it to say that the Air Force has struggled immensely with its Expeditionary Combat Support System (or ECSS) and its Defense Enterprise Accounting and Management System (or DEAMS). They have struggled so much, that despite years of development and millions of investment dollars, Jamie Morin, the Air Force Comptroller, has already decided to utilize legacy systems to achieve audit readiness by 2014, rather than implementing ECSS and DEAMS and risk failure. So that being said, let’s move forward and discuss the viable opportunities within Air Force this year.
  • http://www.dote.osd.mil/pub/reports/FY2009/pdf/af/2009cits.pdfI wanted to take a second to talk about the Combat Information Transport System (or CITS) which is really a family of programs that incorporate a variety of COTS items that have to be integrated to allow the Air Force to carry out its required missions. CITS capabilities are critical to the AFNetOps Commander’s ability to centrally defend, operate and manage the Air Force component of the Defense Information Infrastructure. The tools implemented by the CITS program defend the Air Force network and mission critical information against attack and unauthorized access, identify and repair network vulnerabilities, and continually scan the Air Force network for unusual activity. These tools counter threats to Air Force networks and mission critical information. CITS also provides capabilities that allow remote management of network devices and servers from centralized locations, alert technicians of outages and enable remote troubleshooting and repair. The CITS program also installs robust transport infrastructure required to centrally manage and defend the Air Force network and meet increasing demand for high-speed network access that provides the data, video and imagery required for Air Force operations. CITS also fields high-speed wireless networking technology required by modern weapons systems such as the F-22A and numerous mission support systems that require wireless networking to provide timely, flexible support to the warfighting mission. CITS has recently been restructured into two ACAT I AC programs (Information Transport System (ITS) and Air Force Intranet (AFNET) and multiple ACAT III programs. Each of these programs is reported separately in the Exhibit 53s and 300s.
  • http://www.itdashboard.gov/investment?buscid=906http://www.kmimediagroup.com/files/MIT%2013-7_NETCENTS(1).pdfhttp://www.generaldynamics.com/news/press-releases/detail.cfm?customel_dataPageID_1811=8802http://harris.com/view_pressrelease.asp?act=lookup&pr_id=3163http://www.boozallen.com/about/doingbusiness/contract-vehicles/agency-macs/netcentsThe first program under CITS I wanted to talk about is the Information Transport System, Increment 1. ITS Increment 1 installs Active Duty and Reserve base network backbone infrastructure that is required to meet demand for high-speed network access that provides the data, video and imagery supporting Air Force operations. It also provides a standard infrastructure allowing the 24th Air Force Commander to centrally manage and defend the Air Force network. ITS designs, installs and sustains high-speed network backbones using industry standard design methodologies and installation principles which eliminates design flaws, like single points of failure, which occur as a result of patch-work network design and implementation. ITS Increment 1 provides base network infrastructure that closes network performance gap identified by the Mission Needs Statement and Operational Requirements Document to meet network bandwidth, survivability and performance standards. During FY11 and 12, infrastructure upgrades were accomplished at 4 bases in Europe and the US, and FY13 will see infrastructure upgrades completed at Hurburt Field FL, Malmstrom AFB, Creech AFB, and Mountain Home AFB. Without these required upgrades, bases will not be able to share data or meet throughput and reliability requirements. The program spent nearly $50 million in FY12, and will spend over $32 million in FY13. All contracts in support of this program are awarded through NETCENTS – of course we are all aware that the NETCENTS contract is a $10.5 billion ID/IQ originally awarded to 8 contractors in 2004 to provide products and services to allow the Air Force to ensure interoperability and keep up with the evolution of technology. NETCENTS’s contracting period was recently extended to March 31st of 2013, as the release schedule of NETCENTS II has been delayed. General Dynamics initially won an award off of NETCENTS in 2005 to support ITS to provide lifecycle logistic support and unified communication technical assistance. In 2011, Harris Corporation was awarded an $11 million IT Communication Systems Upgrade Contract under NETCENTS to support ITS, and Booz Allen Hamilton was also awarded a contract off of NETCENTS to provide certification and accreditation support for the ITS program between 2004 and 2015.http://www.itdashboard.gov/investment?buscid=909http://www.generaldynamics.com/news/press-releases/detail.cfm?customel_dataPageID_1811=14312http://harris.com/view_pressrelease.asp?act=lookup&pr_id=3163http://netcentsii.com/http://www.saffm.hq.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-100128-066.pdfAFNet Increment 2 enables the 24th Air Force to remotely defend and operate the AF enterprise. It implements the base level layer of the network defense to protect critical information against unauthorized access and safeguards its infrastructure. This assists in consolidating the fragmented Air Force network and allows for the single network infrastructure to be centrally protected and operated. By the end of FY13, all technical requirements and engineering solutions to update the base network boundaries will have taken place. Funds will be utilized in FY13 to repair and replace end of life equipment, renew enterprise software licenses, and maintain base network boundary capabilities. Once this program has reached full operating capability, funding will transition to base information infrastructure funding. It will spend over $34 million in FY12 and over $50 million in FY13, and will spend nearly $2 billion between 2011 and 2017. General Dynamics won a delivery order off of NETCENTS back in 2003 when AFNET was still under the CITS umbrella to provide system and network engineering and hardware and software support in the redesign of the Air Force’s NIPRNET and SIPRNET Architectures. Also, Harris Corporation won an additional contract off of NETCENTS to provide communications systems upgrades in support of the program. Pending awards on NETCENTS 2, GD and Harris will likely remain services contractors supporting the AFNET program.
  • http://www.itdashboard.gov/investment?buscid=922http://www.saffm.hq.af.mil/shared/media/document/AFD-100128-066.pdfThe Air Force Intranet Increment 3 consolidates MAJCOM-centric network domains into a single AF-centric domain that allows the 24 Air Force Commander to centrally defend, operate and manage the Air Force Component of the Defense Information Infrastructure. AFNET Inc 3 also updates each fixed base Network Control Center (NCC) to replace obsolete network equipment that supports core network services at each base. This program closes capability gaps identified by the Air Force Operational Requirements Board to establish a standardized hardware and software configuration for all core network services across the Air Force. By the end of FY13, AFNET Increment 3 funds will be used to repair and replace equipment that is beyond end-of-life, renew enterprise software licenses and maintain the existing base network control centers. Looking at all three increments, the first phase established unclassified network gateways that increased reliability, performance, and security of the Air Force’s unclassified network enterprise. Phase 2 will update and simplify the SIPRNet to improve reliability and performance and increase overall security. In FY13, Phase 3 will maintain existing base network control centers and consolidate infrastructure to support the single Air Force Network. Network migrations were accomplished at 40 locations in FY12, and another 29 locations will be accomplished in FY13. This phase of the program will spend nearly $15 million in FY12 and over $23 million in FY13.
  • Now, moving on to the Army
  • http://www.militaryaerospace.com/articles/print/volume-23/issue-3/news/trends/the-incredible-shrinking-budget-for-us-military-technology-research.htmlhttp://www.army.mil/article/74955/Shrinking_construction_budget_supports_key_projects/http://www.armytimes.com/news/2012/02/defense-spec-ops-to-grow-as-pentagon-budget-shrinks-020812/http://www.armytimes.com/news/2012/02/dn-2013-army-budget-calls-for-more-program-cuts-021312/http://www.federaltimes.com/article/20120327/ACQUISITION03/203270303/http://www.army.mil/article/85314/NETCOM_changes_command/Here is a look at Army’s total budget request and some top level contacts. As you can see, Army’s total budget will be dropping 9% in FY13 to about $185 billion. To save money, Army plans to acquire fewer aircraft and ships over the next several years. Troop pay raises and Veterans’ health benefits will be limited; and military construction budgets have been hacked by 30%. Also on the chopping block are costly aerospace and weapons systems, like the Global Hawk surveillance drone, the Defense weather satellite, and the Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System. Seven other programs related to weapons systems will be eliminated, saving the Army $5 billion over the next 5 years, and a list of those programs will be included in the territory planner. All in all, Army plans to shrink contract spending 38% to $14 billion in FY13. Thankfully for all of us, Army is not planning to make drastic across the board cuts, and in fact is investing more in some areas. Despite Research, Development, Testing, and Evaluation budgets dropping 14% DOD wide over the last 2 years, the Army will actually see an increase in RDT&E of 2% to almost $9 billion. And while the IT budget will remain relatively flat in FY13, there is an agency wide push to invest more heavily in COTS products to help the agency increase efficiencies and cost savings.Personnel wise, Lt. Gen. Jeffrey Sorenson stepped down as Army CIO in November 2010. Deputy CIO Mike Krieger assumed position of Acting CIO until March of 2011, at which point Major General Lawrence stepped in. General Lawrence had previously served as Commanding General, NETCOM at Ft. Huachuca. As the Army CIO/G-6, Lawrence reports directly to the Secretary of the Army for setting strategic direction and objectives, and supervises all Army C4 (command, control, communications, and computers) and IT functions. As the G-6, Lawrence supports the Chief of Staff of the Army in performing information management, network operations (including computer network defense), force structure, and the equipping and employment of signal forces.  When she first took office, Lawrence stated that “Right now, the network is the Army’s number one modernization effort. We want a network that can provide Soldiers and civilians information of all categories and forms, as well as a means to collaborate in real-time, at the exact moment required, in any environment, under all circumstances.”  Then last year at land war net, she mentioned that “the first and most important thing is that we're going to build a single, secure, standard-based network.” These two statements really summarize the direction that the Army is headed, and what is influencing IT purchases over the next several years.  Gen Raymond Odierno was sworn in as Chief of Staff on September 7, 2011. He was second in command to Gen. Petraeus from late 2006 to early 2008, as U.S. troops poured into Iraq to tamp down the escalating violence. He took over as the top commander in September 2008 and was responsible for the start of the U.S. withdrawal from Iraq; but has been a huge advocate of incrementally drawing our forces back, not making rash decisions to slash troop numbers just to rein in the defense budget.
  • http://defensesystems.com/articles/2011/02/15/army-fiscal-2012-budget.aspxAs we just saw, Army’s overall budget will shrink 9%. IT budgets will remain mostly in tact, decreasing by less than 1%. Even with consecutive annual decreases, the Army remains the largest IT budget in both DOD and Civilian agencies.  Last year, DoD asked the armed services to find over $100 billion in efficiencies over the next 10 years, with the Army’s portion coming in around $26B. In FY 2012, Army found $2.6B in savings while still managing to keep budgets at respectable levels. In the coming year, the Army will be saving money through reductions in its active force, a 10% reduction in funds to support contractor costs, and a freeze in the civilian workforce to FY10 levels. I contend that the military and Congress both are placing a greater emphasis on the cost effectiveness and value of IT products systems, which is why IT budgets have remained consistent. Like I said before, the bad news is for the defense and services contractors is that tangible items, like weapons systems, because they have become targets for cuts. But IT products are still widely viewed as cost savers, so that’s the good news here.
  • http://www.army.mil/info/organization/This org chart represents Army from the HQ level. You can see that these offices are broken into Commands, Reporting Units, and Service Component Commands that all report up to the Secretary. Other components like ARCYBER and PEOs support the Chief of Staff.
  • http://ciog6.army.mil/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=ayfO1U7VONY%3d&tabid=36http://ciog6.army.mil/ArmyCIOG6Earns3rdStar/tabid/115/Default.aspxAs I mentioned earlier, Army’s G-6 is headed up by 3 star Susan Lawrence who oversees 5 component offices and indirectly manages 2 others. Major Gen. Steven Smith in the cybersecurity office says he will regularly meet with his counterparts in the Marines and other services to figure out how to share certified products more easily. Vendors say the process they have to go through to get on these certified lists is inconsistent, difficult and expensive. Smith says DoD recognizes the challenges and wants to increase collaboration among the services. The take home about the G-6 is they want to know your capability and how it saves them money day to day. Remember that they shape the policy and direction of the Army, so if you can get executive support by showing your value, that’s what’s important.
  • http://defensesystems.com/microsites/2012/peo-eis-catalog/command-group.aspxNow there are a number of relevant IT insertion points within the Army, and I have included many of them in this presentation, but given time constraints I’ll just touch briefly on them. All of this information will of course also be included in the planner. I’m sure you’re familiar with a number of program executive offices within the army. The most important one for you to be familiar with is PEO-EIS, which actually manages 40% of the Army’s IT procurement. Doug Wiltse is the Program Executive Officer, and I actually received an email from him about 3 weeks ago stating that there will be a new Biometrics office that will oversee the BEC and JPI programs, headed up by Col Sandy Vann Olejaaz. PEO EIS has its own CIO and G-6 – and it’s important to note that Hari Bezwada pulls a lot of weight in this PEO. The ERP component oversees several programs, including GCSS, LMP, GFEBS, IPPS, and IMS.
  • http://www.army.mil/article/46012/Army_establishes_Army_Cyber_Command/http://www.afcea.org/signal/signalscape/index.php/2011/08/25/13271/http://www.shephard.co.uk/news/digital-battlespace/landwarnet-2011-us-army-detail-cyber-vision-2020/9814/http://www.dodlive.mil/index.php/2011/08/u-s-army-blogger-roundtable-landwarnet-conference/http://www.fortgordonsignal.com/news/2011-08-19/News_Update/Army_Cyber_Command_focuses_on_protecting_vital_net.htmlhttp://www.belvoireagle.com/index.php/news-articles/arcyber_gathers_for_town_hall_at_belvoir/http://defensesystems.com/articles/2010/10/15/cyber-defense-army-cyber-command.aspxhttp://www.arcyber.army.mil/news-arcyber.htmlhttps://secureweb2.hqda.pentagon.mil/VDAS_ArmyPostureStatement/2011/information_papers/PostedDocument.asp?id=256http://federalsoup.federaldaily.com/forum_posts.asp?TID=38389&PID=418202http://www.afcea.org/signal/signalscape/index.php/2011/08/25/13271/http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yDrF8vACA5ohttp://www.disa.mil/news/pressresources/factsheets/go.htmlhttps://secureweb2.hqda.pentagon.mil/vdas_armyposturestatement/2010/information_papers/Cyber_Operations.asphttps://secureweb2.hqda.pentagon.mil/VDAS_ArmyPostureStatement/2011/information_papers/PostedDocument.asp?id=266Now taking a look at ARCYBER, which is located at Ft. Meade and was stood up in October of 2010. It has 14 component offices and 2 subordinate commands, including NETCOM out of Ft. Huachuca and INSCOM at Ft. Belvoir. I saw General Hernandez speak at TechNet last week, and the crowd had some interesting questions for him. He noted that ARCYBER’s basic responsibility is to maintain the Army’s freedom to operate its networks, and that he doesn’t measure success by protecting the networks from 100% of the attacks, because that’s impossible. DOD receives 50 thousand threats via email a month, and it’s impossible to keep up with every single attack. They measure success in the development and execution of a plan that will at least mitigate risk for the majority of the network.
  • http://fedscoop.com/u-s-cyber-command-names-policy-director/http://www.army.mil/info/organization/unitsandcommands/commandstructure/netcom/NETCOM’s focus is on achieving a Joint, Interagency and Multinational network enterprise. As I mentioned, it is based in Ft. Huachuca, but has elements in Arlington and Ft. Belvoir as well. Just in June, General Lynn took over as Commanding General of NETCOM, as General Napper was named the Director of Plans and Policy for USCYBERCOM.
  • The Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology (or ASALT) is an acquisition shop that houses all of the Army’s PEOs, except for PEO EIS of course.
  • http://www.rdecom.army.mil/EDCG%20Telecoms/APPROVED%20(Signed)_%20AMC%20Strategic%20Plan%202013-2020.pdfhttp://www.army.mil/article/27982/DOIM_takes_new_name_but___039_mission_has_not_changed__039_/Army Materiel Command (or AMC) houses the contract shops for the Army, and is based out of Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, after moving from Ft. Belvoir during a BRAC in 2005. AMC was established in 1962 with the mission of supporting the warfighter, and today is a technology leader in the military; procuring not just bullets, guns, helmets, and helicopters, but IT systems, cybersecurity products, and software development tools. AMC works in collaboration with ASALT and TRANSCOM to provide end to end lifecycle management and sustainment of systems and equipment, as well as transportation and distribution services. AMC recently released its strategic plan for 2013 to 2020. It specifically points out that the Directorate of Information Management (or DOIM)’s transition to Network Enterprise Centers (NECs) was a change in name back in 2009, but not in function, and moving forward, it will also change where they report into. The NECs belonged to the 93rd signal Brigade out of Ft. Eustis, VA, but will now be managed under ARCYBER in Ft. Belvoir. This move is aligned with the Army’s transformation to an enterprise focus to achieve the network of 2020 and to obtain a “future operating environment” that can anticipate the needs of the warfighter.There are 3 very important components within AMC to the IT community. The first of which is the Aviation and Missile Command or AMCOM, based in Huntsville, which ensures the Army’s aviation and missile systems are technologically superior, affordable, and always ready. Second is the Communications Electronics Command or CECOM, which is housed at Aberdeen and supports and sustains C4ISR and information systems for the joint warfighter. Third, is the Tank Automotive and Armaments Command, or TACOM, out of Warren Michigan which develops, acquires, fields, and sustains ground systems for the warfighter.
  • Here is a map of the IT insertion points I just covered. NETCOM is out in Ft Huachuca, Materiel Command is in Huntsville, while ARCYBER and PEO EIS reside in Ft. Belvoir, Army G-6 and ASALT are in DC, and PEOs C3T and IEWS are located in Aberdeen.
  • So when considering IT drivers for the Army, I couldn’t help but to begin with budget cuts. Looking at different colors of money on the top line items, we can see that DME (or CapEx) will drop by 12%, while Steady State (or OpEx) funds will actually increase by 12%. This would indicate to me that Army is not prepared to invest much in procurement of new IT systems or enterprise licenses this year.Especially operating under a CR for the first half of the year; I would not expect the Army to begin any new programs, or make any large purchases of brand new hardware or software, unless you can prove to them that your product saves them money in the near term. Looking at the bottom line items, these represent pools of funds that the Army delegates for specific types of investments, and as you can see, now that we’re pulling out of Afghanistan and Iraq, the JIEDDO fund is nearly eliminated, total O&M funds and BRAC funds are nearly cut in half, and multiple other investments will feel the pinch just as badly.
  • http://www.fiercegovernmentit.com/story/key-dod-erps-8-billion-over-budget-say-auditors/2012-07-18?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internalhttp://www.fiercegovernmentit.com/story/gfebs-will-likely-go-over-budget-says-dod-oig/2012-03-28http://defensesystems.com/articles/2011/11/15/defense-it-1-army-enterprise-resource-planning.aspxhttp://defensesystems.com/articles/2012/09/06/project-manager-view-col-patrick-burden.aspx?s=ds_170912http://www.federalnewsradio.com/394/3051486/DoD-applies-tighter-scrutiny-to-business-IT-spendingThe sentiment around DOD’s Business Systems has been shifting from a positive outlook, to a gloomy one. DOD utilized nearly 2,300 business systems, and in FY12 requested over $17 billion for IT infrastructure and business systems.  There were over 500 legacy systems that were supposed to be consolidated to improve data sharing and efficiency, thus cutting costs. Unfortunately, a report released this July by DOD’s inspector general stated that 6 of the DOD’s 10 key ERPs are already over budget by $8 billion and some are as much as 12 years behind schedule. Another report just a couple weeks ago announced that DOD managers of business IT systems will be under tighter scrutiny when requesting funding for their systems as a result of the constant issues the ERPs have caused recently. Moving forward, investment review boards will not just examine spending for new systems under development, but the new process will now monitor and pass judgment on any funding request over $1 million over 5 years; whether it’s a request of steady state or DME dollars. One of Army’s major ERPs, the General Fund Enterprise Business System (or GFEBS) is the service’s web enabled financial, asset, and accounting management system that is supposed to account for over $140 billion in annual spending. GFEBS is supposed to replace over100 Army legacy accounting and financial systems and become one of the biggest ERP systems in the world. In March of this year, the DOD inspector general recommended that the Army should halt the rollout of GFEBS because the system will not resolve any long standing material weaknesses, and it will most certainly run over budget and out of time. But the Army is doing no such thing. In fact, GFEBS Program Manager Col Patrick Burden said last month that the system has been fully deployed and can currently produce auditable reports. He also noted that the Inspector General and GAO reports that blasted GFEBS were based on out dated information and were off base. What this should tell you is that personnel DOD wide, and specifically in the Army, will be sensitive to criticisms of their business systems, and they may soon be on the lookout for band aids to fix the wound left from its troubled and failed ERP systems.
  • http://www.army.mil/article/64268/The Army is striving to create a single, secure, and standards based network that is reliable and enables global collaboration. At Land War Net last year, General Hernandez and General Lawrence addressed the Army’s strategic vision for the network of 2020. They stated that 80% of the Army is CONUS based, so the there will be an increased focus on stateside network infrastructure.  They also mentioned that their largest challenge is dealing with 15,000 different networks, because it stands in the way of information sharing and collaboration. To create a single network environment, ARCYBER and Army G-6 will be working together to clean up applications, determine what applications are relevant, and identify the services and data that soldiers need the most. Initiatives that the Army will need support from COTS vendors will be migrating enterprise exchange email, data center consolidation, enterprise collaboration initiatives, and creating a common operation environment.The new network will allow soldiers to utilize a single ID worldwide, it will enable expeditionary operations in austere environments, and it will allow collaboration across the joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational (JIIM) environment. Additionally the network will provide worldwide application delivery services and will facilitate digital training anywhere at any time. http://www.afceadc.org/army/army-network-2020-vision-brief.pdfhttp://washingtontechnology.com/articles/2012/09/19/army-eagle-contract-awards.aspx?s=wtdaily_200912http://washingtontechnology.com/articles/2012/09/25/ites-3h-solicitation-released.aspx?s=wtdaily_260912This slide is taken from LTG Susan Lawrence’s Luncheon presentation at LWN 2011, where she called industry to engage with her. She invited companies to innovate, develop, and apply the network’s full potential by leveraging emerging technologies. The focus will be on open systems and shared technologies. Another focus area will be to capture, manage, and analyze data in a timely manner, so data management tools will be huge over the next couple of years. The Army needs help to increase the capacity of its wireless infrastructure and allowing for centrally managed deployment of computing resources. The new network will allow soldiers to utilize a single ID worldwide, it will enable expeditionary operations in austere environments, and it will allows collaboration across the joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational (JIIM) environment. Additionally the network will provide worldwide application delivery services and will facilitate digital training anywhere at any time.Now before jumping into the opportunities section, I wanted to note a couple updates in regards to some large Army contract vehicles. Last month Army awarded its EAGLE contract to 33 companies, and it will begin awarding delivery orders on the $23.5 billion ID/IQ shortly. Also of note, Army released a hardware RFP for ITES 3H the last week in September, and responses were due just this past Monday (10/22). Through this $5 billion ID/IQ, the Army will continue purchasing products related to its IT infrastructure.
  • http://www.itdashboard.gov/investment?buscid=903http://peoc3t.army.mil/wint/inc2.phphttp://peoc3t.army.mil/wint/index.phphttp://defensesystems.com/Articles/2012/06/25/C4ISR-communications-on-the-move.aspx?Page=1http://www.lockheedmartin.com/us/products/win-t.htmlhttp://satellite.tmcnet.com/topics/satellite/articles/174001-lockheed-mart-wins-105-million-win-t-contract.htmhttp://www.generaldynamics.com/news/press-releases/detail.cfm?customel_dataPageID_1811=17726http://www.tauntongazette.com/news/x1446666875/Defense-cuts-could-jeopardize-jobs-at-General-Dynamics-facility-in-TauntonWIN-T Inc 2 is the Army’s highest funded program in FY13 by DME, and is their tactical telecom system consisting of infrastructure and network components. WIN-T it provides the Army with the “backbone network that enables the connection of command posts and key commanders and staff when they are tactically deployed,” said Jim Price, vice president of tactical networks for General Dynamics C4 Systems, the Army’s WIN-T prime contractor. WIN-T is run by PEO C3T, and it increases mobility and provides a communication network down to the company level. Tactical Communication Nodes in Increment 2 are the first step to providing a mobile infrastructure on the battlefield. Combined with the Points of Presence, Vehicle Wireless Packages, and Soldier Network Extensions, Increment 2 enables mobile mission command from division to company in a completely ad-hoc, self-forming, self-healing network. The WIN-T Increment 2 addition of embedding communications gear in select vehicles brings SIPRinto the warfighting platform. Select staff have the ability to maneuver anywhere on the battlefield and maintain connectivity to the network.Increment 2 is expected to begin fielding this month. Clearly this program is rich in opportunities for networking and infrastructure focused companies, also application development tools and cybersecurity will be needs over the next year.Lockheed Martin won a $105 million contract in 2011 to provide communications equipment that delivers on the move networking capability using satellite and radio links, focusing on mobile formations. Lockheed’s equipment includes radios, modems, antennas, and platforms that will be integrated into combat vehicles. General Dynamics C4 Systems won a sole source contract in support of the WIN-T program in 2009 for $7 billion over 6 years. They’ve been developing the JTRS Manpack and Rifleman radios that form the baseline of Army’s on the move tactical network. WIN-T is one program that may be met with significant challenges should the sequestration occur in January. The entire WIN-T system that General Dynamics has developed is being implemented from its location in Taunton, Massachusetts, and that plant faces major layoffs, should the sequester occur. Most likely, WIN-T will face a reprogramming according to Col Swanson the WIN-T Program Manager, but details are yet to be seen. https://www.ipps-a.army.mil/our-leadership/http://www.itdashboard.gov/investment?buscid=899Next is IPPS-A, which is a pay system that streamlines Army Human Resources and enhances efficiency of army personnel pay procedures. It’s a web based tool that needs to integrate databases and applications from Army active duty personnel, national guard, and Army reserve as well. This is a 17 year investment that began in 2010, and will spend nearly $160 million in FY13 (you can see that DME funding is dramatically increasing. IPPS-A is the future personnel and pay system for Army and will provide each Soldier with a single, comprehensive record of service, which will feature self-service tools that allow the Service members to update selected personal information. IPPS-A will integrate 70 Army legacy systems and will be built using COTS ERP Software.  It will also utilize other data management and application development tools as well. To dig into the specifics of the IT requirements, IPPS-A will be built using the latest version of PeopleSoft, and migrating data from the DIMHRS environment to an Army Data Center. In FY13, IPPS-A will complete system Design, Development, and Integration efforts for Release 1 to commence in late FY13. In preparation for this, the program will engage in multiple other activities related to system development and deployment, including the build-out of the Production environment and data centers; data conversion and migration; interface conversion; and information security planning. The IPPS-A project management office sits within ASALT, which acquires the equipment for the program, and it is also associated with PEO-EIS for purposes of tactical and management IT systems and products. IPPS-A also has a Functional Management Division which defines requirements, provides business capture, training strategy, and change management for the program. This functional office reports up to the Technology and Business Architecture Integration (TBAI) which ensures strategic integration of IT assets across the multiple Army components. Then the TBAI reports up to the Army G-1, which manages manpower and personnel plans across the service. Over the past year or two, Booz has provided system integration and program management, and Oracle and Citrix have provided COTS solutions related to financial applications, virtualization, and service assurance.
  • https://www.gcss.army.mil/About/Video.aspxhttp://www.itdashboard.gov/investment?buscid=59http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/ngc-wins-600m-logistics-contract-under-ites-2-04410/Finally, the Global Combat Support System or GCSS-A, which is a decade old initiative and a member of the Global Combat Support System (GCSS) Family of Systems. GCSS-A replaces 14 major logistical applications and will eventually be deployed to over 170,000 users and is one of DoD’s largest ERP systems. The planned completion date of this program extends to 2017, but there have been significant delays and cost overruns. GCSS-A technically consists of 2 components: 1) the GCSS-Army ERP solution and 2) the Army Enterprise Systems Integration Program, or AESIP. GCSS-A is managed by the Army Enterprise Systems Integration Program Office (or AESIP), which is designed to integrate business processes and systems by serving as the enterprise hub for the service’s logistics and financial ERP business systems. Important IT requirements for AESIP coming into FY13 include COTS solutions for centralized master data management and cross-functional analytics tools. Also, the program will be in need of service assurance and application performance management, as well as automation and virtualization tools; because the Army needs to monitor multiple data storage sites and applications to project future support requirements and track supplies and equipment as well as measure operational costs. It is designed to bring Army’s 3 ERP systems under one roof, all of which use SAP. Acquiring the IT tools to achieve this is one of Army’s top priorities. As such one of the biggest challenges being addressed in FY12 is how to achieve data standardization and data integration within the ERP systems. Northrop Grumman, the primary systems integrator, announced in September that it had successfully launched its initial deployment phase at Ft. Bliss, TX. The plan is to deploy GCSS-Army across all of Army in 2 phases; the first will replaces warehousing, supply chain and tactical financing functions and the second phase replaces property book and maintenance capabilities. The Army released an RFI October 7, 2011 in support of the deployment phase to being in 3rd quarter FY12. Much of the work being performed on these systems is being awarded through the AESIP Enterprise Services Applications IDIQ, although Northrop won a $600 million contract over 7 years under ITES2 in support of the program, back in December of 2007.
  • To finish up with the services branches, we’ll talk about the Navy and Marine Corps.
  • http://www.navy.mil/navydata/organization/org-over.asphttp://www.finance.hq.navy.mil/fmb/13pres/FY_2013_PB_Overview.pdfhttp://www.doncio.navy.mil/ContentView.aspx?ID=645Department of the Navy has 3 major components to it from an organizational perspective. The Navy Department, which is mostly executive offices in DC; the Operating Forces, which are composed of the Marine Corps, the Reserves, and the Coast Guard; and the Shore Establishment, which provides support to the fleet.Navy has enjoyed relatively consistent budgets over the past several years, only decreasing less than a percent in FY13 from prior year levels. To cut costs this year, DON will cancel or delay shipbuilding construction on a number of ships and will it will purchase fewer aircraft as well. To comply with the Budget Control Act, DON will be more disciplined in its use of resources and it will increase its use of enterprise software licensing agreements in order to save money.Cybersecurity Chief Ray Letteer said just last month that his goal for the coming year is to establish a mature infrastructure across the Marine Corps and the Navy by building one cohesive network for all users, by consolidating applications and data centers, and by regionalizing disaster recovery and coop.
  • http://www.informationweek.com/news/government/leadership/231600186http://www.nextgov.com/nextgov/ng_20110913_9609.php?oref=searchhttp://www.federalnewsradio.com/?nid=239&sid=2533724http://blogs.federaltimes.com/federal-times-blog/2012/01/17/department-of-the-navy-to-cut-2-billion-in-it-spending/Looking at Navy’s IT Budget for FY13, the IT request is consistent with what was allocated in FY12. As we previously established, DOD has been under some pressure to cut spending, and Navy is no exception. CIO Terry Halvorsen cites killing obsolete applications, optimizing systems, leveraging enterprise contracts, and managing IT in a more centralized manner will help the agency reach their cost savings goals. Halvorsen outlined $2 billion in cuts to DON’s IT budget by 2017.
  • http://www.navy.mil/navydata/organization/org-sec.asphttp://www.navy.mil/navydata/organization/org-shor.asphttp://www.navy.mil/navydata/organization/orgopfor.asphttp://www.doncio.navy.mil/Main.aspxFrom an organizational perspective, the relevant IT insertion points reside in within Naval Operations, the DON CIO Office, and in the Marine Corps. I’ll detail a few of these organizations in the following slides.
  • http://www.navsea.navy.mil/AboutNAVSEA.aspxhttp://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=55588http://acquisition.navy.mil/rda/home/organizations/peos_drpms/peo_lcshttp://acquisition.navy.mil/home/organizations/peos_drpms/peo_subshttp://acquisition.navy.mil/home/organizations/peos_drpms/peo_carriershttp://acquisition.navy.mil/home/organizations/peos_drpms/peo_iwshttp://www.navsea.navy.mil/NewsView.aspx?nw=NewsWires&id=133The Naval Sea Systems Command (or NAVSEA) engineers, builds, buys, and maintains ships, submarines, and combat systems; and is the largest of the Navy’s 5 system commands. NAVSEA employs 60,000 military and civilian personnel, and has nearly a $30 billion budget. NAVSEA provides defense and technology resources to properly equip the fleet and it enforces technical authority in combat system design and operation. Admiral Lewis oversees PEO Ships, which manages acquisition and life-cycle support for non-nuclear surface ships. PEO Ships maintains “cradle to grave” responsibility including research, development, acquisition, systems integration, construction and lifetime support. Admiral Murdoch heads up PEO LCS, after PEO LMW was disestablished in July of 2011. PEO LCS oversees the acquisition and maintenance of combat ship capabilities beginning with procurement and ending with sustainment. PEO Sumbarines is run by Admiral Johnson, and he focuses on the design, construction, delivery, and conversion of submarines and advanced undersea and anti-submarine systems.Admiral Moore runs PEO Carriers which focuses on the design, construction and delivery, and life-cycle support of all aircraft carriers and the integration of systems into aircraft carriers.Admiral Syring oversees PEO IWS which provides the Naval Fleet with warfighting capabilities and delivers enterprise solutions for Naval warfare systems.
  • http://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.display&key=OrganizationalStructurehttp://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.leadershiphttp://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.display&key=9E99EE24-2F3D-4E23-A0C1-A54C18C3FFC8http://www.public.navy.mil/donhr/executivemanagement/aboutseniorexecutives/Bios/Kurtz,%20G.pdf.pdfhttp://www.navair.navy.mil/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.aviationSystemsNaval Air Systems Command (or NAVAIR) was established in 1966, is headquartered in Patuxent River, MD, and provides full life cycle support of naval aviation aircraft, weapons, and systems operated by Sailors and Marines. NAVAIR conducts research, testing, systems engineering, logistics support, and acquisition, to ensure that Sailors and Marines are “Armed with Confidence.”Gary Kurtz serves as the CIO and Assistant Commander for Corporate Operations and Total Force for NAVAIR. He is responsible for command of business operations, financial management, and infrastructure operations. The 4 PEOs are mostly responsible for acquisition of weapons systems, rotocraft and related products, fixed wing and aircraft, unmanned air systems, and aviation systems – including electronics and data management systems.Vice Admiral Grosklags oversees PEO ASWVice Admiral Gaddis oversees PEO Tactical Aircraft ProgramsVice Admiral Winter oversees PEO Unmanned Aviation and Strike WeaponsVice Admiral Venlet oversees PEO F-35 Lightning II program
  • https://www.navsup.navy.mil/navsup/Resources/public_web/orgchart-ncodes-mar2012.pdfhttps://www.navsup.navy.mil/navsup/ourteamhttps://www.navsup.navy.mil/navsup/ourteam/navsupbschttps://www.navsup.navy.mil/navsup/ourteam/navsupbsc/biosThe Naval Supply Systems Command (or NAVSUP) provide weapons systems support, global logistics support, and sailor & family support. NAVSUP manages the Navy’s supply system and provides materiel support for ships, subs, and aircraft. Information systems are provided via NAVSUP’s Business Systems Center – which is the Navy’s premier Information Technology provider of choice. The BSC designs, develops, and maintains information systems that support logistics, supply chain management, transportation, accounting and finance across all of the Navy. The BSC offers business consulting services to assist with implementation of enterprise applications, it also provides systems management to ensure that the Navy’s network infrastructure is optimum performance levels. BSC delivers responsive application and system support and comprehensive management of Navy’s IT environments. Additionally, the BSC will provide custom application development when needed, as well as data lifecycle support.
  • http://www.public.navy.mil/spawar/Pages/OrganizationalChart.aspxhttp://www.public.navy.mil/spawar/Pages/AboutUs.aspxhttp://www.public.navy.mil/spawar/Press/Documents/Publications/2012-2016_Strategic_Plan.pdfhttp://www.public.navy.mil/spawar/Press/Biographies/Pages/CIO.aspxSpace & Naval Warfare Systems Command is one of the Navy’s 3 major acquisition commands, and it delivers IT products and services to the fleet and other DOD stakeholders. SPAWAR develops and deploys communications and information capabilities, and also provides research, engineering, and acquisition. In its most recent strategic plan, SPAWAR outlined 3 major strategies and subsequent goals to complete by 2016. Included in those goals were reducing the Navy’s IT footprint (which includes application and data center consolidation), improve interoperability in operational environments, obtain emerging information technology solutions to benefit the Navy, and to become the single IT systems and information dominance authority within the Navy. Of particular interest to the product community will be the Corporate Operations and CIO office led by Kimberly Kesler. The CIO Office is responsible for developing and IT strategy that supports over 12,000 employees worldwide including network management, information assurance, application management, data and knowledge management, and IT policy.
  • http://www.marines.mil/unit/marcorsyscom/Pages/Level-02/AboutUs/MCSC-Level02-AboutUs-OrgChart.aspxMarine Corps System Command is the acquisition and sustainment branch of the Marine Corps for systems and equipment. MARCORSYS researches, develops, tests, procures, and sustains IT equipment to give Marines the technological advantage utilizing the SeaPort-e contract vehicle.
  • http://www.navy.mil/local/fcc10/http://www.fcc.navy.mil/http://www.defensemedianetwork.com/stories/marforcyber-marines-fight-in-a-new-domain/http://www.bgov.com/news_item/0ymQPnA7-yd1iHSfKYItqQThe last relevant IT insertion point I wanted to note in the Navy is the US Fleet Cyber Command US 10th Fleet. This organization is part of the four service components of USCYBERCOM that aides in planning, coordinating, integrating, synchronizing, and conducting operations and defense of DOD information networks. The 10th Fleet serves as the central operational authority for networks, information operations, cyber, electronic warfare, and space capabilities in support of afloat and ashore Naval forces. The 10th Fleet was reactivated in January of 2010 and is based out of Ft. Meade. The Marine Corps is also represented in the four service components of USCYBERCOM with their division, United States Marine Corps Forces Cyberspace Command, or MARFORCYBER. MARFORCYBER was established in May of 2010, and protects critical infrastructure from cyberwarfare and is made up of a command element, the Marine Corps Network Operations Security Center (or MCNOSC), and a part of the Marine Corps Cryptologic Support Battalion. I would note that that Navy’s spending on cybersecurity has increased nearly 60% since 2007, and has actually surpassed the Army in total cybersecurity spending; with Seaport-e awarding over $600 million in cybersecurity contracts over the last 5 years.
  • You can see that location wise, the majority of the IT insertion points are based around DC, although SPAWAR is of course out in San Diego, NETWARCOM is down in Norfolk, MCNOSC is in Quantico, and NAVSUP is up in Mechanicsburg, PA.
  • http://www.doncio.navy.mil/uploads/0606FDN39235.pdfhttp://www.informationweek.com/government/leadership/departing-navy-cio-urges-it-evolution/227400147http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/monographs/2012/RAND_MG1171z2.pdfhttp://www.fiercegovernmentit.com/story/navy-erp-qualified-success/2012-09-09?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internalhttp://defensesystems.com/articles/2012/09/06/interview-williamson.aspx?s=DSfocus_140912http://www.npr.org/2012/01/10/144984593/army-scraps-jtrs-programhttp://defensesystems.com/articles/2012/09/06/interview-williamson.aspx?s=DSfocus_140912Terry Halvorsen released DON’s strategic plan in May of 2011 and it expires at the end of FY2013. In it, he notes that budgetary constraints will not support the continuation of business as usual, so development and delivery of IT will have to change so that cybersecurity and technology are managed more efficiently. The general idea is that (like most other DOD entities) Navy will be taking an enterprise approach to IT, and will be implementing centralized and consolidated efforts in regards to IT procurement. The agency will make protection of personally identifiable information a priority, as well as developing standards for capital planning and investment control. Halvorsen’s predecessor, Rob Carey, made a point prior to leaving the CIO office that the Navy desperately needed to evolve its IT strategy to keep pace with modernization and cyber trends. He also urged Navy personnel to think more globally, instead of only considering the Navy’s needs in regards to technology. Carey began several initiatives that Halvorsen will continue, including the modernization and improvement of the Navy’s IT network, interoperability, and cybersecurity. Halvorsen has been praised in recent months on the success of the implementation of Navy’s ERP program. As I mentioned during the Army presentation, DOD has suffered through the failure of 6 of DOD’s 10 major ERPs, as they’ve run over budget by $8 billion and are 12 years behind schedule. A glimmer of hope has shone from Navy ERP, which has an FY13 total budget request of $135 million and focuses on sharing authoritative information across functional communities to improve Enterprise performance. I will not cover Navy ERP in the following opportunity section because I felt that there were other, more well funded programs to focus on. Additional well funded programs I did not cover were those involved with the Joint Tactical Radio System, or JTRS. The purpose of JTRS was to provide a communications capability for all of the service branches; but the JTRS programs have largely been viewed as a failure. Army scrapped the program after spending billions over the last 15 years because the radios were too heavy and did not function appropriately in combat. And in fact, DOD has initiated a restructuring of the JTRS PEO, which is currently taking place. Heidi Shyu will become the lead acquisition executive for the new PEO, named the Joint Tactical Networking Center or JTNC, which will focus on ensuring tactical networking interoperability. So those are a couple of programs I won’t cover… now on to the programs I will cover.
  • http://www.itdashboard.gov/investment?buscid=57http://www.public.navy.mil/fltfor/cyberfor/Documents/SPRING%202010%20WEB.pdfhttp://www.bgov.com/news_item/_nJGU4OjImj8pDVbZ6kgGAhttp://www.public.navy.mil/spawar/PEOEIS/Pages/ContactUs.aspxhttp://jtnc.mil/Pages/ContactUs.aspxhttps://e-commerce.spawar.navy.mil/command/02/acq/navbusopor.nsf/0/C34D4E2D2454EB1D8625799E0055A875/$FILE/PWSDRAFTRFP%20Release%2020120207.pdfThe first Navy program I wanted to talk about is the Next Generation Enterprise Network. NGEN will provide net-centric capability to replace and improve the enterprise IT services that NMCI previously provided. NGEN is DON’s largest program in terms of investment, spending over $1.6 billion in FY12 and $1.8 billion in FY13. It’s a 15 year investment that began in 2009 with 6 major phases or “blocks or gates,” with each block consisting of several smaller increments or “spirals.” NGEN will begin transitioning information management services from NMCI in FY13, including the DOD’s largest centrally managed IT network. The NGEN program management office will award segmentation contracts for LAN and enterprise services and software licenses using DOD’s ESI. The NGEN PMO is currently in gate 5, with gate 6 planned for FY13. As NMCI’s successor, NGEN will increase Navy command and control through central ownership of the network and management of each segment of the operation. This plan will lower costs, as multiple smaller contracts are less risky for the government than one large service contract. NGEN will use FY13 funding to complete the tech refresh of network hardware and software to maintain the network in compliance with industry standards. Also, they will award O&M contracts to purchase cables, servers, routers, switches, and network devices. Navy plans to award a $4.5 billion ID/IQ called NGEN to 2 primes to operate the network over the next 5 years. NGEN is currently in source selection, with HP having teamed with Lockheed and a separate team of CSC and Harris Corporation having formed as well. GAO has expressed concern that the Navy has not adequately planned to manage the contract or the network and run the risk of delays and cost overruns. Specifically, GAO stated that the navy doesn’t know if its approach is the most cost effective, and they haven’t taken adequate steps to mitigate risks. DON says that it has in fact taken necessary steps to bolster NGEN’s risk management, and is confident that the contract will run smoothly. We are expecting an award on NGEN shortly.http://www.itdashboard.gov/investment?buscid=17http://defensesystems.com/microsites/2010-jtrs/mids.aspxMIDS is a 35 year investment that began in 1990 and funds data and communications systems. The military tactical data exchange network called Link 16 requires communications terminals with lower volume and lighter weight than available Link 16 radios. In some DOD systems, MIDS terminals will migrate to a Joint Tactical Radio System (which I will discuss in a moment). The MIDS program is improving network throughput and increases functionality to run advanced mission applications in a cross platform/cross domain tactical network. Investments in FY13 will focus on replacing or updating hardware, software, and firmware components within the MIDS terminal, as well as developing and incorporating tactical targeting network technology. MIDS spent over $150 million in FY12 and will spend $160 million in FY13. Several contracts have been awarded in support of the MIDS program, the most recent of which was on May 24th of this year to ViaSat, they seem to be the prime on all of the awarded contracts supporting MIDS.
  • http://www.itdashboard.gov/investment?buscid=56http://navymarineassociation.org/USN%20Awards.htmlhttp://www.public.navy.mil/spawar/Press/Documents/Publications/1.25.12_AFCEA_Kit_VIII.pdfCANES is a 20 year investment that started in 2010 which replaces existing afloat networks with new infrastructure for applications, systems, and services. It consolidates the disparate legacy networks that will be EOL by the end of FY12. In FY13, the program will fund procurement, integration, design, and installation of network equipment and other infrastructure products related to system consolidation, virtualization, commonality, and automation of system management. In FY12, the program spent over $211 million, and in FY13 it will spend over $410 million, with the goal of retaining current core Navy network capabilities, while providing increased performance and improved adaptability to afloat LANs. Notable contractors have included Lockheed, Northrop, and SAIC, who are all providing system development and integration. The PEO C4I and the Enterprise Services Program Office (PMW 160) held an industry day for CANES back on July 31st 2007 in San Diego, and they have since issued a $1.9 billion contract vehicle also called CANES, with several smaller contracts that will be awarded over the next several years to support the program.
  • Now, moving out of the service branches to other DOD agencies, beginning with the Military Health System.
  • http://www.health.mil/Libraries/Documents_Word_PDF_PPT_etc/2012_MHS_Stakeholders_Report-120207.pdfAs we all know, MHS maintains the health of military personnel and delivers health care during wartime. It services nearly 10 million beneficiaries across an extensive range of venues from the battlefield to hospitals and clinics. The organization supports the armed services and reports up to the secretary of defense, while receiving its budget from congress.  
  • http://subasepearl.com/pdf/ausn_action_alert_fy13_tricare_rates.pdfhttp://www.nextgov.com/nextgov/ng_20110218_8541.phphttp://www.armytimes.com/news/2012/08/military-health-care-sequestration-tricare-CSBA-082812w/As we just saw, the total FY13 request for DOD Unified Medical Budget that supports MHS was $48.7 billion, down from $52.8 billion in FY12 which is a 16% decrease. The IT budget is down about 6% from prior year levels to $1.87 billion. In terms of budget cuts due to sequestration, Veteran’s health care will be exempt from the cuts, as will basic pay for DOD personnel, retirement pay, and funding for housing. Tricare, on the other hand, will not be exempt, and thus faces a significant cut from sequestration. This will most likely lead to a reduction in personnel so that the military can meet its healthcare obligations. From an IT perspective, MHS will focus this year will be on infrastructure operations and electronic health records. Karen Guice, who was formerly the Acting CIO has officially been named CIO of MHS. In terms of acquisition trends, over 80% of MHS contracts are Cost Plus or Firm Fixed Price, they almost never use set aside contracts, and in fact only $40 million in contracts were awarded in 2011 to 8a firms.  Nearly 99% of MHS’ budget reportedly goes to general health and medical services, with about $4 million a year reportedly being spent on IT hardware and software. Clearly, these numbers need to be taken with a grain of salt, as the $42 billion in purchases categorized as “General Health Care Services” does in fact include some technology products – the government is just so bad at tracking how exactly it spends its money. MHS will occasionally utilize SEWP and Schedule 70, but it appears that they are mostly using BPAs and program specific contracts to make IT purchases.
  • From an organizational perspective, MHS consists of a partnership between the services’ medical departments; so the Army, Navy, AF, Coast Guard, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Cocom surgeons, and TRICARE providers – along with the MHS component agencies.
  • From an IT insertion perspective, the OCIO is where you’ll want to focus on, and the majority of the program planning and acquisition occurs within the PEO of Acquisition Programs, headed up by Stone Quillian. Under this office, there are 3 PEOs, including DHIMS, DHSS, and MCiS.
  • http://dhims.health.mil/about/program-history.aspxLooking more closely at each PEO, starting with DHIMS. DHIMS’ primary responsibility is to develop and manage information management tools that capture and share health data across DOD (for example, they were responsible for deploying and maintaining AHLTA). DHIMS has 400 employees with diverse skill sets whose agenda is to emphasize and promote readiness, health, experience of care, and per capita cost. Major projects this year include Case management and tele-health systems, patient administration and tracking, and data sharing between services and between DOD/VA systems.
  • Moving on to DHSS, which is the largest health IT acquisition program for MHS, as it maintains products used in 60 military hospitals, and over 600 clinics worldwide. DHSS has roughly 250 employees between Falls Church and Ft. Detrick that essentially provide the infrastructure backbone for MHS systems. This PEO provides MHS with clinical support, medical logistics, and resource management, to support applications that maintain warfighter readiness and optimize the delivery of health care to DOD service members. Principal Deputy Program Manager Michael Veasey is in charge of Requirements Management and Acquisition.
  • http://www.health.mil/News_And_Multimedia/News/detail/10-05-19/TIMPO_EHR_Fortification.aspxFormerly the TIMPO PEO, the MHS Cyberinfrastructure Services (or MCiS) organization manages electronic health record infrastructures and protocols for the MHS. Over the next 2 years, this office will be assessing the amount of storage it has, then looking at its computing requirements so that the computing capacity can meet the demand of new and more sophisticated applications. The office will be consolidating testing centers, eventually developing a single test center that will be utilized by all program offices, allowing applications to go through one centralized location.  I haven’t been able to track down an updated org chart, so I just have the Acting PM Joe Martinez listed here. I do know that MCiS owns the database that houses AHLTA, the military's electronic health record, and it runs the MHS’s service desk. As recently as 2010, the MHS service desk consisted of 3 separate groups, the helpdesk, the network operations center, and the blade operating center. These 3 were combined to provide MHS IT user support 24/7/365. Now they are providing network monitoring, application support, system admin, and Remedy management for tracking purposes. This image on the right is an iceberg representing the number of services the service desk provides. I think it is a good target for Oracle’s applications suite, and an opportunity to sell your products that compliment remedy.
  • MHS and its PMOs are located in Falls Church (with an additional DHIMS office at Ft. Detrick). With attention being turned towards a Defense Health Agency, it looks like MHS will be moving to Arlington, if and when it transitions to DHA.
  • http://www.stripes.com/news/defense-health-agency-is-the-next-step-in-curbing-medical-costs-1.171002http://www.usmedicine.com/news/2012/03/09/dod-plan-calls-for-changes-to-mhs-structure.html http://www.health.mil/MHSGovernanceReport/Enclosure1.pdfhttp://www.thenewstribune.com/2012/03/10/v-lite/2061023/defense-health-agency-next-step.htmlIn 2006, Congress recommended collapsing the services‘ surgeon generals and the various health organizations into one Unified Health Command. The problems with this plan are both operational and cultural.  The Navy is trained to deliver care to units afloat and to deployed Marines, the Air Force has expertise in aerial platforms, and Army docs are trained to deliver medical ground support in combat theaters. Additionally, the Army wants to do things the way Army does things. Same with the Navy and Air Force.  So a compromise has been suggested in the form of the DHA, which will at first be an intermediary step towards the UHC. DOD task forces recommend that the DHA will offer a responsible way to move military healthcare forward while producing maximum efficiencies with the least disruption. Creating a DHA would also allow the department to improve its ability to expand shared services to create common business and clinical practices under the leadership of a 3 star general.
  • http://www.health.mil/Libraries/OCIO_Documents/MHS_IM-IT_Strategic_Plan_2010-2015__January_2010.pdfUntil the DHA transition occurs, MHS will be relying on its own goals and plans to continue operations. The MHS Strategic IT Plan for 2010-2015 outlines plans to invest in interoperability, integration of systems, investment in portfolio management, and elimination of duplicative IT systems. This is appropriate, as MHS sort of provides the backbone and the underlying infrastructure for all military health.Out of its 10 goals, a few rang out to me as applicable to Oracle Applications – including goal 4, Enterprise Intelligence and goal 5, personal health agenda. MHS seeks to enhance beneficiaries’ intelligence through the procurement of products and service agreements to improve data availability and foster adoption of technologies with efficient access to information resources. Also, they plan to implement a comprehensive MHS wide portal to deliver access to tools that provide training, benefits information, and allow for scheduling of appointments and filling of prescriptions online with providers.
  • http://www.military.com/money//insurance/health-insurance-and-tricare/military-health-system-electronic-records.htmlhttp://www.usmedicine.com/articles/ahlta-record-defended-at-conference.htmlhttp://www.centechgroup.com/news/download/AHLTA%20Win%20Announcement%2010-13-10.pdfhttp://washingtontechnology.com/articles/2009/05/06/saic-to-support-dod-health-information-system.aspxAHLTA is DOD’s EHR system that stores MHS beneficiaries’ medical data in a central location. It shares information between DOD and VA. MHS is working on is a system that consolidates the AHLTA’s immunization systems into a single system within the clinical workflow with reporting to service-readiness systems. Another application in development is one that will link clinically relevant information into the disability evaluation system allowing benefit assessments to be made much more quickly. This program heavily relies on old Oracle servers, and is looking to make upgrades or replacements in the next year or so.   I listed the director of the acquisition programs PEO, because depending on the route you want to take, there could be a number of people to reach out to. Plus, the AHLTA program manager seat has changed so many times over the years. Army Colonel Vic Eilenfield was the AHLTA program manager up until 2006 (he is now a consultant at the Winkenwerder Company), then Col Claude Hines oversaw the program, then 3 or 4 other people. Now, the MCiS PEO oversees the network layer and computing infrastructure support for AHLTA, and DHIMS provides IT solutions that manage and share the healthcare data for the actual EHRs, both PEOs obviously have their own Program Managers, so I’ll need to know which you want to talk to. You can see that DME funding is winding down, as the timeframe for this investment is between 1996 and 2018. The future of the EHR system will be the Electronic Health Record Way Ahead program. http://www.health.mil/MHSCIO/aboutocio/ocioleadership/Paula-Friedman-Biography.aspxhttp://fcw.com/articles/2010/10/12/defense-ehr-way-ahead-electronic-health-records.aspxAHLTA was deployed in 2000, and planning for EHRWA started in 2009. The new systems will handle 70 terabytes of data for 10 million service members and their families and 77,000 clinical care givers from multiple care settings. We will look for EHRWA to incorporate wireless devices, voice recognition, and training components. In September 2011, Milestone Decision Authority issued an Acquisition Decision Memorandum authorizing EHRWA Program Office to pursue foundational iEHR Enterprise Architecture activities working with the VA, additional development and maintenance activities related to the Blue Button and Personal Health Record, additional VLER Health Development and Deployment activities, and further stabilization of the existing EHR Systems. MHS is pursuing the development of a standards-based, modular architecture, an environment that will allow for end-to-end development and interoperability test activities, procurement of the components that will enable a more service-oriented delivery of capabilities, and Military Treatment Facility data center consolidation. In FY13, EHRWA has $330 million in funding, and plans to establish an integrated development and test center to facilitate joint DOD and VA capability integration, with emphasis on providing service oriented architecture to determine data exchange alternatives between current systems and developing common infrastructure, business practices, and services. By the end of September 2013 EHRWA program managers expect to have purchased all the hardware and software needed for developing functionality, including embedding services like training and access to benefits information and eligibility.
  • http://jitc.fhu.disa.mil/washops/dmlss.htmlhttp://www.health.mil/Libraries/OCIO_Documents/eXpresso_NOV09.pdfhttp://www.tricare.mil/pressroom/contractornews.aspx?fid=41DMLSS is a program enabled by a partnership between MHS and DLA to provide a supply chain for the medical community. The current DMLSS system provides full spectrum capability for medical logistics management and provides joint medical capabilities for medical logistics management of theater medical materiel operations. Investment in DMLSS began in 1991 and will continue through 2021. The program will spend $55 million in FY12 and nearly $45 million in FY13, and purchases in the coming year will be around program management, software upgrades, information assurance procedures, software maintenance fixes, Defense Information Security Agency (DISA) computing support, Testing & Evaluation, and Department of Defense Information Assurance Certification and Accreditation (DIACAP) support. Additionally, they will invest in business intelligence products, in products to modernize messaging systems and upgrading applications.
  • The last agency we’ll cover today is DISA.
  • http://www.disa.mil/About/Our-Organization-StructureToday, the DISA is a combined military, federal civilian, and support contractor workforce nearing 18,000 people touching 100 countries. DISA is a combat support agency responsible for engineering and providing command and control (C2) capabilities and enterprise infrastructure. DISA supports the President, Vice President, Secretary of Defense, Joint Chiefs of Staff, COCOMS, and other Department of Defense (DoD) components during peace and war. DISA requested $1.35 billion from Congress for their operating budget which is less than a 1% decrease from FY12 levels. Of course DISA receives fees for services they provide to Army, Navy, and Air Force, so this is where they derive funds for their IT budget, which is significantly higher. DISA is continuously operating and assuring a global net-centric enterprise in direct support to joint warfighters, National level leaders, and other mission and coalition partners across the full spectrum of operations, and this is what justifies their Congressional funding.
  • DISA operates under the direction, authority, and control of the DoD Chief Information Officer to provide global net-centric solutions in the form of networks, computing infrastructure, and enterprise services to support information sharing and decision making for the Nation’s warfighters and those who support them in the defense of the nation. To accomplish this mission, they will spend around $5.128 billion in FY13, which is an increase from prior year levels, as the Services branches shift to enterprise services.
  • Here is a look at DISA’s org chart. There are 22 offices, 13 of which are relevant to IT, including the OCIO, CTO, 4 PEOs, and DITCO.
  • In terms of IT insertion points, all of the offices of import to IT products manufacturers are local, at Ft. Meade.
  • http://www.nextgov.com/mobile/2012/08/disa-details-defensewide-wireless-and-mobile-device-plan/57198/http://www.nextgov.com/defense/2012/05/disa-plans-single-global-network-contract/55592/http://fedscoop.com/trends-in-dod-it/http://fedscoop.com/disa-director-mobile-enterprise-environment-by-fy14/Looking at DISA from a strategic perspective, they will be a hotbed of activity over the next several years. It is no secret that DOD has consolidated around DISA as the service provider for cloud and hosted base opportunities. Since DISA began hosting their own private cloud, the Army migrated its enterprise email through DISA’s cloud; also as the armed services develop their mobile strategy, DISA has been developing a bring your own device (or BYOD) strategy, and plan to stand up a mobile device management platform for their classified network in conjunction with NSA. General Hawkins said in July that he wants to take a build fast and build big approach to mobility with a subscription based mobile environment ready to go, with over 6,500 devices active by 2014 . Other top priorities for DISA include increasing the use of shared and enterprise services and migrating applications to the cloud, striving to deal with increased cybersecurity threats, and attempting to develop an interoperable network. If it deals with Cloud, Mobility, Security, or Interoperable Networks, DISA will be at the center of it all.
  • http://www.disa.mil/~/media/Files/DISA/About/Strategic-Plan.pdfhttp://defensesystems.com/articles/2012/09/04/disa-strategic-plan.aspx?s=ds_050912http://www.fiercegovernmentit.com/story/disa-plan-calls-cloud-centric-model/2012-09-06?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internalhttp://www.disa.mil/News/PressResources/2012/Strategic-Plan-2013-2018http://comptroller.defense.gov/defbudget/fy2013/budget_justification/pdfs/01_Operation_and_Maintenance/O_M_VOL_1_PARTS/O_M_VOL_1_BASE_PARTS/DISA_OP-5.pdfTo address these issues, DISA released its new strategic plan for 2013 to 2018 in early September with the purpose of identifying strategic goals and key objectives for the agency’s future. DISA listed 8 strategic shifts on which it will focus 4 cross cutting goals – the strategic shifts are listed on this slide, and the goals include Evolving the JIE, Providing joint C2 leadership and support, Operating and assuring the enterprise, and Optimizing department investments. If anyone has been to an AFCEA event lately, you’ve heard either Admiral Simpson, General Bowman, or General Alexander talking about the JIE and enabling end to end information sharing. As I mentioned earlier in the presentation, creating a framework to enable a secure and interoperable enterprise is a top priority for all of DOD, and especially for DISA. Concerning Joint C2 leadership, DISA plans to enhance command and control to improve information sharing across strategic, operational, and tactical operations. To complete the third goal, DISA plans to adapt cyber and network C2 operations to defend a joint and coalition enterprise environment in contested cyber battlespace. Last, to optimize department investments, DISA will standardize support services and business processes, and ensure rapid infusion of technology in the enterprise. These goals and strategies align with DISA’s objectives listed in their FY13 budget documents. The agency outlined a need to transition to a network centric environment to improve how information is shared across DOD. They specifically called out a need to eliminate bandwidth constraints and improving infrastructure and the GIG.
  • http://www.itdashboard.gov/investment?buscid=27http://www.disa.mil/Services/Contracting/Contracts-Guide/Indefinite-Delivery-Indefinite-Quantity/DISN-DGShttp://www.disa.mil/About/Our-Organization-Structure/SPIhttp://fcw.com/articles/2010/05/11/new-disa-cio-sienkiewicz.aspxTaking a look at the DISN, this program accounts for 24% of DISA’s DME funding in FY13. The DISN is the network that provides connectivity to DISA sites worldwide, and this program funds all of the infrastructure, security, long haul information transport, and backup/recovery products that are needed to maintain the network. The DISN’s goal is to seamlessly span the terrestrial and space strategic domains, and the tactical domain to provide the interoperable telecommunications connectivity and value added services required to plan, implement, and support any operational missions. Acquisition in FY12 and 13 will be to sustain the existing network, and fill and deficiencies and gaps in capabilities. The DISN program procures software and hardware via several contract vehicles.  The DGS contract vehicle (DISN Global Solutions) provides lifecycle support management for the DISN website and connects voice, data, and video networks into one system. Apptis owns the small business contract, and SAIC is prime on the large business contract. They were both ID/IQs awarded in 2001, are worth $5.4 billion, and are set to expire on March 31st of 2013.  The DISN Access Transport Services or DATS contract was awarded in 2006 to QWEST Government Services (which is now Century Link Government), and also to AT&T, CapRock Government Solutions, and Harris. DATS provides telecommunication transport services in CONUS, it’s a $3 billion ID/IQ, and will expire in October of 2016.  The DISN Nework Management Suport Services Global (or DNMSSG) provides services and products for DISN related networks and systems; it was awarded in 2007 to CSC and Oberon, and is worth $615 million, and will expire this December.  The International Maritime Satellite or INMARSAT contract provides mobile satellite telecommunications, equipment, and maintenance, was awarded to L-3, Caprock, and ADC, and actually was set to expire last June.  Multiple Schedule 70 contracts have been awarded as well to provide products and services. Last, Net Federal Inc owns the DISN Global Services IDNX BPA that provides network hardware and software… primarily through Promina, and is slated to expire in January of 2014. Funding for the overall DISN program is increasing primarily because of the EMSS Gateway transformation, and procurement for Broadband Global Area Network Remote Access Service equipment. FY13 will see a tech refresh, and deployment of two IP video suites and the acquisition of cryptographic, voice encoding, audio summing, audio distribution and end-user equipment for sites participation in the Presidential National Voice Conferencing (PNVC) project. The DISN investment spans from 1991 to 2025, and will spend over $2 billion in FY13.http://www.itdashboard.gov/investment?buscid=31http://www.dtic.mil/cjcs_directives/cdata/unlimit/m672101.pdfhttp://www.afcea.org/signal/articles/templates/SIGNAL_Article_Template.asp?articleid=2108&zoneid=279http://www.disa.mil/services/command-and-control/gccs-jhttp://www.linkedin.com/pub/kimberly-rice/19/539/aahttp://www.carrollpub.com/Subscribers/personview.asp?PersonID=14003177&PositionID=13419189&OfficeID=3159438&ProductID=1011Next is the Global Command and Control System Joint. The GCCS-J Program funds a Joint Command and Control (JC2) portfolio that includes: GCCS-J and JPES (Joint Planning & Execution Services) – which is a set of capabilities that produces enhancements to the Joint Operations Planning & Execution System (JOPES) system, which is focused on adaptive planning capabilities to provide the warfighter a fully interoperable and adaptive planning and execution system solution. It also supports the development and sustainment of the JC2 Architecture. GCCS-J consists of two primary baselines: the JOPES, and GCCS-J Global, which contains Integrated Imagery and Intelligence (I3), Situational Awareness/Common Operating Picture (COP) capabilities, and supporting infrastructure.  GCCS will provide IT capabilities required to software and system testing support and make recommendations on the systems engineering process. GCCS-J is run by the Global C2 System Program Management Office at Ft. Meade, and the PMO has made specific mention of focusing on COTS products to meet budget reductions, and on working with the manufacturer community to develop requirements to meet timelines. One accomplishment last year that the PMO noted was that during operations in Libya, GCCS-J was able to pull together and display NATO data to AFRICOM COP (common operating pictures) and EUCOM, while creating 3,000 software releases on the forge.mil website. The decrease in DME funding represents a realignment of management overhead, and has not affected any IT specific activities.  Program Managers have actually outlined in the exhibit 300 that program costs will overrun if they don’t utilize COTS solutions. In FY13 they plan to begin a COTS tech refresh to minimize the impact of COTS end of life issues and provide software updates enterprise wide. GCCS-J will transition from the Global C2 System Program Management Office at Ft. Meade to PEO GES, and that transition process will begin in FY13 as well. The program began in 1995, will end in 2018, and will spend over $250 million in FY13. SAIC and Northrop have both won awards in support of GCCS-J through ENCORE II. ENCORE II provides IT solutions for activities throughout all operating levels of all customer organizations in support of all functional requirements, including command and control, intelligence and mission support, and all elements of the GIG. The contract was awarded to over 20 companies, and won’t expire until May of 2018.
  • http://www.itdashboard.gov/investment?buscid=919http://www.disa.mil/Services/SATCOM/Teleport-Systemhttp://comptroller.defense.gov/defbudget/fy2008/fy2007_supplemental/FY2008_Global_War_On_Terror_Request/pdfs/operation/08_DISA_Supp_OP-5.pdfhttp://iq.govwin.com/index.cfm?fractal=opportunities.dsp.search.detail&PrdctCd=PFOIT&OppID=43926https://www.fbo.gov/?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=ed2fc602a96459f91600726feaf3c1bd&tab=core&_cview=0https://www.fbo.gov/?s=opportunity&mode=form&id=9f8c38c04084510dbb65cca165f2ddef&tab=core&_cview=1The last program I’ll detail is the Teleport Generation 3 Program. The Teleport System is a SATCOM gateway that links the deployed warfighter to the sustaining base. It allows warfighters to have access to secure telecom services and access to the DISN. The purpose of the investment is to enable DISA to improve DOD’s communication with a worldwide interconnected set of information capabilities. The system integrates, manages, and controls a number of communications interfaces between the DISN and SATCOM assets froma single point of presence.  Teleport is an extension of the STEP Program (Standardized Tactical Entry Point) – which is an initiative to upgrade existing defense satellite communication systems (DSCS) and their strategic earth terminals by providing warfighters with a set of standardized and pre positioned services for entry into the DISN. STEP allows deployed forces to gain access to multimedia connectivity from deployed locations to the DISN and the GIG. If DISA does not receive funding for the STEP (and by extension the Teleport) program, the DISN data services will falter, C2 support functions will fail, theater management of DOD networks and security will fail, and IT planning and technical support provided to the COCOMs will suffer.  The Teleport System is implemented in 3 phases. Generation 1 spanned 2002 to 2008 and consisted of designing architecture to add capabilities to a portion of STEP sites. It provided satellite connectivity for deployed tactical communications systems. Generation 2 lasted from 2006 to 2010 and focused on implementing additional terminals and adding NETCENTRIC capabilities. Now, Generation 3 (which will run from 2010 to 2015) will consist of implementing high frequency extended data capabilities, and provide enhanced wideband capabilities to warfighters worldwide. It will also provide interoperability between mobile users and legacy UHF users by installing a mobile to legacy SATCOM gateway component to the teleport and gateway sites.  The program is run by PEO-STS, and Bruce Bennett has stated that FY13 will focus on conducting a mobile user objective system (MUOS) to legacy systems interoperability critical design review and refresh end of life defense satellite communications systems terminals. Although generation 3 is slated to run 2010 to 2015, it has funding through 2026, and will spend $48 million in FY13. DISA released an RFI in June for Cisco software and hardware vendors, they also released another RFI in April to determine if small businesses could provide products to support long haul communications in support of the Teleport program. Booz holds a contract that is just coming to an end that provides engineering and program management.

FY13 Department of Defense Budget Briefing FY13 Department of Defense Budget Briefing Presentation Transcript

  • FY13 DOD Budget BriefingActionable Intelligence for the IT Product Community
  • Company Overview immixGroup helps technology companies do business with the government immixGroup Program Revenue Growth Founded in 1997 $1,400 $1B/year in public sector sales $1,200 $1,000 Federal small business Millions $800 250+ employees $600 ISO 9001:2008 registered $400 $200 Credit facility: $25 million $0 FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 (Plan) © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 2
  • Proven Record of Success Responsible Contractor Top Reseller Top 250 GSA Vendors #2 IT 70 Schedule Vendor 2012 BGOV200 #4Top 100 Federal IT Contractors #5 Top Cooperative Federal Industry Leaders Value-Added Reseller Purchasing IT Vendor #22 (State & Local) Top Privately Held Company Top 100 Fed. Prime Contractors #4 Prime Contractor Top GSA Schedule 70 CRN’s Solution Provider 500 Contractors Top 100 Private Co’s Region’s #17 Fastest Growing Co’s Largest Private Co Top 50 Gov Tech Contractors 2012 Federal McAfee 2011 Distributor of the Year Value-Added Distributor of Americas Top 50 Fastest Fast Growth 100 5,000 Fastest Growing Co’s Growing Private Co’s Valued Distributor Exceptional Growth © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 3
  • immixGroup Divisions Contract Management Division Outsourced contracting expertsContract negotiation,formation & compliancefor prime contractors Maintain compliance Reduce risk Help focus on sales instead of contract administration © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 4
  • immixGroup Divisions Contract Contract Technology Management Management Sales Division Division Division Outsourced Unique technology contracting experts resellerContract negotiation, “Co-sell” products to theformation & compliance government via ourfor prime contractors contracts/relationships Maintain compliance  Increase revenue through Reduce risk proactive sales, marketing & Help focus on sales instead demand creation of contract administration  Manage opportunities from leads through orders © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 5
  • immixGroup Divisions Contract Technology Government Management Sales Division Channels Division Division Public sector Outsourced Unique technology channel contracting experts reseller developmentContract negotiation, “Co-sell” products to the Manufacturer-drivenformation & compliance government via our programs to increasefor prime contractors channel productivity contracts/relationships Maintain compliance  Manage channel complexity  Increase revenue through Reduce risk proactive sales, marketing & & compliance Help focus on sales instead  Generate leads for partners demand creation of contract administration  Reward & protect best  Manage opportunities from resellers leads through orders © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 6
  • immixGroup Divisions Contract Technology Government IT Solutions Management Sales Division Channels Division Division Division IT services for gov & Outsourced Unique technology Public sector channel commercial contracting experts reseller development customersContract negotiation, “Co-sell” products to the Manufacturer-driven Implement technicalformation & compliance government via our programs to increase solutions & providefor prime contractors contracts/relationships channel productivity program management Maintain compliance  Increase revenue through  Manage channel complexity  Specializing in Cyber Reduce risk proactive sales, marketing & & compliance Security, Information Help focus on sales instead demand creation  Generate leads for partners Management, Project of contract administration  Manage opportunities from  Reward & protect best Management leads through orders resellers  Access to product and PMP- certified IT professionals © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 7
  • Contract Technology Government IT Solutions Management Sales Division Channels Division Division Division IT services for gov & Outsourced Unique technology Public sector channel commercial contracting experts reseller development customersContract negotiation, “Co-sell” products to the Manufacturer-driven Implement technicalformation & compliance government via our programs to increase solutions & providefor prime contractors channel productivity contracts/relationships program management Maintain compliance  Manage channel complexity  Increase revenue through  Specializing in Cyber Reduce risk proactive sales, marketing & & compliance Security, Information Help focus on sales instead  Generate leads for partners demand creation Management, Project of contract administration  Reward & protect best  Manage opportunities from Management resellers leads through orders  Access to product and PMP- certified IT professionals Additional Services: Market Intelligence | Training | Recruiting | Leasing & Financing © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 8
  • Upcoming immixGroup Events Training: Fundamentals of Selling Technology to the Federal Government Wednesday, November 7, 2012 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Training: Federal Procurement and Contracting Essentials Thursday, November 8, 2012 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. For more information or to register, please visit: www.immixgroup.com/events © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 9
  • FY13 DOD Budget BriefingActionable Intelligence for the IT Product Community
  • Agenda Introduction  Agencies  Planner  Air Force  Industry Events  Army  Resources  Navy/MC IT Procurement Drivers  MHS  Budgets  DISA  Sequestration and CR  Digital Government Strategy  DOD IT Modernization © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 11
  • DOD Territory Planner © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 12
  • Upcoming DOD Industry Events TTC: Information Dominance Symposium 10/31/2012 Arlington, VA AFCEA NOVA: Monthly Luncheon 11/9/2012 Vienna, VA AFCEA Bethesda Monthly Breakfast Today’s briefing should 11/15/2012 North Bethesda, MD help prepare you for discussions with DOD IT GovComm 2012 11/28-29/2012 customers at upcoming Washington, DC industry events AFCEA DC: Winter Gala 12/11/2012 Washington, DC AFFIRM: Navigating the Government Landscape 12/14/2012 Washington, DC © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 13
  • Resources © 2012 immixGroup, Inc.All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 14
  • Department of Defense DOD supports 3.25 million IT users between Active Duty, National Guard, Reserves, and Civilian Personnel DOD operates in 600,000 buildings across 150 countries DOD manages over 10,000 operational IT systems DOD manages nearly 800 data centers and 65,000 servers DOD manages 7 million computers and IT devices, and 300,000 mobile devices © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 15
  • FY13 Budgets DOD IT Budget: $37.2B Federal IT Budget: $78.9B DOD Budget: $525B Federal Discretionary Budget: $1TTotal Federal Budget: $3.8T © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 16
  • IT Budgets Three Year View IT Budget 12 10 8 2011$B 6 2012 4 2013 2 0 Army Navy/MC Air Force DISA MHS © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 17
  • Sequestration and CRSources: Congressional Budget Office and The Heritage Foundation © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 18
  • Sequestration and CR Distribution of Sequestration Cuts by Agency $60,000 $50,000 $40,000$M $30,000 $20,000 $10,000 $0 © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 19
  • Digital Government Strategy • Enable the American people and an increasingly mobile workforce to access high-quality digital government information and services anywhere, anytime, on any device • Ensure that as the government adjusts to this new digital world, we seize the opportunity to procure and manage devices, applications, and data in smart, secure and affordable ways • Unlock the power of government data to spur innovation across our Nation and improve the quality of services for the American people © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 20
  • Digital Government StrategyInformation-Centric: Moves the government from managing documents to managing opendata to tag, share, secure, mash up, and present in a useful wayShared Platform: Allows agencies to work together to reduce costs, streamlinedevelopment, apply consistent standards, and ensure consistency in the delivery of informationCustomer-Centric: Influences how the government creates, manages, and presents datathrough websites, mobile applications, and other methods of delivery, to allow customers toshape, share and consume informationSecurity and Privacy: Ensures innovation happens in a way that promotes the safe andsecure delivery and use of digital services to protect information and privacy © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 21
  • DOD IT Modernization © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 22
  • Consolidate Infrastructure © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 23
  • Joint Information Environment (JIE)• Realizing the JIE means improving interoperability, sharing secure information, delivering capabilities to the warfighter faster, and lowering costs across DOD © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 24
  • Streamline Processes © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 25
  • Strengthen Workforce © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 26
  • United States Air Force (USAF) © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 27
  • Air Force Budget and Leadership Total Budget Teresa Salazar Michael Donley FY2012 FY2013 Deputy CIO / A6 Secretary $115.2 $110.1BUDGET ($B) Gen. Mark Welsh Gen. William Shelton Chief of Staff SPACECOM Commander Lines of Business (FY13) Maj.Gen. Suzanne Vautrinot BRAC Gen. Larry Spencer Commander, Office of the Military Housing Vice Chief of Staff Command Group; 24th Air RDT&E Force Procurement Military Personnel Lt.Gen. Michael Basla Lt.Gen C.D. Moore O&M CIO / A-6 AFLCMC; AF Materiel Command 0 10 20 30 40 50 © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 28
  • Air Force IT Budget IT Budget FY13 FORECAST FY2012 FY2013 IT budget decrease of 14% $6.64 $5.69BUDGET ($B) IT program investments Lines of Business (FY13) decrease of 7.5% Planning and Budgeting Decreases caused by efforts to Financial Mgmt eliminate redundancy and any Admin Mgmt unneeded expenditures HR Mgmt Supply Chain Mgmt Defense & Ntnl Security IT Mgmt 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 29
  • Former Air Force Organization Chief of Staff Operations, Plans, & Requirements Air Force Materiel Air Mobility Command Air Space Command Air Combat Command Command Surgeon General of the PEO C3I&N C3I Networks AF Directorates Pacific Air Forces Lt.Gen. Charles Davis 14th Air Force Command Operational Test & Command Wings Evaluation Center Intel & Requirements North American PEO BM Battle Management Aerospace Defense Space & Missile Systems Command Logistics Installation & Ron Mason Aeronautical Systems Center 9th Air Force Mission Support Air Force Special PEO C2 Electronic Systems Operations CommandInformation Dominance & Command & Control Air, Space, & Nuclear CIO Lt.Gen. Center Davis Charles Operations Directorates Steven Wert US Air Forces in AF Studies & Arnold Engineering Cnt EuropeAnalyses, Assessments, Air Force Network & Lessons Learned PEO BES Bus. Ent. Systems Integration Center Air Armament Cnt Global Strike Brig.Gen. Craig Olson Command AF ISR AF Flight Test Cnt 24th Air Force Air Education and AF Research Lab Training Command © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 30
  • New LCMC PEO Organization HQ AF Materiel Command Gen. Janet Wolfenbarger Life Cycle Management Center (AFLCMC) 66 Air Base Group WPAFB, OH Functional OL Hanscom AFB Hanscom AFB Maxwell AFB Business BattleAF Service Acquisition C3 / Network Enterprise Management Executive Directorate Systems Directorate Directorate Brig.Gen. Craig Olson Rich Lombardi Shof Shofner © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 31
  • Air Force Space Command Commander Gen. William L. Shelton Logistics, Installatio Manpower & Intelligence Requirements Communications & Plans & Program ns, & Mission Spt A-Personnel A-1 A-2 A-5 Information A-6 Analysis A-8/9 Col. Kevin Wooton 7 Space and Space Innovation Air, Space, &14th Air Force 24th Air Force Missile Systems Air Force Network and Development Cyberspace Center Integration Center Center Operations © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 32
  • AFCYBER / 24th Air Force USCYBERCOM COCOMs Air Force SpaceMAJCOMs Command 24th Air Force Maj.Gen. Suzanne Vautrinot 624th Ops Center Col. Victor Diaz 688th Information 689th Combat Operations Wing 67th Network Comms Wing Warfare Wing Col. Paul Welch Col. Joseph Sherrer 38thCyber 33rd Network Eng Group Warfare Squadron 318th Information 5th Combat Comms Operations Group Group INOSCs © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 33
  • USAF Key IT Organizations Air Force Network Integration Center PEO BES and PEO C3IN Air Mobility Command Scott AFB, IL Hanscom AFB, MACommunications Directorate CIO Office Scott AFB, IL Washington DC AFNIC Air Combat Command Communications Directorate Air Force Space Command USAF Materiel Command Langley AFB, VA Peterson AFB, CO Wright-Patterson AFB, OH AFLCMC 24th Air Force Air Education and Training Command Air Force Special Operations CommandLackland AFB, TX Communications Directorate Communications & Information Directorate Randolph AFB, TX Hurlburt Field, FL © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 34
  • Air Force IT Drivers Finding a balance between structure, readiness, and modernization Architecture and Infrastructure Cybersecurity Mobile Computing Interoperability Data Centers © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 35
  • Air Force IT Drivers  Interoperability Program Program Program Program Program Mission Mission Program Capability Capability Mission CapabilityInfrastructure Infrastructure Mission Mission Mission Capability Capability Capability Infrastructure Network Infrastructure/Network © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 36
  • AFNet Present State: MAJCOM-Centric © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 37
  • AFNet Evolution: Gateway Consolidation © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 38
  • Air Force Programs Combat Information Transport System (CITS)  A family of programs that incorporate a variety of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) items that must be integrated to perform the required military missions  In June 2009 CITS was restructured into multiple programs including two ACAT I AC programs that were reported separately in the FY12 and FY13 budget cycle  Information Transport System (ITS) Increments 1 and 2  Air Force Intranet (AFNET)  Multiple ACAT III programs including the Vulnerability Lifecycle Management System (VLMS), and other non-acquisition elements such as simple technology upgrades  CITS provides an end-to-end capability to create, store, transport, manipulate, archive, protect, and defend information within the Air Force components of the Global Information Grid (GIG) © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 39
  • Air Force ProgramsInformation Transport System (ITS) Increment 1 Funding Summary Description IT Requirements  The Information Transport System (ITS) Increment 1 installs robust base network backbone infrastructure Infrastructure$M FY12 FY13 required to meet increasing demand for high-speed network access that provides the data, video and imagery supporting Air Force operations SecurityDME 49.2 31.9  The Air Force will upgrade fewer bases than planned during FY13; this program will complete installations by the end of FY17 Data Management  The program has been renamed to “Base Information Transport Infrastructure, Wired”SS 0.6 0.7 Middleware / Enterprise ArchitectureAir Force Intranet (AFNET) Increment 2 Funding Summary Description IT Requirements  The Air Force Intranet Increment 2 re-designs fixed base network boundaries (classified and non- Infrastructure$M FY12 FY13 classified) to implement standardized, base-level network management and network defense tools  AFNET Inc 2 and Inc 3 will be consolidated after FY13, and will be called AFNET Inc 1 SecurityDME 34.4 50.5 Data ManagementSS 0.1 0.1 Middleware / Enterprise Architecture © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 40
  • Air Force ProgramsAir Force Intranet (AFNET) Increment 3 Funding Summary Description IT Requirements  The Air Force Intranet Increment 3 consolidates MAJCOM-centric network domains into a single AF- Infrastructure$M FY12 FY13 centric domain and updates obsolete network equipment at Network Control Centers  AFNET Inc 3 also updates each fixed base Network Control Center (NCC) to replace obsolete network Security equipment that supports core network services at each baseDME 14.6 23.0  AFNET Inc 2 and Inc 3 will be consolidated after FY13, and will be called AFNET Inc 1 Data ManagementSS 0.1 0.1 Middleware / Enterprise Architecture © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 41
  • United States Army © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 42
  • Army Budget and Leadership Total Budget John McHugh Mike Krieger Deputy CIO / G-6 Secretary FY2012 FY2013 Gen. Raymond Odierno MG Stewart Dyer Chief of Staff Director, Cyber Directorate $202.97 $184.64 CIO/G-6Budget ($B) Lines of Business (FY13) Gen. Lloyd Austin MG Alan Lynn Commanding General Vice Chief of Staff NETCOM Healthcare RDT&E Heidi Shyu Assistant Secretary of the LTG Rhett Hernandez Procurement Army for Acquisition, Commander Logistics, & Technology ARCYBER/2nd Army O&M Military Personnel LTG Susan S. Lawrence MG Lee Price CIO / G-6 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 PEO-C3T © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 43
  • Army IT Budget IT Budget FY13 FORECAST FY2012 FY2013 Army’s total FY13 budget will shrink 9% $8.39 $8.33Budget ($B) Army’s base budget Lines of Business (FY13) (non OCO) will shrink Financial Mgmt 7% Supply Chain Mgmt Army’s IT budget will HR Mgmt shrink 1% Defense & Ntnl Security IT Mgmt Army has the largest IT budget of DOD 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 agencies © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 44
  • Army Organization HQDA Chief of Staff Army CommandsCIO / G-6 ASA (ALT) FORSCOM / G-4 TRADOC AMC (ACOM)PEO-EIS Other PEOs ARCYBERUSAASC ATEC USACIDC NETCOM USARC Direct Reporting Units (DRU)IMCOM USACE MEDCOM USMA INSCOM USARPAC USAREUR ARSOUTH ARNORTH Service ComponentUSARF ARCENT USASOC SDDC SMDC Commands (ASCC) © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 45
  • CIO/G-6 Organization CIO / G-6 LTG Susan Lawrence Deputy CIO / G-6 Mike Krieger Chief Integration OfficerMG James Walton NETCOM/Army 9th Signal Cyber Security CIO – USAR CommandMG Stewart Dyer COL Tom Cole MG Alan Lynn Architecture, Operations, Policy and Resources PEO-EIS Networks & SpaceRichard Sirney Theresa Salazar Doug Wiltsie © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 46
  • PEO-EIS Organization Program Executive Officer Douglas Wiltsie CIO Chief of Staff Hari Bezwada Patricia Lambert Deputy PEO Terry WatsonAssistant PEO Assistant PEO Enterprise Enterprise Biometrics PEO HQ Staff Management Resource PlanningSystems (EMS) (ERP) Business Program Operations and Transformation Management Theater Support and Strategic Communications © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 47
  • ARCYBER/2nd Army Organization ARCYBER LTG Rhett Hernandez NETCOM 9th SC INSCOM DCG ARFORCYBER 1st IO CMD DCG ARFORCBYER Ft. Huachuca, VA Ft. Belvoir, VA Army Cyber Operations 7th Signal Command and Integration Center Cyber Brigade (Theatre) Ft. Belvoir, VA STO Current and Future Ops Intelligence LNOsPlans & Exercises Capabilities Assessment Targeting IO © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 48
  • NETCOM/9th Signal Command Organization NETCOM Commanding General Ft. Huachuca, AZ MG Alan Lynn Deputy Commander Operations Ft. Huachuca, AZ Enterprise Services G-2/Intelligence Arlington, VA Ft. Huachuca, AZ Army Global NetworkInformation Assurance & Operations & Security Compliance Center Arlington, VA Ft. Belvoir, VA © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 49
  • ASA (ALT) Organization ASAALT Acquisition Executive Heidi Shyu Asst. Acquisition Exec LTC Gordon WallaceResearch & Acquisitions & Plans, Programs, Acquisition PEOs Medical Systems Procurement Support CenterTechnology Systems Mgmt & ResourcesPrograms &Technology Transition PEO Ground PEO Missiles & PEO-C3T PEO Aviation PEO-IEW&S Combat Systems Space PEO PEO Combat PEO Chemical & Simulation, Trainin PEO Ammunition Support & Combat PEO Soldier Biological Defense g ,& Service Joint Instrumentation © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 50
  • Materiel Command Organization Commanding General CIO/G-6 ILSC ARDEC RDECOM CECOM TACOM AMCOMBarbara Machak Patricia O’Connor Beverly Siirila Laurie Hill Army Aviation & Sustainment ARL LOGSA Contracting Missile RD&E Command Command © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 51
  • Army IT Acquisition and Program Centers PEO IEWS PEO C3T Aberdeen, MD Aberdeen, MD ASA (ALT) ARCYBER/2nd Army Washington, DC Headquarters Ft. Belvoir, VA Acquisition Support CIO/G-6 Center Washington, D.C. Ft. Belvoir, VA PEO EIS Ft. Belvoir, VA NETCOM Ft. Huachuca, AZ Army Materiel Command Redstone Arsenal Huntsville , AL © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 52
  • Army IT Drivers – Budget Cuts © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 53
  • Army IT Drivers – ERPs Over 500 legacy systems are to be replaced by 10 DOD ERP initiatives The 2010 Defense Authorization Act requires DOD to be “audit ready” by 2017 DOD financial management has been on GAO’s high risk list since 1995; and 6 of 10 ERPs are behind schedule, over cost, and lacking fully integrated master schedule tool DOD’s ability to achieve audit readiness is dependent on the components’ ability to effectively develop and implement tracking and accounting programs that measure budgetary information and asset accountability © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 54
  • Army IT Drivers – Network of 2020 Imperatives of Network 2020  Single, secure, standards-based environment  Enable global collaboration  Ensure access at the point of need  Capable, reliable, and trusted Army Enterprise Outcomes  Transparency in IT spending  True enterprise identity management  Visibility of what’s connected to the network  Improved security against insider and external threats  Significantly improved user experiences Buying more with less  COTS, 80% incremental solutions  Lowest cost, technically acceptable  Products that require minimal implementation, integration, and customization © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 55
  • Army ProgramsWarfighter Information Network - Tactical Increment 2 (WIN-T Inc 2) Funding Summary Description IT Requirements  WIN-T Increment 2 provides an initial commercial and military band networking OTM capability, and it enables the Infrastructure$M FY12 FY13 distribution of information via voice, data, and real time video from ground-to-ground and ground-to-satellite communications Data ManagementDME 837.4 788.7  WIN-T Inc 2 provides commercial and military band satellite communications to Division, Brigade, Battalion and Company, while also providing On-The-Move (OTM) capability and a mobile infrastructure; it also provides Security SATCOM OTM extended to Company levelSS 0.0 0.0 Middleware / Enterprise ArchitectureIntegrated Personnel and Pay System – Army (IPPS-A) Funding Summary Description IT Requirements$M FY12 FY13  IPPS-A will be a modern, multi-component Army HR system that gives soldiers and commanders 24/7, self-service Applications access to personnel and payroll information, and will subsume approximately 70 Army legacy systems  In FY13 IPPS- A will engage in multiple other activities related to system development and deployment, including SecurityDME 68.6 159.7 the build-out of the Production environment and data centers; data conversion and migration; interface conversion; information security planning Application DevelopmentSS 0.0 0.0 Middleware / Enterprise Architecture © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 56
  • Army ProgramsGlobal Combat Support System – Army (GCSS-A) Funding Summary Description IT Requirements  GCSS-Army provides tactical logistics capabilities to the Warfighter by modernizing automated logistics to Applications$M FY12 FY13 streamline supply and maintenance operations, property accountability, and logistics management and integration procedures Data Management  FY13 accomplishments expected are 1) successful Full Deployment Decision (FDD) and fielding to theDME 254.9 233.6 Army, and 2) centralized master data management and cross functional BI and analytics tools in support Application Development of the AESIP initiative  RFI October 7, 2011 in support of the deployment phase to being in 3rd quarter FY12SS 42.6 64.8 Middleware / Enterprise Architecture © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 57
  • United States Navy / Marine Corps (DON/USMC) © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 58
  • Navy/MC Budget and Leadership Total Budget Ray Mabus Brig.Gen. Kevin Nally Secretary of the Navy Marine Corps CIO FY2012 FY2013 Gen. James Amos Ray Letteer Commandant of the Marine Chief, Cybersecurity $157.3 $155.9 Corps Division, USMCBudget ($B) Lines of Business (FY13) Terry Halvorsen VADM Kevin McCoy DON CIO Commander, NAVSEA Infrastructure R&D VADM Kendall Card VADM David Dunaway Procurement DON Deputy CIO Commander, NAVAIR Military Personnel O&M Barbara Hoffman RADM Patrick Brady DON Principal Deputy CIO Commander SPAWAR 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 59
  • Navy/MC IT Budget IT Budget FY13 FORECAST FY2012 FY2013 Total FY13 DON budget decreasing 2% $7.58 $7.57Budget ($B) FY13 DON IT funding Lines of Business (FY13) consistent with prior Financial Mgmt year levels HR Mgmt Navy expected to cut IT Supply Chain Mgmt spending by $2 billion Defense over 5 years IT Mgmt 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 60
  • Navy Organization Secretary of the Navy Chief of Naval DON CIO Operations Commandant of the Marine Corps Shore Chief of Staff / Operating Forces Enterprise Establishment Enterprise IT C4 Department Architecture Comms Naval Sea Systems Naval Special Information & Naval Networks Command Warfare Intelligence Knowledge & Enterprise Command Department Management Naval Air Systems Services Command Operational Test & Evaluation Marine CorpsNaval Supply Systems Cyber / IT Forces Systems Command Cybersecurity Command Workforce Strategic Systems Naval Network Programs Warfare Programs and Command Resources Investment Naval Intelligence Department Management Military SealiftSpace & Naval Warfare Command Installations and Enterprise Commercial IT Systems Command Logistics Strategy © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 61
  • NAVSEA Organization NAVSEA Special Staff / Commander CIO PEOs VADM Kevin McCoy Cathy Ricketts Logistics, Maint Total Force & Naval Systems enance, & Ind. Comptroller Contracts PEO Ships Corporate Ops Engineering Ops RADM Mark Whitney RADM Thomas EcclesRADM David Lewis PEO Littoral Naval Combat Ships ShipyardsRADM James Murdoch Surface Undersea SUPSHIPs Warfare Warfare PEO SubmarinesRADM David Johnson SUBMEPP SURFMEPP PEO CarriersRADM Thomas Moore PEO Integrated Naval Navy Regional Naval Surface Warfare Systems Undersea Maintenance Warfare CenterRADM James Syring Warfare Center Center © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 62
  • NAVAIR Organization NAVAIR Systems Corporate Operations Command PEOs VADM David Dunaway Enterprise Analysis & Planning Corporate Ops & Total PEO (A) Force / CIO Gary KurtzVADM Paul Grosklags Research & Test & Logistics & PEO (T) Contracts Engineering Evaluation Industrial Ops Program ManagementVADM BD Gaddis PEO (U&W) NAWCAD NAWCWD NATEC FRCVADM Mathias Winter PEO (JSF) Naval Test Wing FRC SW FRC E PacificVADM David Venlet Naval Test Wing Training FRC SE FRC W Atlantic Systems © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 63
  • NAVSUP Organization NAVSUP Commander RADM Mark HeinrichEnterprise Business Ops Strategy and Innovation Supply Ops & Logistics Acquisition Logistics Policy Enterprise Logistics NAVSUP WSS EngineeringFinancial Management & Contracting Comptroller NEXCOM NAVSUP GLS NAVSUP BSC CIOCAPT Daniel Allen Karen Fenstermacher © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 64
  • SPAWAR Organization SPAWAR Commander RADM Pat Brady PEOs Fleet Readiness Directorate PEO C4I Logistics & Comptroller Contracts CounselRADM Jerry Burroughs Fleet Support PEO EISRADM Grant Smith Chief Program Science & Corporate PEO Space Engineer Management Technology Ops / CIO Systems Les Hubbard Robert Wolborsky Kimberly KeslerRADM Jerry Burroughs JPEO JTRS Space Field Systems SystemsBrig.Gen. Michael Williamson Activity Center Pacific Center Atlantic © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 65
  • MARCORSYSCOM Organization MARCORSYSCOM Commander Chief PEO Land Brig.Gen. Frank Kelley Management Systems Office / CIO Lt.Col. Jamie Markol Executive Director Dr. John BurrowDeputy Commander Deputy Product Group Program Assistant Resource Commander SIAT Directors Managers Commanders Management Research & Sys Information Systems & Infrastructure Ammunition Competency Engineering Weapons & Sensor Contracts Domain Architecture & Cyber Development GCSS-MC Engineering Comm., Intel., & Networking Financial Light Armored Vehicle Systems Logistics Management Energy & CIED Mine Resistant Ambush Infantry Weapons Systems Sys Engineering & Protected Workforce Integration Armor & Fire Support Programs Management Systems Robotic Systems Technology, Test, & Ground Transport. & Engineer Specialties Training Systems Systems MCTSSA Combat Equipment & Support Chemical & Biological Systems Defense © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 66
  • Navy Fleet Cyber Command / 10th Fleet Organization 10th Fleet Commander VADM Michael Rogers Naval Network Warfare Command Capt. John Chandler Navy Cyber Naval Computer & Naval Navy Information Navy Information Naval Computer & Defense Telecom Area Communication Operations Operations Telecom Master Operations Master Station Security Material Command GA Command VA Station Pacific Command Atlantic SystemCapt. Stephanie Kock Capt. John Post Capt. Brian Johnston Capt. Danielle Barrett Capt. Steve Simon Capt. John MacMuchael Naval Computer & Telecom Station Forces Navy Information Puget Sound Surveillance Operations Support Command Command LCDR John Bray Jake Buckingham CDR Douglas Scheib Naval Computer & Telecom Station San Diego CDR Eugene Bailey © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 67
  • Navy/MC Key IT Organizations 10th Fleet Cyber Command NAVSUP CIO Ft. Meade, MD Mechanicsburg, PA NAVAIR CIO DON CIO Patuxent River, MD Washington D.C. USMC C4 MARFOCYBER Department / CIO Ft. Meade, MD NAVSEA CIO . NAVFAC CIO .SPAWAR CIOSan Diego, CA MCNOSC Quantico, VA NCDOC Norfolk, VA NETWARCOM © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 68
  • Navy IT Drivers “Be Enterprise, Be Effective, Be Efficient”  Implement portfolio management across all of Navy’s IT  Consolidate data centers  Develop and implement enterprise data and information plans  Ensure protection of sensitive information  Develop Cyber workforce development strategy and Information Assurance workforce improvement  Make all Naval IT expenditures visible  Create standard CPIC criteria  Ensure that all IT investments are planned, aligned, and acquired to support Navy enterprise strategies © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 69
  • Navy/MC ProgramsNext Generation Enterprise Network (NGEN) Funding Summary Description IT Requirements  Next Generation Enterprise Network (NGEN) provides secure net-centric data and services to Navy and Infrastructure$M FY12 FY13 Marine Corps personnel  Transition to NGEN begins in FY13 as Program Management Office (PMO) plans to award Data ManagementDME 722.8 726.8 segmentation contracts for Transport Services (i.e. LAN/BAN) and Enterprise Services (seat and non- seat services) Security  Additionally, NGEN will procure End User Hardware as a service and purchase software licenses viaSS 887.5 1,150.2 DOD Enterprise Software Initiative (ESI) Middleware / Enterprise ArchitectureMultifunctional Information Distribution System (MIDS) Funding Summary Description IT Requirements  The Multifunctional Information Distribution System is a jam-resistant, secure, digital (voice/data) Infrastructure$M FY12 FY13 information distribution system enabling rapid integrated communications, navigation and identification for tactical and C2 operations Data ManagementDME 133.4 137.7  MIDS is a voice and data communications terminal that will migrate to a Joint Tactical Radio System (JTRS) which will allow DON/MC to run advanced mission applications in a network enterprise SecuritySS 21.3 22.3 Middleware / Enterprise Architecture © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 70
  • Navy/MC ProgramsConsolidated Afloat Networks Enterprise Service (CANES) Funding Summary Description IT Requirements  CANES is an enterprise afloat system that will provide management services, and replace existing afloat Data Management$M FY12 FY13 networks and provide the necessary infrastructure for applications, systems, and services to operate in the tactical domain Infrastructure  CANES will provide complete infrastructure (hardware, software, processing, storage, and end userDME 202.7 383.7 devices) for all basic network services (email, web, chat, collaboration) to a wide variety of Navy surface Applications combatants (submarines, Maritime Operations Centers, and Aircraft)SS 9.1 24.5 Application Development © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 71
  • Military Health System (MHS) © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 72
  • MHS Budget and Leadership Jonathan Woodson, M.D John Morse Total Budget Assistant Secretary of Defense Business Operations Chief for Health Affairs, MHS Functional Officer, MHS FY2012 FY2013 Karen S. Guice, M.D. M.P.P Principal Deputy Assistant Mark Goodge $58.2 $48.7 Secretary of Defense for Health CTO, MHS Affairs & CIO, MHSBudget ($B) Lines of Business (FY13) Brig.Gen. Bryan Gamble Paula Friedman Deputy Director of TRICARE PEO-Joint Medical Information Management Activity, MHS Systems Military Construction Health Care Accrual Dr. George (Dan) Magee George Chambers PEO-Defense Health Services Director, EHR Center, MHS Systems Military Personnel Defense Health Cynthia Yee Timothy Weber Acquisition Management & Chief of Staff, MHS 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 Support Director © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 73
  • MHS IT Budget IT Budget FY13 FORECAST FY2012 FY2013 Total Unified Healthcare Budget $1.99 $1.87 down 16% in FY13Budget ($B) Lines of Business (FY13) FY13 MHS IT budget Defense down 6% Admin Mgmt Tricare is eligible for IT Mgmt cuts by Health sequestration 0 200 400 600 800 © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 74
  • MHS Organization MHS Service Surgeons MHS Component General Organizations Army Medicine Defense Centers ofAir Force Medicine Force, Health Hearing Center of Excellence for Protection, and Excellence OCIO Psychological Readiness Health and TBI Navy Medicine TRICARE Uniformed Services Vision Center of MHS Offices and University Excellence Programs Coast Guard Medicine © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 75
  • MHS OCIO Organization MHS Chief Information Officer Chief Medical Information Officer Dr. Karen Guice Col. Ron Moody Deputy CIO (SES) / PEO JMIS Deputy CIO for Ops Paula Friedman Col. Portia Prioleau DPEO, Acquisition Services DPEO, Acquisition Programs DPEO, Innovation and Delivery Common Services Nathan Zee . Lt Col MattMatt Escher Lt.Col. Escher, USAF Stone Quillian Col. Claude Hines Finance, Contracts & Portfolio Management DHIMS Support Agreements Sharon Larson Performance Improvement Col. Aaron Silver Lydia Mitchell Ms. Jean Wallace Jean Wallace Test and Independent DHSS Information Assurance Dan Magee Clarissa ReberkennyVerification & Validation Computer/Electronic Greg Guernsey Accommodations Program MCiS External Relationship Dinah Cohen Systems Integration Joe Martinez Management Richard Foster Stone Quillian Enterprise Architecture Stephanie Boyles Acquisition Program Network Operations Jeff Swanson Keith Simmons © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 76
  • DHIMS Organization Program Manager Col. Aaron Silver --------------------------------- Dep. PM Lt. Col. Enrico Bermudez Chief Medical Officer Executive Officer Director of Program Execution Director of System Director of Program Director of Resource Development Operations Management Deputy Deputy Director, Sustainment Director, Acquisition Chief, Systems Chief, Systems Chief of Products Chief of OperationsEngineering, Integratio Sustainment Branch Branch Branch n & Test Branch © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 77
  • DHSS Organization Program Manager George “Dan” MageePrincipal Deputy Program Deputy Program Manager – Deputy Program Manger – Deputy Program Manager – Manager Medical Log Resources Clinical Support Michael Veasey Col. Chris Harrington Michael L. Smith Jenna Noble  CUD  CCE  DMHRSi  CCQAS  Acquisition Support  DMLSS  EAS IV  M2  Information  DCAM  MHS Learn  MDR Assurance  DOEHRS – HC  MDR  NMIS  Project Mgmt  DOEHERS – IH  PEPR  PSR  Security Access  ESSENCE  PHIMIT  SNPMIS  Requirements/Desig  JMAR  TPOCS  TRICARE Online n Mgmt  PMITS  TED  NICoE NCMT  TEWLS  WMSN © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 78
  • MCiS Organization Acting Program Manager Joe Martinez MHS Service Desk consisted of 3 separate entities (Help Desk, NOC, and BOC), which were stove-piped, inefficient, and costly Users See MHS Service Desk Service Desk Under TIMPO, the 3 entities were Provides Blade Administration Blade Security consolidated into 1 Service Desk, which Compliance provides all MHS IT user support 24/7/365 Systems & Technical Functional Network Application Application Support Support Service desk provides network Monitoring monitoring, application support, system Network Reporting Incident Coordination Training Operations administration, and utilizes Remedy for tracking purposes © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 79
  • MHS Key IT and Acquisition Offices DHSS PEO MHS CIO Ft. Detrick, MD Falls Church, VA DHIMS Falls Church, VA MCiS Falls Church, VA DHSS PEO Falls Church, VA © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 80
  • Defense Health Agency Congress recommended a Unified Health Command in 2006 Operational and cultural challenges forced a compromise DHA would reorganize MHS functions, including the removal of the TRICARE Management Authority DHA will also manage common clinical and business practices across MHS  Medical education  Medical logistics  Health IT IT Budget of $1 billion © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 81
  • MHS OCIO Strategic Plan Architecture & Processes EHRs Enterprise Intelligence IT Interoperability Maximize Portfolio Value Innovative Technologies Human Capital Management Distributed Development © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 82
  • MHS ProgramsArmed Forces Health Longitudinal Technology Application (AHLTA) Funding Summary Description IT Requirements$M FY12 FY13  AHLTA, DODs current Electronic Health Record (EHR), serves as one of the worlds largest clinical Data Management information systems; AHLTA provides secure, 24x7, worldwide online access to patients medical records, a key enabler of military medical readiness ApplicationsDME 0.8 2.4  AHLTA is a legacy system that will be replaced by the Electronic Health Record Way Ahead Application DevelopmentSS 142.2 124.0 Middleware / Enterprise ArchitectureElectronic Health Record Way Ahead (EHRWA) Funding Summary Description IT Requirements  Electronic Health Record Way Ahead (EHRWA) will supersede the current legacy systems providing EHR Data Management$M FY12 FY13 capabilities, AHLTA and CHCS. EHRWA will provide a comprehensive, longitudinal electronic health record that is available anytime and anywhere ApplicationsDME 442.6 167.6  EHRWA will promote VLER and will deliver health information collected from multiple locations and sources that will be accessible to providers in both a clinical and theater setting Application DevelopmentSS 0.0 163.4 Middleware / Enterprise Architecture © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 83
  • MHS ProgramsDefense Medical Logistics Standard Support (DMLSS) Funding Summary Description IT Requirements  DMLSS provides integrated supply chain and life cycle management for pharmaceuticals, medical Data Management$M FY12 FY13 supplies, equipment, health facilities, and services; and enables medical logistics support to the Force Health Protection mission for the MHS Applications  DMLSS provides the Military Medical Departments (Army, Navy, and Air Force) one standard DepartmentDME 10.9 7.2 of Defense medical logistics system Application DevelopmentSS 44.3 37.4 Middleware / Enterprise Architecture © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 84
  • Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 85
  • DISA Budget and Leadership Total Budget* LTG Ronnie Hawkins Jr Jimaye Sones Director, DISA CFO, DISA FY2012 FY2013 Dr. Jennifer Carter RADM David Simpson Component Acquisition $1.36 $1.35 Vice Director, DISA Executive, DISABudget ($B) Lines of Business (FY13) BG Frederick Henry Martin Gross Chief of Staff, DISA PEO C2C MilCon Procurement David Bennett Mark Orndorff RDT&E CIO, DISA Director, PEO MA O&M Dave Mihelcic DWCF Bruce Bennett CTO and Principal Director GIG, Director, PEO-STS DISA 0 1000 2000 3000 4000* Represents funding requested from Congress, not including fees received from the armed services © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 86
  • DISA IT Budget IT Budget FY13 FORECAST FY2012 FY2013 Funding for DISA IT programs will increase $5.05 $5.13 about 2%IT Budget ($B) Lines of Business (FY13) Partly due to Supply Chain Mgmt redistribution of funds from Services to DISA as Financial Mgmt the Department shifts toward enterprise Defense services IT Mgmt 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 87
  • DISA Organization Director -------------------------- LTG Ronnie Hawkins Vice Director Strategic PlanningManpower, Person White House Component and General Counsel Network Services nel, & Security Communications Acquisition ImplementationTimothy Sullivan COL Clinton Bigger Chief Information Computing SATCOM & PEO Defense Spectrum OIG Assurance PEO C2C Services STS Organization Executive Henry Sienkiewicz Martin Gross Test & Evaluation GIG Enterprise Management CFO / Comptroller CTO GIG Operations Services PEO Center LuAnne Overstreet Dave Mihelcic Procurement Directorate GIG Enterprise OCIO PEO MA / DITCO Engineering Directorate David Bennett Mark Orndorff © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 88
  • DISA Key IT Organizations C2 Capabilities PEO Ft. Meade, MD CIO & Strategic Business Units Ft. Meade, MD Mission Assurance Net Ops PEO Ft. Meade, MD GIG Enterprise Services PEO SATCOM, Teleport, & Srv PEO Ft. Meade, MD Ft. Meade, MD © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 89
  • DISA IT DriversCloud Security DISA Network ofMobility 2020 © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 90
  • DISA IT Drivers DISA Strategic Plan 2013-2018  “Develop a Joint Force for 2020 that remains ready to answer the Nation’s call – anytime, anywhere”  Global Defense Posture  Cyber Command and Control (C2)  Nuclear Command, Control, and Communications (NC3)  Joint Information Environment (JIE)  DOD Cloud Services  Mobility  Acquisition Agility  DISA First © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 91
  • DISA ProgramsDefense Information System Network (DISN) Funding Summary Description IT Requirements  Defense Information System Network (DISN) is DODs consolidated worldwide telecommunications Infrastructure$M FY12 FY13 infrastructure that provides a ubiquitous, secure, robust, trusted, protected, long-haul information transport for DOD operations SecurityDME 114.8 161.9  The primary beneficiaries of the DISN investment are the DOD COCOMs, Military Departments, Defense Agencies and the Warfighter, as well as our mission Allies Data Management  Supported by 5 major ID/IQs and 1 major BPASS 1,917.3 1,947.5 Middleware / Enterprise ArchitectureGlobal Command and Control System – Joint (GCCS-J) Funding Summary Description IT Requirements  Global Command & Control System-Joint is the Joint C2 system of record, and an essential component Data Management$M FY12 FY13 for successful implementation of the operational concepts of dominant maneuver, precision engagement, full-dimension protection, and focused logistics ApplicationsDME 99.2 76.5  GCCS-J is a suite of mission applications/systems that provide critical joint warfighting C2 capabilities by presenting an integrated, near real-time picture of the battle space for planning and execution of joint Application Development military and multinational operationsSS 147.8 177.8 Middleware / Enterprise Architecture © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 92
  • DISA ProgramsTeleport Generation 3 (TeleportGEN3) Funding Summary Description IT Requirements  DOD Teleport is a collaborative investment within the Department and among the Services that provides Data Management$M FY12 FY13 deployed warfighters with seamless worldwide multi-band Satellite Communication reach-back capabilities to the Defense Information System Network Infrastructure  It provides secure, high-throughput, multi-band telecommunications services to deployed forces; theDME 44.3 37.1 system provides centralized integration capabilities, contingency capacity, and the necessary interfaces to Security access the Defense Information System Network (DISN) in a seamless, interoperable, and economical mannerSS 7.0 9.5 Middleware / Enterprise Architecture © 2012 immixGroup, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this presentation may be reproduced or distributed without the prior written permission of immixGroup, Inc. 93
  • FY13 DOD Budget BriefingTim Larkins Lloyd McCoyMarket Intelligence Consultant Market Intelligence Senior Analysttim_larkins@immixgroup.com lloyd_mccoy@immixgroup.com Actionable Intelligence for the IT Product Community